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kaalakawaa
2nd March 2011, 00:27
Depressing. Very depressing


For the past nine years, I have been in a dysfunctional relationship. My liaison started somewhat unexpectedly, quickly becoming an all-consuming passionate love affair. My partner reciprocated strongly, bestowing deep affection and adoration upon me. Blinded by love, I was naive to her failings. Yes, at times she was self-destructive, irrational and grossly irresponsible, but I hoped by appealing to her nature’s better angles she could change. Instead, as the years progressed, and, supported by her ‘friends’ in the media, she corroded, simultaneously displaying signs of megalomania and paranoia. Once the relationship turned abusive and I feared for my life, I decide to call it quits. Today, the divorce comes through. Her name is Pakistan. And today, I am leaving her for good.

This was not a difficult decision to make. In fact, I didn’t make the decision. It was made for me. You do not chart your own destiny in Pakistan; Pakistan charts it for you. It’s emigration by a thousand news stories. I am aware that bemoaning the state of Pakistan as a final shot appears churlish and arrogant. After all, I have the luxury to leave — many others do not. Nor do I want to discredit the tireless work of the thousands who remain to improve the lives of millions of Pakistanis. They are better men and women than I. Pakistan has also given me so much over the years. It was Pakistan who introduced me to the love of my life. And it was upon her manicured lawns that we married, and upon her reclaimed soil that we set up our first home. She brought the love of a new family and new friends into my life. And it was Pakistan that witnessed the birth of my son, Faiz — named after one of her greatest sons.

She embraced me like no other **** post-9/11. I appeared in a documentary/reality series titled “George Ka Pakistan”. It allowed me to explore the country. I ploughed fields in the Punjab, built Kalashnikovs in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (probably couldn’t do that now), and mended fishing boats in Balochistan. The culmination of the series saw the then prime minister, Shaukat Aziz, confer Pakistani citizenship upon me, after the viewing public voted overwhelmingly to make me one of them. I was their George. Fame and affection followed.

But that love was conditional. Conditional upon me playing the role cast — the naïve ****. The moment I abandoned the Uncle Tom persona and questioned the defined establishment narratives — whether through my television work or columns — excommunication began. No longer a Pakistani in the eyes of others, my citizenship evidently was not equitable to others.

So, as I depart, I could go with my reputation tarnished, but still largely intact. Or I could leave you with some final words of honesty. Well, true love values honesty far more than a feel-good legacy. So here goes.

Pakistan, you are on a precipice. A wafer-thin sliver is all that stands between you and becoming a failed state. A state that was the culmination of a search for a ‘Muslim space’ by the wealthy Muslims of Northern India has ended up, as MJ Akbar recently pointed out, becoming “one of the most violent nations on earth, not because Hindus were killing Muslims but because Muslims were killings Muslims”.

The assassination of Salmaan Taseer saw not only the death of a man but also represented for me the death of hope in Pakistan. I did not mourn Taseer’s death. I did not know the man. But I mourned what he represented — the death of liberal Pakistan. The governor’s murder reminded us how far the extremist cancer has spread in our society. A cancer in which I saw colleagues and friends on Facebook celebrate his murder. A man murdered for standing up for the most vulnerable in our society — a Christian woman accused of blasphemy. He committed no crime. Instead, he questioned the validity of a man-made law — a law created by the British — that was being used as a tool of repression.

In death, the governor was shunned, unlike his killer, who was praised, garlanded and lionised for shooting Taseer in the back. Mumtaz Qadri became a hero overnight. But Qadri is not just a man — he’s a mindset, as eloquently put by Fifi Haroon. Fascism with an Islamic face is no longer a political or an economic problem in Pakistan, it’s now become a cultural issue. Extremism permeates all strata and socio-economic groups within society. Violent extremists may still make up a minority but extremism now enjoys popular support. As for the dwindling moderates and liberals, they are scared.

Pakistan does not require a secret police, we are in the process of turning upon ourselves. But then what do you expect when your military/intelligence nexus — and their jihadi proxies — have used religious bigotry as a tool of both foreign and domestic policy. It is ironic that the one institution that was designed to protect the idea of Pakistan is the catalyst for its cannibalisation. Christians, Ahmadis, Shias and Barelvis have all been attacked in the past year. Who will be next? Groups once funded and supported by the state have carried out many of these attacks. And many jihadi groups still remain in cahoots with the agencies.

So as I leave Pakistan, I leave her with a sense of melancholy. Personally, for all my early wide-eyed excitement and love for the country and its people, Pakistan has made me cynical, disillusioned and bitter over time. I came here with high hopes, adopting the country, its people and the language. I did find redemption here — but no longer.


Source: http://tribune.com.pk/story/125853/george-ka-khuda-hafiz--i/

theglitterconspiracy
2nd March 2011, 00:30
Oh this is too sad to read :(
I read a fb status about this but didn't believe it but I guess it's true...

Strike!
2nd March 2011, 00:45
I don't blame him.

Hando
2nd March 2011, 01:16
Very, Very Bad news :(

Munda Pakistani
2nd March 2011, 01:28
Boo hoo.

Full of melodrama, and **.

90MPH
2nd March 2011, 02:21
Sad and totally understand his decision.

chacha kashmiri
2nd March 2011, 02:28
very emotional

Free Hit
2nd March 2011, 02:28
Boo hoo.

Full of melodrama, and **.

why dont you move to a country, which doesnt have you language and learn its language, different people, get to know them with the age george was, surely it resulted him getting fame, but he sacrifised alot to reach that fame in pakistan.


ji oye george :afridi

AZ
2nd March 2011, 02:29
yea, I just killed a few Lahoris on the way home.

it's a jungle out there.

theglitterconspiracy
2nd March 2011, 02:31
^haha you really know how to poke a lighthearted joke in any situation!

kkmix
2nd March 2011, 02:37
How is this sad? He was missing the luxuries of life in Pakistan so he decided to move out.

theglitterconspiracy
2nd March 2011, 02:39
just read the way he describes the country. He believes the country is a failed state or atleast on the verge of being one!

shahrukh619
2nd March 2011, 02:45
The governor’s murder reminded us how far the extremist cancer has spread in our society. A cancer in which I saw colleagues and friends on Facebook celebrate his murder. A man murdered for standing up for the most vulnerable in our society

Can't blame him, after this event that took place, and people celebrating the death of others.

kkmix
2nd March 2011, 02:47
The way he is describing, doesn't seem he goes out in public much. Whatever happens in Pakistan doesn't affect the normal people one bit. He is describing Salman Taseer's case, and how people reacted to this, but that's no reason to leave any country. And I don't even think he knows much about the country otherwise he wouldn't mind these extremist, as there are very few of them. I personally think, he is missing the luxury life that he was used to and wants to go back, so just finding excuses.

AZ
2nd March 2011, 02:50
why dont you move to a country, which doesnt have you language and learn its language, different people, get to know them with the age george was, surely it resulted him getting fame, but he sacrifised alot to reach that fame in pakistan.


ji oye george :afridi

what did he sacrifice?

ehjaz
2nd March 2011, 03:11
I still LOVE my Pakistan and will always do..............no matter what

lahori
2nd March 2011, 03:17
yea, I just killed a few Lahoris on the way home.

it's a jungle out there.

I managed to escape :)

AZ
2nd March 2011, 03:20
I'll get you one day...:butt

Eagle_Eye
2nd March 2011, 03:22
Everyone is running for their lives.... Thank God George managed to get out safely!!..... :)

Hassan0987
2nd March 2011, 03:28
Remember I watched "George ka Pakistan" Great show :inzi

kaalakawaa
2nd March 2011, 03:46
George got threats from the army for writing against it. Army did not want George to write against Lashkar, JamaatDawa etc. State refused to protect him. This is why he's leaving

kkmix
2nd March 2011, 04:01
George got threats from the army for writing against it. Army did not want George to write against Lashkar, JamaatDawa etc. State refused to protect him. This is why he's leaving

Ab pangay lo gay to yahi hoga na, he doesn't know about the power of those people.

C++
2nd March 2011, 05:44
George was stupid so he came to Pakistan. Then George got more stupid, and he left Pakistan.

Conclusion: George is stupid.

PakPrince
2nd March 2011, 05:57
Wow!!

As soon as his popularity starts to wane and he is being treated like a common Pakistani, he decides that this country is not good enough for him.

What did he expect? To be treated like royalty wherever he went?

No, Mr.George! That was never the real Pakistan. Just becasue you are white doesnt make you liable for any special luxuries. If you ever wanted to be a Pakistani then you would not been so weak and would not have run out of the country at the first sign of tough times.

Be a man!

And when you fly out on the British Airways and leave Pakistan for good, my reaction would be 'Good Riddance!'

oyei
2nd March 2011, 06:46
The way he is describing, doesn't seem he goes out in public much. Whatever happens in Pakistan doesn't affect the normal people one bit. He is describing Salman Taseer's case, and how people reacted to this, but that's no reason to leave any country. And I don't even think he knows much about the country otherwise he wouldn't mind these extremist, as there are very few of them. I personally think, he is missing the luxury life that he was used to and wants to go back, so just finding excuses.

its really disturbing to read some your comments here, claiming that whatever happening in Pakistan does not affect normal citizen of Pakistan, explain who are these normal citizen of Pakistan, are these the poor people who barely survive on less then a dollar a day(majority of them) or the middle class if that exist in pakistan any more, or the rich people whose kids get kidnapped by the government officials (only to be freed when ransom is paid) or the 70% of the population whose avg age is 20 some years, or our celebrities who get caught across the border trying to escape tax? or the normal people who enjoy Pakpassion website in their air condition room, typing the word Normal?

it affect every Pakistani, each and every citizen of Pakistan get affected. this is the kind of mentality that is slowly and gradually ruining Pakistan, yea we do not see it right now, most of us go about our business each and every day until or unless something happen to us personally or to close relative. This is a country where 70% of the population is under the age of 20 or some years, and government only spend 2% of its budget on education, where do you think these 70% of the population will end up, 60% + can not read and write, Pakistan will soon to be the 3rd or 4th populated country in the world, with minimum resource, minimum GDP, no infrastructure, effed up justice system, rich getting richer, poor getting poorer, corruption etc. I wonder what will these 70% of the population will do when they do not have the basic skill to survive. You know what is the number 1 money making business in Pakistan currently, Kidnapping and extortion, if the current state of Pakistan is not fixed soon, then the 70% of the population in pakistan mostly poor will become an animal and they will feed on those who are sitting behind their computer screen in their air condition room typing... "this does not affect me because in pakistan there are only few extremist", When Taseer was killed thr were thousand of Pakistani were praising Qadri as if he has conquer the whole world, and thr were thousand of Pakistani who were unable to praise Qadri on facebook because they did not know what facebook is. if any of you believe that current state of Pakistan does not affect the "NORMAL" citizen of Pakistan, then "Normal" citizen of Pakistan are very naive

SIMBA
2nd March 2011, 06:53
In before anyone says it :afridi

Was George one of the dozens of dodgy CIA agents who left Pakistan after the Davis affair.

Hmmmmmm :moyo:moyo :yk

SAF
2nd March 2011, 07:15
Good for him.
He probably ****** his pants after learning about the other (and only) Gorah remaining in Pakistan at the moment. No wonder..:RaymondDavis

kkmix
2nd March 2011, 07:37
its really disturbing to read some your comments here, claiming that whatever happening in Pakistan does not affect normal citizen of Pakistan, explain who are these normal citizen of Pakistan, are these the poor people who barely survive on less then a dollar a day(majority of them) or the middle class if that exist in pakistan any more, or the rich people whose kids get kidnapped by the government officials (only to be freed when ransom is paid) or the 70% of the population whose avg age is 20 some years, or our celebrities who get caught across the border trying to escape tax? or the normal people who enjoy Pakpassion website in their air condition room, typing the word Normal?


I can't believe you wasted your time writing so much. While I agree with some of it, rest it nonsense.

Let me clarify myself to you. By normal people, I am talking about the average person that is not big (as in post, popularity, etc) for any reason. It includes upper class, middle class, or people below poverty line. Now let me tell you what I meant by normal people not getting affected by everything. People are so used to everything (such as everything you listed), that it doesn't affect them anymore. They are immune to it. For example, if there is a bomb blast in one place, then after half hour you will see people walking around there like everything is normal. Not to say that it isn't sad that people died in the bomb blast, but what do you expect people to do? mourn for rest of their lives about that? And obviously the average citizen who died, or their family, it isn't normal to them but to rest of the population, it is as normal as anything.

And for people celebrating Taseer's death, how does that affect anyone, why should it affect you or me? It does start a talking point, but how is average person affected by it?

Finally, I will advise you to stop assuming things (I don't have air conditioner in my room).

oyei
2nd March 2011, 08:02
I can't believe you wasted your time writing so much. While I agree with some of it, rest it nonsense.

Let me clarify myself to you. By normal people, I am talking about the average person that is not big (as in post, popularity, etc) for any reason. It includes upper class, middle class, or people below poverty line. Now let me tell you what I meant by normal people not getting affected by everything. People are so used to everything (such as everything you listed), that it doesn't affect them anymore. They are immune to it. For example, if there is a bomb blast in one place, then after half hour you will see people walking around there like everything is normal. Not to say that it isn't sad that people died in the bomb blast, but what do you expect people to do? mourn for rest of their lives about that? And obviously the average citizen who died, or their family, it isn't normal to them but to rest of the population, it is as normal as anything.

And for people celebrating Taseer's death, how does that affect anyone, why should it affect you or me? It does start a talking point, but how is average person affected by it?

Finally, I will advise you to stop assuming things (I don't have air conditioner in my room).

nothing scare me more then people being immune to dysfunctional country or society, but i guess some people are fine with it.

seem like you have totally failed to understand the concept of society and how one incidence affect the society as a whole.

kkmix
2nd March 2011, 08:10
^ seems like you have totally misinterpreted my initial point.

AZ
2nd March 2011, 10:59
nothing scare me more then people being immune to dysfunctional country or society, but i guess some people are fine with it.

seem like you have totally failed to understand the concept of society and how one incidence affect the society as a whole.

it is simply because of a silent majority and a vocal minority, doesn't mean that the whole of Pakistan accepted Taseer's killer with open arms.

people have to deal with their own reality and situations rather than be overly concerned about a dead governor.

yes perhaps we should be more concerned, but that's the way it is.

indifference does not mean acceptance.

Looney
2nd March 2011, 13:05
After Bhatti's assassination , and minorities , heck , the majority even is not being protected so what do we expect ? he is lucky he gets to leave but he did not have to be so melodramatic

hussnainn
2nd March 2011, 13:46
I wrote something in response in a new thread. Please read that as well.

http://www.pakpassion.net/ppforum/showthread.php?t=120669


Dear Mr. George,

Firstly I would like to Thank you very much for the time that you have spent here in Pakistan. I always found hope when I saw people like you living in my country and writing on daily basis about the problems of my country. Thank you for that again.

I am sure you will remember the love that you got from the people of Pakistan. People cheered for you wherever you go. Open there homes for you even in Khaiber Pakhtoonkhwa (NWFP at that time). I mentioned that place’s name because they are the ones who care about their nang and namoos more than anybody else. After “George ka Pakistan”, you came on Aaj tv with “Kiran aur George”. I remember it was one of the most famous show on air at that time. People called and loved to talk to you not because you were a foreigner but because they took you as their own. I hope you remember all that. I wish you luck for your future but would like to say a few things on your final words.

Mr. George – As I type these words, I have seen another person (Mr. Shehbaz Bhatti) who has been violently killed in the name of religion. That may strengthen what you have said but how could you possibly think that Salman Taseer’s death is the death of hope in Pakistan. Hope does not die until it is dead. How did you think it is dead.

You saw all those people on the streets celebrating the death of Salman Taseer and giving justification to the murder but did you see the 80% of the press writing against it & People blogging tirelessly against it? Did you see the people who spoke and wrote against the killing receiving death threats and still talking about it. Are these the signs of dying hope? Supreme court bar association is the primary body of lawyers and the president speaks for all the lawyers. Wasn’t she one of the people who spoke against the killing on national and international media? It would have been great if you had talked about the reasons behind all this intolerance and violence rather than spreading the message of hopelessness.

Sir – A family member never leaves home when it is in trouble & this home is going through the most testing times ever. People of this country took you as a family member and treated you like that till the time you had close interaction with them. How could you hope for the same treatment and response when you are not interacting with people anymore like the way you used to? This was not the time to leave if you really had this country in your heart Sir.

I wish you best of luck once again for the future. Please leave but don’t tell us that there is no hope as we have to live here and get this country out of the crisis with the same society that we have. You have made us stronger in believing that no one else is going to come for rescue. Everything has to be done and corrected by us.

The Blazer
2nd March 2011, 19:44
yea, I just killed a few Lahoris on the way home.

it's a jungle out there.

Pakistanis will keep ignoring the truth that is staring them in the face.

And before I get the accusation of being a Westerner thrown at my face, I spent a decade living in a better Pakistan during the '90s.

AZ
2nd March 2011, 19:50
I'm not saying it's all hunky-dory, of course there are significant, serious problems that Pakistan has to tackle.

but as far is George is concerned, the issue at hand seems a lot more personal (if what was said in post # 21 is true) rather than the grandiose nature of his article.

Indiafan
2nd March 2011, 20:38
it is simply because of a silent majority and a vocal minority, doesn't mean that the whole of Pakistan accepted Taseer's killer with open arms.

people have to deal with their own reality and situations rather than be overly concerned about a dead governor.

yes perhaps we should be more concerned, but that's the way it is.

indifference does not mean acceptance.

But obviously the vocal minority are calling the shots and making the difference. If the silent minority hadn't been so silent, the second incident with the minority minister might not have happened.

Indifference is only going to cause a rise in such incident

Looney
2nd March 2011, 23:53
But obviously the vocal minority are calling the shots and making the difference. If the silent minority hadn't been so silent, the second incident with the minority minister might not have happened.

Indifference is only going to cause a rise in such incident

the vocal minority has an agenda to work with and they have some powerful elements supporting it while the silent majority has to fight for every little thing . you go to sleep , you wake up , and there are 10 different problems waiting for you to be solved . Only when you solve them , will you get food on the table , water , electricity, a shower etc .that is how the days go by . Solving and fighting the same problems everyday so you don1t get time for anything else . Survival is impossible without solving them .

ShehryarK
3rd March 2011, 10:56
yea, I just killed a few Lahoris on the way home.

it's a jungle out there. LOL! :)) Trust AZ to get to the point in his own imitable way.


just read the way he describes the country. He believes the country is a failed state or atleast on the verge of being one!Anti-Pak people have been describing Pak that way for 60+ years, and will continue to do so for the next 600.

I personally think, he is missing the luxury life that he was used to and wants to go back, so just finding excuses. That's probably not far off the mark.

PakPrince
3rd March 2011, 11:04
LOL! :)) Trust AZ to get to the point in his own imitable way.

Anti-Pak people have been describing Pak that way for 60+ years, and will continue to do so for the next 600.
That's probably not far off the mark.

Thing is that when he was here earlier he used to be treated like royalty everywhere he went and there would be khaatir-tawaazu was for him. But now that he's settled for a couple of years and people he interacts with have gotten used to him, ofcourse there is no special treatment and he is treated like a normal Pakistani guy.
So when the going got tough for him, he quit

ShehryarK
3rd March 2011, 11:29
Thing is that when he was here earlier he used to be treated like royalty everywhere he went and there would be khaatir-tawaazu was for him. But now that he's settled for a couple of years and people he interacts with have gotten used to him, ofcourse there is no special treatment and he is treated like a normal Pakistani guy.


Exactly - the novelty effect has worn off and he is no longer a VVIP that he was initially.

hussnainn
4th March 2011, 09:14
But obviously the vocal minority are calling the shots and making the difference. If the silent minority hadn't been so silent, the second incident with the minority minister might not have happened.

Indifference is only going to cause a rise in such incident

1. I think you meant majority there.

2. There has been a vocal majority in past on issues like Sawat. It does not stop these people from what they want to do.

3. Had there been any other minister with this stance instead of minority minister, they would have tried to do the same with him. Sherry Rehman is an example who has made rare public appearances since the sad death of Taseer.

4. Real issue is that the government is still hesitating to go head on with these people and still want to put things under the carpet. Unfortunately, its not gonna help.

hussnainn
4th March 2011, 09:25
Can't blame him, after this event that took place, and people celebrating the death of others.

If it was only about facebook, majority of people condemned that. I wonder if he saw that as well. And the people who were celebrating it had no idea what they were doing. You can simply check some of the profiles. They had (lady gaga, South park & Akon along with Malik mumtaz qadri in "likes". And i checked many of them that day. The point is, he should have just left without saying anything if he had to..

give this a read as well

http://www.pakpassion.net/ppforum/showthread.php?t=120669

PerfectionPersonified
5th March 2011, 16:43
To me he is exactly what ahmed qureshi wrote


An Englishman’s Anti-Pakistan Rant

An anti-Pakistan racist, George Fulton and his Pakistani wife were turned into highly-paid and high-flying celebrities by Pakistani television networks. A previous government naturalized him as a goodwill gesture. Now he pays back the favor by calling Pakistanis ‘degenerates’ and pooping on the country.
GHALIB SULTAN | Thursday | 3 March 2011 | ZoneAsia-Pk.com
WWW.PAKNATIONALISTS.COM
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan—George Fulton, a.k.a. George the foreigner, who became a Pakistani citizen thanks to a dictator’s Prime Minister, has been true to form. After nine years, he has written two columns (Pakistani newspaper Express Tribune March 2 and 3) to say Khuda-Hafiz in our words, and Good-bye in his, to Pakistan.
In these columns, he has castigated Pakistan’s military and intelligence services and the ‘mullahs’, implying a nexus between the three that, in his opinion, is harming Pakistan. This is what most westerners say, and they say so when their designs are thwarted and they come up against the bulwark that defends Pakistan, and in doing so, earns their wrath. What Pakistanis consider as their assets are made out to be liabilities and attacked relentlessly. Small wonder that our larger eastern neighbor, and the Western-backed segments on our western border, join the chorus; even adding new twists and insinuations. George ‘the ex-Pakistani’ is no exception.
To be fair to the Pakistani George (assuming that he has not turned in his citizenship) he has some good things to say about Pakistan—at least about those with whom he could relate and interact. He does not say anything about the brutal massacres of Muslims and Christians in India by crazed fanatic Hindu mobs, which thank God has no parallels in Pakistan.
Nor does he talk about the brutality of the Hindu-dominated military and para-military forces in Kashmir—the rapes, the tortures and the killings. These do shape opinions and reactions in Pakistan even if the naked aggression by India that broke Pakistan in two 1971 is forgotten—not that it is or ever will be.
He is critical of our nuclear weapons but says nothing about what drove Pakistan to get them. He writes about Pakistani society but this society is no different from societies elsewhere in the world—all have warts, injustices, corruption, vice, drugs, violence, exploitation, haves and have-nots; the good, the bad and the ugly. And like many other societies, Pakistan is going through a transitional phase.
This does not say that there are no problems in Pakistan. There are serious problems that the state is addressing against great odds. The average Pakistani, like the average person in all other countries, wants peace, security, health care, education and the opportunity to work and play without fear for the security of his loved ones. It is the resilience of this average Pakistani that has enabled the state of Pakistan to survive and make progress.
Fulton, while fulminating, did not have much to say on this. He also seems to have forgotten that the destabilization and radicalization of Pakistan is in direct proportion to the US/NATO aggression in Iraq and Afghanistan without any reason—in fact, on the basis of distorted facts and often outright lies. Small wonder then, that the US and NATO stock is so low in the Muslim countries—and falling.
Khuda-Hafiz George, and may you be safe from dangers wherever you go to find what you did not find in Pakistan.
Pakistanis will not miss you.





http://www.ahmedquraishi.com/2011/03/03/an-englishman%E2%80%99s-anti-pakistan-rant/

ozymandias
5th March 2011, 16:51
To me he is exactly what ahmed qureshi wrote


An Englishman’s Anti-Pakistan Rant

An anti-Pakistan racist, George Fulton and his Pakistani wife were turned into highly-paid and high-flying celebrities by Pakistani television networks. A previous government naturalized him as a goodwill gesture. Now he pays back the favor by calling Pakistanis ‘degenerates’ and pooping on the country.
GHALIB SULTAN | Thursday | 3 March 2011 | ZoneAsia-Pk.com
WWW.PAKNATIONALISTS.COM
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan—George Fulton, a.k.a. George the foreigner, who became a Pakistani citizen thanks to a dictator’s Prime Minister, has been true to form. After nine years, he has written two columns (Pakistani newspaper Express Tribune March 2 and 3) to say Khuda-Hafiz in our words, and Good-bye in his, to Pakistan.
In these columns, he has castigated Pakistan’s military and intelligence services and the ‘mullahs’, implying a nexus between the three that, in his opinion, is harming Pakistan. This is what most westerners say, and they say so when their designs are thwarted and they come up against the bulwark that defends Pakistan, and in doing so, earns their wrath. What Pakistanis consider as their assets are made out to be liabilities and attacked relentlessly. Small wonder that our larger eastern neighbor, and the Western-backed segments on our western border, join the chorus; even adding new twists and insinuations. George ‘the ex-Pakistani’ is no exception.
To be fair to the Pakistani George (assuming that he has not turned in his citizenship) he has some good things to say about Pakistan—at least about those with whom he could relate and interact. He does not say anything about the brutal massacres of Muslims and Christians in India by crazed fanatic Hindu mobs, which thank God has no parallels in Pakistan.
Nor does he talk about the brutality of the Hindu-dominated military and para-military forces in Kashmir—the rapes, the tortures and the killings. These do shape opinions and reactions in Pakistan even if the naked aggression by India that broke Pakistan in two 1971 is forgotten—not that it is or ever will be.
He is critical of our nuclear weapons but says nothing about what drove Pakistan to get them. He writes about Pakistani society but this society is no different from societies elsewhere in the world—all have warts, injustices, corruption, vice, drugs, violence, exploitation, haves and have-nots; the good, the bad and the ugly. And like many other societies, Pakistan is going through a transitional phase.
This does not say that there are no problems in Pakistan. There are serious problems that the state is addressing against great odds. The average Pakistani, like the average person in all other countries, wants peace, security, health care, education and the opportunity to work and play without fear for the security of his loved ones. It is the resilience of this average Pakistani that has enabled the state of Pakistan to survive and make progress.
Fulton, while fulminating, did not have much to say on this. He also seems to have forgotten that the destabilization and radicalization of Pakistan is in direct proportion to the US/NATO aggression in Iraq and Afghanistan without any reason—in fact, on the basis of distorted facts and often outright lies. Small wonder then, that the US and NATO stock is so low in the Muslim countries—and falling.
Khuda-Hafiz George, and may you be safe from dangers wherever you go to find what you did not find in Pakistan.
Pakistanis will not miss you.





http://www.ahmedquraishi.com/2011/03/03/an-englishman%E2%80%99s-anti-pakistan-rant/

Ahmed Qureshi :)))

Mullahs are assets?? :facepalm:

PakPrince
5th March 2011, 23:37
Who is this Ahmed Qureishi???

I doubt we will miss George but still I dont like Ahmed Qureishi's comments. Basically he is saying that as long as India massacres Muslims and abuses Kashmiri rights, it is okay if Pakistan does not treat its minorities well?

Why is India the gold standard for people like him? Truth is if we are trying to emulate India its not a shocker to see the current position our country is in. They aren't exactly having a great ride either no matter what the media tries to potray