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    The World's Newest Nation: South Sudan

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/10/wo...gewanted=print
    July 9, 2011
    After Years of Struggle, South Sudan Becomes a New Nation
    By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
    JUBA, South Sudan — The celebrations erupted at midnight. Thousands of revelers poured into Juba’s steamy streets in the predawn hours on Saturday, hoisting enormous flags, singing, dancing and leaping on the back of cars.

    “Freedom!” they screamed.

    A new nation was being born in what used to be a forlorn, war-racked patch of Africa, and to many it seemed nothing short of miraculous. After more than five decades of an underdog, guerrilla struggle and two million lives lost, the Republic of South Sudan, Africa’s 54th state, was about to declare its independence in front of a who’s who of Africa, including the president of the country letting it go: Omar Hassan al-Bashir of Sudan, a war-crimes suspect.

    Many of those who turned out to celebrate, overcome with emotion, spoke of their fathers, mothers, sons and daughters killed in the long struggle to break free from the Arab-dominated north.

    “My whole body feels happy,” said George Garang, an English teacher who lost his father, grandfather and 11 brothers in the war.

    By sunrise, the crowds were surging through the streets of Juba, the capital, to the government quarter, where the declaration of independence would be read aloud. Thousands of soldiers lined the freshly painted curbs, tiger patches on their arms, assault rifles in their hands. This new nation is being built on a guerrilla army — the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, whose field commanders are now South Sudan’s political leaders — and the amount of firepower here is unnerving.

    By 9 a.m., the sun was dangerous. The faces, necks and arms of the people packed thousands deep around a parade stand built for the occasion were glazed with sweat. A woman abruptly slumped to the dirt and was whisked away.

    “She fainted because she’s happy,” said a man in the crowd. “There will be many others today.”

    In a column of black polished steel, one brand-new Mercedes after another, came the African leaders: Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s president; Jacob Zuma, South Africa’s; Meles Zenawi, prime minister of Ethiopia; Teodoro Obiang, Equatorial Guinea’s president and chairman of the African Union; Mwai Kibaki, Kenya’s president; and Yoweri Museveni, president of Uganda, among others.

    But, almost inexplicably, Mr. Bashir, who for years prosecuted a vicious war to keep the south from splitting off and to prevent this very day from happening, drew the loudest burst of applause when his motorcade rolled in.

    “It is not happiness,” explained Daniel Atem, dressed in a suit and tie for the occasion, a miniflag flying from his lapel. “If you are talking to your enemy, you cannot say, You are bad.” But, he added, “you know what is in your heart.”

    From the mid-1950s, even before Sudan shook off its colonial yoke in 1956, the southern Sudanese were chafing for more rights. Sudan had an unusually clear fault line, reinforced by British colonizers, with the southern third mostly animist and Christian and the northern part majority Muslim and long dominated by Arabs.

    The southern struggle blew up into a full-fledged rebellion in the 1960s and then again in the 1980s, and the Sudanese government responded brutally, bombing villages and unleashing Arab militias that massacred civilians and enslaved southern Sudanese children. Many of the same scorched-earth tactics associated with the crisis in Darfur, in Sudan’s west, in the mid-2000s, were tried and tested long before that here in southern Sudan. (The International Criminal Court has indicted Mr. Bashir on genocide charges for the Darfur massacres.)

    The central government also sowed divisions among the southerners, turning ethnic groups against one another. Some of the most unspeakable violence, like the Bor massacre in 1991 when toddlers were impaled on fence posts, was internecine.

    Christian groups had been championing the southern Sudanese since the 19th century. And their efforts paid off in 2000 when George W. Bush was elected president of the United States. He elevated Sudan to near the top of his foreign policy agenda, and in 2005, the American government pushed the southern rebels and the central government — both war weary and locked in a military stalemate — to sign a comprehensive peace agreement that guaranteed the southerners the right to secede.

    On Saturday, one man held up a sign that said “Thank You George Bush.”

    The American-backed treaty set the stage for a referendum this January in which southerners voted by 98.8 percent for independence.

    At 1:20 p.m. on Saturday, the southerners officially proclaimed their freedom.

    “Recalling the long and heroic struggle of our people,” began the legislative speaker, James Wani Igga.

    A few minutes later, the flag of Sudan was lowered and the new South Sudan flag (actually quite similar, plus a star) was raised. The masses exploded in one loud roar.

    “Mabrook Janoob Sudan!” they yelled. “Congratulations South Sudan!”

    South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, wearing his signature black cowboy hat given to him by Mr. Bush, signed the interim Constitution. Then the speeches began.

    “This is a beautiful day for Africa,” said Joseph Deiss, president of the United Nations General Assembly. “This is a remarkable achievement, a longstanding conflict has been stopped.”

    Perhaps. But South Sudan — Texas-size and with about eight million people — is already plagued by ethnic tensions and rebellions. More than a half-dozen renegade groups are battling the government, some with thousands of fighters. And relations with the north are still dicey. Negotiators have yet to agree on a formula to split the revenue from the south’s oilfields, which have kept the economies of both southern and northern Sudan afloat. And Mr. Bashir’s army has been pounding southern-allied rebels who have refusing to disarm just north of the border in the Nuba Mountains, which some analysts worry could drag the whole region back into a full-scale war.

    This is why Mr. Bashir’s presence here was such a curiosity. He did sign the peace agreement in 2005, and many southerners, however mixed their feelings are, are grateful to him for that.

    He seemed in a magnanimous mood on Saturday.

    “This moment came through peace,” Mr. Bashir said. “We must respect it.”

    He even thanked the United Nations for its hard work and said he wanted to bring peace to Darfur, though he did slip in, “Sudan’s unity would have been better,” but “I convinced myself that unity shouldn’t be through war.”

    Mr. Kiir then shared a few words.

    “We have waited for more than 56 years for this,” he said. “It is a dream that has come true.”

    “This land has seen untold suffering and death,” he added, somberly. “We have been bombed enslaved and treated worse than a refugee in our own country. We have to forgive, though we will not forget.”

    The independence ceremony then wrapped up much in the way the struggle began: with a barrage of very loud cannon shots. The crowd pumped their fists in the air and hollered, “South Sudan, oh yay!”

    Josh Kron contributed reporting.
    Discuss.

  2. #2
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    Badhai chaiman

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    The South Sudanese rely heavily on the oil revenues,some of said oil passes through the North. Clean drinking water is scarce and literacy rates are low - primary school education is not easily accessible.

    Some big decisions are to be made for the newcomers.
    Last edited by Markhor; 9th July 2011 at 20:07.

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    Congratulations to the people!

    btw, is it a theocracy (islamic state) or a secular one? ..just curious

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aly View Post
    Congratulations to the people!

    btw, is it a theocracy (islamic state) or a secular one? ..just curious
    i thought the ones in South were Christian?
    Or is it the other way around?

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    Quote Originally Posted by nish_mate View Post
    i thought the ones in South were Christian?
    Or is it the other way around?
    must be christians then, dont know much about sudan myself, all i know is that there are many muslims living there and even osama took refuge there for a while

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    The South is mostly Christian.

    The North consists of mainly Arab Muslims.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markhor View Post
    The South is mostly Christian.

    The North consists of mainly Arab Muslims.
    The south consists of oil, gold, diamonda and other resources.

    The North consists of: Sand

    Very unfortunate

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    When will we Muslims understand ....

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    Quote Originally Posted by poisonjet View Post
    When will we Muslims understand ....
    This is destined to happen till the army takes of from: Khorasan

    Muslims are yet to see more harder times.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIMBA View Post
    This is destined to happen till the army takes of from: Khorasan

    Muslims are yet to see more harder times.
    its really frustrating , its like either u do what u r supposed to do when being subjected to suppression .. or u dont even utter a word , turn a blind eye , cover ur ears , eyes . Most of the Muslims have taken the later as a choice .

    anyways .... Thats why we have employed Special units of Revolutionary Guards all over the khorasan region ..... so when the time comes ...

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    ^^but if u do the first one..............they call u terrorists/taliban

    aur ooper se garmi bari hai to inqilaab kaisay aye ga :zohairtoru

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    http://www.pakpassion.net/ppforum/sh...d.php?t=132431

    Beware Pakistan.

    The Caliph Ali (RA) narrated as follows: "I heard the Holy Prophet (Sallal Laahu Alaihi Wasallam) as saying that as the Day of Qiyamah approaches there will appear a group of youths with a low mental capacity and understanding, apparently they will talk of good but their Imaan will not go beyond their throat and they will leave the true Deen like an arrow leaves the prey. Wherever you find them, you should make Jihad with them." (Sahih Bukhari pp/1024)

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    Good for them. North Sudan had it coming for being very oppressive to the Christian south and using their resources without developing the South.

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    Congrats! Its all good and well creating a new nation but i hope they dont go the way of some of the other african countries, where war, disease, corruption and famine is rife


    If pakistan cricket is to move forward they need to stop going back

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markhor View Post
    The South is mostly Christian.
    I read it has mainly tribal religions, with a Christian minority.

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    Source was the demographics section of South Sudan's Wikipedia page.Dont know how reliable it is but one thing that stands out is how many languages they have !

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    Quote Originally Posted by poisonjet View Post
    When will we Muslims understand ....
    in 2030


    pak sar zameen zindabad

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    i can understand peoples need for apparent liberty and freedom but ive never been a fan of splitting countries into small economiccaly unviable territories on sectarian lines.

    altho bashirs rule is oppressive and quite discrimanatory against the african southerners i dont see how south sudan can be a viable country, most likely it will become another african basket case.

    also i dont see bashir not being tempted to creating instability in the south, i see some form of attritional conflict as the most obvious outcome.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    i can understand peoples need for apparent liberty and freedom but ive never been a fan of splitting countries into small economiccaly unviable territories on sectarian lines.

    altho bashirs rule is oppressive and quite discrimanatory against the african southerners i dont see how south sudan can be a viable country, most likely it will become another african basket case.

    also i dont see bashir not being tempted to creating instability in the south, i see some form of attritional conflict as the most obvious outcome.

    People said the same about Pakistan didn't they however decades later you're still alive and kicking?

    Sometimes different communities just cannot live with each other in peace and splitting up larger nations is the only solution.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stylish Executive View Post
    http://www.pakpassion.net/ppforum/sh...d.php?t=132431

    Beware Pakistan.

    The Caliph Ali (RA) narrated as follows: "I heard the Holy Prophet (Sallal Laahu Alaihi Wasallam) as saying that as the Day of Qiyamah approaches there will appear a group of youths with a low mental capacity and understanding, apparently they will talk of good but their Imaan will not go beyond their throat and they will leave the true Deen like an arrow leaves the prey. Wherever you find them, you should make Jihad with them." (Sahih Bukhari pp/1024)
    These are the Khawarij that arise through history from the time of Hazrat Ali, to the Hashasheen, to the modern day Al Qaida and co, Note this does not include the Taliban who were a legitimate Government who have been unjustly represented by those who had no authority to displace them in the first place so as to hide their own crimes

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    People said the same about Pakistan didn't they however decades later you're still alive and kicking?

    Sometimes different communities just cannot live with each other in peace and splitting up larger nations is the only solution.
    yes that is true, however if you jusdge objectivaly it is obvious you cannot compare pakistans geography and resources to those of south sudan.

    pakistan had fairly abundant natural resources for its own requirements at independence, apart from oil we had pretty much everything we needed.

    from what i see of sudan, and what i have heard of pakistan in 47, the level of poverty in modern south sudan is higher than that of pakistan in 47, south sudan is also susceptible (spelling?) to famine due to droughts and not very fertile land. pakistan historically never had a problem with feeding its people.

    majority of south sudans income will rely on oil in the north of the country, oil which is pipelined through northern sudan. i dont think they will make any easy deals with the south.

    south sudan is land locked, if its neighbours decide they dont want to play ball, in terms of trading globally south sudan will be trapped, pakistan has always had access to an ocean, and before '71, had geographically varied ports from where it could trade.

    lastly i have no doubt the government of the new south will be corrupt and exploititive, you can say im being prejudiced or whatever but that is my own view.

    Your reply highlights the point i was trying to make, unless you can see a economically viable way to run a country with trustworthy leadership i dont see the point in splitting up a country. This process should have taken 10 or 15 years imo, first through federalisation, then proper autonomisation (i dont know if thats a word, but you get the idea), and then gradually to independence.

    even in 1947 pakistan and india were created in a haphazard and rushed manner costing millions of lives, but that is a topic for another discussion.

    i hope i am proved wrong and south sudan does become economically viable and prosper, but i cant see how that would happen. good luck to them anyway.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingkash786 View Post
    These are the Khawarij that arise through history from the time of Hazrat Ali, to the Hashasheen, to the modern day Al Qaida and co, Note this does not include the Taliban who were a legitimate Government who have been unjustly represented by those who had no authority to displace them in the first place so as to hide their own crimes
    What or who are the Khwarij?
    What are their signs?



  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    yes that is true, however if you jusdge objectivaly it is obvious you cannot compare pakistans geography and resources to those of south sudan.

    pakistan had fairly abundant natural resources for its own requirements at independence, apart from oil we had pretty much everything we needed.

    from what i see of sudan, and what i have heard of pakistan in 47, the level of poverty in modern south sudan is higher than that of pakistan in 47, south sudan is also susceptible (spelling?) to famine due to droughts and not very fertile land. pakistan historically never had a problem with feeding its people.

    majority of south sudans income will rely on oil in the north of the country, oil which is pipelined through northern sudan. i dont think they will make any easy deals with the south.

    south sudan is land locked, if its neighbours decide they dont want to play ball, in terms of trading globally south sudan will be trapped, pakistan has always had access to an ocean, and before '71, had geographically varied ports from where it could trade.

    lastly i have no doubt the government of the new south will be corrupt and exploititive, you can say im being prejudiced or whatever but that is my own view.

    Your reply highlights the point i was trying to make, unless you can see a economically viable way to run a country with trustworthy leadership i dont see the point in splitting up a country. This process should have taken 10 or 15 years imo, first through federalisation, then proper autonomisation (i dont know if thats a word, but you get the idea), and then gradually to independence.

    even in 1947 pakistan and india were created in a haphazard and rushed manner costing millions of lives, but that is a topic for another discussion.

    i hope i am proved wrong and south sudan does become economically viable and prosper, but i cant see how that would happen. good luck to them anyway.

    Bangladesh during independence had hardly any natural resources either (barring naural gas), most industries destroyed, no communication structure to talk about. No leaders with experience of running a country. A country only better than ethiopia in per capita GDP. Relied on 85% + aid for its budget implementation. Most intellectuals martyred... And after 40 years we think we are a happier nation than the one we broke from!!!! Sudan shall also survive...

  25. #25
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    Things are not looking good for South Sudan as political and ethnic violence have killed thousands in only a few weeks.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-25511595

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    Considering Africa its the norm unfotunately.

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    Pakistan should help them.

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    The world's newest country marks the fifth anniversary of its independence today.

    S Sudan: More than 100 dead on independence anniversary
    Scores of soldiers reported to be dead after fighting erupts in Juba, with fears growing of a return to all-out war.

    At least 115 soldiers from different armed factions in South Sudan have died after gun battles broke out across the capital Juba on the eve of the country's fifth independence anniversary, according to reports.

    The fighting on Friday began outside the presidential compound as President Salva Kiir was meeting with first vice president and former rebel leader Riek Machar and soon spread through the city.

    An Al Jazeera correspondent later saw bodies of soldiers on the lawn in the compound.

    William Gatjiath Deng, spokesman for Machar's military faction, said the fighting had occurred near the state house and in army barracks.

    "In the morning we collected and counted 35 (dead) from the SPLM-IO (Machar's faction) and 80 people from the government forces," he was quoted as saying by the Reuters news agency on Saturday.

    Local broadcaster Radio Tamazuj put the number of total deaths to 146.

    South Sudan was founded with celebrations in the capital on July 9, 2011, after it gained independence from Sudan in a referendum that passed with close to 100 percent of the vote.

    READ MORE: South Sudan cancels independence celebrations

    The majority of the bodies the hospital were soldiers, the doctor said speaking on condition of anonymity because he feared for his safety.

    Rivals Kiir and Machar appealed for calm as fears grew in Juba of a return to civil war. Many people, worried for their safety, stayed indoors on Saturday and the streets were almost deserted except for soldiers.

    Al Jazeera's John Hendren, reporting from Juba, said: "You don't see a lot of people on the streets here. UN Peacekeepers believe it's too unsafe. The people of Juba are in a very, very unstable situation."

    Nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, which our correspondent said were "long and sustained".

    He said: "I don't think it's possible to overstate the potential impact of the attack on the government compound. This was an effort to topple that government."

    'Running for safety'

    Gunfire continued into the night on Friday outside a UN base in Juba sheltering more than 25,000 people.

    Budbud Chol, who oversees security at a clinic inside the base, said on Saturday they had received about 40 people wounded by gunfire, all but three of them men.

    "They are still coming up to now. All of them are gunshot," Chol said.

    Chol said many of the wounded were hit in crossfire outside the UN base. One woman was hit by a stray bullet inside the base.

    The latest series of violence began on Thursday night with fighting between opposing army factions who are supposed to be carrying out joint patrols under a fragile peace deal reached last year.

    That shooting, which killed five soldiers, was similar to the skirmish between soldiers in Juba in December 2013 that led to the civil war in which tens of thousands of people were killed.

    "Thousands of people started running for safety," Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa reported from a refugee camp in Wau. "Many have ended up here at this UN makeshift camp."

    WATCH: Al Jazeera talks to Salva Kiir and Riek Machar

    Wau is one of South Sudan's biggest cities.

    "About 19,000 people were in this camp. We're told that 4,000 more people have arrived here," Mutasa said. "Most of the IDPs here are women, children and the elderly ... they fear the peace deal could unravel and because they were so scared, they left their homes."

    Thousands of others were taking shelter in a church and school in Wau, with many others hiding in the bush.

    Andrew Gethi of the International Organisation for Migration told Al Jazeera: "We cannot rule out more people coming in because 8 million people are insecure in the country ... We're currently engaged in expanding the camp. Currently, there are just 2.7 square metres per person - this is way below the standard. We want to make it at least 3.5 square metres per person."




    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/0...090438275.html

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    Wow, those are some depressing statistics right there.


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    Hows the North faring in comparison?

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    Some things are just messed up.

    So many hopeless countries in the world.

    It will take another 50 years for them to be (hopefully) stable.


    I am not one of you. I never was. I am not one of them either.

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    Things are dire in South Sudan. While they are asking others to feed their starving population they are wasting money on arms.

    The government of South Sudan is spending its oil revenue on weapons, even as the country descends into a famine largely caused by Juba's military operations, according to a confidential United Nations report.

    The report by a panel of experts, whose findings were dismissed by South Sudan's government, calls for an arms embargo on the country - a measure rejected by the Security Council during a vote in December.
    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/www.alj...200215330.html

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    And to buy more weopons and no doubt line their own pockets the leaders of South Sudan are trying to rob aid workers.

    Aid agencies say they are urgently seeking clarity from the South Sudanese government after it signalled that it would ramp up the cost of work permits for foreign aid workers, days after a famine was declared in the country.

    Aid groups said the move by the labour ministry to increase the cost of permits from $100 to up to $10,000 (£8,230) was “terrible timing” in a country where 100,000 people are starving and a further 1 million are on the brink of starvation.
    https://www.theguardian.com/global-d...es-aid-workers

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