Instagram



Sohail Speaks Yasir's Blog Fazeer's Focus

User Tag List

Results 1 to 43 of 43
  1. #1
    Debut
    Aug 2009
    Venue
    Chaht keh nechay :)
    Runs
    23,487
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Bat Knocking Guide

    Since a lot of people have questions regarding knocking so I thought I would post one of the best written piece (by James) on knocking (thanks to SalmanK Bhai )

    It's not just about picking out the right bat. You need to make sure that you look after it correctly. Incorrect care and maintenance will lead to reduced performance and a shorter life span for your bat.

    Why & How to get the best performance out of your new bat.

    Almost all new cricket bats require knocking in before use.
    Knocking in is the process of hardening and conditioning the blade's surface. There are two reasons for knocking in; firstly, it protects the bat from cracking as well as increasing its usable life and secondly, it improves the middle of the bat so the middle is bigger and better. The nature of the game of cricket is that a hard ball is propelled at high speed toward the batsman who swings the bat in the attempt of hitting the ball. This contact will cause an insufficiently prepared bat to crack very quickly and therefore have a short life span.

    Cricket bats are pressed in the bat-making workshop using a mechanical press. The mechanical press applies up to two tons per square inch of pressure to the face of the bat through a roller. Willow, in its natural state, is a very soft timber and has to be pressed to form a hard, resilient layer on the surface. Once this has been done, the bat can be shaped.

    The finished bat still needs a final hardening as the mechanical presses are unable to completely protect the bat, or get the perfect performance required from the blade. This requires knocking in by hand with a mallet. Whilst it is possible to prepare a bat solely by pressing, this compresses the wood too deep into the blade which dramatically reduces the performance of the bat. A bat pressed heavily will have a small middle and the ball will not travel as far it would from a bat pressed lightly and knocked in by hand.

    Heavily pressed bats do not break so some firms over press bats to keep their warranty work down. This ruins the middle of the bat and the ball will not 'ping' off the middle as it should. We occasionally get asked to try to improve the middle of over pressed bats - this is a tricky task and not always successful.

    The knocking in process:

    There are different ways of preparing your bat for the knocking in process, but we recommend the following process as repeated trials in bat factories have shown us that this works far better than all other methods.

    Raw linseed oil should be used to moisten the surface of the bat and enable the fibres to become supple. This helps them knit together, thus forming an elastic surface. This is more likely to stretch on impact, rather than crack. Raw linseed is used, as it stays moist for longer than boiled linseed. About a teaspoonful should be applied to the surface of the bat.

    We recommend that oil should be applied once (3 times if not one of our bats) before the process of compressing the face begins. Each coat of oil should be about one teaspoon full. Spread the oil over the face of the bat using your fingers. Spread the leftover linseed oil over the edges and toe of the bat. Let each coat of oil soak in overnight and repeat the process before starting the knocking in with the mallet.

    Knock in Face

    After the oil has been applied, the knocking in process can begin. This should be done using a Hardwood bat mallet. This provides much better performance than a ball mallet and also speeds up the process.

    Start by hitting the middle of the bat just hard enough to create a dent. [This is surprisingly hard]. Hold the bat up to the light to see if you are making a dent.


    Knock in Toe

    Gradually compress the face of the bat around these dents so that the face of the bat is level and you cannot see the initial dents any more. The bottom of the bat toe (the part that is in contact with the ground) should never be hit with the mallet.


    Knock in edge

    The edges require special attention. They need to be rounded off so that the hard new ball cannot damage them too much. The edges should be struck at 45 degrees to the face so that the mallet can compress the willow. Similar to the face make one dent on the edge, and then gradually even out the edge so that the whole surface has a smooth, rounded appearance. The back of the bat should never be touched with the mallet (or the ball).

    If the bat is hit on the edge at 90 degrees to the face, it reduces the width of the bat and is making contact with an area that is not mechanically pressed. This increases the likelihood of cracking and you should not be hitting the ball flush on the edge in any case.

    With a hardwood bat mallet the knocking in process should take between 10 and 15 sessions of about 10 minutes each (it is probably worth doing this for a bit longer if the bat is of different brand to ours).
    Once you have completed this process take the bat into the nets and play a few shots with an old ball. If the bat is showing very deep seam marks then it needs more compressing. One will always get seam marks on the face of the bat; however they should not be too deep.


    General knocking in

    The price of a bat does not have any effect on whether or not it cracks. The best bats are usually more expensive, but liable to crack more than cheaper bats because the willow is often softer.

    Back in the late 1800s the bats were subjected to huge amounts of pressure at the pressing stage to make the willow very hard. If the blade started to show signs of cracking during this process, it was rejected. Linseed oil was very often used to saturate the blade in order to soften the wood, make it more comfortable to use (over pressed bats jar on impact), and get a bit of extra performance out of it. WG Grace would have a few of the junior members of his club using his linseed soaked bats for a season or so before he would deem them ready for use.

    When a bat is pressed very hard, it is very difficult to hit the ball off the square. The thin protective layer of hard (pressed) willow becomes a thick layer that is too deep into the willow. Hard-pressed willow does not have the desired elastic qualities of the soft pressed willow, meaning the ball does not 'ping' off the bat. Some manufacturers over press their bats, as the harder wood does not crack as readily, reducing the need for warranty work. Their bats, however, have very small middles.
    Last edited by Cover Drive; 14th January 2011 at 07:12.

  2. #2
    Debut
    Oct 2010
    Runs
    44,447
    Mentioned
    374 Post(s)
    Tagged
    9 Thread(s)
    Nice, I do most anyway,

  3. #3
    Debut
    Jan 2011
    Venue
    Bahrain
    Runs
    1,566
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Raw linseed oil hi na mill raha ho kahin say tu phir kya kerain? :S

  4. #4
    Debut
    Oct 2009
    Venue
    Germany
    Runs
    17,474
    Mentioned
    915 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AmmarAshraf View Post
    Raw linseed oil hi na mill raha ho kahin say tu phir kya kerain? :S
    Buy GN bat oil easily available.


    جاگن والیاں رجّ کے لٹیا اے،
    سوئے تسیں وی او، سوئے اسیں وی آں۔

  5. #5
    Debut
    Aug 2009
    Venue
    Chaht keh nechay :)
    Runs
    23,487
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yaar AA Bhai use Ebay UK, you will easily find oil there

  6. #6
    Debut
    Jan 2011
    Venue
    Bahrain
    Runs
    1,566
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Abb tu mil bhi gya hai

  7. #7
    Debut
    Mar 2011
    Runs
    192
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    I purchased a CA Y-King 313 today and very happy with it, however as standard, all CA bats come with an anti-scuff sheet. I would like to ask, should I apply to sheet and then oil and knock in the bat or do the reverse??

    Thanks

  8. #8
    Debut
    Sep 2009
    Venue
    Trent Bridge
    Runs
    1,551
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    I'd say oil it lightly and then round off edges and knock in the bat lightly. Apply the scuff sheet after the oil has dried off. After that you can knock in the bat more with scuff sheet on.


    *´¨)
    ¸.•´¸.•*´¨) ¸.•*¨)
    (¸.•´ (¸.• My Highest scorE 115 not Out

  9. #9
    Debut
    Mar 2011
    Runs
    192
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you very much for your reply, I will do that

  10. #10
    Debut
    Aug 2009
    Venue
    Chaht keh nechay :)
    Runs
    23,487
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Don't oil much though It is better to under oil rather than over oiling it

    PS: Welcome to PakPassion, I hope you enjoy your stay here!

    Mind posting a review/pictures of it?

  11. #11
    Debut
    Dec 2011
    Runs
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi CD bhai can you tell me about oiling if the bat is fitted with anti scuff? should i oil the back and how much oil to use in back and how many coats , or should i remove antiscuff ? if so how to remove?

  12. #12
    Debut
    Aug 2009
    Venue
    Chaht keh nechay :)
    Runs
    23,487
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If face has scuff sheet then no need to peel it off to oil the bat, just oil the back lightly (very light coat).

  13. #13
    Debut
    Dec 2011
    Runs
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Need your help CD bhai ...............

    cd bhai.............


    after knocking in the grains are cracking and coming out , is that normal after knocking ?

  14. #14
    Debut
    Aug 2009
    Venue
    Chaht keh nechay :)
    Runs
    23,487
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How much did you knock?

    Bounce a old ball and see if there are seam cracks appearing, if no then your bat is fully knocked.

  15. #15
    Debut
    Jan 2012
    Runs
    394
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After oiling...is it better to put a scuff sheet on and then knock the bat or the other way around?

  16. #16
    Debut
    Jun 2008
    Runs
    10,041
    Mentioned
    315 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    CD bhai are you there? I am going to knock my bat soon as the season is getting closer, par bohot darr aa raha hai. What if it get's hurt?


    Pakistan Zindabad!

  17. #17
    Debut
    Jun 2008
    Runs
    10,041
    Mentioned
    315 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Ok guys, I have started the knocking. However I am very unsure about the knocking of the edges.

    I have knocked the edges as shown in some videos, at a 45 degree angle, but now the edges are "bumpy" and not straight, is this normal?

    And also, am I supposed to knock all the edges up to the handle, or just where the main part of the bat is?


    Pakistan Zindabad!

  18. #18
    Debut
    Apr 2012
    Venue
    Hyderabad,India
    Runs
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi CD bhai and other guys i'm new here ... Wanted to know i just purchased a GM ICON 909 bat from a sports shop in my city....The shopkeeper says The GM bats are ready to play ...No need of Knocking & oiling.......Please tell me should i knock & oil the bat .....or shall the GM bat is Ready to play in the nets ???

  19. #19
    Debut
    Jun 2008
    Runs
    10,041
    Mentioned
    315 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Hi Aditya. I bought a GM Icon 606, and after reading and talking to people here and there I found out that I have to knock the bat for 1-2 hours and then do easy field practice/throwdowns in the nets with good old balls. If the ball does not leaves marks on your bat, then it is ready to play.

    Usually new bats has to be knocked for around 6 hours, but this one only 1-2 hours because of the "pre knocked" in thing. Now this means that it has been pressed extra at the factory, not that some person has been knocking it beforehand for you.

    Also, if your bat comes with that protective sheet (which my did), then don't take it off, and you DON'T have to oil the bat.


    Pakistan Zindabad!

  20. #20
    Debut
    Apr 2012
    Venue
    Hyderabad,India
    Runs
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by anakwalajinn View Post
    Hi Aditya. I bought a GM Icon 606, and after reading and talking to people here and there I found out that I have to knock the bat for 1-2 hours and then do easy field practice/throwdowns in the nets with good old balls. If the ball does not leaves marks on your bat, then it is ready to play.

    Usually new bats has to be knocked for around 6 hours, but this one only 1-2 hours because of the "pre knocked" in thing. Now this means that it has been pressed extra at the factory, not that some person has been knocking it beforehand for you.

    Also, if your bat comes with that protective sheet (which my did), then don't take it off, and you DON'T have to oil the bat.
    Thank you so much for your advice bro and for knocking process will use quality SG tournament old ball in the nets....cheerss

  21. #21
    Debut
    May 2012
    Runs
    7,637
    Mentioned
    127 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks..


    World Cup Champions and Champions of Champions

    MS Dhoni - Greatest Captain ever

  22. #22
    Debut
    Dec 2012
    Runs
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi guys, I have just bought an AS V12 bat and need some guidance on preparing it. As per the guide, I am going to apply 3 coats of oil and then will knock in for 3-4 hours.

    The question is that should I then apply a scuff sheet or not. I actually prefer not because I like naked grains. So essentially just want to confirm that not applying a scuff sheet is ok.

    Your expert advice (specially by Mr Cover Drive) will be highly appreciated.

    Thanks and regards,

    Ozcfa
    Brisbane, Australia

  23. #23
    Debut
    Apr 2013
    Runs
    20
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not trying to crack a nut here... However, thought of raising this point for the experts to shower information.

    > I believe that the knocking in / preparation process has to be different for each make of the bat.

    > A broad lever classification would be between English made bats VS Asian made bats

    > Between Hard pressed bats VS Soft pressed bats

    > Ready to Play - fully Knocked - ready to use VS no manufacturer preparation bats

  24. #24
    Debut
    Feb 2013
    Runs
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    should i oil my mb sher amin

  25. #25
    Debut
    May 2013
    Runs
    20
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Is it ok to oil after knocking the bat?

  26. #26
    Debut
    Jun 2013
    Runs
    4,436
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    this is a useful thread .

  27. #27
    Debut
    Aug 2006
    Runs
    283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Help.

    Scenario 1: Apply 2 very light coats of oil. Knock cricket bat in. Then apply scuff sheet

    Scenario 2: Apply scuff sheet, then knock cricket bat in.

    Question: Which knocks the bat in better? Thanks

  28. #28
    Debut
    Jan 2014
    Runs
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Knocking in the edges is best done with a wooden rolling pin to slightly round off edges

  29. #29
    Debut
    Jan 2014
    Runs
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    roll the bat edges along rolling pin which is on the floor

  30. #30
    Debut
    Aug 2006
    Runs
    2,673
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am looking to buy bat from New York
    Any guidance in terms of store and what to buy is appreciated
    I know there is SA Sports, Biddessi and Singh sports in the city

  31. #31
    Debut
    Aug 2013
    Runs
    8,182
    Mentioned
    276 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    How do you knock the bat edges


    "Life is Pain"
    ~House~

  32. #32
    Debut
    Nov 2014
    Runs
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    go nawaz go

  33. #33
    Debut
    Jul 2015
    Venue
    ACKLETON
    Runs
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Knocking in your Cricket bat is an essential part of its preparation. Even if you have purchased a "pre knocked in" bat, further knocking is always required. Below is a step by step guide to knocking in.

    Apply Raw linseed oil to the face, edges and back of the bat evenly, 2 to 3 teaspoons of oil is the correct amount. Whilst oiling take care not to oil the splice (where the handle fits into the blade), handle or labelled areas, also take great care not to over oil the bat as this will deaden the fibres of the timber and affect performance.

    Leave the bat horizontal and face up to dry for 24 hours.

    If you are planning to use the bat in its natural state, without an anti scuff sheet, then repeat steps 1 and 2 twice more. If you are planning to have a protective anti scuff sheet fitted then one initial coat of oil is sufficient.

    Wipe off any excess oil and knock in your bat with a specialist bat mallet for approximately 4 hours. The edges and toe of the blade require particular attention using glancing blows off the face to harden and round these areas. Particular care and attention should be made not to hit the edges, toe or back of the bat directly as this will cause damage. The knocking in should be performed with gradual increasing force, but never too hard to cause damage.

    Fibre tape is applied to the edges of the bat and an Anti scuff sheet is fitted over the top if required. We strongly recommend this procedure.

    Test the blade using a good quality old ball during a light net session or having "throw downs". If seam marks and indentations occur further knocking in is required.

    Go out and enjoy your new bat!

  34. #34
    Debut
    Sep 2016
    Runs
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi, Just Bought new mb malik bat and wanted to know if I have to oil my new bat and have to knock with mallet? No stupid jokes.

  35. #35
    Debut
    Apr 2015
    Venue
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Runs
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Asme10 View Post
    Hi, Just Bought new mb malik bat and wanted to know if I have to oil my new bat and have to knock with mallet? No stupid jokes.
    Yes. You must do it. If done correctly, it will increase the life of the bat as well as improve the output. Just read and follow the previous post carefully.

  36. #36
    Debut
    Sep 2016
    Runs
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    But I have asked some sports shop owners they said no need for knocking and oiling because it's only worth 7k Pkr Bat.They said knocking and oiling is for A++ bats which costs about minimum 30k you just do some knocking in the nets now please tell me should I oil my bat? And what about knocking with the mallet or its ok to knock in nets thanks.

  37. #37
    Debut
    Apr 2015
    Venue
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Runs
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well. Most of the bats these days comes pre oiled and pre knocked. But I can talk here with respect to Pakistani bats only. Don't ever believe anyone neither in person nor the bat stickers "pre-knocked" or "ready to play ". You are talking about 7K, I never use even 3K bats in matches directly. I am actually captain of my club for 6th season and also take cares of the team equipments. We have here bats provided by team management and each bat is being used by multiple players. So you can safely go with my advice.

    Talking technically, the bats these days are softly pressed to gain maximum profile and wonderful stroke quality. However it reduces the bat life. Another point is feather weight big profile bats. The moisture in the bat is reduced to minimum to acheive that. Again it produces feather weight but mostly reduces the possible life span. To gain an optimum result, you should oil the bat at least once. To gain optimum result you should knock the bats as well. Knocking will actually lightly presses the bat face, and also prepare other parts of bat to perform better other than the middle. In short, increses the sweet area.

    You should oil your bats lightly 1-3 times.
    Never over-oil. Multiple under oil coatings have produced better results for me.
    Oil whole bat other then the handle and the part connecting handle with face.
    Use wooden mallet for knocking.
    Always knock the edges round using around 60p degrees of angle.
    Then knock the bat starting lightly.
    You will know now which part of bat face needs a little more focus.
    Gradually increase the power but dont focus on bats middle sweet spot much.
    Once done enough knocking, time to goto nets and use old balls.
    Check the bat face after net. If still the ball marks (not color) the wood then you need to knock more.
    Now your bat is really ready to play.

    Hope it helps.

    Khurram

  38. #38
    Debut
    Apr 2015
    Venue
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Runs
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Asme10 View Post
    But I have asked some sports shop owners they said no need for knocking and oiling because it's only worth 7k Pkr Bat.They said knocking and oiling is for A++ bats ....
    Well, who wouldn't like low price customers to return and buy more often?

  39. #39
    Debut
    Sep 2016
    Runs
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oiled my cricket bat and left my bat on roof in afternoon but my bat got wet in rain what to do now I think face is rough now help please!!

  40. #40
    Debut
    May 2005
    Runs
    16,958
    Mentioned
    97 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Stick it somewhere dry for a few days and hope for the best

  41. #41
    Debut
    Apr 2015
    Venue
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Runs
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In that case, the first thing is to dry it immediately. If the wood hasn't swelled, it's still in playing condition.

    Otherwise, you can do whatever you want with it, like, use it as fuel in bar-b-que, save it as memory, etc.

    I hope the later is not the case.

  42. #42
    Debut
    Sep 2016
    Runs
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Haha thanks for your kind words but now my bat is all right lol. I used sandpaper on my bat..

  43. #43
    Debut
    Apr 2015
    Venue
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Runs
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Really glad to know that. I wasn't that lucky when I was young. And it was a big big loss when you are a student.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •