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  1. #1
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    "I plan to represent Australia in the World Twenty20 in 2020" : Usman Qadir

    With the weight of expectations placed on his shoulders by virtue of being the son of the legendary Abdul Qadir, the 24-year-old Usman Qadir has had to endure some testing times in the past few years. The inability to break into the national side has been a source of great frustration for the young leg-spinner and it would appear that his patience with Pakistan’s system of selection even at domestic level has reached its limit as he spoke in detail about his plans to apply for Australian citizenship in an exclusive interview with PakPassion.net.




    “I was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 around the time when the Under-19 World Cup ended. At that time, I did not accept the offer on the advice of my father, as he felt that I had done well at the Under-19 level and had a bright future ahead with the Pakistan side. I went back to Pakistan and was ignored for selection from the national side. I then told the Pakistan Cricket Board that I am going back to Australia which prompted them to add my name to the Pakistan squad for the 2013 tour of West Indies. However, very close to the time of departure for the squad, my name was removed without any reason due to what can only be described as a case of ‘dislike’ for a certain player. It did not stop there, I was ignored for selection when I performed for Pakistan A even after I out-performed the likes of Yasir Shah. Later on, I was inducted in the Lahore Qalandars squad for the Pakistan Super League in 2017 but once again, I was not played in even one game. I recently came over to Australia a few months ago with Lahore Qalandars along with some other players too. Make no mistake, I really admire players like Salman Irshad and his performance in Grade B cricket in Australia, but despite my excellent Grade A cricket results in Australia, he was preferred over me for this year’s PSL by Lahore Qalandars, purely due to political reasons. But, thankfully, I am not concerned by all that as I now have a chance to play in Australia, thanks to former Australia player Justin Langer’s advice and assistance. I want to make my father proud, but I cannot do that by languishing in Pakistan and waiting for opportunities which will never arise.”

    The prospect of Usman playing in Australia must be a matter of concern for Abdul Qadir whose services for his country are well known. Indeed, it had been Abdul Qadir who had first advised Usman to seek his fortunes in the country of his birth. It would appear that, even the die-hard commitment of Abdul Qadir to ensure his son represents his country seems to be wavering as Usman explained.

    “I think my father was shocked and taken aback in the manner I have been ignored by the selectors in Pakistan and reality seems to have set in. I reminded my father that I had never depended on nepotism or connections for selection as there was no challenge in that for a cricketer like me. I think even a steadfast patriotic person like my father finally saw the light and told me that I should seek my fortune in Australia and I would have his full support.”

    Whilst leaving one’s country of birth and making Australia his home may look like a daunting move for any young player, Usman has a plan to make this a reality and is clear about his next steps, “My goal is clear. I plan to represent Australia in the World Twenty20 in 2020 in Australia. I wish to use the same process of acquiring the ‘Distinguished Talent Visa’, which Fawad Ahmed also used to allow him to play for Australia. This visa allows any talented sportsman to gain permanent residency in Australia and this is the path I wish to follow as well.”

    Having the desire to play for a country like Australia is an admirable goal but as Usman Qadir explained, he believes he also has the talent and skills to beat the tough competition in Australia to find a place in the national team and make his wish come true.

    “One must always have confidence in one’s abilities. This has always been the case for me and for a good reason because as my stats from Under 19 or Pakistan A tours prove, I have always performed in an outstanding manner. I am fortunate to be hoping to play in a system which is structured to ensure that the best talent comes to the fore. They keep an eye on each player in the system to monitor his performance; they even keep an eye on which batting position a player is batting in. No small detail escapes the eyes of the administrators in Australia. What I am really looking forward to is to show the world that I will be moving ahead in my career based purely on my talent and not due to connections which seems to be the case in Pakistan. It is a little sad though that even if I do succeed in Australia, many people will still say that Usman is Abdul Qadir’s son and that is why he is playing there. Unfortunately, no one will talk about the hard work which goes behind success in a place like Australia.”

    Of course, Usman Qadir will not be the first or the last Pakistan player to have left his country to explore better prospects for himself elsewhere. The case of Imran Tahir serves as an excellent example of a player who was struggling to make a name for himself in Pakistan but has become famous since his migration to South Africa. For Usman Qadir, there can be no better example than Imran Tahir to show him that success is possible by moving to another country where he is appreciated more.

    “Imran Tahir has shown how one can rise to the top by moving to an environment where one is valued for his skills and not whom he knows. He is like a brother to me and we speak on a regular basis and his advice on my move to Australia will always be very useful. He isn’t the only one I ask for advice as I have an excellent network of family and friends who are there to help me out.”

    Leaving one’s home country and settling in a foreign land to play cricket for Australia sounds like a tough task in emotional terms, but for Usman Qadir there is no element of guilt involved in this decision as he feels that he has suffered a lot due to the vagaries of the system in Pakistan. Whilst he will be the first one to acknowledge his roots, he has no remorse about moving to what he sees as greener pastures where he has a chance to shine and prove his mettle, “I have no regrets at all about making the move to Australia as I have tried my best in Pakistan and all doors to selection have been systemically closed on my face. I will take this next part of my career as a challenge to face and overcome, in the same way I have done so far. It seems that in Pakistan being related to a famous former cricketer disqualifies you from selection, in the same way it’s to others. In Australia, there is no such issue where players like Shaun Marsh and Mitchell Marsh are representing Australia. The same applies to Mark Waugh’s son as well. But in Pakistan, this seems to be an issue and players like I suffer due to this. All this is in the past and my goal now is to play for Australia in 2020 and I know that I am in a place where my performance and not petty politics will decide my future”, he concluded.


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  2. #2
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    good luck to the guy.But his Fc stats are not impressive to be even considered for A tours,

  3. #3
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    This is the first time I have heard someone saying that it hurts their chances of getting selected if they are related to some former cricketer.
    Don't get too ahead of yourself mate, just keep your head down and work hard. It's not like Australia doesnt have a single spinner. With Lyon, Zampa, Swepson, Pope and Agar in the line up, I can't see Usman getting ahead of these. Plus I don't believe he was able to outperform Yasir Shah in 4 day cricket after 2011.

  4. #4
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    Good luck to him, but I don't see how he could've been selected for the Pak team I don't see any performances to grant a selection.

  5. #5
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    Please! You gotta be kiddin' me! I just don't see him turning out for the Aussies. He will just be another few matches wonder like Fawad Khan if he manages to get a cap. Getting in to the Aussie side is much harder then doing so for Pak.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by PakLFC View Post
    Please! You gotta be kiddin' me! I just don't see him turning out for the Aussies. He will just be another few matches wonder like Fawad Khan if he manages to get a cap. Getting in to the Aussie side is much harder then doing so for Pak.
    As a spinner its easier, especially in their one day set up as they lack a good spinner in their LOI cricket. Not saying Qadir is the guy but its easier to compete with the like of Zampa, Swepson, Holland, Boyce then it is to compete with Shadab, Yasir, Asghar, Mir, Raza, Irfan etc

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titan24 View Post
    As a spinner its easier, especially in their one day set up as they lack a good spinner in their LOI cricket. Not saying Qadir is the guy but its easier to compete with the like of Zampa, Swepson, Holland, Boyce then it is to compete with Shadab, Yasir, Asghar, Mir, Raza, Irfan etc
    Don't know who or how good the Aussie spinners are at the moment. For us only Shadab is playing these days. Don't even know if Usman is any better then his many brothers who have represented Pak at U-19 level.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  8. #8
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    Australia is the toughest place to bowl leg spin. Big names, one after the other, have all come undone on tracks there except for Warne and McGill both of whom had outstanding skill.

    Good luck to Usman but of all the places to choose, he's picked the toughest one to succeed as a leg spinner.

  9. #9
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    Good luck to him. A shame he gave up on playing for Pakistan.

  10. #10
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    good for him , his father was a legend but that does not mean he gets a direct entry into PAK team, and i cant agree with his statment that his performance is better then yasir

  11. #11
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    Finally he got the message. Doesn't have any talent but still wants to play for Pakistan.

  12. #12
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    Karachi [Pakistan], Feb 19 (ANI): After being repeatedly ignored by the Pakistan selectors, Usman Qadir, son of Pakistani spin bowler Abdul Qadir, has revealed that he is planning to represent Australia in the World Twenty20 in 2020.

    The failure to break into the national side and the expectations placed on his shoulders by virtue of being the son of legendary Abdul Qadir, Usman's patience seems to have reached its limit as he spoke about his plans to apply for Australian citizenship.

    Usman revealed that he was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 during the Under-19 World Cup, but he ignored the same.

    "I was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 around the time when the Under-19 World Cup ended. At that time, I did not accept the offer on the advice of my father, as he felt that I had done well at the Under-19 level and had a bright future ahead with the Pakistan side. I went back to Pakistan and was ignored for selection from the national side. I then told the Pakistan Cricket Board that I am going back to Australia which prompted them to add my name to Australia which prompted them to add my name to the Pakistan squad for the 2013 tour of West Indies. However, very close to the time of departure for the squad, my name was removed without any reason due to what can only be described as a case of 'dislike' for a certain playerKarachi [Pakistan], Feb 19 (ANI): After being repeatedly ignored by the Pakistan selectors, Usman Qadir, son of Pakistani spin bowler Abdul Qadir, has revealed that he is planning to represent Australia in the World Twenty20 in 2020.

    The failure to break into the national side and the expectations placed on his shoulders by virtue of being the son of legendary Abdul Qadir, Usman's patience seems to have reached its limit as he spoke about his plans to apply for Australian citizenship.

    Usman revealed that he was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 during the Under-19 World Cup, but he ignored the same.

    "I was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 around the time when the Under-19 World Cup ended. At that time, I did not accept the offer on the advice of my father, as he felt that I had done well at the Under-19 level and had a bright future ahead with the Pakistan side. I went back to Pakistan and was ignored for selection from the national side. I then told the Pakistan Cricket Board that I am going back to Australia which prompted them to add my name to ," the Pakpassion.net quoted Usman as saying.

    The 24-year-old further revealed that his selection issues did not stop there as he continued to being snubbed even out-performing the likes of Yasir Shah for Pakistan A.

    "I recently came over to Australia a few months ago with Lahore Qalandars along with some other players too. Make no mistake, I really admire players like Salman Irshad and his performance in Grade B cricket in Australia, but despite my excellent Grade A cricket results in Australia, he was preferred over me for this year's PSL by Lahore Qalandars, purely due to political reasons," he said.

    However, Usman said that he now could no longer afford to wait for opportunities which will never arise in Pakistan and, therefore, looking to make his father proud by representing Australia.

    "My goal is clear. I plan to represent Australia in the World Twenty20 in 2020 in Australia. I wish to use the same process of acquiring the 'Distinguished Talent Visa', which Fawad Ahmed also used to allow him to play for Australia. This visa allows any talented sportsman to gain permanent residency in Australia and this is the path I wish to follow as well," he said.

    Usman has appeared in eight first-class matches for Pakistan taking seven wickets, while he made 17 List A matches bagging 15 wickets.

    https://www.aninews.in/news/sports/c...2191614590001/
    Last edited by UN talkz; 19th February 2018 at 11:12.


    [QUOTE=Mamoon;9742871]Don't see us ascending from 7th/6th in the near future. 5-0 in England and South Africa awaits us, we will be lucky to even draw one match. [/QUOTE]

  13. #13
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    If your heart says Pakistan but your wallet says Australia, you're never going to be successful.

  14. #14
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    He compares himself to a newbie fast bowler... just shows the sense of entitlement in the lad...

    Funny how he thinks he will be given the distinguished talent visa... last played grade cricket in 2013...... so has he got a contract with anyone yet?

  15. #15
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    Some have self confidence this one is too over confident and cocky.

  16. #16
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    I'm glad that he "never depended on nepotism or connections for selection", however, how does he feel about depending on good performances when it comes to selection?

    I wish the guy all the best & if he finds success in Australia - good on him.

    Having said that - the irony is that if his last name wasn't Qadir, this wouldn't even be news worthy and he wouldn't even be getting any media attention whatsoever. Therefore in a round about way he is relying on nepotism and connections to get media attention.

    He's right in saying Tahir has done very well for himself and it could be argued that he 'slipped through the cracks' of the Pakistani system. However, with the likes of Ajmal, Yasir and Shadab around - it could also be argued that Tahir rightfully wouldn't have been able to make it into the national team.

    Look at Fawad Ahmed. When he moved to Aus there was a lot of chat about "another one slipping through the system", however, here we are 5 years since he last played for Aus - and that too - after an international career spanning a total of 5 limited over international matches.

    The fact is that Usman has not put in the consistent performances which warrant such chat. If this was coming from someone like Fawad Alam or Saddaf Hussain it would make sense, but not from Usman.

    To be brutally honest - the bottom line of all this (in my mind) is that Usman has bought into the hype which has been built around him by the media thanks to the "Qadir" name. Due to this, rather than being willing to put in the hard yards and work for his place in the national team, he is willing to take what he seems to be the "easy way out", even though he has convinced himself that he is "doing the right thing".

    Anyway - that's just my interpretation of the situation and I may be way off the mark. Regardless - all the best to Usman and good luck to him with his career down under. If he is even half as good as he thinks he is, at the very least he should be able to secure a decent career as a domestic cricketer in Australia.

  17. #17
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    ‪If im not mistaken, it was Lahore Qalandars who had brought him back in the cricketing folds with PSL given his lacklustre performance in FC Cricket. Qalandars chose him for touring Australia and see what he’s given back. Not good‬

  18. #18
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    In 8 First Class matches, he has taken 7 wickets after bowling 85 overs; I am sorry, why was he not selected to play for the world XI right away?

    Seriously, even in List A matches, in 17 matches he has taken 15 wickets with an economy of 5.26.

    T20's, he did not fare much better with 11 wickets in 13 games although his economy of 5.77 is def good but none of his stats are earth shattering like he is implying!

    He actually has much better batting stats with averages of 19 (FC), 34 in Lista A (some NO's inflating the average though), and 14.66 in T20's...despite it all, I cannot see why any Int'l team gotta have him at all costs?
    Last edited by Abdullah719; 19th February 2018 at 16:54.

  19. #19
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    I had some time so did research on the guy's performances in Australia. It's not complete, but hopefully an Australian forumer can elaborate and fill in the blanks.

    TLDR version: He has a poor record in Pakistan. In Australia, he's played grade cricket for only two seasons- Nov'17-Feb '18, and Oct'Dec 2012. In Grade cricket he has a decent record, with his best performances coming in the 20:20 version (numbers wise they're pretty good). But it's unclear how good he actually is; certainly his claims of being discriminated against seem to hold little water.

    Longer version:

    He played Nov '17-Feb '18 First Grade last year for Hawkesbury Cricket Club, where he had a decent First Grade bowling performance and a very very impressive 20:20 record.

    Link 1

    Before that he's played 12 games in 2012 for the Adelaide cricket club. His 20:20 bowling performances were his best feature.

    Link2

    In 2012 also he also played 2 games in the Australian U23 4 day cricket competition with a pretty poor average:

    Link3

    While Australian Grade cricket is regarded as the best in the world below FC level, I have no idea what playing for the Hawkesbury club means, how good they are, what Qadir's average actually implies.

    Of Usman's FC and List A bowling record in Pakistan, the less said the better. He has FC and List A bowling averages of 49+ and 41+, and the last time he was selected goes back to 2014.

    All this is available in cricinfo: http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan...er/348152.html

  20. #20
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    To be fair to him, when LQ were hyping up the Kashmiri pace bowler after some good performances in Grade 2 cricket in Australia, this guy was doing well in Grade 1 cricket in Australia without a single mention.



  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cryin Out Loud View Post
    I had some time so did research on the guy's performances in Australia. It's not complete, but hopefully an Australian forumer can elaborate and fill in the blanks.

    TLDR version: He has a poor record in Pakistan. In Australia, he's played grade cricket for only two seasons- Nov'17-Feb '18, and Oct'Dec 2012. In Grade cricket he has a decent record, with his best performances coming in the 20:20 version (numbers wise they're pretty good). But it's unclear how good he actually is; certainly his claims of being discriminated against seem to hold little water.

    Longer version:

    He played Nov '17-Feb '18 First Grade last year for Hawkesbury Cricket Club, where he had a decent First Grade bowling performance and a very very impressive 20:20 record.

    Link 1

    Before that he's played 12 games in 2012 for the Adelaide cricket club. His 20:20 bowling performances were his best feature.

    Link2

    In 2012 also he also played 2 games in the Australian U23 4 day cricket competition with a pretty poor average:

    Link3

    While Australian Grade cricket is regarded as the best in the world below FC level, I have no idea what playing for the Hawkesbury club means, how good they are, what Qadir's average actually implies.

    Of Usman's FC and List A bowling record in Pakistan, the less said the better. He has FC and List A bowling averages of 49+ and 41+, and the last time he was selected goes back to 2014.

    All this is available in cricinfo: http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan...er/348152.html



    So, while sitting at home for last 3-4 years, he expected to be picked up by the National side or A Team or PSL, how?

    From what I can gather from his stats on that cricket site, he is more of a batting all rounder than a bowler jusging purely on his numbers that I could see

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    To be fair to him, when LQ were hyping up the Kashmiri pace bowler after some good performances in Grade 2 cricket in Australia, this guy was doing well in Grade 1 cricket in Australia without a single mention.
    You're right, but the Kashmiri guy is a pacer, not sure whether Qadir, as a leg spinner, was justified in comparing himself a pacer and citing a proof of favouritism. Maybe LQ needed a cheap pacer who'd done well in Australia (You guys would know better being close to the action)? He did pretty well in Grade 2. I agree it's lower than Grade 1, so the data may be useless. But FWIW

    Link
    Salman Irshad



    Quote Originally Posted by Monsee View Post
    So, while sitting at home for last 3-4 years, he expected to be picked up by the National side or A Team or PSL, how?

    From what I can gather from his stats on that cricket site, he is more of a batting all rounder than a bowler jusging purely on his numbers that I could see
    I agree, more or less, with your first sentence.

    However, look at the links again from my previous post- they are his bowling aggregates in First Grade cricket, which aren't bad at all.

  23. #23
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    I couldn't edit previous post but another data set is that, tosubstantiate what Monsee said above, I can't find any record for him for any games in Pakistan or Australia for the three years 2014/15/16. He started playing again in 2017.

    For his appearances in Pakistan, apart from cricinfo, you can check:

    http://www.pcb.com.pk/player-detail....layer_id=24946

    Perhaps his non appearances (if they are as such) for three years in a row worked against him?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cryin Out Loud View Post
    You're right, but the Kashmiri guy is a pacer, not sure whether Qadir, as a leg spinner, was justified in comparing himself a pacer and citing a proof of favouritism. Maybe LQ needed a cheap pacer who'd done well in Australia (You guys would know better being close to the action)? He did pretty well in Grade 2. I agree it's lower than Grade 1, so the data may be useless. But FWIW

    Link
    Salman Irshad
    I think he's referring to the hype for Salman Irshad, despite him playing in what was basically pretty low level club cricket.



  25. #25
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    What i don’t understand about him is that he is complaining about not getting national selection, when he’s barely played any domestic cricket over the last couple of years.

    And when he has, he’s been mediocre according to his stats.

    Can some one explain to me why he’s complaining because it’s seems a bit unreasonable to me. Or am I missing something?

  26. #26
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    Why didn’t he play more domestic cricket in Pakistan?

  27. #27
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    Good luck mate , hopefully you will do much better than Imran Tahir.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abdullah719 View Post




    “I was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 around the time when the Under-19 World Cup ended. At that time, I did not accept the offer on the advice of my father, as he felt that I had done well at the Under-19 level and had a bright future ahead with the Pakistan side. I went back to Pakistan and was ignored for selection from the national side. .
    He expected to be selected in the international side ahead of the likes of Afridi,Ajmal, Zulfiqar Babar, Abdul Rehman and Shah based just on U-19 cricket?

    Confidence is a good thing but too much of it could prove to be an issue in some cases.

  29. #29
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    His plan is to represent Australia

    Pakistani cricketers always plan there route to the top when imigrating abroad, how about just being humble and hopfull, sound like Chris Eubank jr

  30. #30
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    What's with the blackmail lol, he's acting like he's gonna get the visa and then Aus will pick him - I don't think it's that streamlined lol.


    "Peace is only made with the powerful"

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    2020 wc?? That's too soon. His unlikely to get full citizenship until 2022 or so imo. Despite that, he seems to be underrating Australia's legspinners. Mitchell Swepson, Zampa, and Muirhead are pretty decent. Also, Lloyd Pope coming up. But it depends, I have a gut feeling Usman might make it to the Australian t20 squad at some stage- provided he excels in the BBL.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by muhammad saad View Post
    Good luck mate , hopefully you will do much better than Imran Tahir.
    Imran Tahir has done really well in South Africa. He has achieved a lot more in South Africa than he would have if he stayed in Pakistan.



  33. #33
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    He is rubbish. It will be a miracle if he gets picked for Australia. I think he would be looking for an alternate career in Australia in a few years.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    He is rubbish. It will be a miracle if he gets picked for Australia. I think he would be looking for an alternate career in Australia in a few years.
    may do well enough to get into a BBL side and earning a good living

    either way, he is delusional


    "Last time Uganda toured Canada, half their team ran away to start a new life" - cricfan967

  35. #35
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    All talk and no play, i don't see him getting anywhere near the international side, i'd like to see him play in grade cricket, score and spin the web, trust i personally played grade cricket here in sydney the type of players coming from overseas to play along with us, are packed with talent yet they struggle to get any lime light as there so many people that just turn up everywhere, to get in the Australian team , this guy is a country mile away, its sad state when you have to throw shades at your own country just to get residency and lime light in Australia ...

  36. #36
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    I would wait until 2020 before making too much fun of Usman.


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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    I would wait until 2020 before making too much fun of Usman.
    Why? What exactly has he achieved?

    He is playing grade 1 cricket, which is still amateur cricket.... albeit it one or two professionals in the team maybe.

    A guy playing amateur cricket is going to catapult into Australian national team in two years? In my calculation he has about a year to impress at club to get into the state sides or selection into bbl teams maybe.

    Salman and Qadir played for the same club in the current season. I presume they probably have one overseas player rule in Aus like in UK, hence salman got shunted to grade 2.

  38. #38
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    It is not rare in cricket world to see players migrating from their homeland to play for another cricketing nation. Likes of Kevin Pietersen, Dirk Nannes, Eoin Morgan, Imran Tahir and many more such names are available. It takes time and process and each player has their own reason to not choose their homeland. Recently, Usman Qadir, son of legendary Pakistani spin bowler Abdul Qadir, clearly revealed his intentions for not playing for Pakistan and aiming to represent Australia.

    The junior Qadir blamed Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) and its selectors for ignoring him for long despite his performance. This was revealed after Usman posted a picture on Instagram on February 9 wearing a replica Australia jersey and a caption which read, “Goal 2020, green and gold I’m coming for you Inshallah”. Australia is hosting the World Twenty20 in 2020 and the young bowler has aimed for it. Usman alleged that he has been a performer on a constant basis while he hasn't got a national call but his peers, who have not performed, have been called for the Pakistan Cricket Team's national side. Now Usman's patience seems to have reached its limit and he is targetting Australia as the country to represent.

    Usman revealed that he was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 during the Under-19 World Cup, but PCB lured in him promising a national stint which never happened.

    "I was offered Australian citizenship back in 2012 around the time when the Under-19 World Cup ended. At that time, I did not accept the offer on the advice of my father, as he felt that I had done well at the Under-19 level and had a bright future ahead with the Pakistan side. I went back to Pakistan and was ignored for selection from the national side. I then told the Pakistan Cricket Board that I am going back to Australia which prompted them to add my name to the Pakistan squad for the 2013 tour of West Indies. However, very close to the time of departure for the squad, my name was removed without any reason due to what can only be described as a case of 'dislike' for a certain player," the Pakpassion.net quoted Usman as saying.

    The 24-year-old further revealed that his selection issues did not stop there as he continued to being snubbed even out-performing the likes of Yasir Shah for Pakistan A.

    "I recently came over to Australia a few months ago with Lahore Qalandars along with some other players too. Make no mistake, I really admire players like Salman Irshad and his performance in Grade B cricket in Australia, but despite my excellent Grade A cricket results in Australia, he was preferred over me for this year's PSL by Lahore Qalandars, purely due to political reasons," he said.

    However, Usman said that he now could no longer afford to wait for opportunities which will never arise in Pakistan and, therefore, looking to make his father proud by representing Australia.

    "My goal is clear. I plan to represent Australia in the World Twenty20 in 2020 in Australia. I wish to use the same process of acquiring the 'Distinguished Talent Visa', which Fawad Ahmed also used to allow him to play for Australia. This visa allows any talented sportsman to gain permanent residency in Australia and this is the path I wish to follow as well," he said.

    http://www.timesnownews.com/sports/c...rld-t20/201380


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  39. #39
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    I think it's also worth mentioning that irrespective of how good or bad he is, he would have had more chances in Pakistan if his father was not Abdul Qadir, who is a strong critic of the current PCB regime.



  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    Imran Tahir has done really well in South Africa. He has achieved a lot more in South Africa than he would have if he stayed in Pakistan.
    Yes, Tahir has actually set a very high standard for anyone who is citing him as an inspiration.

  41. #41
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    Sorry for the multiple successive posts- but but it occurred to me that we have gone deep into this thread without on single bowling video of the guy. I mean, we're predicting success and/or failure based on stats only, but how does he actually bowl?

    I couldn't find much video evidence of his bowling unfortunately (there are some 2/3 puff pieces out there). I think that's because he only started playing last year after a 3/4 year (apparently) layoff.

    Based on a casual net search, below are three balls. They don't say a lot, but it's better than nothing.

    Last edited by Abdullah719; 22nd February 2018 at 23:32.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    I think it's also worth mentioning that irrespective of how good or bad he is, he would have had more chances in Pakistan if his father was not Abdul Qadir, who is a strong critic of the current PCB regime.
    Wrong. He's got more chances because his father is qadir, the kid isn't cut out for the top level.

  43. #43
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    So is Irshad that bad Usman?


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  44. #44
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    Is Australia really that bad? @Convict

  45. #45
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    Imagine that. A player thinking he can get into Australia's side after being rejected by Pakistan.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    I think it's also worth mentioning that irrespective of how good or bad he is, he would have had more chances in Pakistan if his father was not Abdul Qadir, who is a strong critic of the current PCB regime.
    You know him because he is Qadir's son

    As a player he is well behind guys like Shazaib


    #MPGA

  47. #47
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    Good to see him now signed up for BBL 8 by Perth Scorchers


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  48. #48
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  49. #49
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    Good sandgroper lad tearing the Vics a new one.

    Hard to say where he is at. Australian batting standards are really bad when it comes to facing wrist spin.


    Quote Originally Posted by Saqs on Steve Smith
    And who taught him to bat? Chris Martin? Is he the Australian equivalent of ....wait, I'm struggling to think of another useless player of his calibre.

  50. #50
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    A traitor in my eyes. People will say say you can migrate blah blah blah but his story is different from Tahir or Fawad who had poorer backgrounds. I can respect when they make a way for themselves.

    This guy is entitled. He has had every opportunity and access to resources others do not. Don't think because his father is a critic of the current regime (Despite being part of it few years ago) he is a victim. We only know him because of his father. Access to all the coaches, academies etc...all through his name.

    Playing for your country should mean something. If he makes it at to the international level, hope to see him get smashed.


    No one likes me cause I am a Paul Heyman guy.

  51. #51
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    That ponytail is perhaps the worst I have ever seen


    "Last time Uganda toured Canada, half their team ran away to start a new life" - cricfan967

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amir View Post
    A traitor in my eyes. People will say say you can migrate blah blah blah but his story is different from Tahir or Fawad who had poorer backgrounds. I can respect when they make a way for themselves.

    This guy is entitled. He has had every opportunity and access to resources others do not. Don't think because his father is a critic of the current regime (Despite being part of it few years ago) he is a victim. We only know him because of his father. Access to all the coaches, academies etc...all through his name.

    Playing for your country should mean something. If he makes it at to the international level, hope to see him get smashed.
    If it was a refugee case, then yes it's shameful and pathetic.

    But if he did other legal means of migration, it's absolutely fine.

  53. #53
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    I really do hope that he plays when we play them this season'I play domestic myself around here, if you ball leg spin , you get auto selected, because nobody else bowls legs spin around here, can't see him playing for Australia.

  54. #54
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    Usman Qadir: I want to play for Australia

    Usman Qadir has his legendary father’s blessing despite turning his back on Pakistan in the hope of playing for Australia.

    Qadir, 25, the son of Pakistani leg-spinning great Abdul Qadir, burst onto the Australian domestic scene on Wednesday, taking 3-50 on debut for Western Australia as the Warriors crushed Victoria by six wickets in their JLT Cup match at Junction Oval.

    A leggie like his dad, Qadir jnr used his wrong-un to good effect, and got plenty of flight and bounce.

    He played first-class cricket in Pakistan, where his record was modest, but moved to Australia in 2016 and last summer played grade cricket in Sydney.

    Qadir had previously harboured ambitions to follow his father and play for Pakistan, but became disillusioned with the running of the sport in the country, which he says was infested with politics.

    He has already signed as a replacement player with the Big Bash League’s Perth Scorchers, and is eyeing a move to WA to play grade cricket, and potentially in the Sheffield Shield.

    Longer-term though he is hopeful of following in the footsteps of Fawad Ahmed by obtaining Australian citizenship, with selection in the Australian squad for the 2020 World Twenty20 on home soil is goal.

    “No more Pakistan. I want to play for Australia definitely, 100 per cent. Because I did not get any chances in Pakistan,” Qadir said after WA’s win on Wednesday.

    “There is politics. I did not get any chances [in Pakistan].

    “Hopefully I will perform well in Australia and grab the chance to play.

    “Hopefully I will get citizenship in two years’ time. My goal is to play for Australia at the 2020 World T20.”

    Abdul Qadir took 236 Test wickets for Pakistan and is widely considered to be one of history’s greatest leg-spinners. He also served as Pakistan’s chief selector last decade, and spent a season playing district cricket with Carlton 20 years ago, where he unsurprisingly dominated.

    Usman Qadir said his dad had backed his decision.

    “He said ‘feel free to do whatever you want to do. You are grown up and can make your own decisions, and I’m with you, I’ll support you',” Usman Qadir said.

    The import had Cameron White stumped for 19, while also removing teenage debutant Mackenzie Harvey and tailender Scott Boland.

    The Warriors moved five points clear atop the JLT Cup standings after claiming the bonus point on Wednesday.

    Victoria won the toss and elected to bat on a good batting deck but lost regular wickets, failing to build momentum.

    Peter Handscomb top-scored with 57, while Glenn Maxwell - again batting at No. 5 - failed to take advantage of what could have been a lengthy stay at the crease, gone for a quick-fire 25, caught at deep fine leg by Qadir off the bowling of Andrew Tye, who was named man of the match for his 3-47.

    That WA would win never looked in any doubt after openers Josh Philippe (65) and Josh Inglis (42) got the Warriors off to a quick start.

    Former Victorian Marcus Stoinis finished things off in a hurry by smashing 47 not out from 26 balls.

    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricket...26-p5067d.html


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  55. #55
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    Prime Minister's XI squad named for South Africa clash

    Prime Minister’s XI
    George Bailey (c) – Tasmania
    Jason Behrendorff – Western Australia
    Max Bryant – Queensland
    Ben Dwarshuis – New South Wales
    Jack Edwards – New South Wales
    Nic Maddinson – Victoria
    Kurtis Patterson – New South Wales
    Josh Philippe – Western Australia
    Usman Qadir – Western Australia
    Gurinder Sandhu – Tasmania
    Jason Sangha – New South Wales
    12th man: Tom Engelbrecht – ACT/NSW Country


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  56. #56
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    Crazy how much weight he has put on. He use to be so lean.

  57. #57
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    He is not good enough for International Cricket , he has to accept that fact and move on.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abdullah719 View Post
    Prime Minister's XI squad named for South Africa clash

    Prime Minister’s XI
    George Bailey (c) – Tasmania
    Jason Behrendorff – Western Australia
    Max Bryant – Queensland
    Ben Dwarshuis – New South Wales
    Jack Edwards – New South Wales
    Nic Maddinson – Victoria
    Kurtis Patterson – New South Wales
    Josh Philippe – Western Australia
    Usman Qadir – Western Australia
    Gurinder Sandhu – Tasmania
    Jason Sangha – New South Wales
    12th man: Tom Engelbrecht – ACT/NSW Country
    Has taken one wicket so far in the game -

    Most economical amongst all SA bowlers.


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  59. #59
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    3 for 28 off 10

    Brilliant stuff


    Dazzling the stage, Ginga Bishonen. Shinpathy!

  60. #60
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  61. #61
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    Lol Imran Tahir kind of celebration. But good bowling figures.

    I think there is some egoism from Abdul Qadir here, that he want's to teach PCB a lesson if UQ can represent Australia at senior level, probably putting to much preassure on Usman.


    Ki Mohammad (saw) sey wafa tu ney tou hum terey hain
    Yeh jahaan cheez kya hai Loh-o-Qalam tere hain

  62. #62
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    I wouldn't be too surprised if Australia plays him. Due to lack of quality spinners in Australia the competition is less compared to Pakistan or any other sub-continent team. But what I'm more looking forward to is will he have an International Careet.

  63. #63
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    When bowlers like Usman Qadir who cant even get in our domestic teams are on the verge of Aus selection this tells you how bad we are in nurturing talent.

    I remember Usman wasnt in top 15 spinners in Pakistan.

    Our system has ruined fantastic players
    Last edited by Abdullah719; 31st October 2018 at 09:50.


    Sarfi as captain'll lead us to glory.Babar'll be our best odi bat & Haris'll be world class in tests

  64. #64
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    Didn't realise it was against an almost full strength SA side.

  65. #65
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    Man those googlies were mean. I always though he was a below average spinner, guess I was wrong.

  66. #66
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    Usman Qadir edges closer to the great Australian cricket dream

    Every time Usman Qadir brought up the prospect of playing cricket for Australia, the idea was quickly shut down by his father Abdul - a Pakistan legend no less.

    But Qadir's great Australian dream of playing at the World Twenty20 in 2020 could become a reality if his latest outing is anything to go by.

    He made the most of his first chance to impress in a Cricket Australia representative side in claiming 3-28 (10) for the Prime Minister's XI to inspire a stunning four-wicket win over South Africa at Manuka Oval on Wednesday.

    The leg-spinning son of Pakistani great Abdul Qadir burst onto the scene for Western Australia last month and has finally received his father's blessing to chase a baggy green.

    The Proteas fielded a near full-strength side for their lone outing before launching into a one-day series against Australia, the very team Qadir dreams of playing for.

    The 25-year-old is a spitting image of his father - on the cricket field at least - bowling stylish leg-spinners with a superb wrong'un in his arsenal.

    Qadir grew disillusioned with cricket in Pakistan and a stint in Australia reignited the fire - but getting the tick of approval from his father, a veteran of 171 internationals, was far from easy.

    "There is a very big debate whenever I talk about Pakistan things. I’d just keep on telling my dad that I want to play for Australia and he keeps telling me ‘no, you have to play for Pakistan’," Qadir said.

    "For a couple of years I did not get any chance to play in Pakistan, I got named in the teams but I never played, in Twenty20s or one-dayers or whatever, I was always sitting on the bench. When I came here, they give me the opportunity and I’m performing. It’s a real difference between Pakistan and Australia.

    "He just gave me permission and said ‘I have a blessing with you. Whatever you need to do, you can do it, because you are growing up and you’re old enough to make your own decision’.

    "That’s how I finally made my decision last year, that I wanted to play for Australia, so here we go. I’m in the line now."

    Growing up as the son of a Pakistani legend meant Qadir was once desperate to wear a Pakistan uniform in an international match, but a lack of opportunity left him disheartened.

    He spent some time away from cricket before his brother coaxed him into returning for Hawkesbury in Sydney's premier competition in 2016, and he quickly made up his mind: Qadir wants to don a baggy green with the Australian coat of arms emblazoned across the front.

    To make it happen Qadir will likely have to follow the path paved by Fawad Ahmed, who has has played a handful of matches for his adopted nation after officials helped to fast track his citizenship application.

    Ahmed claimed asylum in Australia in 2010 having fled Pakistan, and now Qadir wants to put his name on the lift of Pakistani tweakers suiting up for Australia.

    "Hopefully I will get fast-tracked and my goal is to play for Australia in Twenty20," Qadir said.

    "The first thing I want to tell you is to play for Australia is my goal. Whether it be Twenty20 or one-day or Tests, my goal is to play for Australia. Whatever comes first."

    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricket...30-p50csu.html

  67. #67
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    Out of dad’s shadow: Usman Qadir

    When I was a child, my father would almost never go out with me.

    Never out for dinner. Never to go shopping. Never to the park.

    I knew he loved me. He cared deeply about me. I was his last son, the one he chose to attend the Madrassa to learn the Hafiz Qur’an. The one he stopped from playing cricket for Pakistan to avoid accusations of nepotism.

    There have been times we didn’t see eye to eye. It took a long time to gain his blessing to marry my love, Sobia. It took a long time before I received his permission to pursue my dream of playing for Australia.

    But I believe my best interests were always in his heart. And I believe he is prouder of me now than ever before. This makes me so very happy.

    My dad is a superstar in Pakistan. The great Abdul Qadir. A cricket legend. Wherever he goes people flock to him to hug him, ask for autographs and to take photos. When I was young and he had only recently finished playing international cricket, we couldn’t do the normal things most families would do. I didn’t know any different.

    As the child of a legend, I was born with a silver spoon, there is no doubt. He played in the 1980s and ’90s, so we didn’t have as much money as some people might think. Certainly not as much as cricketers today. But I was still very fortunate compared to most. We lived in a big house in the grand city of Lahore, where I was born 25 years ago, we had a car and everything we needed.

    Because we couldn’t live a normal life beyond our four walls, my father would try to make it up to us by spending quality time at home. I have fond memories of life back then, largely because of the effort my parents made to make our home our sanctuary. I appreciate that now much more than I did at the time.

    There were four floors in our house. The first was rented out. On the second was my father’s office. The third floor was where we lived and on the fourth was a terrace with a barbeque. On the terrace there was space for games of tennis ball-cricket and we would use my father’s bowling machine. Often, we would do kiting, which was a popular pastime in Pakistan back then.

    My childhood was full of friends and cousins coming over to play and to eat meals, spending afternoons with my parents, three brothers and two sisters, and looking to the sky, which was often filled with colourful kites flying from neighbourhood rooftops.

    We had other visitors. From time to time cricketers would drop over. Shane Warne visited our house during an Australian team tour to ask my father for some tips. I remember also Anil Kumble coming over to see dad.

    When my father did take me out with him, it was often something to do with cricket. Like when I was nine years old and he took me to Gaddafi Stadium, not far from our house, when Sri Lanka was touring. I ended up bowling in the nets to Marvan Atapattu and mucking around with Murali.

    It was about that time that I started to realise that my life was a bit different to other kids. It was about that time that I started to understand who my father was, not to me and my siblings playing on the terrace, but to millions of fans around the world.

    But I was still too young to see how his fame and importance would impact on my life in the years ahead and steer me in directions I never imagined.

    NOT ANGRY, MORE SAD

    I don’t remember ever making a conscious decision to play cricket. It’s just in my blood. It was always there.

    My brothers were very good cricketers and each played for first-class teams at home. However, my father, by that time, would sometimes speak up about things he saw were going wrong at the Pakistan Cricket Board, which made it hard for my brothers’ careers to progress.

    These days, one is in England playing club cricket and running a business, another takes care of my father’s academy in Lahore and the other runs a property business.

    Following in the footsteps of all the men in my family seemed a natural thing for me. I would finish studies at the Madrassa each day at 4.30pm and go straight to my father’s academy to practise. I was so exhausted each night that I was asleep by 9pm.

    I was very ambitious with my cricket and after a couple of years of this routine, I wanted to trial for the Pakistan under-15s. But my dad said, ‘No, you are not ready yet and you can’t go’. I didn’t listen to him. I went to the trials without telling him and I got selected.

    When I came home, he was shouting at me for not listening to his decision. He asked what happened, I told him I got selected and he was shocked.

    We talked that night and he started showing me how to bowl. I mean really properly teaching me. He said to me, ‘Your career starts now’ and he began to outline the steps I needed to take to become successful. I will always cherish that moment.

    From that time, I started working really hard at my game. When my dad was playing, he would go to the nets at 1 o’clock and come back at 7 o’clock. He had a tremendous work ethic, something that is quite unusual in Pakistan, and I wanted to copy his way.

    Bowling leg spin is very hard. To put it in the right place every ball is a great challenge, so I was asking my dad all the time to help me. He was a great support, I was doing well and getting better every day.

    Then something peculiar happened. I was playing in a national tournament and did very well. In one match I took seven wickets including a hat-trick. The people at the Pakistan Cricket Board could watch the game because they could view the ground from their offices. I was named best bowler in the tournament.

    Pakistan A was going to tour Australia soon afterwards. The PCB chairman at the time, Ijaz Butt, and two other selectors put my name in the squad. However, my father, who was the chief selector at that time, took my name off the list.

    He said he would resign from his post if they put my name back again.

    The chief executive, Wasim Bari, asked my father why he cut my name from the squad. Everything had been ready; my clothes, my visas, my flights. My father told him that people would think I was selected only because I was his son. It was a very hard time for me.

    I won’t say I was angry, more that I felt sad. I could understand why my father did that. It was a real problem for us that all the time people would say I was getting selected in teams because of my dad.

    People didn’t look at my performances, or even the stats, just my name. As soon as people saw ‘Qadir’, they would know I was the son of the great Abdul Qadir. People would talk behind my back and it was hard to see how that could change.

    That was when I started to tell my father that I wanted to leave Pakistan and play in Australia.

    CAFES, NEWSPAPERS AND BEING PUNCTUAL

    I’m learning the national anthem of Australia at the moment. I love this country. I love the people. I love the culture. I feel I belong here and it’s where I want to live my life and play my cricket. My goal is to represent Australia at the Twenty20 World Cup in two years’ time.

    This feeling in me didn’t happen overnight. I’ve been coming to Australia since 2012, when Darren Berry brought me to Adelaide to play club cricket. I played for a time at Hawkesbury in Sydney, a wonderful club. I came here twice with my team back in Pakistan, Lahore Qalandars, to play in series against the Sydney Sixers and Sydney Thunder.

    All along the way, people have been so helpful, so encouraging, so giving. I never had such support before. Australian people really care about you. If you need something, they will try to help you get it. If you ask a question, they will try to answer it the best way they can.

    I love Pakistan very much and am so very proud of my heritage. It makes me sad that the media portrays the country as dangerous or a place of terrorism. It’s not fair and it is not true. Pakistan is a peaceful and beautiful country.

    There have been problems with politicians in the past. But now, with Imran Khan, we have a great leader, an inspiration who I believe will show new generations how to be successful for themselves and the nation. I have supported Imran’s political career since I was 17 and I wish him and the country every success. But my future is now in Australia.

    Playing first-class for Western Australia this season, getting a run for the Prime Minister’s XI, playing for the Perth Scorchers in the Big Bash League – this is where I want to be.

    Away from cricket I still get to enjoy my favourite hobby of playing snooker, but I’m also adopting every part of Australian life I can. Learning the ways of this special place.

    I sit at the cafe in the mornings and have a flat white or cappuccino. I’ve started reading the newspapers each day. I talk to people all the time about Australian culture and beliefs. I want to learn as much as I can. This nation fascinates me and I feel already so much a part of it.

    As for the culture of Australian cricket, the biggest lessons I’ve learnt so far are, firstly, you must be punctual. Also, if you have spare time, enjoy yourself. But when you are training, you must be 100 per cent switched on. These might sound to people here like normal habits, but it is different to how it is in Pakistan.

    It feels right to me to follow these rules. I know that they will bring out the best in me as a cricketer.

    Finally, last year, my father gave me permission to chase my dream of playing for Australia. He knew there were too many obstacles in Pakistan. He said, ‘OK, you are old enough and you can make your own decision’. He says he will support me and this means more to me than you can imagine.

    https://www.playersvoice.com.au/usma...268mx1GVQb8.97

  68. #68
    Debut
    Mar 2014
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    Wish him all the best. Was pleasantly surprised and happy to see him doing well and getting selected for upper tier squads.

    He doesn’t owe Pakistan anything, you have to go out and make your own name in this world. If playing for Australia is how he wants that success, who are we to call him a traitor.


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