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Markhor
6th March 2013, 02:37
Channel 4, Sky News have confirmed that Hugo Chavez has died tonight. RIP.

Strike!
6th March 2013, 02:40
RIP.

A great leader of a great country.

DeadlyVenom
6th March 2013, 02:41
I'm saddened. What a leader he was.

Eagle_Eye
6th March 2013, 02:41
Rip

bobwoolmersarmy
6th March 2013, 02:42
one of the good guys

RIP

insaftak
6th March 2013, 02:47
RIP.

"You are a donkey Mr. George W. Bush"

:bow:

UP
6th March 2013, 03:02
It was just a matter of days. RIP.

shabbu1
6th March 2013, 03:17
RIP. Saddened by this

speed
6th March 2013, 03:20
Rip

pakistanalltheway
6th March 2013, 03:20
R.I.P
A great leader who refused to be a sell out

90MPH
6th March 2013, 03:42
He was sick for sometime. A very charismatic leader who was not afraid to confront others especially the US.

Only recently won a 6 year term.

RIP Hugo

mahout
6th March 2013, 03:44
An amazing leader, every country needs a Chavez!

James
6th March 2013, 03:46
Rest in Peace.

Kwremb
6th March 2013, 03:51
RIP Great leader

shah_1
6th March 2013, 03:57
RIP

Indeed a great leader Kwremb

shaykh1985
6th March 2013, 04:19
RIP...I liked Chavez for the most part...he was good at being liked...not sure how good he was at ruling though...poverty hardly declined...Venezuela is still incredibly violent...

Also didn't like the fact that it was made public who everyone voted for...not what you want in a democratic state...

His opposition to the US was admirable...he was a sincere man who genuinely seemed to want to do good by his people...its just quite often he didn't...

A good man but a flawed leader...

Love Pakistan
6th March 2013, 04:32
Rip.

classic
6th March 2013, 06:00
He did what a prime minister/ president should do for his country and his people

RIP

TM Riddle
6th March 2013, 07:17
.:afridi

LethalSami
6th March 2013, 07:25
my family lease a CITGO gas station............CITGO is owned by Venezuela

hopefully Uncle Sam don't go and "deliver democracy" to Venezuela

oyei
6th March 2013, 07:46
^^ Venezuela is a democratic country, probably not capitalist, but i am sure it is a democratic country, he got 55% vote in the last election.

Looney
6th March 2013, 07:59
Lucky day for Amreekis


May his soul rest in peace . The kind of leader people want for the country .

shaykh1985
6th March 2013, 08:35
^^ Venezuela is a democratic country, probably not capitalist, but i am sure it is a democratic country, he got 55% vote in the last election.

You missed his sarcasm...

The US overthrew him with a military coup to deliver democracy...it was incredible how they sold it as that too...

That said its overstated how democratic his state actually is...however the fact is that the US has never been interested in a democracy there...

waqar goraya
6th March 2013, 12:22
Chavez death echoes with leftists worldwide


Reactions to the death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez were as mixed, polemical and outsized as the leader was in life, with some saying his passing was a tragic loss and others calling it an opportunity for Venezuela to escape his long shadow.

Seen as a hero by some for his anti-US rhetoric and gifts of cut-rate oil, others considered him a bully.

A teary-eyed Bolivian President Evo Morales, one of Chavez’s closest allies and most loyal disciples, declared that “Chavez is more alive than ever”.

“Chavez will continue to be an inspiration for all peoples who fight for their liberation,” Morales said Tuesday in a televised speech. “Chavez will always be present in all the regions of the world and all social sectors. Hugo Chavez will always be with us, accompanying us.”

In Cuba, President Raul Castro’s government declared two days of national mourning and ordered the flag to fly at half-staff.

“It is with deep and excruciating sorrow that our people and the revolutionary government have learned of President Hugo Rafael Chavez Frias’ decease,” it said in a statement read on the nightly state TV newscast. “The Cuban people view him as one of their most outstanding sons.”

Some islanders worried that the loss of the country’s No. 1 ally, who has sent billions of dollars of oil to Cuba at preferential terms, could have a negative ripple effect there.

“It’s a very tough blow…now I wonder, what is to become of us?” said Maite Sierra, a 72-year-old Havana resident.

“It’s troubling what could come now, first for Venezuela but also for Cuba,” said Sergio Duran, a Havana resident. “Everything will depend on what happens in Venezuela, but in any case it will never be the same as with Chavez, even if Chavez’s party wins” in upcoming elections.

In the United States, where relations with Venezuela were strained under Chavez, President Barack Obama issued a statement reaffirming Washington’s support for the “Venezuelan people and its interest in developing a constructive relationship with the Venezuelan government”.

“As Venezuela begins a new chapter in its history, the United States remains committed to policies that promote democratic principles, the rule of law, and respect for human rights,” the statement read.

Filmmaker Oliver Stone, who produced a film about Chavez and his leftist allies, wrote in his Twitter account, “I mourn a great hero to the majority of his people and those who struggle throughout the world…hated by the entrenched classes, Hugo Chavez will live forever in history. My friend, rest finally in a peace long earned.”

Some of the estimated 189,219 Venezuelan immigrants living in the United States — about half of them in Florida — turned out cheering and waving their country’s flag and expressed hope Tuesday that change would come to their homeland.

“He’s gone!” dozens in a largely anti-Chavez community chanted after word spread of the socialist’s death

“We are not celebrating death,” Ana San Jorge, 37, said amid a jubilant crowd in the Miami suburb of Doral. “We are celebrating the opening of a new door, of hope and change.”

Wearing caps and T-shirts in the Venezuelan colours of yellow, blue and red, many expressed cautious optimism and concern.

“Although we might all be united here celebrating today, we don’t know what the future holds,” said Francisco Gamez, 18, at El Arepazo, a popular Venezuelan restaurant in Doral.

“I always knew that for things to get better they had to get worse,” said Mario Di Giovanni, a Venezuelan student activist in Miami who helped organise voters for last October’s election. “So I guess this is the first step toward real change in Venezuela.”

Republican US Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida called Chavez’s death “an opportunity for democracy in Venezuela.”

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez, another Chavez ally, declared three days of mourning nationwide.

She and President Jose Mujica of neighbouring Uruguay also prepared to travel to Venezuela for the funeral.

In Nicaragua, another nation that broadly benefited from Venezuelan cut-rate oil, Rosario Murillo, the wife and spokeswoman of President Daniel Ortega, said Chavez is “one of the dead who never die”.

“We are all Chavez,” she said in televised comments.

But Raul Martinez, a leader of the leftist, pro-government Sandinista Youth group, acknowledged in an interview with a local television station that “it is a hard blow”.

“Hugo Chavez was our best ally, but we are confident that the Venezuelans will continue their support,” Martinez.

Former US President Jimmy Carter released a statement saying Chavez “will be remembered for his bold assertion of autonomy and independence for Latin American governments”.

“We came to know a man who expressed a vision to bring profound changes to his country to benefit especially those people who had felt neglected and marginalised,” Carter wrote.

“Although we have not agreed with all of the methods followed by his government, we have never doubted Hugo Chavez’s committment to improving the lives of millions of his fellow countrymen.”

At the United Nations, Russian UN Ambassador Vitaly Churkin called the death a tragedy.

“He was a great politician for his country, Latin America and the world. He played a very important role in the development of relations between Venezuela and Russia, so we feel very badly about it,” Churkin said.

British Foreign Secretary William Hague sent condolences to Venezuela and the family of Chavez, who he said “left a lasting impression on the country and more widely” during his 14 years as president.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper offered condolences to Venezuela’s people and said he hopes Chavez’s death brings hope of a better future.

“At this key juncture, I hope the people of Venezuela can now build for themselves a better, brighter future based on the principles of freedom, democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights,” Harper said in a statement.

A wistful Rafael Correa, president of Ecuador and another of Chavez’s closest allies, predicted Chavez would have a lasting influence. “We have lost a revolutionary, but millions of us remain inspired.”

For good or ill, Chavez’s influence was felt across Latin America. Alfonso Astorga, 65, a math teacher, was holding back tears as he walked into a store in a wealthy neighbourhood of Santiago, Chile.

“He was an example of courage, struggle and passion for Latin America’s integration,” Astorga said. “The world loses a great man.”

In China, which has provided tens of billions of dollars in loans that helped bankroll Chavez’s social programs in exchange for oil, Chinese leaders did not immediately comment. But the Internet, the freest court of public opinion in China, crackled with praise for Chavez for standing up to the US and for his socialist policies.

“Chavez and the ’21st century socialism’ he advocated was a big bright spot after drastic changes in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe sunk the world socialist movement in a low ebb, and he was known as an ‘anti-American standard-bearer,” Zhu Jidong of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ World Socialism Research Center wrote on his feed on Sina Corporation’s Twitter-like microblog service. “Mourn this great fighter.”

There was no shortage of emotional farewells to a socialist hero who some feel rivalled the revolutionaries of the 1960s.

Cuban folk singer Silvio Rodriguez, whose ode to revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara became famous, used the song’s title words to bid farewell to Chavez on his blog.

“Hasta siempre, comandante,” he wrote, Spanish for “Farewell forever, commander”.

A must read article!!!!


Filmmaker Oliver Stone, who produced a film about Chavez and his leftist allies, wrote in his Twitter account, “I mourn a great hero to the majority of his people and those who struggle throughout the world…hated by the entrenched classes, Hugo Chavez will live forever in history. My friend, rest finally in a peace long earned.”


Former US President Jimmy Carter released a statement saying Chavez “will be remembered for his bold assertion of autonomy and independence for Latin American governments”.

“We came to know a man who expressed a vision to bring profound changes to his country to benefit especially those people who had felt neglected and marginalised,” Carter wrote.

“Although we have not agreed with all of the methods followed by his government, we have never doubted Hugo Chavez’s committment to improving the lives of millions of his fellow countrymen.”

:bow: :bow:

LethalSami
6th March 2013, 12:27
^^ Venezuela is a democratic country, probably not capitalist, but i am sure it is a democratic country, he got 55% vote in the last election.

O democracy :zardari its the BESHHHT revenge

lets talk about how we have a democracy in the US and how "Corporations are people, my friend" http://www.politico.com/design/general-election-2012/balance-romney.png:)))

Gabbar Singh
6th March 2013, 14:05
America and their supporters painted him as the spawn of satan. Whereas his supporters portrayed him as some sort of Jesus reincarnation who was here to sacrifice his life for the poor. As with all politicians, the truth will be somewhere in the middle.

That said, he was a democratically elected leader and now his death will bring instability to Venezuela which is something no nation needs. So it's a shame he had to die so young.

avidlearner
6th March 2013, 15:05
America and their supporters painted him as the spawn of satan. Whereas his supporters portrayed him as some sort of Jesus reincarnation who was here to sacrifice his life for the poor. As with all politicians, the truth will be somewhere in the middle.

That said, he was a democratically elected leader and now his death will bring instability to Venezuela which is something no nation needs. So it's a shame he had to die so young.

RIP!

@Gabbar - Very well said (Bolded parts). BTW, Nicolas Maduro (Current VP) who will replace Chavez as President of Venezuela is said to be an ardent follower of (Late)Satya Sai Baba from Andhra Pradesh.

saeedhk
6th March 2013, 15:30
RIP.

Was a very brave leader.

IAJ
6th March 2013, 15:38
RIP...I liked Chavez for the most part...he was good at being liked...not sure how good he was at ruling though...poverty hardly declined...Venezuela is still incredibly violent...

Also didn't like the fact that it was made public who everyone voted for...not what you want in a democratic state...

His opposition to the US was admirable...he was a sincere man who genuinely seemed to want to do good by his people...its just quite often he didn't...

A good man but a flawed leader...

That is wrong. I was listning to radio this morning and they said if there is something he will be remembered most for, it is his work against poverty as poverty declined with 50% during his reign.

Wazeeri
6th March 2013, 17:08
poverty hardly declined....
Wrong

Venezuela is one of the only countries to have achieved their millenium goals.
Extreme poverty lowered to 7%
overall poverty decreased from close to 50% to 25%
Hunger from 20% to 6%.

The man is a model of how to run a developing country.

The only thing you can fault him on is his tackling of opponents who he thought of as spies for the USA. He went beyond the law and had too much power. But he put that power to good use.

Markhor
6th March 2013, 18:00
Wonderful statement by Jimmy Carter. Chavez was not without his flaws, he did have some authoritarian tendencies but you cannot doubt his intentions, he genuinely wanted to improve the lot of the poorest and most vulnerable in society. He is not the demon portrayed by the right, nor the Jesus that GS rightly points out that the left can make him out to be, but he was a charismatic and iconic figure - and you don't get many leaders like him nowadays. A sad loss, hopefully Venezuela remains stable and that the US don't try and organise a coup for some puppet to take over as they did during the Cold War with various Latin American countries. Elections will be held in 30 days.

Black Zero
6th March 2013, 18:36
was he a victim of biological weapon? (as he himself suggested 2 years back)

shaykh1985
6th March 2013, 21:52
Wazeeri and Iaj...I stand corrected...I was under the impression his plans were always better than his results...but evidently I'm wrong...

He was authoritarian but benevolent...it tends to be the result of constant threats to a regime...he was significantly less authoritarian before that disgraceful coup...

In fact many authoritarian regimes never started off that way...Castro is another that comes to mind...

oyei
6th March 2013, 22:22
You missed his sarcasm...

The US overthrew him with a military coup to deliver democracy...it was incredible how they sold it as that too...

That said its overstated how democratic his state actually is...however the fact is that the US has never been interested in a democracy there...

i guess i did missed his sarcasm

but i saw the documentary about military coup to deliver so called democracy, everyone should watch it, it totally exposed military, and how the private media manipulated footage, and what is funny about all this is that currently every media is using the same footage to portray him as a tyrant. below is the footage of it, starts at 33 min.

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised - Chavez: Inside the Coup

http://youtu.be/Id--ZFtjR5c?t=33m7s

oyei
6th March 2013, 22:22
O democracy :zardari its the BESHHHT revenge

lets talk about how we have a democracy in the US and how "Corporations are people, my friend" http://www.politico.com/design/general-election-2012/balance-romney.png:)))

i guess i missed your sarcasm.

waqar goraya
6th March 2013, 22:30
was he a victim of biological weapon? (as he himself suggested 2 years back)

May be a victim of a radioactive substance..?

The advancement in Poison to kill has also been sharp along with other developments....

KingKhanWC
6th March 2013, 22:46
Condolences to Venezuela.

A sad loss of a truly great leader who changed the fortunes of his people after 14 years in power. Voted in by his people time after time because he bought real change to their status with infrastructure and reduction in poverty. A revolutionary who opposed American imperialism in the region and the wider world because he wanted to remain part of a free nation and a free world.

I hope the next leader doesn't sell out to the US and reverse the oil industry changes made by Chavez. It's certain the American terrorists will be joyful and planning their next moves in South America.

ace58
6th March 2013, 22:58
Wrong

Venezuela is one of the only countries to have achieved their millenium goals.
Extreme poverty lowered to 7%
overall poverty decreased from close to 50% to 25%
Hunger from 20% to 6%.

The man is a model of how to run a developing country.

The only thing you can fault him on is his tackling of opponents who he thought of as spies for the USA. He went beyond the law and had too much power. But he put that power to good use.

That according to statistics compiled by the the Venezuelan government under his regime. according to the financial times

“Early last year, Venezuela's National Statistics Institute said 53 per cent of the population lived in poverty at the end of 2004, 9.2 points higher than in early 1999, at the start of the Chávez government. Irked by the numbers, the president ordered a change in INE's "methodology". Shortly after, it announced that, in mid-2005, only 39.5 per cent of people lived in poverty - a 14.5 point "improvement" in a few months.”[8]

Plus his record on free speech is not exactly the best. Its amazing how this guy became a such a big star just by name calling George bush and the evil corporations.

KingKhanWC
6th March 2013, 23:15
It's universally accepted Chavez reduced poverty substantially, the evidence is there on the ground.

This is after 10 years.


Among the highlights:
¾ The current economic expansion began when the government got control over the national
oil company in the first quarter of 2003. Since then, real (inflation-adjusted) GDP has nearly
doubled, growing by 94.7 percent in 5.25 years, or 13.5 percent annually.
¾

Most of this growth has been in the non-oil sector of the economy, and the private sector
has grown faster than the public sector.
¾

During the current economic expansion, the poverty rate has been cut by more than half,
from 54 percent of households in the first half of 2003 to 26 percent at the end of 2008.


Extreme poverty has fallen even more, by 72 percent. These poverty rates measure only cash
income, and do not take into account increased access to health care or education.
¾

Over the entire decade, the percentage of households in poverty has been reduced by 39
percent, and extreme poverty by more than half.
¾

Inequality, as measured by the Gini index, has also fallen substantially. The index has fallen
to 41 in 2008, from 48.1 in 2003 and 47 in 1999. This represents a large reduction in
inequality.
¾

Real (inflation-adjusted) social spending per person more than tripled from 1998-2006.
¾

From 1998-2006, infant mortality has fallen by more than one-third. The number of primary
care physicians in the public sector increased 12-fold from 1999-2007, providing health care
to millions of Venezuelans who previously did not have access.
¾

There have been substantial gains in education, especially higher education, where gross
enrollment rates more than doubled from 1999-2000 to 2007-2008.
¾

The labor market also improved substantially over the last decade, with unemployment
dropping from 11.3 percent to 7.8 percent. During the current expansion it has fallen by
more than half. Other labor market indicators also show substantial gains.
¾

Over the past decade, the number of social security beneficiaries has more than doubled.
¾

Over the decade, the government’s total public debt has fallen from 30.7 to 14.3 percent of
GDP. The foreign public debt has fallen even more, from 25.6 to 9.8 percent of GDP.
¾

Inflation is about where it was 10 years ago, ending the year at 31.4 percent. However it has
been falling over the last half year (as measured by three-month averages) and is likely to
continue declining this year in the face of strong deflationary pressures worldwide.

http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/venezuela-2009-02.pdf

ace58
6th March 2013, 23:17
also the banking and inflation system in Venezuela is completely shot, violent crime has gone up as well. The increase in GDP is only because the increased demand for oil in emerging markets like India and china.

Im not saying that's all his fault though but people are painting too much of a rosy picture of Chavez.

ace58
6th March 2013, 23:24
It's universally accepted Chavez reduced poverty substantially, the evidence is there on the ground.

This is after 10 years.



http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/venezuela-2009-02.pdf

Good read but the poverty numbers they use are taken using numbers provided by the Valenzuela government. I don't even trust poverty numbers complied by the US government.

KingKhanWC
6th March 2013, 23:28
The world is full of leaders who are working for the interests of corporations. The so called western world which is often painted as the civilised world continues to fool the people with two party fraud systems where both are actually on the same agenda.

David Cameron was voted from around 10% of the population. He has no popular mandate, the whole system is demockracy. Chavez was reinstated twice by his people in what would be considered a landslide.

If Chavez is painted wrongly with a rosy picture, please name ONE other leader alive today who has done more for their people and accepted by his people in larger numbers?

KingKhanWC
6th March 2013, 23:30
Good read but the poverty numbers they use are taken using numbers provided by the Valenzuela government. I don't even trust poverty numbers complied by the US government.

Only a fool would believe anything the US says. As I said the evidence is on the ground(for those who pick and choose stats) and people living there know the difference he made.

ace58
6th March 2013, 23:52
The world is full of leaders who are working for the interests of corporations. The so called western world which is often painted as the civilised world continues to fool the people with two party fraud systems where both are actually on the same agenda.

David Cameron was voted from around 10% of the population. He has no popular mandate, the whole system is demockracy. Chavez was reinstated twice by his people in what would be considered a landslide.

If Chavez is painted wrongly with a rosy picture, please name ONE other leader alive today who has done more for their people and accepted by his people in larger numbers?

Chavez won by 55% which is huge but also given the stark differences between him and his opponent that would suggest that their are a lot of Venezuelans who hate Chavez.