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JaDed
23rd May 2016, 17:44
At the entrance to Thaungtan village there’s a brand new sign, bright yellow, and bearing a message: “No Muslims allowed to stay overnight. No Muslims allowed to rent houses. No marriage with Muslims.”

The post was erected in late March by Buddhist residents of the village in Myanmar’s lush Irrawaddy Delta region who signed, or were strong-armed into signing, a document asserting that they wanted to live separately.

Since then a couple of other villages across the country have followed suit. Small but viciously insular, these “Buddhist-only” outposts serve as microcosms of the festering religious tensions that threaten Myanmar’s nascent experiment with democracy.

After decades of military rule, Myanmar has entered a new era. As state counsellor, Aung San Suu Kyi is in charge, though key institutions remain under the army’s control.

Recent weeks, however, have brought a surge in nationalist activity. Scores rallied outside the US embassy in Yangon last month to demand diplomats stop using the word Rohingya to describe millions of Muslims confined to internal displacement camps and villages in western Myanmar. Nationalists insist the group are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

The few public comments Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy has given on the issue have not been encouraging.

Suu Kyi reportedly instructed the new US ambassador not to use the term Rohingya. The new minister for religion, former general Thura Aung Ko, recently called Muslims and Hindus “associate citizens”.

The fact that nationalist rhetoric has gone unchallenged, and has in some cases been echoed, by the new government has left some wondering what place the country’s minorities have in its future.

Thaungtan is a small village of about 700 people, mostly farmers. At the end of a long dirt road flanked by tall grass and banana trees, it is extremely isolated.

Recently, residents formed the Patriotic Youth Network, a nationalist group dedicated to developing the village and keeping it out of foreign hands.

At the local monastery, a young monk with piercing black eyes named Ma Ni Ta sits unsmiling as villagers clamour to explain the new sign.

“The village has talked and seen that the NLD didn’t do anything on the religious matter,” he says.

It has fallen to the village to handle the mission to “protect religion” themselves.

In early 2015 a stranger of south Asian origin moved to Thaungtan.
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According to the villagers’ version of events he initially got along well with his neighbours. He said he was Hindu. Then he started buying land. That’s when they jumped to the conclusion that he must be Muslim.

“It’s like ghosts. We have never seen a ghost but we’re afraid,” says one villager, with a rueful laugh. He was part of a small minority who opposed the sign, he says, asking not to be named for fear of reprisals.

Members of the Patriotic Youth Network found the new arrival and his family did not all have identity cards. “They might have sneaked in from Bangladesh,” says Ma Ni Ta.

“If we live together, we might have some problems with donations and religious ceremonies,” he says.

Kyaw San Win was the stranger who came under suspicion. A stocky 28-year-old with large, long-lashed eyes, he stands in his cousin’s drinks shop in Yangon, three hours drive from Thaungtan.

He points at a small Buddha statue on a shelf and explains how his family followed both Buddhist and Hindu traditions.

Kyaw San Win says he was living in Yangon when his elderly father decided to retire to the countryside. Kyaw San Win’s cousin suggested his wife’s village: Thaungtan. They bought and renovated an old wooden house.

The monks and villagers were immediately unfriendly, he says.

After they bought another piece of land, planning to open a teashop, he and his wife got an urgent call from his father.

“Please, my son,” he said. “Please come back to the village because the villagers and the monks, they don’t really want us to live here.”
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At the monastery, they were told that residents didn’t want “kalar”, an offensive term for Muslims, in their village.

“I ate pork in front of them,” Kyaw San Win recalls with an exasperated laugh. “They said I was just pretending so I could do some mission, like jihad.”

Later he says members of the Patriotic Youth Network warned him: “Someone may come and burn your house down.”

Then groups of young men took to walking and running around the house at all hours. They revved motorbikes outside.

According to Kyaw San Win, the village administrator said he couldn’t guarantee their security. So they left the village, eventually selling the home last month. Around the same time, pictures on Facebook showed members of the Youth Patriotic Network standing beside their new sign.

“Every religion, every person, should be able to live in every part of the country,” says San Htay, Kyaw San Win’s cousin. “Every person should be under the same law … The nationalist guys want to rule the village.”

“We’re really lucky we are Buddhist,” adds Kyaw San Win. “If we were Muslim there would be a conflict in that village.”

Recently it has seemed to some as though Myanmar could again be teetering on the verge of religious violence. After the disappointment of last November’s election, nationalist groups, who backed the losing military-backed Union and Solidarity Party, are again making noises.

“Now that the post-election dust has settled, it’s business as usual for religious extremists throughout the country,” says Matthew Smith, executive director of the nonprofit Fortify Rights. “Without a stronger counter-movement, this brand of religious discrimination will continue to flourish. Violence is inevitable.”

The Youth Patriotic Network in Thaungtan denies links to extremist nationalist organization Ma Ba Tha, which has waged an anti-Muslim campaign of hate in recent years.

The firebrand monk Ashin Wirathu has been accused of inciting deadly riots through his Facebook page, where he posts unsubstantiated rumours about Muslims.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Religious Affairs says he hasn’t heard about the “no-Muslim” villages. “Basically [complaints] should come from the regional level,” he said. He could not be reached to answer further questions.

The NLD is in a precarious position. Hatred of the Rohingya penetrates all levels of society. Recently, local magazine the Irrawaddy, which is run by human rights activists, published a cartoon that featured a dark-skinned half-naked man holding a sign that said “boat people”.

When students from the Yangon School of Political Science held a small peace march across the city, a few dozen men, women and children carried banners saying: “Accept Diversity. Promote Tolerance.” Police said they planned to charge the activists with unauthorised protest.

Nanda Kyaw, a Muslim taxi driver who was beaten outside Shwedagon Pagoda, from which Islamic vendors were evicted a few weeks earlier, says he is still getting headaches.
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“I have to drive every day for my survival,” says the slight 31-year-old.

At least once a day, he says, a passenger waves him on when they see his goatee. But the attack in April came as a surprise.

A group of young people wound down their windows and shouted racially charged insults. Then, he said, they swerved in front of his car and beat him with iron rods. They left him bleeding from his mouth and head.

“Some people stopped their cars and watched a little bit. It’s because it was a problem between a Muslim guy and a Buddhist guy, they are afraid.”

He declines to have his picture taken, for fear of inflaming tensions.

Kyaw San Win feels the same. It’s the reason his family haven’t pursued charges against the people who hounded them from the village. Besides, he says, they wouldn’t want to move back now.

“The people, they are very narrow-minded, we don’t want to live with them,” his cousin says.

Additional reporting by Cape Diamond and Aung Naing Soe


http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/23/no-muslims-allowed-how-nationalism-is-rising-in-aung-san-suu-kyis-myanmar

JaDed
23rd May 2016, 17:45
Terrible state of affairs ,Myanmar's society has somewhat been a disgrace!

Dman
23rd May 2016, 17:53
I wonder how's the life for Hindus in Myanmar.

Are Muslims harassed only in rural parts or Yangoon too?

Arham_PakFan
24th May 2016, 00:19
What a mess Myanmar is in.

Hindus and Muslims are treated as second rate citizens.Officially!!!

IAJ
24th May 2016, 01:10
And this lady got Nobel Peace Prize in 1991:facepalm:

Prize motivation: "for her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights" Unbelievable!

IAJ
24th May 2016, 01:12
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3508710/Moment-Burma-heroine-lost-cool-Today-s-Mishal-Suu-Kyi-s-anger-no-one-told-going-interviewed-Muslim-heated-questioning-BBC.html

Bewal Express
24th May 2016, 02:55
And here I was thinking that the Buddhists were peace loving pacifists.

sensible-indian-fan
24th May 2016, 03:43
And here I was thinking that the Buddhists were peace loving pacifists.

And here I was thinking that generalizing was wrong.

Especially in cases where regular citizens have little control over such policies.

Bewal Express
24th May 2016, 03:52
And here I was thinking that generalizing was wrong.

Especially in cases where regular citizens have little control over such policies.

But when some cretins in Muslim countries kill innocent people or spread hate, they are shown to be representative of all of us. Buddhists have extremely good press, but as we saw in SL and now in Burma, all is not what it seems.

Suleiman
24th May 2016, 03:54
My qaari saab was from Myanmar when I was a kid. Had a voice as good as the imams that lead the prayers in the Kaaba, really great teacher. Used to work in mosque itself. Hope he is still in Malaysia and happy instead of the dangerous conditions back in Myanmar.

sensible-indian-fan
24th May 2016, 03:59
But when some cretins in Muslim countries kill innocent people or spread hate, they are shown to be representative of all of us. Buddhists have extremely good press, but as we saw in SL and now in Burma, all is not what it seems.

They are shown as representatives by whom?

By people who generalize.

Buddhists have extremely good press cos over millenias, their community has had an awesome rep.

gattaca
24th May 2016, 04:26
But when some cretins in Muslim countries kill innocent people or spread hate, they are shown to be representative of all of us. Buddhists have extremely good press, but as we saw in SL and now in Burma, all is not what it seems.
You are doing the same thing what other people do. You would cry conspiracy when a Someon blames it on Muslims.But when this happens in other community you question the whole community. What is the difference ?

dayvancowboy
24th May 2016, 05:50
And this lady got Nobel Peace Prize in 1991:facepalm:

Prize motivation: "for her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights" Unbelievable!

Yeah, I'm sure you would much rather have Mumtaz Qadri be given the Nobel Peace Prize instead. :facepalm:

dayvancowboy
24th May 2016, 05:52
But when some cretins in Muslim countries kill innocent people or spread hate, they are shown to be representative of all of us. Buddhists have extremely good press, but as we saw in SL and now in Burma, all is not what it seems.

Actually, I've seen a lot of comments left in sites like NY Times about the plight of Rohingyas and have seen a shift from those who used to view Buddhism in a positive light and saw Buddhists as incapable of such acts take a change of tone after realizing that Buddhists are no less prone to humanity's worst acts than other religious groups.

In the end, the actions of people do not represent a religion. And unfortunately, these fascist Buddhist blowhards are making it difficult for Buddhist-Muslim relations throughout Southeast Asia, especially in Indonesia.

Saeed
24th May 2016, 07:19
Wasn't she kept under house arrest for a decade? One would expect a little empathy from a person who went through hard times herself. Power probably makes people forget their past quickly.

dayvancowboy
24th May 2016, 08:11
Wasn't she kept under house arrest for a decade? One would expect a little empathy from a person who went through hard times herself. Power probably makes people forget their past quickly.

Politics corrupts anybody. She's no different from Imran Khan. When's the last time Imran Khan has denounced laws against Ahmadis?

Which reminds me, had she expressed sympathy for Rohingyas perhaps some Buddhist fanatic would have assassinated her and be lionized as a hero by wide sections of Burmese Buddhist society, similar to Qadri.

Saeed
24th May 2016, 08:32
Politics corrupts anybody. She's no different from Imran Khan. When's the last time Imran Khan has denounced laws against Ahmadis?

Which reminds me, had she expressed sympathy for Rohingyas perhaps some Buddhist fanatic would have assassinated her and be lionized as a hero by wide sections of Burmese Buddhist society, similar to Qadri.

Well you already explained why not. If Imran Khan says something pro Mirzai he might have 100s of bigots at his throat. Noora league also won't miss the opportunity to use this against him. But I doubt he would do it because his popularity has got nothing do with minority rights. Though a principled person won't hesitate to say the right thing.

street cricketer
24th May 2016, 14:24
Buddhist radicalization is the fastest growing threat to the world right now.

What is the reason behind this sudden violent transformation? anuk

Eagle_Eye
24th May 2016, 14:55
Hindus and Muslims as "associate citizens"...... Never heard that notion before. What if a native Buddhist becomes Hindu or Muslim do they get demoted to being associate citizen?

Shameful silence from the lady, considering her first boyfriend at Oxford was a Muslim Pakistani .....

QazzarFan
24th May 2016, 16:06
Do not deserve that Nobel Prize.

the Great Khan
24th May 2016, 16:40
Buddhist radicalization is the fastest growing threat to the world right now.

What is the reason behind this sudden violent transformation? anuk

sounds like a cultural problem or sense of insecurity?

anuk
24th May 2016, 17:06
Buddhist radicalization is the fastest growing threat to the world right now.

What is the reason behind this sudden violent transformation? anuk

hardly a world threat when it's burma only. the situation is sl has been blown out of proportion. how many deaths of muslims in sl over the 2 years of extremist buddhists were roaming around? 2 or 3? more christians/non believers are killed in some muslim countries every hour.

even when u consider muslims being killed, there were more killed by the indian army in kashmir within a day last month.

as a matter of fact the biggest violence against the muslims in sl was in the mid 90s by the tamils - north and the east were ethnically cleansed of muslims within a day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expulsion_of_Muslims_from_the_Northern_province_by _LTTE

gani999
24th May 2016, 17:39
Why is Syu Kyi being blamed for this? Does she even have any control over the security apparatus in Myanmar?

street cricketer
24th May 2016, 17:40
hardly a world threat when it's burma only. the situation is sl has been blown out of proportion. how many deaths of muslims in sl over the 2 years of extremist buddhists were roaming around? 2 or 3? more christians/non believers are killed in some muslim countries every hour.

even when u consider muslims being killed, there were more killed by the indian army in kashmir within a day last month.

as a matter of fact the biggest violence against the muslims in sl was in the mid 90s by the tamils - north and the east were ethnically cleansed of muslims within a day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expulsion_of_Muslims_from_the_Northern_province_by _LTTE

Why getting so defensive anuk bhai for a simple question?:inzi

You are normally outspoken about religious fundamentalists causing trouble in many countries around the world. But recent developments have shown that violent monks have been hijacking Buddhism in countries like SL and Burma, which is otherwise known to be a peaceful religion. I, as a well wisher for peace, share your concern towards rising religious extremism as well and so enquired about the reason for this development since you would know more information about it.

anuk
24th May 2016, 17:54
Why getting so defensive anuk bhai for a simple question?:inzi

You are normally outspoken about religious fundamentalists causing trouble in many countries around the world. But recent developments have shown that violent monks have been hijacking Buddhism in countries like SL and Burma, which is otherwise known to be a peaceful religion. I, as a well wisher for peace, share your concern towards rising religious extremism as well and so enquired about the reason for this development since you would know more information about it.

not defensive.

buddhist radicalization is limited to burma and to a much lesser (and non violent) degree to sl.

definitely is not a threat to world peace in any meaningful way.

but i admit that all organized religions bring nothing but grief. some religions more than others tho.

Spookiewookie
24th May 2016, 17:57
hardly a world threat when it's burma only. the situation is sl has been blown out of proportion. how many deaths of muslims in sl over the 2 years of extremist buddhists were roaming around? 2 or 3? more christians/non believers are killed in some muslim countries every hour.

even when u consider muslims being killed, there were more killed by the indian army in kashmir within a day last month.

as a matter of fact the biggest violence against the muslims in sl was in the mid 90s by the tamils - north and the east were ethnically cleansed of muslims within a day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expulsion_of_Muslims_from_the_Northern_province_by _LTTE

Agree - it is a localised issue and not a global epidemic like with Islam.

Any fundamentalism religious or otherwise that causes suffering of human beings should not be tolerated.....sad set of affairs in Burma.

the Great Khan
24th May 2016, 18:45
hardly a world threat when it's burma only. the situation is sl has been blown out of proportion. how many deaths of muslims in sl over the 2 years of extremist buddhists were roaming around? 2 or 3? more christians/non believers are killed in some muslim countries every hour.

even when u consider muslims being killed, there were more killed by the indian army in kashmir within a day last month.

as a matter of fact the biggest violence against the muslims in sl was in the mid 90s by the tamils - north and the east were ethnically cleansed of muslims within a day.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expulsion_of_Muslims_from_the_Northern_province_by _LTTE

and this my dear friends is the problem we have. the "we may be bad but you lot are so much more worse than us so that means we can do what we want" narrative. How cheap. But no unsurprising considering this particular posters islamaphobia and unsubstantiated anti Muslim hate.. laughable response!!

the Great Khan
24th May 2016, 18:47
Agree - it is a localised issue and not a global epidemic like with Islam.

Any fundamentalism religious or otherwise that causes suffering of human beings should not be tolerated.....sad set of affairs in Burma.

lol so therefore lets just push it under the carpet and not really talk about it because its a "local issue". The hypocrisy that seeps forth is no longer a surprise. It is not a local issue. It is a international human rights issue when a country goes down this road. For that matter Rwanda and bosnia were also "local" issues. Preposterous!!

Spookiewookie
24th May 2016, 18:59
I'll make an exception and explain my post this one time.


lol so therefore lets just push it under the carpet

never said that



It is not a local issue. It is a international human rights issue when a country goes down this road. For that matter Rwanda and bosnia were also "local" issues. Preposterous!!

Never said it was a local issue - I did however say localised - there is a difference. I then preceded to say the following "Any fundamentalism religious or otherwise that causes suffering of human beings should not be tolerated.....sad set of affairs in Burma."

so i do agree that it's an issue that shouldn't be ignored however I disagree that it is a globalized issue.

Hope that is now clear :)

anuk
24th May 2016, 19:23
and this my dear friends is the problem we have. the "we may be bad but you lot are so much more worse than us so that means we can do what we want" narrative. How cheap. But no unsurprising considering this particular posters islamaphobia and unsubstantiated anti Muslim hate.. laughable response!!

Did u read the question that street cricketer asked by any chance? He asked if it was a worldwide threat and I explained that it wasn't. Surely even u agree that It's not even close to being a worldwide threat.

And my opinion is hardly the problem. 27000 terror attacks in 15 years is a bigger problem I think.

aniket1911
24th May 2016, 21:28
And this lady got Nobel Peace Prize in 1991:facepalm:

Prize motivation: "for her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights" Unbelievable!

Ne win was the dictator of Myanmar for many year and committed many atrocities over it's people which led to many people flee from the country and take refuge in India and other neighboring country.

It was aung, who kept on fighting for the freedom despite of being under house arrest. She did deserve noble peace prize.

People change, that's all I can say but she did deserve that awards.

the Great Khan
25th May 2016, 13:47
Did u read the question that street cricketer asked by any chance? He asked if it was a worldwide threat and I explained that it wasn't. Surely even u agree that It's not even close to being a worldwide threat.

And my opinion is hardly the problem. 27000 terror attacks in 15 years is a bigger problem I think.

that correspond to 4 million Muslim dead. So yes it is an international problem as it simplys add's to the grievances and the narrative. To simply say it is not a international issue is ridiculous. Pogroms and genocide are international human rights issues.

anuk
25th May 2016, 14:15
that correspond to 4 million Muslim dead. So yes it is an international problem as it simplys add's to the grievances and the narrative. To simply say it is not a international issue is ridiculous. Pogroms and genocide are international human rights issues.

of course it's a human rights issue but it is localized to burma. imo it's ridiculous to group it along with islamic terror that affects the whole world. ill start believing that it's the case when a buddhist that is not burmese kills a muslim in a country other than burma.

JaDed
25th May 2016, 15:13
Why is Syu Kyi being blamed for this? Does she even have any control over the security apparatus in Myanmar?

She is being blamed for her silence,don't you think if she appealed to her people they would listen?This is beyond atrocious from the woman who was hailed as the great role model during my school time.

Even the right-wing leaders of India such as Advani,Atal Bihari have more of a heart than she does which is saying a lot.

JaDed
25th May 2016, 15:15
Ne win was the dictator of Myanmar for many year and committed many atrocities over it's people which led to many people flee from the country and take refuge in India and other neighboring country.

It was aung, who kept on fighting for the freedom despite of being under house arrest. She did deserve noble peace prize.

People change, that's all I can say but she did deserve that awards.

True she did deserve it then and she deserves to condemned now for she has a lot of say in her country and its still happening but i don't really see the western "progressive" countries condemning her as such.

Spookiewookie
25th May 2016, 16:14
of course it's a human rights issue but it is localized to burma. imo it's ridiculous to group it along with islamic terror that affects the whole world. ill start believing that it's the case when a buddhist that is not burmese kills a muslim in a country other than burma.

Agree - :19: - chalk and cheese - no comparison.

enkidu_
25th May 2016, 16:23
of course it's a human rights issue but it is localized to burma. imo it's ridiculous to group it along with islamic terror that affects the whole world. ill start believing that it's the case when a buddhist that is not burmese kills a muslim in a country other than burma.

There are not dozens of Buddhist countries to begin with, especially with a decent Muslim population.

As per Wiki only 8 countries in the world with +50% Buddhists (there are more Arab countries alone, Arabs themselves making 20% of world's Muslim population), 3 of them with only few millions of individuals. Also whereas there are many countries at 90% or more Muslims, only two in the Buddhic world : Cambodia (96) and Thailand (93 ; where the problem is not so much Islam but a separatist insurgency taking religious tones, like in Kashmir.)

You can't also compare the whole geo political situation (if Saudi Arabia invaded and killed 100 000s of Buddhists in, let's say, Laos, you'd have perhaps a different dynamic. The destruction of the Bamyan Buddha statues in Afghanistan caused problems in that sense.)

anuk
25th May 2016, 16:30
There are not dozens of Buddhist countries to begin with, especially with a decent Muslim population.

As per Wiki only 8 countries in the world with +50% Buddhists, 3 of them with only few millions of individuals. Also whereas there are many countries at 90% or more Muslims, only two in the Buddhic world : Cambodia (96) and Thailand (93 ; where the problem is not so much Islam but a separatist insurgency taking religious tones, like in Kashmir.)

You can't also compare the whole geo political situation (if Saudi Arabia invaded and killed 100 000s of Buddhists in, let's say, Laos, you'd have perhaps a different dynamic. The destruction of the Bamyan Buddha statues in Afghanistan caused problems in that sense.)

what does the majority being buddhist have to do with anything? muslims are not a majority in a lot of countries they go around murdering people in.

also like i said ill continue this discussion when a non burmese buddhist kills a muslim again. until then it's a localized issue for me.

u can try to equate the violent nature of islam to other religions anyway u want but i won't buy it until they start murdering people like islamists. sorry.

enkidu_
25th May 2016, 21:30
what does the majority being buddhist have to do with anything? muslims are not a majority in a lot of countries they go around murdering people in.

also like i said ill continue this discussion when a non burmese buddhist kills a muslim again. until then it's a localized issue for me.

u can try to equate the violent nature of islam to other religions anyway u want but i won't buy it until they start murdering people like islamists. sorry.

I agree that Buddhism is a peaceful religion as compared to Abrahamic theoimperialisms, and perhaps the only peaceful religion in the world as a whole (with Jainism), but you totally missed my point : it has to do with the fact that there are 50+ Muslim majority countries and 8 Buddhist majority countries, and even in these Buddhist, the majority is not as pronounced as in the Muslim countries : so you have less chances of Buddhist violence. That's purely statistical. Not even talking about the whole geo political issue (rise of al Qaida, ISIS, etc are pretty recent phenomenons. In Canada for instance the most gruesome attack in peoples' imagination until recently was done by Sikhs.)

keyser
26th May 2016, 00:13
Terrible state of affairs ,Myanmar's society has somewhat been a disgrace!
I don't agree with this at all. Those of you who are condemning this do you also condemn the signs in Saudia Arabia that do not allow non Muslims in certain areas?

anuk
26th May 2016, 06:13
I agree that Buddhism is a peaceful religion as compared to Abrahamic theoimperialisms, and perhaps the only peaceful religion in the world as a whole (with Jainism), but you totally missed my point : it has to do with the fact that there are 50+ Muslim majority countries and 8 Buddhist majority countries, and even in these Buddhist, the majority is not as pronounced as in the Muslim countries : so you have less chances of Buddhist violence. That's purely statistical. Not even talking about the whole geo political issue (rise of al Qaida, ISIS, etc are pretty recent phenomenons. In Canada for instance the most gruesome attack in peoples' imagination until recently was done by Sikhs.)

i don't get where this majority argument comes from. islamists are minorities in a lot of countries they commit atrocities in. same with christians although the violence is to a much lesser degree.

dayvancowboy
26th May 2016, 09:09
u can try to equate the violent nature of islam to other religions anyway u want but i won't buy it until they start murdering people like islamists. sorry.

Do you even know how involved Buddhism was in the formation of Imperial Japan?

dayvancowboy
26th May 2016, 09:09
I don't agree with this at all. Those of you who are condemning this do you also condemn the signs in Saudia Arabia that do not allow non Muslims in certain areas?

I do, but can't say the rest of the people here as they have trouble condemning any discrimination that Muslim countries engage in.

JaDed
26th May 2016, 09:27
I don't agree with this at all. Those of you who are condemning this do you also condemn the signs in Saudia Arabia that do not allow non Muslims in certain areas?

Check out my posts have always had a dislike for Arab nations and they are not a benchmark in the first place!

anuk
26th May 2016, 10:22
Do you even know how involved Buddhism was in the formation of Imperial Japan?

how does something like that apply to a thread where we are discussing the current situation?

dayvancowboy
26th May 2016, 10:33
how does something like that apply to a thread where we are discussing the current situation?

Do you know how touchy the subject of Japanese colonialism is to Chinese and Koreans? Go make a visit to Nanjing sometime and tell them that Japan's crimes have no relevance to today's world.

anuk
26th May 2016, 11:19
Do you know how touchy the subject of Japanese colonialism is to Chinese and Koreans? Go make a visit to Nanjing sometime and tell them that Japan's crimes have no relevance to today's world.

are they engaging in terror activities now? if not, there is no relevance to this thread.

aniket1911
26th May 2016, 12:42
True she did deserve it then and she deserves to condemned now for she has a lot of say in her country and its still happening but i don't really see the western "progressive" countries condemning her as such.

True. Her anti-muslim disposition is baffling. Some days ago, She was furious after being interviewed by muslim journalist.

dayvancowboy
27th May 2016, 09:51
are they engaging in terror activities now? if not, there is no relevance to this thread.

So you want to pretend that Buddhists are all peaceful and all Muslims are inherently violent? Come on bro, you're just as blind as the Muslims on here who keep insisting that there's no such thing as 'Islamic terrorism'. I used to give you a hard time in the past and I don't want to do that anymore since you have the potential to be levelheaded eventually so I still got hope in you.

Also, your boy Trump wants to let Japan have nuclear weapons so I assure you, China and South Korea won't be worried about Islamic extremism when they have a bigger problem with their former oppressors now gaining nuclear weapons when that happens if Trump wins.

anuk
27th May 2016, 11:40
So you want to pretend that Buddhists are all peaceful and all Muslims are inherently violent? Come on bro, you're just as blind as the Muslims on here who keep insisting that there's no such thing as 'Islamic terrorism'. I used to give you a hard time in the past and I don't want to do that anymore since you have the potential to be levelheaded eventually so I still got hope in you.

Also, your boy Trump wants to let Japan have nuclear weapons so I assure you, China and South Korea won't be worried about Islamic extremism when they have a bigger problem with their former oppressors now gaining nuclear weapons when that happens if Trump wins.


the original argument was whether buddhism was the fastest growing threat to world peace. it clearly is not.

i know i was born buddhist but i'll be the first to admit most of it is made up stuff just like every other religion.

of course buddhists and hindus have been violent in the past. but the majority seem to have evolved to a point where religion is not a huge cause for killing. certainly not to the point where they are the 'fastest growing threat to world peace'. buddhists make up a billion or more of the world population and the only religious killings i've heard of are in burma.

MenInG
27th May 2016, 11:49
The so called leader of freedom could not raise her voice against the murder of Rohinjas deserves only derision from everyone. All other bits are irrelevant.