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  1. #2081
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    Even 64k pounds is a lot of money. Does that money Desmond Tutu is only after money too?

  2. #2082
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    Even 64k pounds is a lot of money. Does that money Desmond Tutu is only after money too?
    The thread is not about Tutu, feel free to start one and I will give my opinion if you really want to read it.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  3. #2083
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    @KingKhanWC Malala is a Brummie now, thou shall not intentionally criticise a fellow Bear; it's the 11th Commandment


    Ah, so this is what it feels like

  4. #2084
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaz619 View Post
    @KingKhanWC Malala is a Brummie now, thou shall not intentionally criticise a fellow Bear; it's the 11th Commandment
    Ha , we are very welcoming to all.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  5. #2085
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    Ha , we are very welcoming to all.
    She opened the library on broad street as well I was going past it today and thinking what kind of library closes at 5pm ! it would have been nice if they used all the money from the cuts made to the rubbish collectors to pay the staff at the library a few quid to stay on a bit longer

    The old one am pretty sure was open longer then 5pm although it may not have required as much maintenance. In the end who cares about a fancy looking building, because people need to revise and read books which is the main thing; all that extra space for nothing
    Last edited by shaz619; 11th October 2017 at 20:55.


    Ah, so this is what it feels like

  6. #2086
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    The thread is not about Tutu, feel free to start one and I will give my opinion if you really want to read it.
    Charging money in itself is not an issue especially if speaking at for-profit organizations.

  7. #2087
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    Once again bro, you've no idea about the stuff I did in 12th Grade so stop being personal, alright.

    Why can't I have the audacity to ask another Pakistani to help her own countrymen before settling abroad and sending this "bechaari" image of hers throughout the world? Pakistan was the country that gave her an identity (otherwise, who knows, she would've been another "Rohingya massacre" news story) therefore it is her duty to serve her nation 1st and foremost.

    Its not personal. You're talking as if I'm cursing Malala for going to Cambridge. I'm criticising the Ivy League unis for not being transparent enough.
    Are you seriously contemplating why Oxford preferred to give Malala admission over you?

    I don't know you personally so I won't pass any judgments. You might have done some great stuff in college, but whatever you did, it is clearly not comparable to what Malala has achieved because you are not renowned and recognized all over the world, you do not meet political and global leaders every month and you are not amongst the most influential and inspiring people in the world today.

    Malala is all those things and every single institute in the world will give her admission over me and you even if our grades are superior.

    Think from Oxford's perspective: would you rather have Malala, who quite likely to be PM of Pakistan one day or a global leader in some capacity at least, as your alumni or Mamoon or Hadi Rizvi who have no international standing and global appeal?

    It is not always about the grades, and in Malala's case, she can walk into any top university in the world with C and D grades. I am sure she probably didn't even need to submit an application and admission form to Oxford, and for good reason. She is not an ordinary person, and to be ranked amongst the most influential people in the world in your teens and show resolve after getting shot in the face by terrorists takes a lot of guts which vast majority of the people do not have.

  8. #2088
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaz619 View Post
    @KingKhanWC Malala is a Brummie now, thou shall not intentionally criticise a fellow Bear; it's the 11th Commandment
    I think this is the right way to view Malala now. She fought a brave public fight for female education in some tribal areas of Pakistan and was understandably used in the propaganda war when the war against the Taliban was at it's height. Her job is done, hopefully that has meant that those areas can share the same rights to female education that was already available in most cities in Pakistan. Now she should be free to make her life over here and live it how she pleases.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  9. #2089
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    I think this is the right way to view Malala now. She fought a brave public fight for female education in some tribal areas of Pakistan and was understandably used in the propaganda war when the war against the Taliban was at it's height. Her job is done, hopefully that has meant that those areas can share the same rights to female education that was already available in most cities in Pakistan. Now she should be free to make her life over here and live it how she pleases.
    Pakistani's expect too much from her, they should worry more about politicians in their country which are directly responsible for policy or those who potentially could be in that position one day e.g opposition parties.


    Ah, so this is what it feels like

  10. #2090
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaz619 View Post
    Pakistani's expect too much from her, they should worry more about politicians in their country which are directly responsible for policy or those who potentially could be in that position one day e.g opposition parties.
    I wouldn't have thought Pakistanis actually living in Pakistan really discuss her too much now, this thread was more than likely bumped by an ex-pat or some other nationality. But if they are still talking about her in Pakistan, yeah they need to worry about what's going on in their own country rather than what's happening over here.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  11. #2091
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    I wondered why people don't like Malala, especially some Pakistanis. One Pakistani replied to me that what she did was brave but she goes around the world preaching this " false image ". Someone who chooses bits and pieces and you can see is clearly not 100% genuine. She advocates woman's rights but at the same time portrays a negative picture of Islam. That is one opinion some share of her.

  12. #2092
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    Pakistanis hate those who point out their deficiencies and weaknesses. They hate the one who shows them the mirror.


    Sehwag and Steyn are the Best.

  13. #2093
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    Quote Originally Posted by saeedhk View Post
    Pakistanis hate those who point out their deficiencies and weaknesses. They hate the one who shows them the mirror.
    True but that can be said about most groups of people. If anything, it should motivate them to fix their weaknesses.

  14. #2094
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    Quote Originally Posted by sshakir411 View Post
    I'm not getting personal. Doing stuff in Grade 12 is not enough...this is my point. If despite your amazing grades and "stuff" you've been doing, you're unable to figure out why you didn't make it, then I think you don't belong there. Again, no offense. [1]

    A good first step would be to take a look at your competition at these schools and how your profile relates to them. Trust me, you're not making a strong case for yourself with your reasoning here.

    Why should any Pakistani help others before helping herself? Do you have any idea how nonsensical that sounds. Any person would choose to make their life better first and then do what they can to help others. Are you forgetting what happened to her in Pakistan? Sounds like you have an issue that she chose to get an immigration...why does that even matter? The country that gave her an identity also gave her bullets in her head and a life full of fear. [2] Do you honestly think Malala wouldn't be a target again? [3]

    I think it's absolutely PATHETIC of you to say it's her duty to serve her nation first. What in the actual HELL have you ever done to serve your nation? And what gives you a right to tell anyone that they should serve their nation before they serve themselves? [4]

    Pakistanis are a cursed community and the opinions on Malala are a clear example why we don't belong in the civilized world. Thanks for the debate, I wish you a lot of luck for your future. You will need it. [5]
    [1] Mate, please stop with the guess work which is very clear from your 1st paragraph.

    [2]Pathetic. Absolutely pathetic. How could you blame your country for the state its in right now when its very clear that the people running it are incompetent and solely responsible for it.

    [3] Two words. Benazir Bhutto. Ring a bell? She's also the inspiration for Malala. I don't think I need to say anymore, do I? As for those who are talking about Malala's "balls of steel", anyone can criticise any terrorist group or organization (present in the East) while sitting in their new home in the West and then claim "balls of steel".

    [4]Mate, have you EVER been to a citizenship awarding ceremony? Do you know what they say in the oath? Better check it out before talking about this point again.

    [5]True dat because we value those who aren't worthy while those who are worthy are ignored and neglected until they die.

    Few more points and they're directed to everyone who's on this topic:

    a) Since when did something as simple as speaking up for your rights become such a huge act of "courage and bravery" that you're sent to UN to give speeches and meet world leaders while achieving nothing at all with regards to whatever you spoke out for IN YOUR OWN NEIGHBOURHOOD.

    b) Let's just consider this scenario:
    What if Malala was treated successfully in Pakistan and gone back home and still held the same stance in the face of the Taliban in Swat? Now compare this to what actually happened. What would you, as a logical human being, consider "bravery and courage" among both these scenarios?

    c)According to @Mamoon, the top universities would always prefer to have alumni who have international fame/recognition etc etc. Since when did "fame and recognition" become the criteria for getting the best possible facilities and quality of education in the world? Is it fair? I thought hard work was the key to success, wasn't it? This was my point in my 1st post about Malala's Oxford admission. What about all those students who've worked hard all their academic lives and been active in every extra-curricular activity available yet preference is given to a select few in the world because of international fame/recognition? I have no idea of how to justify this claim. Again, most posters will call me a cry baby but hey, when you've put in the hard yards and you've gotten the required results and you've achieved all those awards and certificates but you're still not considered because of a lack of fame/recognition then there is nothing more demoralizing/disheartening than that.

    d)Yes, Malala spoke up for a great cause; yes she was very young when she did all this; yes she was resolute in her path but was it the bullet which made her what she is today? I certainly feel so and I'm sure most other posters will too.

    The Malala I criticise is not that young girl who was speaking for her rights at such a young age.

    The Malala I criticise is the one who, after getting shot, never looked back at fellow countrymen and children who suffer to this day from the exact circumstances that she stood up against.

  15. #2095
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    [1] Mate, please stop with the guess work which is very clear from your 1st paragraph.

    [2]Pathetic. Absolutely pathetic. How could you blame your country for the state its in right now when its very clear that the people running it are incompetent and solely responsible for it.

    [3] Two words. Benazir Bhutto. Ring a bell? She's also the inspiration for Malala. I don't think I need to say anymore, do I? As for those who are talking about Malala's "balls of steel", anyone can criticise any terrorist group or organization (present in the East) while sitting in their new home in the West and then claim "balls of steel".

    [4]Mate, have you EVER been to a citizenship awarding ceremony? Do you know what they say in the oath? Better check it out before talking about this point again.

    [5]True dat because we value those who aren't worthy while those who are worthy are ignored and neglected until they die.

    Few more points and they're directed to everyone who's on this topic:

    a) Since when did something as simple as speaking up for your rights become such a huge act of "courage and bravery" that you're sent to UN to give speeches and meet world leaders while achieving nothing at all with regards to whatever you spoke out for IN YOUR OWN NEIGHBOURHOOD.

    b) Let's just consider this scenario:
    What if Malala was treated successfully in Pakistan and gone back home and still held the same stance in the face of the Taliban in Swat? Now compare this to what actually happened. What would you, as a logical human being, consider "bravery and courage" among both these scenarios?

    c)According to @Mamoon, the top universities would always prefer to have alumni who have international fame/recognition etc etc. Since when did "fame and recognition" become the criteria for getting the best possible facilities and quality of education in the world? Is it fair? I thought hard work was the key to success, wasn't it? This was my point in my 1st post about Malala's Oxford admission. What about all those students who've worked hard all their academic lives and been active in every extra-curricular activity available yet preference is given to a select few in the world because of international fame/recognition? I have no idea of how to justify this claim. Again, most posters will call me a cry baby but hey, when you've put in the hard yards and you've gotten the required results and you've achieved all those awards and certificates but you're still not considered because of a lack of fame/recognition then there is nothing more demoralizing/disheartening than that.

    d)Yes, Malala spoke up for a great cause; yes she was very young when she did all this; yes she was resolute in her path but was it the bullet which made her what she is today? I certainly feel so and I'm sure most other posters will too.

    The Malala I criticise is not that young girl who was speaking for her rights at such a young age.

    The Malala I criticise is the one who, after getting shot, never looked back at fellow countrymen and children who suffer to this day from the exact circumstances that she stood up against.

    I literally skimmed through your post because I seriously can't stand what you've been saying. Let's ignore Malala and your views on her. I will not have that debate with you because I honestly think you are very naive.

    Lets look at why you were not able to get in to Oxford/Cambridge...and I'll base this off the information you've given me.

    Let's make a few things clear...starting extra curricular activities in Grade 12 is not enough because university applications are due by December of that year...Semester for all schools starts in fall Aug/Sep...that is 4 months of you doing "stuff"...that will not get you in to Cambridge. Sorry. They look at what you've done since grade 9. So yeah, that's one area you were clearly lacking in your application. It also matters what extra curricular activities you were involved in...(debate team, tier 1 athlete, not-for-profit volunteer, student club founder/leader, etc..)

    Top universities DON'T only accept people who have international fame/recognition. This is where you're wrong. All universities, specially the top ones, maintain a DIVERSE incoming class each year. Let me break this down for you....

    1) If Harvard has an incoming class of 200 students...and this is the breakdown of the applicants:
    - 400 Caucasian applicants
    - 100 Black Applicants
    - 350 Non-Asian Asians (Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Sri Lankan)
    - 350 Asians (Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, etc.)
    - 200 Latin Americans (Brazilians, Argentinians, Mexicans, etc.)

    Out of these 1400 applicants, you will be fighting for 50 spots that are open for Non-Asian Asians meaning anyone who is Indian, Pakistani, Afghani, Iranian, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan, Nepalese). Your direct competition for a spot is with students who share your ethnicity. You are going up against Indian kids who a very tough competition. . The only time you will not go up against your own ethnicity is when you're an "Under Represented Minority"

    So you were basically compared to All non-asian Asians during your admission process and you didn't make the cut...why? Because there must have been more students from your ethnic background that had a better application. You really are at a disadvantage because Indians have flooded all the best universities in the world and you just can't compete with them on the nerdy stuff. What you need to separate your self from the desis is unusual extra curricular activities...

    This is the same process used by all top universities. There are many different websites where you can actually read up on many very qualified candidates from around the world getting rejected because they were either White or Indian. (www.poetsandquants.com, www.wallstreetoasis.com, www.gmatclub.com - these are some websites that actually lay out the admission criteria for all top schools (these are related to business schools but I'm sure you can find more on whatever your field is)).

    And to debunk your international recognition/fame theory...I'll give you a few examples..

    1) Mark Zuckerberg - hailed from a very poor Jewish family, no connections, no hi-fi college prep high school, got a scholarship to Harvard because he learned to code at the age of 15

    2) Barack Obama - Grew up in Hawaii, no money, no fame, never met his father, got a scholarship at Columbia because he was a community leader who helped the homeless (at age 18)

    3) David Rubenstien - his dad was a post office worker in Maryland, lived in one bedroom house with a family of 8, got a full ride to Duke and U Chicago because he was the smartest kid in Maryland (literally)

    There are many others. These are some famous people who became famous after turning 30.

    And for full disclosure I applied to Columbia, Cornell, Upenn and got rejected from all 3 not because I wasn't famous but because my application was weak compared to other people of my ethnicity. If I have to explain to you how Universities go about deciding which students to include you're already behind the game.

  16. #2096
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    Quote Originally Posted by sshakir411 View Post
    I literally skimmed through your post because I seriously can't stand what you've been saying. Let's ignore Malala and your views on her. I will not have that debate with you because I honestly think you are very naive.

    Lets look at why you were not able to get in to Oxford/Cambridge...and I'll base this off the information you've given me.

    Let's make a few things clear...starting extra curricular activities in Grade 12 is not enough because university applications are due by December of that year...Semester for all schools starts in fall Aug/Sep...that is 4 months of you doing "stuff"...that will not get you in to Cambridge. Sorry. They look at what you've done since grade 9. So yeah, that's one area you were clearly lacking in your application. It also matters what extra curricular activities you were involved in...(debate team, tier 1 athlete, not-for-profit volunteer, student club founder/leader, etc..)

    Top universities DON'T only accept people who have international fame/recognition. This is where you're wrong. All universities, specially the top ones, maintain a DIVERSE incoming class each year. Let me break this down for you....

    1) If Harvard has an incoming class of 200 students...and this is the breakdown of the applicants:
    - 400 Caucasian applicants
    - 100 Black Applicants
    - 350 Non-Asian Asians (Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Sri Lankan)
    - 350 Asians (Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, etc.)
    - 200 Latin Americans (Brazilians, Argentinians, Mexicans, etc.)

    Out of these 1400 applicants, you will be fighting for 50 spots that are open for Non-Asian Asians meaning anyone who is Indian, Pakistani, Afghani, Iranian, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan, Nepalese). Your direct competition for a spot is with students who share your ethnicity. You are going up against Indian kids who a very tough competition. . The only time you will not go up against your own ethnicity is when you're an "Under Represented Minority"

    So you were basically compared to All non-asian Asians during your admission process and you didn't make the cut...why? Because there must have been more students from your ethnic background that had a better application. You really are at a disadvantage because Indians have flooded all the best universities in the world and you just can't compete with them on the nerdy stuff. What you need to separate your self from the desis is unusual extra curricular activities...

    This is the same process used by all top universities. There are many different websites where you can actually read up on many very qualified candidates from around the world getting rejected because they were either White or Indian. (www.poetsandquants.com, www.wallstreetoasis.com, www.gmatclub.com - these are some websites that actually lay out the admission criteria for all top schools (these are related to business schools but I'm sure you can find more on whatever your field is)).

    And to debunk your international recognition/fame theory...I'll give you a few examples..

    1) Mark Zuckerberg - hailed from a very poor Jewish family, no connections, no hi-fi college prep high school, got a scholarship to Harvard because he learned to code at the age of 15

    2) Barack Obama - Grew up in Hawaii, no money, no fame, never met his father, got a scholarship at Columbia because he was a community leader who helped the homeless (at age 18)

    3) David Rubenstien - his dad was a post office worker in Maryland, lived in one bedroom house with a family of 8, got a full ride to Duke and U Chicago because he was the smartest kid in Maryland (literally)

    There are many others. These are some famous people who became famous after turning 30.

    And for full disclosure I applied to Columbia, Cornell, Upenn and got rejected from all 3 not because I wasn't famous but because my application was weak compared to other people of my ethnicity. If I have to explain to you how Universities go about deciding which students to include you're already behind the game.
    Brilliantly put.

  17. #2097
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    @Hadi Rizvi

    I'll try and keep this short and sweet . I understand where you are coming from and my post is not intended on attacking you. I applied to 7 universities at the end of my senior year of high school. I made it into 5 of them, the 2 that I missed out were Colombia and NYU. I had an interview for Colombia and immediately recognized I was not going to get in due to my lack of extra curricular activities. Did I cry and complain why someone else did? Focus on yourself first. Results are what matter and Malala despite what you may think of her, has achieved more in her short life than you and I have. I tried out for the mock trial team first semester which is one of the top 10 in the country. I got torn to shreds by the professor during my cross-examination. But it was my fault. I didn't give up my hopes of being a lawyer. I got hungrier to succeed next time. There should be no such thing as free time when you are a student. You wake up, go to school, do extra-curricular activities, volunteer, hit the sack. Everybody who applies to top universities has high grades. What separates everyone is what they have achieved outside of the classroom and what can they add to the institution. So are you gonna bite your tongue and get accepted or keep crying cause nobody held your hand? Good luck and hope you make it.
    Last edited by Abdullah719; 12th October 2017 at 21:14.

  18. #2098
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    Quote Originally Posted by sshakir411 View Post
    I literally skimmed through your post because I seriously can't stand what you've been saying. Let's ignore Malala and your views on her. I will not have that debate with you because I honestly think you are very naive.

    Lets look at why you were not able to get in to Oxford/Cambridge...and I'll base this off the information you've given me.

    Let's make a few things clear...starting extra curricular activities in Grade 12 is not enough because university applications are due by December of that year...Semester for all schools starts in fall Aug/Sep...that is 4 months of you doing "stuff"...that will not get you in to Cambridge. Sorry. They look at what you've done since grade 9. So yeah, that's one area you were clearly lacking in your application. It also matters what extra curricular activities you were involved in...(debate team, tier 1 athlete, not-for-profit volunteer, student club founder/leader, etc..)

    Top universities DON'T only accept people who have international fame/recognition. This is where you're wrong. All universities, specially the top ones, maintain a DIVERSE incoming class each year. Let me break this down for you....

    1) If Harvard has an incoming class of 200 students...and this is the breakdown of the applicants:
    - 400 Caucasian applicants
    - 100 Black Applicants
    - 350 Non-Asian Asians (Indians, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Sri Lankan)
    - 350 Asians (Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, etc.)
    - 200 Latin Americans (Brazilians, Argentinians, Mexicans, etc.)

    Out of these 1400 applicants, you will be fighting for 50 spots that are open for Non-Asian Asians meaning anyone who is Indian, Pakistani, Afghani, Iranian, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan, Nepalese). Your direct competition for a spot is with students who share your ethnicity. You are going up against Indian kids who a very tough competition. . The only time you will not go up against your own ethnicity is when you're an "Under Represented Minority"

    So you were basically compared to All non-asian Asians during your admission process and you didn't make the cut...why? Because there must have been more students from your ethnic background that had a better application. You really are at a disadvantage because Indians have flooded all the best universities in the world and you just can't compete with them on the nerdy stuff. What you need to separate your self from the desis is unusual extra curricular activities...

    This is the same process used by all top universities. There are many different websites where you can actually read up on many very qualified candidates from around the world getting rejected because they were either White or Indian. (www.poetsandquants.com, www.wallstreetoasis.com, www.gmatclub.com - these are some websites that actually lay out the admission criteria for all top schools (these are related to business schools but I'm sure you can find more on whatever your field is)).

    And to debunk your international recognition/fame theory...I'll give you a few examples..

    1) Mark Zuckerberg - hailed from a very poor Jewish family, no connections, no hi-fi college prep high school, got a scholarship to Harvard because he learned to code at the age of 15

    2) Barack Obama - Grew up in Hawaii, no money, no fame, never met his father, got a scholarship at Columbia because he was a community leader who helped the homeless (at age 18)

    3) David Rubenstien - his dad was a post office worker in Maryland, lived in one bedroom house with a family of 8, got a full ride to Duke and U Chicago because he was the smartest kid in Maryland (literally)

    There are many others. These are some famous people who became famous after turning 30.

    And for full disclosure I applied to Columbia, Cornell, Upenn and got rejected from all 3 not because I wasn't famous but because my application was weak compared to other people of my ethnicity. If I have to explain to you how Universities go about deciding which students to include you're already behind the game.
    I'll keep the tone lighter this time.

    I thought I was gonna get some long lectures about Malala etc etc but instead, we're discussing something which literally no one cares about except for me. Well thank you for explaining me all of this. I learnt quite a bit from your post and c'mon my profile isn't THAT bad you know. I actually had an offer at the University of Manchester (usually ranked in TOP 40 worldwide) so I must have done something right in extra-curriculars to get that far, don't you think?

    Coming back to Malala, I say let's wait and see what she does after she's graduated. Since we're getting irritated by each other's point of view, let's just end this here and agree to disagree.

  19. #2099
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    Brilliantly put.
    Agreed

  20. #2100
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    Quote Originally Posted by ManFan View Post
    @Hadi Rizvi

    I'll try and keep this short and sweet . I understand where you are coming from and my post is not intended on attacking you. I applied to 7 universities at the end of my senior year of high school. I made it into 5 of them, the 2 that I missed out were Colombia and NYU. I had an interview for Colombia and immediately recognized I was not going to get in due to my lack of extra curricular activities. Did I cry and complain why someone else did? Focus on yourself first. Results are what matter and Malala despite what you may think of her, has achieved more in her short life than you and I have. I tried out for the mock trial team first semester which is one of the top 10 in the country. I got torn to shreds by the professor during my cross-examination. But it was my fault. I didn't give up my hopes of being a lawyer. I got hungrier to succeed next time. There should be no such thing as free time when you are a student. You wake up, go to school, do extra-curricular activities, volunteer, hit the sack. Everybody who applies to top universities has high grades. What separates everyone is what they have achieved outside of the classroom and what can they add to the institution. So are you gonna bite your tongue and get accepted or keep crying cause nobody held your hand? Good luck and hope you make it.
    Thanks for all the advice. Much appreciated. Read post #2099 tho.

    Oh and btw, I'm already studying at RMIT since Feb 2017, therefore I wouldn't call it "crying" if I talk about it 10 months after being rejected.
    Last edited by Hadi Rizvi; 13th October 2017 at 09:53.

  21. #2101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    Thanks for all the advice. Much appreciated. Read post #2099 tho.

    Oh and btw, I'm already studying at RMIT since Feb 2017, therefore I wouldn't call it "crying" if I talk about it 10 months after being rejected.
    Nice! I just want you to do well because I know where you are coming from.

  22. #2102
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  24. #2104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post



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  26. #2106
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    An inspiration to billions around the world except to her own country people. Makes me sad.

  27. #2107
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    An inspiration to billions around the world except to her own country people. Makes me sad.
    Why isn't she a hero to some people in Pakistan? I genuinely have no idea.


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  28. #2108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman View Post
    Why isn't she a hero to some people in Pakistan? I genuinely have no idea.
    Maybe due to ignorance


    [QUOTE=Mamoon;9742871]Don't see us ascending from 7th/6th in the near future. 5-0 in England and South Africa awaits us, we will be lucky to even draw one match. [/QUOTE]

  29. #2109
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    Combination of false understanding of national pride, misogyny, jealousy, and a lack of critical thinking (thus believing in wild conspiracies theories). It's not just the men or the uneducated - the dislike for her goes crosses gender, economic, educational, and ethnic lines.

  30. #2110
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    Combination of false understanding of national pride, misogyny, jealousy, and a lack of critical thinking (thus believing in wild conspiracies theories). It's not just the men or the uneducated - the dislike for her goes crosses gender, economic, educational, and ethnic lines.
    But why? There must be some reason why she is disliked. What wrong has she done to be disliked? Here in India she is held in high regards.


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  31. #2111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman View Post
    Why isn't she a hero to some people in Pakistan? I genuinely have no idea.
    Some people choose to ignore her accomplishments entirely. Some say that she is an "americi agent". Other say that her book makes wild claims about pakistan and that she is misninformed. I havent read the book so can't comment.

  32. #2112
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    Because Pakistanis despise people who show them the mirror.They despise people who point out the nation's shortcomings.They despise people who raise awareness about issues because , according to them, it brings infamy to the nation.

  33. #2113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman View Post
    Why isn't she a hero to some people in Pakistan? I genuinely have no idea.
    If a person supporting a basic human right would be deserving of a Nobel Peace Prize and the highest civilian award in Pakistan then 90% of all humans would be Nobel Laureates.

    I see nothing special in what she's done so far. Only twist to her story is that she got shot by narrow minded terrorists and survived.

  34. #2114
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    Quote Originally Posted by saeedhk View Post
    Because Pakistanis despise people who show them the mirror.They despise people who point out the nation's shortcomings.They despise people who raise awareness about issues because , according to them, it brings infamy to the nation.
    So according to them, turning a blind eye to the shortcomings of one's nation is the solution?

  35. #2115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman View Post
    So according to them, turning a blind eye to the shortcomings of one's nation is the solution?
    Reality is this that they think supporting Malala will make them traitor to Islam and Pakistan.

    Religion and Nationalism makes man blind and takes him far far away from humanity.

  36. #2116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    If a person supporting a basic human right would be deserving of a Nobel Peace Prize and the highest civilian award in Pakistan then 90% of all humans would be Nobel Laureates.

    I see nothing special in what she's done so far. Only twist to her story is that she got shot by narrow minded terrorists and survived.
    You get shot in the face first and then we will talk more about it.


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  37. #2117
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    I have her autobiography (I am Malala) and read parts of it. It speaks beautifully of the Swat valley and the northern areas of Pakistan and is also honest about the culture of the area which is very conservative (female literacy in tribal areas is around 10%). The arguments I've heard against her are the following:

    1. She says women are stopped from going to school in Pakistan
    If you look at statistics, female literacy is substanitally lower than male literacy overall (20% difference), reaching a low of 10% in northern Pakistan. The gap is smaller in cities. Malala not only did she experience a culture not in full favor of women's education, she directly experienced the rule of Taliban in the Swat Valley. She has a perspective which is clearly justified based on her life experience in Northern Pakistan and the Taliban rule (very different than the perspective of those who live in cities)

    2. She hasn't done anything
    As a 12 year old, she had a radio program about promoting women's education and constantly wrote to newspapers about it. She was a vocal proponent of women's education from a very young age which only intensified when Taliban took over. She continued to do so knowing her life is in danger until she was shot at the age of 14.

    Remind me again what were the majority of people doing at the age of 12? And how many of us would continue to champion a good cause knowing our lives are at risk for doing so?

    3. She left the country
    So she goes to UK because of the medical tech to save her life after being shot. She stays there for recovery and continues to speak for women's education. Didn't Nawaz Sharif go to London for medical treatment? Didn't Bilawal Bhutto grow up in London? Isn't Altaf hiding in London for the past 20 years? Yet they get elected every single time by the same public.

    4. She makes Pakistan look bad
    Pakistan already looks bad. They don't need Malala for it. The only time I've heard others speak positively of Pakistan is when they say admire Malala who is from Pakistan. Otherwise, it's crime, poverty, terrorism, etc. Western culture admires individual strength and courage and this is why she's valued.

    I also admit that she has a team around her who knows how to run PR but I don't blame her for it. I or anyone else would do the same if we were in her spot.

  38. #2118
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    Quote Originally Posted by saeedhk View Post
    You get shot in the face first and then we will talk more about it.
    See, that's why you can't argue with Malala fans. Getting shot in the face is not and should not be a criteria for getting a Nobel Peace Prize.

    And please don't talk to me about getting shot in the face.

    My Shia community get blown to pieces/targeted by target killers throughout Pakistan especially Hazara community so we know what it feels like. We don't need you or Malala to remind us of any of that.

    Talk with strong arguments not silly one-liners.

    Tell me one thing that Malala has done ON HER OWN that none of us could've done. Or keep living in this delusion that Malala is some sort of extraordinary heroine who has saved or helped Pakistan/Pakistani lives while ignoring people like Ansar Burney, Sarim Burney, Edhi/Chhipa, "Fix It" founder Alamgir and countless more who've actually come out of the comfort of their homes and achieved something and saved lives through their own hard work and hard-earned money.

    Again, I'm not accusing her of being anti-Pakistani/foreign agent but I feel hers is just a case of being hyped to the moon by the whole world for no apparent reason. She's just a normal girl who's good at studies and got shot by terrorists for speaking out for female education. ABSOLUTELY NO BIG DEAL IN THAT.

  39. #2119
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    ^Please see point 2 in my response above yours. I agree that it's likely not enough to get a Nobel Peace Prize but the bar for that has fallen in recent years (Obama, etc.). But that still doesn't take away from her courage and bravery at the age of 12.

    Plus even if she did win it "undeservedly," why not use her to promote Pakistan (see point 4)?

  40. #2120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    See, that's why you can't argue with Malala fans. Getting shot in the face is not and should not be a criteria for getting a Nobel Peace Prize.

    And please don't talk to me about getting shot in the face.

    My Shia community get blown to pieces/targeted by target killers throughout Pakistan especially Hazara community so we know what it feels like. We don't need you or Malala to remind us of any of that.

    Talk with strong arguments not silly one-liners.

    Tell me one thing that Malala has done ON HER OWN that none of us could've done. Or keep living in this delusion that Malala is some sort of extraordinary heroine who has saved or helped Pakistan/Pakistani lives while ignoring people like Ansar Burney, Sarim Burney, Edhi/Chhipa, "Fix It" founder Alamgir and countless more who've actually come out of the comfort of their homes and achieved something and saved lives through their own hard work and hard-earned money.

    Again, I'm not accusing her of being anti-Pakistani/foreign agent but I feel hers is just a case of being hyped to the moon by the whole world for no apparent reason. She's just a normal girl who's good at studies and got shot by terrorists for speaking out for female education. ABSOLUTELY NO BIG DEAL IN THAT.
    Wise people say: You could not make every one happy.

    Sir, your case is exactly this one. You are finding faults in Malala even though it is not her fault that she impressed the world more than Burni. It is normal human behaviour where some times one action becomes more famous than the other.

    There are many (or at least few) in the league of Burni, who are doing excellent social work.

    But see, how many Malalas are there who are fighting for the girl education right from the age of 12, despite living exactly in the area of Taliban?

    Burnies are great, but Malala is different.

    Burnies are great, but due to this difference in Malala's story, Taliban was compelled to shoot her.
    Taliban didn't shoot Burnies while they didn't feel threatened enough from their work while they were working in the big cities which were not the Taliban centre. But Malala fought right from the middle of the centre of Taliban, which Taliban could not have ignored.

    Malala indeed inspired the girls in her neighbourhood, her columns indeed inspired the youth in whole Pakistan, and then whole world was inspired by the bravery and insight of this small girl.

    Malala may not be special, but what she did, it was really very very very special at that time.

  41. #2121
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    I believe Malala was very genuine and passionate about girls' education when she was shot at the age of 14. Are there "more deserving" people out there for Nobel Prize? Likely. But that doesn't mean Malala needs to be torn down and humiliated which is what many Pakistanis want.

    I've actually read her book and it's clear she has a VERY good PR team around her telling her what to do. She has a personal challenge in continuing to be sincere in her work and not be suckered to do what is in her PR's best interest. She's only 19 so I'm confident she'll figure it out over time.

    If the average Pakistani doesn't like her for whatever reason, the solution is not to tear her down but to put your energies into something constructive for yourself and the country.

  42. #2122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alam_dar View Post
    Wise people say: You could not make every one happy.

    Sir, your case is exactly this one. You are finding faults in Malala even though it is not her fault that she impressed the world more than Burni. It is normal human behaviour where some times one action becomes more famous than the other.

    There are many (or at least few) in the league of Burni, who are doing excellent social work.

    But see, how many Malalas are there who are fighting for the girl education right from the age of 12, despite living exactly in the area of Taliban?

    Burnies are great, but Malala is different.

    Burnies are great, but due to this difference in Malala's story, Taliban was compelled to shoot her.
    Taliban didn't shoot Burnies while they didn't feel threatened enough from their work while they were working in the big cities which were not the Taliban centre. But Malala fought right from the middle of the centre of Taliban, which Taliban could not have ignored.

    Malala indeed inspired the girls in her neighbourhood, her columns indeed inspired the youth in whole Pakistan, and then whole world was inspired by the bravery and insight of this small girl.

    Malala may not be special, but what she did, it was really very very very special at that time.
    How exactly do you define "fighting"?

    Going by your definition, I "fought" for my rights in KSA to freely practice my religion and my father "fought" for BASIC work rights. How is any of that commendable to the point of inspiring youth? I mean c'mon yaar start thinking rationally and practically. I haven't met a single Pakistani student/youth who's come forward and said: "I've been inspired by Malala and want to follow in her footsteps". None at all.

    Which is why I plead "youth" to follow people who've actually done something other than speaking out aloud for BASIC rights. Follow and idealise people who've served humanity and saved people. Its not necessarily a courageous/righteous act if it has "impressed" global celebrities/politicians but it is surely a courageous/righteous act if it has helped/saved a single human.

    You also said there are a lot of "Burnies".

    Well, I'll ask you that, the day when you'll need them in this cruel world.

  43. #2123
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    ^Please see point 2 in my response above yours. I agree that it's likely not enough to get a Nobel Peace Prize but the bar for that has fallen in recent years (Obama, etc.). But that still doesn't take away from her courage and bravery at the age of 12.

    Plus even if she did win it "undeservedly," why not use her to promote Pakistan (see point 4)?
    I would've called it courage and bravery if she had continued her "rights activism" in Pakistan AFTER getting shot.

  44. #2124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    I would've called it courage and bravery if she had continued her "rights activism" in Pakistan AFTER getting shot.
    Ok so you don't think she's done anything to deserve the fame. Now you have two choices:

    1. attack her at every mention of her name in hopes of trying to bring her reputation down and show non-Pakistanis that a person rest of the world admires is hated at home (which further sinks the reputation of a country already at the very bottom of opinion polls and grouped with war ravaged and rogue states)

    2. accept that the rest of the world is not going to change their opinion on a Nobel Laureate and continue to look up to her (and by extension Pakistan). You can simply keep quiet and let others get a favorable view of Pakistan and its people.

    Why do most Pakistanis choose 1?

  45. #2125
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    Ok so you don't think she's done anything to deserve the fame. Now you have two choices:

    1. attack her at every mention of her name in hopes of trying to bring her reputation down and show non-Pakistanis that a person rest of the world admires is hated at home (which further sinks the reputation of a country already at the very bottom of opinion polls and grouped with war ravaged and rogue states)

    2. accept that the rest of the world is not going to change their opinion on a Nobel Laureate and continue to look up to her (and by extension Pakistan). You can simply keep quiet and let others get a favorable view of Pakistan and its people.

    Why do most Pakistanis choose 1?
    Pakistanis living in Pakistan cannot digest Malala's fame. They believe other Pakistanis like themselves have suffered with similar issues without getting the benefits that Malala did. They're sour...and that's pretty much it. No matter how much they try to rationalize it.

  46. #2126
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    It's shocking to read some of the replies on this thread. I wonder if our people will ever start thinking logically and not use religion as an excuse/basis for literally everything. What bothers me the most is how people overlook her contributions...She is one of rare ones who took a stand and raised her voice to bring change. There should be more people like her and that's the only way we will see progress in our country.


    Have you ever been to heaven at night?

  47. #2127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunny786 View Post
    It's shocking to read some of the replies on this thread. I wonder if our people will ever start thinking logically and not use religion as an excuse/basis for literally everything. What bothers me the most is how people overlook her contributions...She is one of rare ones who took a stand and raised her voice to bring change. There should be more people like her and that's the only way we will see progress in our country.
    I have not heard religion used as an excuse against her. It's more of nationalist angle.

    "She's bringing Pakistan a bad name" or "She doesn't do anything for Pakistan" etc etc

  48. #2128
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    I have not heard religion used as an excuse against her. It's more of nationalist angle.

    "She's bringing Pakistan a bad name" or "She doesn't do anything for Pakistan" etc etc

    She has weird links to both ANP and Madonna
    Other than that good on her , all da best for the future bro


    "If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles"

  49. #2129
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    Ok so you don't think she's done anything to deserve the fame. Now you have two choices:

    1. attack her at every mention of her name in hopes of trying to bring her reputation down and show non-Pakistanis that a person rest of the world admires is hated at home (which further sinks the reputation of a country already at the very bottom of opinion polls and grouped with war ravaged and rogue states)

    2. accept that the rest of the world is not going to change their opinion on a Nobel Laureate and continue to look up to her (and by extension Pakistan). You can simply keep quiet and let others get a favorable view of Pakistan and its people.

    Why do most Pakistanis choose 1?
    Why do you wanna blindly follow what the world likes/dislikes?
    Awaiting the world's approval for your opinions/actions is a fool's errand.

    And why should I look up to her?
    The reason for Pakistan's existence is enough for me to be proud of my motherland and its people.

  50. #2130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    Why do you wanna blindly follow what the world likes/dislikes?
    Awaiting the world's approval for your opinions/actions is a fool's errand.

    And why should I look up to her?
    The reason for Pakistan's existence is enough for me to be proud of my motherland and its people.
    Weren't you trying to get into a UK university? And you don't think the image of Pakistan has anything to do with how the UK gov't treats your application? Or gives you a visa?

    For any Pakistani with any kind of ambition in studies, career, business, etc, the image of Pakistan matters because we live in a globally connected world. Why is there no foreign direct investment (FDI) in Pakistan? Why are no major companies setting up bases? Why do major international brands in Pakistan have little presence in the country? Etc Etc.

    This is not about pleasing the world. It is about portraying Pakistan as a country which can be partnered up with for academia, business, trade, cultural exchange, etc. All of which benefits Pakistanis in the end.

  51. #2131
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    Weren't you trying to get into a UK university? And you don't think the image of Pakistan has anything to do with how the UK gov't treats your application? Or gives you a visa?

    For any Pakistani with any kind of ambition in studies, career, business, etc, the image of Pakistan matters because we live in a globally connected world. Why is there no foreign direct investment (FDI) in Pakistan? Why are no major companies setting up bases? Why do major international brands in Pakistan have little presence in the country? Etc Etc.

    This is not about pleasing the world. It is about portraying Pakistan as a country which can be partnered up with for academia, business, trade, cultural exchange, etc. All of which benefits Pakistanis in the end.
    And best way to do that is to let west give fame to people because they portray a bad image of Pakistan society for women obviously.... Malala is completely typical of how western nations give lessons by portraying other nations as regressive.... Some no name no talent girl who becomes world famous because it shows that Pakistan is a horrible place for girls.... Same as girl who was sentenced in Iran for not wearing hijab... Not anyone of the thousands of girls and boys from Pakistan and Iran who are achieving in science and medicine and literature and everything, just oppression Olympics...

    0.001% in west know about Dr Abdus Salam or any of thousands of people from Pakistan who are truly great... But they go on and on and on about Malala in their media... And you think this is good for Pakistan?

    Itís just usual colonial patronizing mindset... We Pakistanis should know our worth... We had many people to be proud of in the past and we will have many people to be proud of in the future... Donít need western stamp on somebody for being shot in the head, we are much greater than that...

    You think USA is defined by Neil Armstrong, Roosevelt and Hemingway or by the kids who got shot in school shootings?? Then why do they want to define us by some random girl who got shot???

  52. #2132
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoniInsafian View Post
    And best way to do that is to let west give fame to people because they portray a bad image of Pakistan society for women obviously.... Malala is completely typical of how western nations give lessons by portraying other nations as regressive.... Some no name no talent girl who becomes world famous because it shows that Pakistan is a horrible place for girls.... Same as girl who was sentenced in Iran for not wearing hijab... Not anyone of the thousands of girls and boys from Pakistan and Iran who are achieving in science and medicine and literature and everything, just oppression Olympics...

    0.001% in west know about Dr Abdus Salam or any of thousands of people from Pakistan who are truly great... But they go on and on and on about Malala in their media... And you think this is good for Pakistan?

    Itís just usual colonial patronizing mindset... We Pakistanis should know our worth... We had many people to be proud of in the past and we will have many people to be proud of in the future... Donít need western stamp on somebody for being shot in the head, we are much greater than that...

    You think USA is defined by Neil Armstrong, Roosevelt and Hemingway or by the kids who got shot in school shootings?? Then why do they want to define us by some random girl who got shot???
    Agree with everything except the part that Malala has defamed Pakistan.

    We have wayyyy too many people to drool over rather than Malala.

  53. #2133
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    Quote Originally Posted by faraz39 View Post
    Weren't you trying to get into a UK university? And you don't think the image of Pakistan has anything to do with how the UK gov't treats your application? Or gives you a visa?

    For any Pakistani with any kind of ambition in studies, career, business, etc, the image of Pakistan matters because we live in a globally connected world. Why is there no foreign direct investment (FDI) in Pakistan? Why are no major companies setting up bases? Why do major international brands in Pakistan have little presence in the country? Etc Etc.

    This is not about pleasing the world. It is about portraying Pakistan as a country which can be partnered up with for academia, business, trade, cultural exchange, etc. All of which benefits Pakistanis in the end.
    Mate, you're talking as if I'm arguing against having trade with other countries.

    Please get over the fact that whatever "Positive Image" of Pakistan being portrayed by Malala, is worthless to Pakistan or its repute.

    Malala or no Malala, Pakistan's image is not affected by that.

  54. #2134
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    1. Literacy rate for women in tribal areas hovers around 10% (much higher in cities though). The rural areas of Pakistan have incredibly low rates of female education in Lahore, Balochistan, etc. The higher rates of female literacy and rights in cities does not negate the impoverished conditions of women in rural areas of Pakistan. We can't deny the realities of rural life just because we happen to live in cities. Solution is to increase levels of female education and empowerment in rural areas.

    2. Abdul Salam is not really celebrated in Pakistan because of his Ahmadi beliefs. So the only two Nobel Laureates in history of Pakistan are looked down upon by Pakistanis. Now they don't have to be our heroes but we have to know how to use them to promote softer image of Pakistan. There is a statue of Gandhi in the downtown area of the city I live in because India has successfully used Gandhi as a PR tool. Where are Jinnah or Iqbal or Edhi? Forget Malala, why is Pakistan failing miserably in promoting anyone?

    3. You don't have to like Malala or believe in her. But to speak ill of her and malign her to non-Pakistanis only reflects poorly on the Pakistanis not her.

    4. Not sure how much either of you have traveled outside of Pakistan or if you have spent extended periods of time in other countries. I wish it wasn't so but Pakistan has one of the worst reputations you'll find. None of that has to do with Malala. The only times I've heard people speak well of Pakistan is....actually I can't even recall and I grew up in Canada have been here for over two decades.

    5. I work for a tech company with head office in Canada but offices in Central America, Eastern Europe, Asia (India, Philippines). India and Philippines both have security and other issues but they are chosen for investment by companies because they have a soft image. Bollywood does that for India in addition to the promotion of sites such as Taj Mahal, etc. You don't have to like Malala to know that she can be used as a way (combined with other methods) to soften Pakistan's image because no one is going to come and invest in a country with a reputation for terrorism, assassinations, and instability. No one would take me seriously in the company if I suggested we open an office in Pakistan due to its reputation.

    6. There are millions of overseas people of Pakistani origins who send billions in remittance which keeps the country afloat and supports people in Pakistan. Without this money, the country would be in an even worse shape than it currently is. Whether those inside Pakistan like it or not, overseas Pakistanis are the only ones investing in Pakistan right now (inshallah it changes and others invest too).

  55. #2135
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    Well, as a Pakistani it was a proud moment for us that she won the Nobel peace prize. But, realistically, she didn't deserve it at all.

    Abdul Sattar Edhi deserved it more than anyone else in our country. The next contender for Nobel prize must be Imran Khan, from Pakistan, as he has done a lot for humanity.

  56. #2136
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post

    Small point : It is claimed Anne Franks diary was a forgery. It was amended using Ball Point pen, which was not invented at the time of WW2.

  57. #2137
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    Quote Originally Posted by R3verse Swing View Post
    Small point : It is claimed Anne Franks diary was a forgery. It was amended using Ball Point pen, which was not invented at the time of WW2.
    Claimed by holocaust deniers yes however the forensic and academic studies into the authenticity of the work concluded that it's her work.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1989/06/08/bo...k-s-diary.html

  58. #2138
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    Malala's latest interview done by David Letterman is amazing to watch. A very graceful and composed character interviewed by, in my humble opinion, one of the best late night talk show hosts. Many people hate Malala but I urge everyone to watch it.

  59. #2139
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    Quote Originally Posted by R3verse Swing View Post
    Small point : It is claimed Anne Franks diary was a forgery. It was amended using Ball Point pen, which was not invented at the time of WW2.
    Ironically, Anne Frank's diary was also presented to the world by her father and she is famous for being killed by Nazis. That's literally her only claim to fame, keeping a diary in a war

  60. #2140
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    One of the most overrated figures ever.

  61. #2141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mercurial View Post
    Well, as a Pakistani it was a proud moment for us that she won the Nobel peace prize. But, realistically, she didn't deserve it at all.

    Abdul Sattar Edhi deserved it more than anyone else in our country. The next contender for Nobel prize must be Imran Khan, from Pakistan, as he has done a lot for humanity.
    This is a fair argument to make Mercurial and worth discussing.
    But I can't stand the blind and almost personal hate Pakistanis have for Malala. The kind of hate which should be reserved for those who have screwed up the country beyond recognition in the last 60 years.

  62. #2142
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  63. #2143
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    Malala to arrive in Pakistan tonight: sources

    ISLAMABAD: Pakistani Nobel laureate Malala Yousufzai is likely to arrive in the country early Thursday, sources informed Geo News.

    Malala will be staying in Pakistan for four days, sources said. She would be reaching Islamabad from Dubai via foreign flight no. EK-614.

    She will hold meetings with Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi and other important figures.

    In October 2012, Malala — then fifteen-years-old — was shot in the head at point blank range by Taliban gunmen as she was returning from her school in Swat valley. She suffered bullet injuries and was admitted to the Military Hospital Peshawar and then taken to London for further treatment.

    The shooting drew widespread international condemnation.

    She has become an internationally recognized symbol of resistance to the Taliban's efforts of denying women education and other rights and was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her activism.


    'Want to go back to Pakistan'

    Asked about her plans for the future while speaking at the World Economic Forum session titled 'An Insight, An Idea with Malala Yousafzai' in January 2018, the 20-year-old shared: "I hope that I can go back to Pakistan sometime and see my country.

    "It is just so hard if you haven't seen your home, your relatives, your friends for more than five years," she said, adding, "I didn't leave the country by choice it was the circumstances that forced me. So I want to go back to Pakistan."

    Malala also remarked that her father wants her to complete her Masters and PhD and "stick to university." However, she shared that she wants to explore more.

    In March 2018, the Nobel laureate appeared in David Letterman’s My Next Guest Needs No Introduction on Netflix.

    Speaking about her hometown, Swat, Malala said, "It is just like a paradise on Earth."

    She said she "did not realise how beautiful Swat was" until she moved to the UK "and looked out the window and asked where the mountains were.”

    Whether she'll go back to Swat, Malala said, "I haven’t been back to Swat since I was attacked. Unfortunately it’s been a very difficult time. I tried to to go but I didn’t find the right time. I have received a lot of support in my country. There is this lust for change. People want to see change in their country. I am already doing work there but I want my feet to touch that land.”

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/188427-mal...onight-sources


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  64. #2144
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    So a girl, who is only 20 years old, went around the world, inspired philanthropist to raise money so can educate more girls, and still people find their ways to criticize her. You Sir and Madams: need to smell chai and look in the mirror.

    Protect Malala as much as you can Pakistan. She will inspire lot of young kids from 'poor' background financially or academically. (Probably not to some arm chair nationalist)


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  65. #2145
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    You see people usually don't do charity just like that, they need a name, or need an idol, and any charity is good charity.

    So it doesn't matter if people, who suffered more than her, don't get the same limelight, how about praising someone who is getting limelight. Who cares if western liberals are using her name to show bad things about Pakistan. She is raising funding for good, great for economy, if under her name investors put their money for the good.


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  66. #2146
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricketworm View Post
    You see people usually don't do charity just like that, they need a name, or need an idol, and any charity is good charity.

    So it doesn't matter if people, who suffered more than her, don't get the same limelight, how about praising someone who is getting limelight. Who cares if western liberals are using her name to show bad things about Pakistan. She is raising funding for good, great for economy, if under her name investors put their money for the good.
    It's great she's going back to Pakistan and imo she should live there. It's also great whatever good she does too.

    It's also great she is a millionaire now too.
    Last edited by DeadBall; 28th March 2018 at 20:32.


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  67. #2147
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    If we disrespect Malala then we are also disrespecting children who suffered in APS attack as well. Both suffered at the hands of same monster so why should we dislike Malala just because she was lucky enough to survive and is living better life?

    Welcome home Malala!

  68. #2148
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  69. #2149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitman View Post
    But why? There must be some reason why she is disliked. What wrong has she done to be disliked? Here in India she is held in high regards.
    First of all I would like to say I am a big Malala supporter, she is an inspiration to millions. However, in the interest of playing devil's advocate I will try to explain it the best I can from one of her haters point of views.

    First reason people dislike her is they don't understand how this one girl got so famous and made so much money. The West magically turned her into a larger than life figure. When in reality she is just one of thousands of children in Pakistan that were targeted in terrorist attacks. Not only that, the West on one hand elevated her as a messiah, yet continued to attack tribal areas with drones killing many innocents including women and children. So it is not understood by her haters why she is special amongst tens of thousands of dead souls that were lost in America's illegal war, the same America that propped her up. Its a case of selective outrage by the West. Therefore she is seen as a propaganda tool by the West.

    The other major reason why she is disliked is because she is famous for a negative incident in Pakistan. As you can imagine Pakistan is portrayed as a failed state, where women are all in burkas, people are all extremists, and the country is on the brink of becoming North Korea. When was the last time Pakistanis were portrayed as normal people? Only the negatives are highlighted, which exist in every country. Even India which has Bollywood an enormous way to show India in a positive light, suffers from these insecurities. When Slumdog millionaire the movie came out, some Indians were outraged because it showed India as a slum. Well slums do exist in India, but the fact that only that was pointed out made some people uneasy.

    These are the reasons why I think some people dislike her.

  70. #2150
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    So, the CIA/RAW/Mossad agent has returned to Pakistan to cause more secular damage to the country by promoting education for women...

  71. #2151
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    It's great she's going back to Pakistan and imo she should live there. It's also great whatever good she does too.

    It's also great she is a millionaire now too.
    She could be a trillionaire....but it still won't compensate for the horror she went through.

    Why would she live in a country where the the general public hate her even though she has done so much for education in Pakistan? Why should she live in Pakistan where the taliban have said they will kill her if she comes there?

    Pakistanis who give her abuse after everything she has been through and done are a disgrace to humanity to put it simply.

  72. #2152
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    It's great she's going back to Pakistan and imo she should live there. It's also great whatever good she does too.

    It's also great she is a millionaire now too.
    Yep how dare she make money by writing a best selling book. Shocking stuff really.

  73. #2153
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    Yep how dare she make money by writing a best selling book. Shocking stuff really.
    She didn't write the book, it was ghostwritten by some British war correspondent. The problem with Malala is that she is used as a propaganda symbol for America's 'civilising the savages' war in Afghanistan and NWFP

  74. #2154
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    As Malala returns to Pakistan, leaders declare terrorism defeated

    ISLAMABAD -- Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai returned to her native Pakistan early Thursday for the first time since she was shot in 2012 by Taliban militants angered at her championing of education for girls. Tight security greeted the now-20-year-old university student upon her arrival at Benazir Bhutto International Airport.

    Local television showed her with her parents in the lounge at the airport before leaving in a convoy of nearly 15 vehicles, many of them occupied by heavily armed police.

    Hours after her arrival, Yousafzai met with Pakistan Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, who praised her and said he was happy to welcome her back to Pakistan, where he said terrorism has been eliminated.

    Yousafzai said she was excited to be back. With tears in her eyes, she recalled having to leave the country for treatment when she was shot. At a ceremony at Abbasi's office, the university student said she had always thought about returning to Pakistan.

    "It is now actually happening and I am here," she said, vowing to continue to campaign for the education of girls.

    Her return had been shrouded in secrecy and it wasn't immediately clear how long she would be in the city or whether she planned to travel to her hometown of Mingora, where the shooting occurred.

    As news broke about Yousafzai's arrival in Pakistan's, her countrymen welcomed her.

    Cricketer turned opposition leader Imran Khan's party said Yousafzai's return was a sign of the defeat of extremism in the country.

    Mohammad Hassan, one of Yousafzai's cousins in the northwestern town of Mingora, said it was one of the happiest days of his life. He said he was not sure whether Yousafzai would visit her home town, where schoolchildren were jubilant on her return, though they wished Yousafzai had visited Mingora so that they could greet her.

    Javeria Khan, a 12-year-old schoolgirl in Yousafzai's hometown, said she was excited about Yousafzai's return.

    "I wish I could see her in Swat. I wish she had come here, but we welcome her," she said, as she sat among schoolchildren.

    Marvi Memon, a senior leader of the ruling Pakistan Muslim League party, also welcomed Yousafzai, saying it was a pleasant surprise for her to see Yousafzai back home.

    "What an incredible surprise I woke up to this morning" to know that Yousafzai is back along with her parents, she said. Memon said it was a proud day for Pakistan that Yousafzai was back in Pakistan.

    Yousafzai was just 14 years old but already known for her activism when Taliban gunman boarded the school van in which she was sitting and demanded to know "who is Malala?" before shooting her in the head. Two of her classmates were also injured. In critical condition, Yousafzai was flown to the garrison city of Rawalpindi before being airlifted to Birmingham in Britain.

    She has since spoken at the United Nations, mesmerizing the world with her eloquence and her unrelenting commitment to the promotion of girls' education through the Malala Fund, a book, meetings with refugees and other activism.

    She was awarded the Nobel in 2014, along with Indian child-rights activist Kailash Satyarthi, and said on the day she collected the prize that "Education is one of the blessings of life, and one of its necessities."

    She remained in Britain after undergoing medical treatment there and was accepted to the University of Oxford last year.

    At home in Pakistan, however, she has been condemned by some as a Western mouthpiece with some even suggesting on social media that the shooting was staged. Yousafzai has repeatedly responded to the criticism with a grace far outstripping her years, often saying education is neither Western, nor Eastern.

    Often when she has spoken in public she has championed her home country and spoken in her native Pashto language, always promising to return to her home.

    On March 23 when Pakistan celebrated Pakistan Day, Yousafzai tweeted, "I cherish fond memories of home, of playing cricket on rooftops and singing the national anthem in school. Happy Pakistan Day!"

    Local television channels have been showing her return to Pakistan with some replaying the horror of her shooting and the rush to get her treatment.

    Pakistani officials say they captured several suspects after the attack on Yousafzai, but the head of the Taliban in Pakistan, Mullah Fazlullah, is still on the run and believed to be hiding in neighboring Afghanistan.

    Fazlullah's spokesman, Mohammad Khurasani, earlier this month said Fazlullah's son was among 21 "holy warriors" killed by missiles fired by a U.S. drone at a seminary in Afghanistan.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/malala-...iban-defeated/

  75. #2155
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    It's great she's going back to Pakistan and imo she should live there. It's also great whatever good she does too.

    It's also great she is a millionaire now too.
    So you’re advising her to live in Pakistan,where she was shot.Yet you are living in the UK yourself?

  76. #2156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arham_PakFan View Post
    So you’re advising her to live in Pakistan,where she was shot.Yet you are living in the UK yourself?
    The savages have also vowed to kill her if she returns to Pakistan. Yet she is supposed to reside in Pakistan. The other gentleman however will continue to live in England


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  77. #2157
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    It's great she's going back to Pakistan and imo she should live there. It's also great whatever good she does too.

    It's also great she is a millionaire now too.
    We know what will you do if you were/are millionaire.

    And we are seeing or will continue to see what she is doing after becoming millionaire.


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  78. #2158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adijazz1706 View Post
    She didn't write the book, it was ghostwritten by some British war correspondent. The problem with Malala is that she is used as a propaganda symbol for America's 'civilising the savages' war in Afghanistan and NWFP
    I don't know about the propaganda thing but she sure has hell done a lot for the cause of women empowerment and education.
    By this logic one can start finding fault in almost anybody since no one is perfect.

    We need brave girls like her in India too.Long Live Malala!


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  79. #2159
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    Whatever you may think of her as an individual, she has done a lot of positive for Pakistanís PR on the world stage.

  80. #2160
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    I have dreamed of returning to Pakistan for five years, says emotional Malala in homecoming speech



    A visibly emotional Malala Yousafzai, the youngest Nobel laureate in history, couldn't contain her disbelief upon finally returning home after more than five years away following a Taliban attack in Swat in 2012.

    "I have dreamed of returning to Pakistan for the past five years," said a teary Yousafzai in a homecoming speech on Thursday at a function at Prime Minister House in Islamabad.

    Yousafzai returned to Pakistan on a four-day visit late Wednesday night accompanied by her father Ziauddin, Farah Mohamed and Amiro*byn Thompson. The 20-year-old Oxford University student from Swat has been living in the United Kingdom after surviving a Taliban attack which necessitated her departure abroad for medical treatment.

    "Today, I am very happy that, after five-and-a-half years, I have set foot on the soil of my nation again," she began in Urdu. Switching to Pashto, she said: "Today is the happiest day of my life, because I have returned to my country, I have stepped foot on my nation's soil again and am among my own people."

    "I am very happy, and I still can't believe ─ if I am honest ─ I still can't believe that this is actually happening, this is real. For the last five years, I have dreamed of returning back home. And whenever I would be in plane or a car and I would see the cities of London or New York, I would say [to myself], 'Just imagine that this is Pakistan, imagine that you are driving in lslamabad, imagine that this is Karachi', and it was never true. And now that I am seeing it today, I am very happy," she continued in Urdu, pausing to wipe tears away from her eyes.

    "I was born in 1999," she said, stopping to wipe more tears from her eyes. "I don't cry often," she laughed.

    "I am now 20-years-old, but I have seen a lot over the course of my life. From growing up in Swat ─ it was such a beautiful place ─ to then seeing terrorism and extremism from 2007 till 2009. And then seeing how many difficulties women and girls face in our society, and how we can fight against those challenges."

    "And then being attacked, leaving my country...Everything was happening itself, I could not control anything. If it was my call, I would never have left my country. The doctors performed surgery on me and saved my life. But then for further treatment I had to go out and continue my education there. But it was always my dream that I return to Pakistan. And I want to be able to move freely in the streets and meet and talk to people peacefully, without any fear. And [I hope that] it will be like my old home ─ just as it was."

    "So it's actually heartening, and I am grateful to all of you," she added.

    Yousafzai described Pakistan's future generations as "the biggest resources we have".

    "We need to invest in kids' education. The Malala Fund is already working on this. We have invested more than $6 million on girls' education in Pakistan, and we are continuing this work... I hope we can all join hands in this mission for the betterment of Pakistan, so that our future generation can receive the right education and women can become empowered, do jobs, stand on their own two feet and earn for themselves. That's the future we want to see."

    "I still can't believe I am here. perhaps if I spend more time here [it will sink in]... It is literally a dream," she concluded.


    'Welcome home, Malala'

    PM Abbasi, who also addressed the gathering after Yousafzai, said he is happy that a daughter of the nation has returned to her homeland.

    "You were a 13-year-old girl when you left and now you are the most famous citizen of the country. The entire world gave you honour and respect and Pakistan will [also]," he said.

    "It is your home. Now you are not an ordinary citizen, your security is our responsibility."

    "After your departure, we have fought a difficult war in which 6,500 soldiers, 25,000 policemen, paramilitary forces and civilians embraced martyrdom. Terrorism has been eliminated and still, we are fighting a war against terrorism. Set aside what the world says about us, Pakistan is fighting the largest war against terror. More than 200,000 soldiers are engaged in the war," he said.

    "Welcome home, Malala," he concluded.

    Earlier today, Yousafzai called on Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi at his office, where she was to attend the special function marking her achievements as an activist for girls education.

    Sources told DawnNewsTV that Yousafzai shared her future plans with the premier during their meeting, and that PM Abbasi assured her of his complete support in connection with the educational projects she wanted to work on.

    The premier also assured her of the provision of security in case she wants to visit anywhere in the country. The two also discussed prevailing situation in the country.

    PML-N leader Marvi Memon, Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting Marriyum Aurangzeb and State Minister for Information Technology and Telecom Anusha Rahman also attended the meeting.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1398265/i-...ecoming-speech


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