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cricket083
18th May 2014, 17:23
This thread is to learn Urdu idioms as it makes your conversation more rich in meaning..

Here you can see some

Aab-o-dana uth jana=Zindagi kay din pure ho jana.

Aasmaan sar par utha lena=Bohat zada shor karna

Apna ullo seedha karna=Apna matlab nikalna.

Baat ka batangar banana=Barha charha kar byan karna.

Baal baal bachna=Bari mushkil sa bachana.

Bagh bagh homa=Boht khush hona.

Share yours and I will share more later.

Kianig89
18th May 2014, 18:53
Adha teetar adha batair = When one tries to imitate somebody and loses his identity

Sabz Badh dekhana = trying to deceive somebody

Oont (Camel) k mo mai zeera = when something is not sufficient

kuttey ki dum hamesha terhi hi rhe gi = when something cannot be corrected/altered

cricket083
19th May 2014, 16:50
Adha teetar adha batair = When one tries to imitate somebody and loses his identity

Sabz Badh dekhana = trying to deceive somebody

Oont (Camel) k mo mai zeera = when something is not sufficient

kuttey ki dum hamesha terhi hi rhe gi = when something cannot be corrected/altered

Good addition.

GreenKnightRises
24th May 2014, 11:55
Nice Thread :yk

I would like to hear more of those

AdnaaSaaInsaan
24th May 2014, 20:58
nau, do, gyaaraa honaa - to run away

It is in Hindi but I'm sure must be on the list of Urdu speakers as well.

96NotOut
24th May 2014, 21:06
Can someone tell me what:

1. Ghar ki murghi daal barabar hona,

and,

2. Dhobi ka kutta, na ghar ka na ghaat ka,

mean?

Pakistani_Legend
24th May 2014, 21:16
Can someone tell me what:

1. Ghar ki murghi daal barabar hona,

and,

2. Dhobi ka kutta, na ghar ka na ghaat ka,

mean?

The first one means that the things a person possesses are always undermined and not valued, while the possessions of others always seem to be better. It is used in the same way as the English proverb "the grass is greener on the other side".

The second one means that a person is stuck between two things; he is neither here nor there.

96NotOut
24th May 2014, 21:24
The first one means that the things a person possesses are always undermined and not valued, while the possessions of others always seem to be better. It is used in the same way as the English proverb "the grass is greener on the other side".

The second one means that a person is stuck between two things; he is neither here nor there.
Thanks, bro. :)

Pakistani_Legend
24th May 2014, 21:27
Thanks, bro. :)

No problem, baaji. You can always ask for help in Urdu.

Kianig89
24th May 2014, 22:12
Gadhay (Donkey) k sar se seeng gaib hona - When all of a sudden something is missing

Aik panth do kaaj - killing 2 birds with 1 stone

Apne moo mian mithoo hona - Praising yourself

haathi k daant dikhane k or khane k or - All that glitters is not gold

Firebreaker
27th May 2014, 21:10
Bakre ki jaan gayi kha ne wale ko swaad nahi aya

Firebreaker
27th May 2014, 21:12
Jiske ghar Daane unke kamle nhi siyaane

cricket083
27th May 2014, 21:14
Jiske ghar Daane unke kamle nhi siyaane

Bhi

Pakistani_Legend
27th May 2014, 21:53
Please provide the meanings of the idioms mentioned above.

cricket083
27th May 2014, 21:56
Please provide the meanings of the idioms mentioned above.

Don't know about the first one,meaning of the other one is Those who are rich are considered right,no matter what they say,even rubbish

Pakistani_Legend
27th May 2014, 22:04
Don't know about the first one,meaning of the other one is Those who are rich are considered right,no matter what they say,even rubbish

Thanks.

cricket083
27th May 2014, 22:06
Thanks.

You're welcome.

Firebreaker
27th May 2014, 22:41
The first idiom means that the life of a Goat is gone but still eaters didn't like the meat of it

cricket083
27th May 2014, 23:06
The first idiom means that the life of a Goat is gone but still eaters didn't like the meat of it

Please explain it.

Saqs
27th May 2014, 23:07
Is Khasman nu Khao an idiom?

Firebreaker
27th May 2014, 23:09
Like if someone orders McDonald for you for 1000 rupees but you did not liked it

Pakistani_Legend
27th May 2014, 23:11
Is Khasman nu Khao an idiom?

Brilliant! :)):))):91::96:

cricket083
27th May 2014, 23:16
Like if someone orders McDonald for you for 1000 rupees but you did not liked it

Okay thanks.

cricket083
27th May 2014, 23:17
Is Khasman nu Khao an idiom?

:))) probably a punjabi idiom.

Kianig89
27th May 2014, 23:24
baigani Shaadi mai Andullah dewana - When somebody gets too excited on irrelevant stuff

Koyloon ki dallali mai apna hi moo kaala - One would get in trouble while doing some tricky/dirty work

Hatheli pe sarsoo jamana - Building castles in air

DHONI183
27th May 2014, 23:42
Is Khasman nu Khao an idiom?

"Eat your lover!"

Another version is, "Khasmaa`n da sarr kha!", meaning, "Eat your lover's head!"

Saqs
28th May 2014, 00:12
This thread has provided hours of entertainment with the family.

I'd encourage all the young posters here to sit with thread open and ask their parents about these.

Guaranteed lols and a good time.

DHONI183
28th May 2014, 12:57
It feels nice to see that I knew most of the ones mentioned here.

"Bandar kya jaaney adrak ka sawaad (how would a monkey know the taste of ginger)?"

Used to taunt a person not being in a position to judge the value of something.

"How would Saqs bhai know the value of MS Dhoni?"

Firebreaker
28th May 2014, 14:16
900 choohe kha ke billi hajj ko chali

cricket083
28th May 2014, 16:39
Naak par makhi na bethne dena: to be very proudy.

Maindaki ko zukaam hona: to talk more than one's status.

Ghoray baich kar sona: to be thoughtless.

Kaan par jun tak na reengana: to have no effect in the least.

Kitaabi kerra hona: to have a habit of studying all the time.

Saqs
28th May 2014, 17:54
It feels nice to see that I knew most of the ones mentioned here.

"Bandar kya jaaney adrak ka sawaad (how would a monkey know the taste of ginger)?"

Used to taunt a person not being in a position to judge the value of something.

"How would Saqs bhai know the value of MS Dhoni?"

Lol I am going to use this one but change Bandar to something that sounds like Bandar but starts with a k

Pakistani_Legend
28th May 2014, 18:28
Lol I am going to use this one but change Bandar to something that sounds like Bandar but starts with a k

:)):))):91::96:

Cracker.

Kianig89
28th May 2014, 19:13
Maan na maan mai tera mehman : getting free with others without any reason

A Punjabi one Eidy peche tamba : doing something when the damage is done and its urdu is Ab pachtaye kia hoot jab chiyraan chug gai khait

Piyaase aa katora labha te paani pee pee aaphareya : gets too excited after having something

Andho mai kaana Raja - A figure among cyphers

cricket083
28th May 2014, 21:48
Mods can you please make two changes in the OP?I have written YOU instead of YOUR and in the last line LATTER insted of LATER:facepalm:..I have just noticed:P

Afridi96
29th May 2014, 03:14
A simple one - Daal mein kuch kaala hai :uakmal

DHONI183
29th May 2014, 12:58
Mods can you please make two changes in the OP?I have written YOU instead of YOUR and in the last line LATTER insted of LATER:facepalm:..I have just noticed:P

Done (yesterday itself)! Donīt thank me; I will get a 'disturbery' notification:msd.


A simple one - Daal mein kuch kaala hai :uakmal

"Thereīs something black in the lentils."

Afridi96
29th May 2014, 13:17
Done (yesterday itself)! Donīt thank me; I will get a 'disturbery' notification:msd.



"Thereīs something black in the lentils."

There's a picture of daal with an aadmi (kaala) inside it, not sure if i'm allowed to post that picture?

DHONI183
29th May 2014, 13:20
There's a picture of daal with an aadmi (kaala) inside it, not sure if i'm allowed to post that picture?
Letīs tread the safe path and let it be:moyo.

Afridi96
29th May 2014, 13:21
Letīs tread the safe path and let it be:moyo.

Fair enough :))

cricket083
29th May 2014, 21:40
Done (yesterday itself)! Donīt thank me; I will get a 'disturbery' notification:msd.

Okay I won't thank you but you must have got the notification..:D

Kianig89
30th May 2014, 10:03
A couple of more from Hassan Nisar's urdu column today

jis ki taig us ki daig - Might is right

Tola bhar ki roti kia patli or moti - Something is better than nothing

cricket083
30th May 2014, 12:36
A couple of more from Hassan Nisar's urdu column today

jis ki taig us ki daig - Might is right

Tola bhar ki roti kia patli or moti - Something is better than nothing

Good addition from you bro:)

DHONI183
30th May 2014, 14:45
"Baghal meyīn chhurri, moonh meyīn "Raam Raam."

Used for backstabber etc., but not that easy: this is exclusively used for Hindus, which is the reason why I dislike this to the extremes. I really dislike it!

Firebreaker
30th May 2014, 17:13
Aik inaar so bemaar

Firebreaker
30th May 2014, 17:15
Asmaan se gira khajoor Mai atka
Jis se Allah rake use kon chakhe
Kabab Mai haddi ban na

Firebreaker
30th May 2014, 17:16
Magarmuch ke aansoo

Firebreaker
30th May 2014, 17:20
Pagri uchaal na
Chor ki daari Mai tinka

Firebreaker
30th May 2014, 17:33
Chaar chand lagana
Zakhm pe namak chirakhna

Firebreaker
30th May 2014, 17:35
Apne pair par kulhari maar na
Jinni chadar go tune pair philana

Munna
30th May 2014, 19:40
Jiski laathi uski bhains :inzi
Meaning.. he who wields the stick, his is the buffalo

To explain this further.. u dont mess with the boss :moin

DHONI183
31st May 2014, 13:32
Choosing the right time to use them is very important, I have learnt.

http://i62.tinypic.com/o6ebl4.jpg

RWAC Afridi96 blinding light cricket083

Afridi96
31st May 2014, 14:42
Choosing the right time to use them is very important, I have learnt.

http://i62.tinypic.com/o6ebl4.jpg

RWAC Afridi96 blinding light cricket083

What's the meaning of the phrase?

DHONI183
31st May 2014, 14:49
What's the meaning of the phrase?
Oī man thatīs tough! I hope someone will step in to explain.

Pakistani_Legend bhai, can you?

Pakistani_Legend
31st May 2014, 15:19
Oī man thatīs tough! I hope someone will step in to explain.

Pakistani_Legend bhai, can you?

I haven't heard it before.:|:(

DHONI183
31st May 2014, 15:51
I haven't heard it before.:|:(

Hmmmm.....

Let me call Nostalgic and Munna for help.

Munna
31st May 2014, 16:00
Depends on the context it is used in. Generally if any person who who is dependent upon me orders me to do something, then I can use this idiom for him.

A distant cousin of this idiom may be "aasteen ka saanp"

cricket083
31st May 2014, 16:34
Choosing the right time to use them is very important, I have learnt.

http://i62.tinypic.com/o6ebl4.jpg

RWAC Afridi96 blinding light cricket083

Ummm,It doesn't make sense to me:20:.the guy doesn't know the meaning and he has used it just for the hell of it,I guess.

Afridi96
31st May 2014, 16:35
Hmmmm.....

Let me call Nostalgic and Munna for help.


Depends on the context it is used in. Generally if any person who who is dependent upon me orders me to do something, then I can use this idiom for him.

A distant cousin of this idiom may be "aasteen ka saanp"

Ohhhhhh I get it now :)) :)) and thanks :)

blinding light
31st May 2014, 17:21
Choosing the right time to use them is very important, I have learnt.

http://i62.tinypic.com/o6ebl4.jpg

RWAC Afridi96 blinding light cricket083

:)))

maddgenius
1st June 2014, 01:18
A distant cousin of this idiom may be "aasteen ka saanp"

Asteen ka saanp won't even be phupphi k nandoi k behnoi ki khala ki dewrani ka cousin of this idiom :yk

cricket083
24th September 2014, 22:09
Let me clear the difference between Idioms(Muhaawaraat) and Aphonices(Zarb-ul-misl).

An Idiom can't be used without a sentence, it is mandatory to put it into the sentence to make a sense.

For instance, Bagh Bagh hona, we need to put it into a sentence in order to make sense, it doesn't make any sense alone.

While zarb-ul-misl make sense without being put into a sentence.For example Aasmaan se gira khajoor main atka, Qaazi ke ghar ke chohay bhi sayanay etc.

Nostalgic
8th October 2014, 08:51
A few that contain references to the Humsaaya Mulk, where, lest we forget, Urdu first flourished:

Ultay Baans Bareilly Ko
Ulti Ganga Bahaana
Hunooz Dilli Duur Ast (this one is actually what the Iranians disparagingly call Subk-e-Hindi, i.e. faux-Persian Urdu)

The boy or girl who can explain these gets a kudos.

Nostalgic
8th October 2014, 09:00
Another few I really like:

"Larka baghal mein dhandora shehr mein." Used, for instance, when I place my glasses on top of my head, and then search for them throughout the house.

"Boorhi ghorri, laal lagaam." Picture an auntie who is past her prime, yet insists on dressing in the latest fashions. I would find her quite becoming, but hey, that's just me.

"Baasi karhi mein ubaal aana." That's me trying to start weight-training, or guitar playing, or writing, after months away, only to give up again, for another few months.

"Kawwa chala hans ki chaal, apni chaal bhi bhool gaya." That's me trying to be something I'm not. Like a Norwegian or something.

And finally, a Punjabi one:

"Jithey di khoti, uthay aan khaloti." I'll leave this to you to decipher.

RWAC
8th October 2014, 09:25
A few that contain references to the Humsaaya Mulk, where, lest we forget, Urdu first flourished:

Ultay Baans Bareilly Ko
Ulti Ganga Bahaana
Hunooz Dilli Duur Ast (this one is actually what the Iranians disparagingly call Subk-e-Hindi, i.e. faux-Persian Urdu)

The boy or girl who can explain these gets a kudos.

Ultay Baans Bareilly Ko - This is a relic from the time when Bareilley had a big bamboo industry, and used to export bamboo to rest of India. So, to bring (back)/ship bamboo to Bareilley would be a pointless thing, akin to someone shipping oil to Saudi Arabia.

Ulti Ganga Bahaana - This one's self-explanatory - to go against the tide/take an opposing stance.

Hunooz Dilli Duur Ast - IIRC, this comes from the legend where a king, while in Bengal, threatened to kill a Sufi (can't recall names), upon the king's arrival in Delhi. That's when the Sufi quipped that "Delhi is far away for now". Generally, used to convey that there's a the final destination/goal is still far away (and a person needs to keep working towards that).

Nostalgic
8th October 2014, 09:45
Ultay Baans Bareilly Ko - This is a relic from the time when Bareilley had a big bamboo industry, and used to export bamboo to rest of India. So, to bring (back)/ship bamboo to Bareilley would be a pointless thing, akin to someone shipping oil to Saudi Arabia.

Ulti Ganga Bahaana - This one's self-explanatory - to go against the tide/take an opposing stance.

Hunooz Dilli Duur Ast - IIRC, this comes from the legend where a king, while in Bengal, threatened to kill a Sufi (can't recall names), upon the king's arrival in Delhi. That's when the Sufi quipped that "Delhi is far away for now". Generally, used to convey that there's a the final destination/goal is still far away (and a person needs to keep working towards that).

Excellent! Very impressive.

DHONI183
8th October 2014, 15:16
A few that contain references to the Humsaaya Mulk, where, lest we forget, Urdu first flourished:

Ultay Baans Bareilly Ko
Ulti Ganga Bahaana
Hunooz Dilli Duur Ast (this one is actually what the Iranians disparagingly call Subk-e-Hindi, i.e. faux-Persian Urdu)

The boy or girl who can explain these gets a kudos.


Another few I really like:

"Larka baghal mein dhandora shehr mein." Used, for instance, when I place my glasses on top of my head, and then search for them throughout the house.

"Boorhi ghorri, laal lagaam." Picture an auntie who is past her prime, yet insists on dressing in the latest fashions. I would find her quite becoming, but hey, that's just me.

"Baasi karhi mein ubaal aana." That's me trying to start weight-training, or guitar playing, or writing, after months away, only to give up again, for another few months.

"Kawwa chala hans ki chaal, apni chaal bhi bhool gaya." That's me trying to be something I'm not. Like a Norwegian or something.

And finally, a Punjabi one:

"Jithey di khoti, uthay aan khaloti." I'll leave this to you to decipher.

I have highlighted in bold the ones that I had known about, basically all except one in the second post and all in the first post.

Regarding the Punjabi one. Itīs hard to explain for me at least. Could it be something along the lines of "Making a mistake which makes you return to your erstwhile state"?

Geo Newsī anchor Hamid Mir famously tweeted this when Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif turned to the army to solve the issues with the PTI and the PAT.

cricket083
8th October 2014, 18:20
A few that contain references to the Humsaaya Mulk, where, lest we forget, Urdu first flourished:

Ultay Baans Bareilly Ko
Ulti Ganga Bahaana
Hunooz Dilli Duur Ast (this one is actually what the Iranians disparagingly call Subk-e-Hindi, i.e. faux-Persian Urdu)

The boy or girl who can explain these gets a kudos.


Another few I really like:

"Larka baghal mein dhandora shehr mein." Used, for instance, when I place my glasses on top of my head, and then search for them throughout the house.

"Boorhi ghorri, laal lagaam." Picture an auntie who is past her prime, yet insists on dressing in the latest fashions. I would find her quite becoming, but hey, that's just me.

"Baasi karhi mein ubaal aana." That's me trying to start weight-training, or guitar playing, or writing, after months away, only to give up again, for another few months.

"Kawwa chala hans ki chaal, apni chaal bhi bhool gaya." That's me trying to be something I'm not. Like a Norwegian or something.

And finally, a Punjabi one:

"Jithey di khoti, uthay aan khaloti." I'll leave this to you to decipher.
Knew the highlighted ones.

Jithon di khoti, uthay aan khaloti: It is said that pet animals never forget the place they dwell in, there is a renowned jest about it that

"aik aadmi ke pas billi thi jo usay boht tang karti thi, os ne osay kahin chor anay ka iraada kiya, iraaday ke mutabiq wo osay kahin le gaya or wahan chor diya, lekin jab wo ghar aya tou billi os se pehle hi pohanch chuki thi, agli dafa os ne socha ke isay bohat dur daraz illaqe me chor ata hun, iraday ke ain mutabiq wo osay bohat dur chor anay ki niyat se chala gaya or billi ko wahan phaink diya lekin jab wapis anay laga tou rasta bhool gaya, os ne ghar phone kiya ke billi pohanch gai kya? onho ne kaha han, pohanch gai. Admi bola osay kaho mujhe bhi aa ke le jae."

This idiom means things eventually go back to where they belong, I think. Am I right?

Nostalgic
9th October 2014, 08:52
DHONI183 and cricket083

You're both right about "Jithon di Khoti, uthay aan khaloti." I think the closest Urdu equivalent is "Laut ke buddhu ghar ko aye."

Another few:

"Yak naa shudd, do shudd:"

Again, it is Subk-e-Hindi. The story found in our Matriculation Muraqqa-e-Urdu was that a black magic practitioner told his disciple how to resurrect the dead from their graves. Years later, the disciple tries it, only to find that the dead man starts chasing him, zombie-like. He frantically runs away but the dead guy keeps chasing him. He decides to consult his teacher. Alas, the teacher has died. So he goes to the teacher's grave and resurrects him. But that does him no good, since the teacher starts chasing him too. Hence the saying Yak naa shudd, do shudd, i.e. trying to solve one problem and ending up with two instead, or in other words inadvertently exacerbating the situation.

"Hum Bhi Hein Paanchon Sawaaron Mein:"

The story goes that four aristocratic horsemen set off for some far away place. On the way, a peasant on a donkey tags along. Whenever someone asks them where they are headed, the peasant answers, Us five riders are headed to such and such a place. Used whenever someone jumps on to the bandwagon, so to speak.

"Andhon Mein Kaana Raaja:"

In English, "In the Valley of the Blind, the One-Eyed Man in King."