Haider -- The Movie ! On Kashmir ! Indian Army ! Indian Censor !


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  1. #1
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    Haider -- The Movie ! On Kashmir ! Indian Army ! Indian Censor !

    Just came back from the Haider, I though the movie deserved a seperate because of the content in the movie.

    Movie was powerful and one of the best I have seen, ending was so powerful.

    Reason for starting the thread though , is it had a lot of scenes against the Indian army. Kinda showed the movie from the separatists point of view.

    #boycotthaider has been trending on twitter since morning

    Vishal Bharadwaj's Shahid Kapoor starrer Haider released on Thurday and as reviews raving about the movie hit social media so did a mass call to boycott the movie which Twitter. #BoycottHaider trended as Twitter users claimed the movie was sympathetic to separatists and that it doesn't account for the suffering of the Kashmiri pandits who were forced to flee the state and insulted the Indian army.
    http://www.firstpost.com/bollywood/b...e-1740651.html

    All the reviews, for the movie have been around 4 to 5 . Mainstream actors like Shahid, Tabu ,KK,Irfan Khan directed by Vishal bharadwaj...most of all Indian censor board agreeing the movie. I am actually kinda happy that it got a release no fuss , nothing, such great reviews with out no cuts. Movie industry going in the right direction..

    Lot of debate going on twitter and other social platforms though....Movie made 9 crores on the first day !

    Trailer:

    Last edited by IgnitedMind; 3rd October 2014 at 09:18.

  2. #2
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    Is it a family friendly movie?

  3. #3
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    havent watched the movie yet. but this trend is disturbing. just because something doesnt agree with your POV, you start asking for a boycott. and it is educational to learn about the opposite POV too. this crowd (mostly on twitter) who want to shout down anything they dont agree with are a disgrace.
    Last edited by dhump; 23rd October 2014 at 12:49.

  4. #4
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    Nope ! Lot of Violence .....

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    I have heard good things about the movie too. Will be watching this in a couple of days.

  6. #6
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    #boycottHaider and #haiderTrueCinema are both trending on twitter......very interesting debate !!

    Was just reading aparently writer of the movie is a kashmiri seperatist !

  7. #7
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    Vishal Bhardwaj: Im not anti- national, but Ill comment on whats anti-human

    Handling a confrontational story set in Kashmir means walking a tightrope between catering to jingoism and risking the 'anti-national' tag. Vishal Bhardwaj explains how he balances that in Haider.

    After you finished Haider, and started the phase of promotions, three Kashmir-centric events of a fairly high visibility happened. One, the floods, and the relief operations, within which you had episodes such as Yasin Malik's asking people to not take the Army's help. Two, Bilawal Bhutto declaring that he would "take Kashmir back" - yet again proving that the easiest way for a politician to trend online is to make one grand declaration on Kashmir. Thirdly, Nawaz Sharif and Modi speak at the UN General Assembly and the usual expected statements on plebiscite and exported terror are exchanged. Kashmir perspectives tend to be very fixed - 'traitors', 'motherland', 'terror', 'brutality', 'saviours', and such catchphrases start playing in all debates. How do you view or consume these developments differently after having spent this much time understanding the Kashmir story?

    Actually, it's important to see it in its reality. What I have attempted to do is observe the life of a common family in Srinagar. And my film is set in a period, in 1995, when militancy was it at its peak. What a middle class family in Kashmir goes through in a time of conflict. How a family that doesn't belong to either side, that wants to live a normal life, how that family gets sucked into all this is my story. Politics is a backdrop, a very strong backdrop, but finally I am exploring the story of a family. Mujhe jo lagta hai, ki jo abhi tak hamari filmein mostly Kashmir pe bani hain, humnein almost always baahar se jaa kar dekha hai. We haven't seen it from the other side. What is the viewpoint of the people who have lived over there, what they have gone through - that has not been taken up. Sometimes we see it from the view of an intelligence officer, sometimes from the viewpoint of a journalist, sometimes it could be the story of a South Indian lady who is attempting to find her husband. That is the way the filmmaker likes to access what he thinks he can actually be closest to. I did not want to do that. Which is why I hadn't taken this up earlier, even though I'd wanted to make a movie on Kashmir for many years.

    Why?
    Because it's a conflicted state. It is a human tragedy. And a filmmaker is always interested in reflecting the times he lives in. For the past 25 years, I have grown up in the shadow of these conflicts - first Punjab and then Kashmir. Punjab finally stabilized, and perhaps people expected Kashmir to, as well, and there is a thought ki militancy ki age hoti hai, 10 years, it will finish. But it has been more than 20 years and the militancy in Kashmir is not finishing. I read the book by Basharat Peer, his memoirs of growing up in the 90s, and I found a lot of insight in that. So I took him up as my co-writer, we adapted Hamlet to that, and that's how my Kashmir film finally came into being.

    Suppose you were called to take part in a TV debate on Kashmir, and asked to comment on local people being asked to boycott help from the Army by the likes of Yasin Malik amid very heated opinions. What would you say?

    I don't think these questions were there in the first two or three days when the situation was really bad. They began to come up later. When things are really tough, I don't think it is about who is an Armyman and who is a separatist. It is about the basic value of human life and of saving that life. I think that sort of debate is an afterthought. I am not sure of who said what, but I think it was an afterthought, that question. In reverse, I remember seeing TV and Mirwaiz Umar was on TV and they were somewhere in Kashmir University, I think, and they were saying we need more boats. And at that time I think it was very insensitive on the part of a journalist who asked Mirwaiz, now do you feel gratitude towards the Army? I mean, what a time to ask that! Isn't it insensitive for us to ask that? Dekhiye hum aap ke liye kitna kar rahe hain. Aap unko apna maante hai na? Phir ehsaan jataane ki zaroorat kyun? And the thing is that the Army, which is actually doing the work, is not making a show of doing a favour. The Army has blinders - it keeps out of politics, does its work and goes back. Problem shuru hoti hai when politics enters areas such as flood relief and then the media tries to sensationalize things. These are times to win people over, not score points. And from what I have seen, there is a lot of respect for the Army there, it has done a lot of work.


    You are setting the story in 1995, and you are shooting in Kashmir for that story in 2014 - when it has moved ahead about two decades. How much of a change did you notice from 1995 when you spent time in Kashmir now?

    Elections have happened many times since then. Militancy is much lesser than what it was at its peak. And the common Kashmiri is fed up. Their business has been very badly affected amid all this. I think they want to live a normal life - yeh mujhe laga.

    When a filmmaker makes a movie where the concept of 'Hindustan' has a key role to play, isn't it easier to make something like a Gadar - no shades of grey, the hero effortlessly uproots handpumps and wins against everyone because he's a hot-blooded patriot? If a movie, in trying to tell both sides of a story, has shades of being 'anti-India', it's likely to cause angst as well as censor troubles.How do you walk that tightrope? How does a creative individual work his way around the jingoism of the mass audience?

    I'm also an Indian, I'm also a patriot, I also love my nation. So I won't do anything which is anti-national. But what is anti-human, I will definitely comment on it. That is what I have done in the film as well. I am definitely not anti-national, I am only against what is anti-human. I have had not a single objection raised to any scene, any dialogue in my film being cleared (by the CBFC).

    Surely you would have expected some objections, given the nature of the topic?

    Yeh toh hum assume kar ke chalte hain. Aajkal ki film is the easiest punching bag. Anyone wants publicity, all he has to do is file a PIL against a film. Meri toh koi film release hoti hai toh mujh pe chalees cases hote hain. Jin previous films mein kuch controversial nahi thaa un mein bhi hua, is mein jab release hogi tab pata chalega kitne hote hain!

    Are we getting increasingly hyper-touchy and sensitive, or is it that publicity-seeking by slamming cinema is becoming an art form?

    Dono hi cheezein hain. A film is the easiest way to gain publicity.

    Aren't societies supposed to get more evolved and mature with time? Why is the reverse happening here?

    I really don't know, but so many basics aren't taken care of in our system. The begging mafia exists at every traffic light in our country. Isn't the government aware that most beggars don't beg for their individual needs but are controlled by a mafia? Isn't the government aware that if you have to buy a flat, you have to pay 40 to 50% in black? Everyone knows that. What is being done about it? A person like me, if I have to buy a flat, I have money only in white, what do I do? I have to turn my white into black to make the purchase, I have to consult a CA who will tell me how to turn white money into black! Disgusting! Hamara yeh attitude hai na, ki jahaan tak hamara personal kaam nikal raha hai, society gayi tel lene. If giving a hundred rupee bribe gets me a berth to sleep at night in a train, we will all give it, I will also give it. This is part of our psyche. We are getting to be a morally corrupt society. Maybe the next generation will be able to change something, I can't see it happening very soon. These are just my personal views, though.

    You've said earlier that "I needed a place with a political conflict" as a setting for this movie. Punjab has also had a bloody and violent phase. Naxalism is today rated as a greater internal security threat than Kashmir. Did it occur to you to place your Hamlet in either of these locations?

    Naxal topic tha mere dimaag mein kaafi time tak. Prakash Jha nein in the meantime own kar liya Naxalism ko (laughs). Many movies got made on it. And then the risk is that audiences can begin to respond like "arey yaar ek aur aa gayi", they can get put off.

    You also said that we have not made any mainstream movie on Kashmir in all these years. Isn't that true of most of our political questions and our political personalities? We have not made any mainstream movie on Nehru, we have not made any mainstream on Patel - if we did, we would have had to explore the questions of accession, plebiscite, wouldn't we?

    Banane kahaan dete hain, bataiye? Indira Gandhi par nahi banni chahiye film? What a graph! What a beginning, middle, end! Bananey denge? Nahi bananey denge. Phir hoga ki jaise woh chahte hain, waise... Take Nehruji ki story. Kitni colourful life hai, kitni committed life hai. Aadmi swaraj ke liye fight kare toh kya colourful nahi ho sakta? Lekin you can't make a film like that - yahaan toh laathi utha kar maarne ke liye pehle taiyyar rehte hain!

    But even the movies that are made - do our audiences consume them? I recall meeting Laxmi Sehgal in Kanpur when Benegal's 'Bose: The Forgotten Hero' released, to ask her what she thought of her portrayal in the movie. She hadn't seen it - it wasn't running in a single theatre in the city! Why don't movies on political issues or political biographies work here?

    See, there's another side to it. Nobody knew the Tamil actor of Roja - but the film was a huge hit. I don't think it's always about whether it is political or not. It has also got to do with the storytelling. Aap mazedaar film banaiye pehle. Is kism ki filmein - yeh laddoo ke andar kadwi dawai chhupa ke dene waali baat hai. Upar se laddoo lagna chahiye. Jaise munh mein poora rakha, jab ab thook bhi nahi sakte - tab...! Woh laddoo toh lagna chahiye na. Agar chamcham nahi hai, chandi ka warq nahi laga hai, toh phir Kanpur mein nahi lagegi film! Mainstream mein reh kar yeh karna is a very difficult task - but that's the only way to reach people.

    Aapki Kashmir ki dawai Shakespeare ke laddoo mein hai?

    (Laughs) Ji, main Shakespeare ke kandhe pe rakh kar goli chalata hoon!

    What's the identity crisis a filmmaker like you faces when he has to balance Box Office returns and your sensibilities - how much dawaai, how much laddoo?

    These questions come up, in every film. But I don't do things for others. I make the film for myself. Mujhe kal sharm nahi aani chahiye isko dekhne mein. If I have a doubt about that, that's when I put a stick out and stop it. And I hope that some others will relate to my sensibility. And there must be enough people who share that sensibility for the producers to come back and put money in my movies. I make myself the audience. If I will look back at something I have done five years down the line aur mujhe sharm aayegi - main woh nahi karta.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/e...w/43810239.cms

  8. #8
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    kashmiri separatists are the darling of the leftist indian media, especially that **** yasin malik who is invited to JNU (the den of leftist extremists). but surely there must be some valid reasons for the separatism. even if the movie is one sided, we must allow all opinions in public sphere. debate against opinions you don't agree with, instead of trying to shout them down.

  9. #9
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    I actually agree the movie is one sided, There are very few scenes or dialogues pro indian army. but thats okay . People on that side are humans whose stories need to be heard too. It is one such story.

    For a person involved in the mess, that one side is his whole story.

  10. #10
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    Vishal Bharadwaj's Shahid Kapoor starrer Haider released on Thurday and as reviews raving about the movie hit social media so did a mass call to boycott the movie which Twitter. #BoycottHaider trended as Twitter users claimed the movie was sympathetic to separatists and that it doesn't account for the suffering of the Kashmiri pandits who were forced to flee the state and insulted the Indian army.
    Time someone makes a movie on them too.

  11. #11
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    Yep, heard the movie was pretty powerful.. The Kashmir issue may have different vantage points and this is one of them.. We should respect that, but both sides need not be judgmental..

  12. #12
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    This movie was banned in Pakistan. Makes me wonder which side it appeases to if even Indians are disliking the subject matter?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0tt0man View Post
    This movie was banned in Pakistan. Makes me wonder which side it appeases to if even Indians are disliking the subject matter?
    It wants Kashmir to be a separate state perhaps.. Being disliked by both countries

  14. #14
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    ^^^ Pretty much, but concentration was on india...there were dialogues here and there on pakistan... ! There is a dialogue by shahid in the movie..I am just paraphrasing from what I remember...

    "From that side pakistan..and from this side India...are leeching on us. "

    It had some very brave dialogues against AFSPA - Armed Forces Special Powers Act !
    Last edited by IgnitedMind; 3rd October 2014 at 11:16.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by desi_launda View Post
    Time someone makes a movie on them too.
    There is one movie that i know of "Sheen"

    The only way their plight can be addressed is if a good mainstream director makes a movie on them.

  16. #16
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    I don't see what the problem is. There are so many over the top patriotic Indian movies, so what is wrong with one going the other way?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indiafan View Post
    I don't see what the problem is. There are so many over the top patriotic Indian movies, so what is wrong with one going the other way?
    Exactly. the meaning of patriotism has been perverted to mean blind obedience towards the state, and hatred against the other opinion.
    give me a Haider over hundreds of sunny deol movies anyday (not leone, that i would prefer over haider).

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indiafan View Post
    I don't see what the problem is. There are so many over the top patriotic Indian movies, so what is wrong with one going the other way?
    Actually there should not be any problem, but lot of people are asking to boycott the movie ...I guess thats okay...boycotting is a right ! atleast not asking for a ban..

    heard the movie just stopped showing in kashmir !

  19. #19
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    Liked this review in The hindu

    It takes some amount of guts, ambition and skill to ride two wild horses — at the same time. And Vishal Bhardwaj is in glorious form as he churns out the best of his Shakespeare trilogy, an adaptation of Hamlet… which is also an unflinching look at the recent political history of Kashmir that bred many Haiders thirsting for revenge against the brothers of their fathers based on a ghost version of history. A story so audacious that Mother India crosses the Line of Control, not just metaphorically.

    While the political repercussions of juxtaposing the Kashmir situation with Hamlet can be argued endlessly, especially in the context of the depiction of the Indian army, there is no denying that mass graves of disappeared people were indeed found. It is a proven and uncomfortable part of Kashmir’s history where a few people with power gave an entire force a bad name. But the Kashmir issue is not just about who did what but about the why: Revenge. Misguided youth baying for blood goaded on by manipulative politicians.

    Haider then is the story of a flawed, misguided, conflicted man, not a hero. Shahid Kapoor is a revelation as a man with a wounded soul and existential crisis torn between his love for Arshia, his Ophelia (even Shraddha Kapoor is thoroughly convincing) and his hate for her father. He represents Kashmiri youth (whose homes were destroyed during a painfully turbulent phase in recent history) haunted by the past and coping with the newly formed alliance at home.

    Haider’s old home was destroyed thanks to the war between militants and the army. His father (Narendra Jha is quite the find of the film) was a casualty of a misunderstanding, representative of a generation that literally disappeared because of doubt — when the State could not take a chance or tell who was a militant and who wasn’t.

    The mother (Tabu representing Mother India shines in one of the strongest roles ever written for women in modern cinematic history) is trying to move on and trying to embrace normalcy, even if this sense of security is given by the people responsible for the destruction of her family (Kay Kay Menon, as the uncle with designs on the mother, pulls off an equally complex role with ease).

    What happens when the boy is given a gun to get his revenge?

    This is a murderous and explosive family dynamic — a ticking time-bomb and Haider is all about the tension that goes down to the wire with the timeless question that echoes all through the narrative.

    Vishal Bhardwaj crafts this nervous tension in pale white Kashmir, lets it simmer all through the first half, soaking you in the environment slowly and indulgently till the dramatic entry of the ghost (Irrfan Khan in simply one of the finest roles he has ever got) and then stokes the flames, sexes it up with a rocking score, loaded lyrics, colourful choreography and brilliantly staged monologues — all as interesting interpretations of scenes from the source material. The second half is when the politics of Kashmir impregnates Hamlet. Shahid’s long monologue and the choreography of ‘Bismil’ are two of the best moments in Hindi cinema of recent times. Will he or won’t he take the revenge he has been craving for?

    Haider is about one man’s journey from the ruins of his home to the refuge of a graveyard and his ultimate choice. Vishal bookends his film with these two homes: A home that gets blasted into a graveyard and the second a graveyard that shows him the way home. It doesn’t get more lyrical than this in Hindi cinema.

    Lyricist Gulzar, writer-director Vishal Bhardwaj, and writer Basharat Peer have given us an instant classic, a literary epic (the screenplay is out in the stores too) with a lesson to learn from recent history. Haider is an incredibly brave uncompromising film made with loads of conviction with blatant disregard to market conventions, one that will make you cheer during the meta-moment in the film when Salman Khan fans get their skulls crushed.

    Get your minds blown. Forget your phone, forget your watch. Brush up on your Shakespeare or at least Wiki it. And you will find Haider to be a truly rewarding cinematic experience.
    http://www.thehindu.com/features/cin...cle6469064.ece

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by CricketCartoons View Post
    no, that was during my boyhood phase. these girls are all younger to me. one from UP, one punjaban, one from saudi arabia (indian origin). become good friends, and i find that finally the girl in me is at peace, because i giggle and gossip with them.
    I wish I could have been like you when I was younger.

  21. #21
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    The folks #boycotting it are unwittingly giving it free publicity.

    Not that anything like this should be boycotted in the first place - if the movie is going against the grain, brilliant. Adds some variety to the industry and in some critics' eyes can be seen to be the exception that proves the rule - sort of thing.

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    I am glad the Indian's are accepting that there are always two sides to a story, about time. They should behave in a mature manner instead of all the propaganda rubbish.

  23. #23
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    Terrible Movie, completely anti-India. Not sure why any Indians would watch it.

    If people want to watch the truth than movies like Mission Kashmir, Border and countless other will show you the truth.

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    I just came back from the cinema watching this film.

    All I will say is after a long time have I not seen such a brilliant well made movie. Simply beyond expectations.

    Everything was stunningly well made - from the beautiful Kashmiri scenery, to the brilliant acting Especially Shahid Kapoor, the screenplay and dialogues were top notch and the message at the end was a very meaningful one.

    Of course this film is made on the Kashmir political background but I really want to praise the team for not just pointing fingers one way.

    Honestly this is how Indian movies should be made - above all a damn solid story.

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    A time will come when Bollywood would make better movies than Hollywood. Pakistanis would be still watching it but at least we will watch something of quality unlike now a days.

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    Watched it yesterday. For once a balanced movie on Kashmir but can't say for sure that it represents the views of majority Kashmiris.

  27. #27
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    I, like many others of my generation, grew up on an oily diet of Kashmir masala films.

    Roja. Which, besides introducing this guy called A R Rahman, gave hope to boys like me that you could have a physique like ArvindSwamy but still get to curl your fingers around the shapely waist of a Madhu, if you play the marriage cards right or if the script-writer writes that in the script for you.

    Pukaar. Where sinister plots from across the border are spoiled by Anil Kapoor’s verdant chest hair.

    Mission Kashmir. A convicted Bombay Blast accused played a patriotic cop and where the man who single-handedly wiped out polio played a terrorist.

    Countless other action films, their names a-blur, typically starring Sunny Deol, in which all laws of physics and common sense could be violated as long as Pakistani *** was being mausichi-ed.

    The rhetoric was simple. Pakistan was evil, India was good, Kashmiris were misguided and all would be well in the end if the pesky Pakistanis and their agents were demolished.

    When I came out of the theater after seeing Haider, I was happy I had seen a film that had flipped the formula. I was happy that finally the censors were letting audiences decide what was wrong and what was right and that there were no bans or stay-orders or any of the other silliness that has so stifled the free expression of ideas in India, a fact that was doubly surprising given that our wise mediwallahs had been prophesying a dystopian Hitlerian Bharat of suppress-oppress-depress ever since that man took over.



    Haider is a film that deserves to be seen. It is about as ingenious an adaptation of Hamlet that you could hope to see, true to form and structure and with enough “A-ha that was nicely done” moments which make it more than worth the price of admission. Tabu is sensational, the cinematography marvelous, and Shahid Kapoor abandons his “saaj daaj ke tashan mein rahena” mainstream leading man avatar for something different, the kind of risk most of his contemporaries would not even consider taking. Haider is not perfect of course, with Shraddha Kapoor recycling her Aarohi expressions, the Rosencratz-Guildenstern Salmaniacs hammy in a Keshto Mukherjee comedy track kind of way, and the politics of the film suffocating the narrative at several places. But even then it is pretty darn impressive, particularly in an age where people like me who love cinema have given up on Bollywood producing anything except 100-plus-crore targeted products of the Bang-Bang variety.

    The pity though is that Haider is just as black and white as anything Sunny Deol would have put his name to, as jingoistic in its propaganda and as selective in its portrayal of reality as its less pretentious cousins.

    To be honest, any time you name your villain as Abhrush as Pukaar does or the director’s credit says Guddu Dhanoa, you are not expecting the audience to take you seriously.

    However Haider wants you to trust that it is painting the real picture of Kashmir, anchoring the story to actual incidents and making the film realistic and gritty, and then for good measure, harping on the “this is the true story of Kashmir” angle in the movie promotions.

    This is definitely not fiction, in the way Mission Kashmir is, and it would be naive to argue otherwise.

    It is pointed political propaganda.

    And that’s where it goes wrong for me.

    Haider starts off with the honest, upright doctor, with the sad gentle face, who also own ponderous books titled Physics in his library (alert: intellectual), being called by “independence fighters” to take out the infected appendix of its leader. Now being a dutiful doctor, he not only treats his patient, a criminal as per the laws of the Indian state, but extends the scope of the Hippocrates oath to also hide him in his emergency vehicle and bring him home. Now in some places, this might be defined as “harboring a criminal and aiding and abetting crimes against the state” but in the world of “Haider”, this is positively heroic, because of course the Indian state is the criminal and this person is a freedom fighter. The Indian Army comes, the doctor comes out holding his passport where he is identified by a masked traitor sitting in the car (There is a gigantic plot-hole here, given the resolution, but I am not getting into that, trying to keep this as spoiler-free as possible). The Indian Army goes into his house where they are fired on by the Azaadi-fighters with AK47s. Taking losses, the commanding officer decides to mortar down the house because he does not want to risk the lives of any more of his officers.

    In some other film, this might seem to be the rational decision given that there are terrorists armed to the teeth firing back from the house.

    But Haider is no “some other film”. Here it’s all symbolic. Tabu is the state of Kashmir, Shahid Kapoor the conscience, and Kay Kay Menon…well watch it to see what he is. And that broken down house is symbolic of the cruelty of the Indian state, as we are shown how Haider, the son of the doctor, mopes about its ruins, remembering days gone by.

    Bharadwaj is pulling the heartstrings here and there is no doubt where your sympathies are supposed to lie.

    And so it goes, Haider alternating between story and blunt political sloganeering.

    There is nothing new about the version of events of course, this is the official azaadi narrative.

    The Kashmiri-fighters are innocent lambs who only fire when fired upon, the real terrorists are the Ikhwan-ul-Muslemoons, agents of the Indian army tasked with extrajudicial killings of the Azaadi-fighters, Kashmir is a big open-air prison for its denizens, and the Armed Forces Special Powers Act is the worst instrument of India’s aggression.

    As I said, nothing new.

    However even more important than what Haider keeps in is what it keeps out.

    While there are anti-India graffiti scribbled everywhere on the walls, there are no green flags of Islam (not any I saw), no Islamic slogans, no “Kashmiri Hindu men leave Kashmir but leave your wives and daughters” naarebaazi, or any kind of religious symbolism that characterizes the radical-Islamic nature of the Kashmir struggle. In each frame, Bharadwaj drains out the radical green and colors the struggle with the neutral black color of secular suffering and “azaadi”. This de-religionization of the most radical agitations is the intellectual subterfuge that allows self-avowed Leftists to throw their lot in with Islamic-fundamentalist power-grabs all over the world, despite inconvenient developments like the underdog-against-evil-overlord Syrian independence struggle morphing into ISIS, and allows them to frame the battle in Kashmir as one waged by an evil expansionist state against innocent citizens, and not one of a secular nation protecting itself from Talibanization/ISIS-ization.

    Moving on.

    A standard author-trick is to make an evil character say a number of statements. Once you discredit a large number of those statements later on in the narrative, the ones you don’t discredit explicitly become false by association.

    Bharadwaj does this in Haider. Here is how.

    Ashish Vidyarthi plays an Indian Army commander who, in a press conference, expounds on the policy of using terrorists to kill terrorists, or as it is known technically “Jaise lohe lohe ko kaatta hai” from the film Sholay, historically a strategy used to break the Naxals in Bengal and Khalistanis in Punjab. Since those familiar with the history of the state know this to be true, it is obvious that we are not in the realm of total fiction, we are talking “what actually happened” now. Ashish Vidyarthi then says that the Indian Army does not torture, it interrogates. The movie then demolishes that “lie”, showing multiple instances of inhuman torture on supposedly innocent Kashmiri folk. (As a matter of fact, the original torture sequences were more graphic it seems).

    Then Vidyarthi says that the freedom struggle is an expansionist design of Pakistan. That the movie wants us to believe is the second “Indian lie”. In a subsequent plot point, another treacherous Indian agent calls Person X a Pakistani ISI agent, and since this treacherous Indian agent only lies and the said person is not shown to be a Pakistani, there we have another falsehood.

    Two lies. Now comes the third statement.

    The Kashmiri Pandit exodus. Vidyarthi throws it out there, and by association, that becomes the third “Indian lie”. Once again, this is very much part of the Kashmiri-struggle narrative, the fact that the exodus of the Kashmiri Pandits is either false or grossly exaggerated or entirely voluntary, and that the mention of Kashmiri Pandits in any conversation on Kashmir is done with the express intent of discrediting the noble Azaadi fighters and bringing a kind of moral equivalence between them and the “Indians”. Of course the fig-leaf used by the makers of the movie would be that it is to give the other side of the story, but that is absolute tommyrot, given that it comes from the mouth of the villain whose every other statement is a lie, and most importantly because, the film never once tries to tell the other side of the story in any serious way(and yes the closing dedication to the Army was so egregiously “for the censors” to be almost laugh out loud funny, like porn films that end with the message “Porn is bad”)

    Again a film does not require balance, it can be as tunnel-visioned and as one-sided as it likes. It just needs to work as a film. Haider does. Most definitely.

    But to sell it as the true story of the Kashmiri struggle requires some…what’s the word now?
    Chutzpah.

    [PS: My book Yatrik is now out. Here are details
    http://greatbong.net/2014/10/12/few-thoughts-on-haider/

  28. #28
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    The best thing about the Haider film was the two actors who talked and dressed like Salman Khan while working for the police, in some ironic way it was showing the other extreme, that of kashmiri youth dressed and talking daft after being brainwashed by on screen issues


    "If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles"

  29. #29
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    ive never ever seen a boycott movement work.

    if anything it always does the opposite

  30. #30
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    Brilliant Movie.Perhaps Bhardwajs best.Better than Maqbool and far better than Omkara.The subtle potrayal of the oedipius complex was brilliant.


    aaj mujh ko bahut burā kah kar
    aap ne naam to liyā merā
    -----Jaun Eliya

  31. #31
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    rubbish article.


    when tyranny becomes law, rebellion becomes duty

  32. #32
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    incredible performance from Shahid Kapoor, dude simply went to another level.

    2nd half and the ending was a bit of a drag but fantastic film, no doubt.


    Proud Shehri of Misbah Ka Pakistan

  33. #33
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    Top film, went in with high expectations and didn't come out disappointed. Great stuff from Shahid as well.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madplayer View Post
    rubbish article.
    A little explanation on why you think so ?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricketjoshila View Post
    Brilliant Movie.Perhaps Bhardwajs best.Better than Maqbool and far better than Omkara.The subtle potrayal of the oedipius complex was brilliant.



    Actually that was the most understated part of the movie....requires genius and class of vishal to potray it with such subtleness and still put across a point.
    Last edited by IgnitedMind; 23rd October 2014 at 20:33.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by IgnitedMind View Post
    Actually that was the most understated part of the movie....requires genius and class of vishal to potray it with such subtleness and still put across a point.
    Did you misquote someone?


    aaj mujh ko bahut burā kah kar
    aap ne naam to liyā merā
    -----Jaun Eliya

  37. #37
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    yes, I was actually going to quote your post about oedipius complex .Editted.

  38. #38
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    Fantastic movie for those who knows only one side of the reality. Unfortunately and sadly the state of Kashmir is being taken to road of no recovery by Millitants and Army both whom is neither right nor wrong.

    They have shown a neutral perspective not sure why it is banned in Pak

  39. #39
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    This great bong supported Israel terrorist acts.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by CricketCartoons View Post
    havent watched the movie yet. but this trend is disturbing. just because something doesnt agree with your POV, you start asking for a boycott. and it is educational to learn about the opposite POV too. this crowd (mostly on twitter) who want to shout down anything they dont agree with are a disgrace.
    +1

    Particularly when it's a work of fiction/entertainment - those who want to watch it should and those who don't shouldn't.

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