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Results 241 to 272 of 272
  1. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaDed View Post
    Its not, esp the climax which seems to be an issue with any horror movie.There are few good scenes at best nothing more.
    I never made it that time. Going today now.

    Looking forward to it, albeit slightly concerned given that when something is hyped to death it is never likely to live up to expectations.

  2. #242
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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    Have not been in the office this week, so have had the time to sit and enjoy some seriously excellent films:

    - The Shape of Water
    - Blade Runner 2049
    - mother!
    - Get Out
    - It

    Absolutely superb couple of days!
    How was Mother!,? didn't get around to watching it due to the negative reviews.

  3. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadBall View Post
    How was Mother!,? didn't get around to watching it due to the negative reviews.
    I can see why it was not for everyone, but I thought it was brilliant. Directed mostly from an inverse first person viewpoint (camera looking at her face and walking backwards), you dont see anything that Jennifer Lawrence doesnt, and everything that she experiences you experience as well. It is based on the Book of Genesis essentially, with some gruesome late twists, set in a country house and has a very small cast of main characters. I would definitely give it a try, you will probably go the way of most critics - either five stars or zero stars.

  4. #244
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadBall View Post
    How was Mother!,? didn't get around to watching it due to the negative reviews.
    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    I can see why it was not for everyone, but I thought it was brilliant. Directed mostly from an inverse first person viewpoint (camera looking at her face and walking backwards), you dont see anything that Jennifer Lawrence doesnt, and everything that she experiences you experience as well. It is based on the Book of Genesis essentially, with some gruesome late twists, set in a country house and has a very small cast of main characters. I would definitely give it a try, you will probably go the way of most critics - either five stars or zero stars.
    I think aside from liking the metaphors, allegories and Darren Aronofskys overall vision of this world, one essential ingredient one needs to like Mother is how one feels about Jennifer Lawrence. If like me you can be happy just watching her saunter around the house for two hours in an elegant yet simple gown then it would be much easier to like the movie, which I admit can get a bit too precise and tiresome in its depiction of the Book of Genesis.

  5. #245
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    Enjoyed Hereditary. The theme of headless bodies was done quite originally. And fantastic acting from Toni Collette, totally loses herself in her role.

  6. #246
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    I decided to rewatch the Disney classic Pibochio after a very long time. When you wish upon a star by Cliff Edwards was playing somewhere and that song has such a sweet and heavenly quality to it that it instantly transported me back to my childhood. The animation is meticulous and has a charming quality to it. Even with the latest 3D animation and high tech advances, its hard to find the genuineness and sincerity like Disney used to bring back in the day. Snow White was another masterpiece as well which I saw not long ago and was blown away. Frozen and the rest pales in comparison.

  7. #247
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    ^^^

    Its Pinocchio if anyone is wondering. Thats what happens when you type on a phone and your eye sight is not what it used to be. My apologies.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  8. #248
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    Bambi is my personal favourite Disney classic, but everyone will have their own. The early films have a certain panache and charm to them that hints towards Walters direct supervision of every sound, frame and sinew. As much as DisneyCos two greatest later entries - Beauty & The Beast, The Lion King - are grandiose and magnificent films that have aged like fine wines, there is something childlike and extra-magical that can no longer be located within.

  9. #249
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    Watched Upgrade, Didn't get such a Sci Fi, Action thrill since the "No" part by Neo in The Matrix. Totally recommended.

  10. #250
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    Zama (2017)

    The movie is set in the late 18th century somewhere in South Ameica where Spanish colonial forces rule and the protagonist Zama played deftly by Daniel Gimenez Cacho, is a Spanish administrative agent also known as the corregidor, who while wileding some form of authority is in reality a mere pen pusher.

    The movie is astonishingly beautiful with lush dreamy images of South American beaches and country side. The beauty is however strikingly contrasted with the misery and dread of the inhabitants of this place, mainly Zama, a tragic figure, reminiscent of Barry Lyndon, who is desperate to get transferred out of this place back to his wife and kids in Spain but is being pushed back by successive Governors.

    The opening shot is of Zama standing on the beach facing the sea, the new world, as his profile and figure frames the picture gracefully, he seems lost, confused, trapped, almost out of place amongst the surrounding natural beauty. His graceful demeanor is quickly brought down as he is seen peeking through the bushes at a group of native women taking a mud bath. He is caught and starts walking away as one of the women go after him. He slaps her as she tries to grab him, quickly asserting his authority over her. The beauty of the surroundings dissolving into an absurdist almost comical scene and ending in a brutal act. Treated with neutrality of a detached observer, it definitely sets the tone of what is to come later.

    While the narrative is disjointed, the story lacks any concrete plot and the camera is often more interested in reactions than actual action, this move is beyond doubt a cinematic masterpiece. It is made by the acclaimed Argentinian female director Lucrecia Martel based on a old novel, it defiantly delves into cinematic prose with images without the help of words or narration.

    Highly recommended, especially for those interested in works by Werner Herzog, Antonioni and Kubrick.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  11. #251
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    Roma (2018)

    Witten and directed by Alfonso Cuarn, a Mexican writer and director best known for his controversial coming of age story Y Tu Mam Tambin , one of most thought provoking and harrowing science fiction movies of last 20 years Children of Men and his last and most well known commercially and critically successful movie Gravity starring Sandra Bullock.

    Roma is perhaps his most personal and introspective of all his movies. The story is told through the eyes of a domestic worker or maid serving a white collar family of 4 young children, their grandmother, the father who is a doctor and his wife, Sofia. They live in a middle class neighborhood of Mexico City called Roma. The year is 1970-71. One can sense the story being partly biographical since Alfonso was born in Mexico City in 1961 and grow up their in the late 60's and 70's. Perhaps that is the reason why the imagery, sounds and atmosphere of the movie has such poignant resonance and nostalgia. He manages to not only realize the images of his childhood from his imagination on to the screen, but also infuse us with the sense of innocent foreboding embodied by the main character by simply using the sounds and images of the daily mundane of life from that time. This showcase the mastery of Cuarn direction who is able to visually and spiritually engross the audience in the story with classic film techniques from the likes of Antonioini and Farhadi without dwelling much into dialogue or the storyline.

    Shot in gorgeous black & white, the richness of the art direction is absolutely stunning and mesmerizing. Each scene and composition reminds of the elusive and artful photography of that era from the likes of Lee Friedlander who captured the snapshot of Americana from the early 60's through his lens.

    The story in brief is about the maid who is going through her own travails of rejection and isolation as she is witness to her employer's seemingly perfect but slowly unravelling household. The doctor husband goes on a long out of country assignment leaving the wife and kids to celebrate New Years on their own. As word comes out that he has taken a mistress and will not be returning back, the lady of the household breaks down before building herself back up carrying the kids along. All this family turmoil is happening while political unrest has permeated the city as witnessed by the images and sounds of riots and protests. The breaking of social order surrounds the main protagonists of the movie while their own personal lives are turned upside down. But the movie is not about the political turmoil or the social movement at that time, rather its told brilliantly from the perspective of the family and their daily struggles. We witness the mayhem through their eyes as the maid and the grandmother goes to the main city to select a baby crib from a furniture store, a riot breaks out and we watch with them one of the most visually stunning scenes of the movie. The feeling of helplessness is not suffice to explain the situation, its as if the protagonists are trapped in an avalanche of tragedies, too big and grand for them to comprehend or deal with, all they can do is for the storm to pass over so they can get back to their own personal monsoons.

    As a cinephile, their is a lot to admire and appreciate. The opening shot of a stone floor being washed with water and soap as the puddle of water reflects the flying plane above is enough to wet the appetite of the viewer for the visual feast to come. Like I stated above, almost every scene and composition of the movie is worth a thousand words, but there are couple of tracking shots worth mentioning which stood out for me. One where the maid character is chasing after the kids on the crowded streets of Mexico City as they are heading towards a movie theatre. She loses them amongst the noisy hustle bustle of the city before miraculously finding them flipping through magazines at a newspaper stand. Then their is the tracking shot while the maid and the grandmother of the family is walking through a street while a student protest is going on, they are seen through the windows of large buses filled with soldiers seemingly bored and waiting for orders, as the camera follows them dwarfed and trivialized by the complexity of the whole situation. Lastly, the last great scene of the movie on the beach, as the maid who doesn't know how to swim, walks into the raging sea as she attempts of save the two kids helplessly being thrown around by the gigantic tides. Once again the motif of a small and insignificant individual thrown at the mercy of forces much larger and consequential then them. Their is also a single camera angle one long take no edit scene of child birth that is so heart-wrenching and powerful, it nearly took my breath away.

    But the movie is not a cry-fest. It's just a bitter dose of reality which could have come across much more morbid and dry if not for the beautiful camerawork and art direction which has managed to infuse the movie with a melancholic beauty and poignancy that is hard to find nowadays.

    Roma is a piece of art, a defining work of cinema. A personal movie that is also universal. A movie that not only questions and challenges our notions of society and hierarchy but also reflects the inanity and randomness of life. Yet, it also leaves us with a modicum of hope for the human race. That despite all the travails and challenges, ultimately we have to learn to live with each other, our survival hinges on being able to cope with our personal and environmental challenges through the bonds of family, friends and society.

    A masterpiece, highly recommended.

    Its out on Netflix but please watch it on a big screen if possible. Their is just so much to admire that a phone or laptop screen will not do justice to it. I never tag people in my reviews but I'm doing on this one as I feel movies likes these need to be watched, appreciated and pointed out amongst the avalanche of mediocrity that is accessible to us through our current media.

    @DeadBall @TM Riddle @James @JaDed @aliasad1998 @DHONI183 @


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  12. #252
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    May 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    Roma (2018)

    Witten and directed by Alfonso Cuarn, a Mexican writer and director best known for his controversial coming of age story Y Tu Mam Tambin , one of most thought provoking and harrowing science fiction movies of last 20 years Children of Men and his last and most well known commercially and critically successful movie Gravity starring Sandra Bullock.

    Roma is perhaps his most personal and introspective of all his movies. The story is told through the eyes of a domestic worker or maid serving a white collar family of 4 young children, their grandmother, the father who is a doctor and his wife, Sofia. They live in a middle class neighborhood of Mexico City called Roma. The year is 1970-71. One can sense the story being partly biographical since Alfonso was born in Mexico City in 1961 and grow up their in the late 60's and 70's. Perhaps that is the reason why the imagery, sounds and atmosphere of the movie has such poignant resonance and nostalgia. He manages to not only realize the images of his childhood from his imagination on to the screen, but also infuse us with the sense of innocent foreboding embodied by the main character by simply using the sounds and images of the daily mundane of life from that time. This showcase the mastery of Cuarn direction who is able to visually and spiritually engross the audience in the story with classic film techniques from the likes of Antonioini and Farhadi without dwelling much into dialogue or the storyline.

    Shot in gorgeous black & white, the richness of the art direction is absolutely stunning and mesmerizing. Each scene and composition reminds of the elusive and artful photography of that era from the likes of Lee Friedlander who captured the snapshot of Americana from the early 60's through his lens.

    The story in brief is about the maid who is going through her own travails of rejection and isolation as she is witness to her employer's seemingly perfect but slowly unravelling household. The doctor husband goes on a long out of country assignment leaving the wife and kids to celebrate New Years on their own. As word comes out that he has taken a mistress and will not be returning back, the lady of the household breaks down before building herself back up carrying the kids along. All this family turmoil is happening while political unrest has permeated the city as witnessed by the images and sounds of riots and protests. The breaking of social order surrounds the main protagonists of the movie while their own personal lives are turned upside down. But the movie is not about the political turmoil or the social movement at that time, rather its told brilliantly from the perspective of the family and their daily struggles. We witness the mayhem through their eyes as the maid and the grandmother goes to the main city to select a baby crib from a furniture store, a riot breaks out and we watch with them one of the most visually stunning scenes of the movie. The feeling of helplessness is not suffice to explain the situation, its as if the protagonists are trapped in an avalanche of tragedies, too big and grand for them to comprehend or deal with, all they can do is for the storm to pass over so they can get back to their own personal monsoons.

    As a cinephile, their is a lot to admire and appreciate. The opening shot of a stone floor being washed with water and soap as the puddle of water reflects the flying plane above is enough to wet the appetite of the viewer for the visual feast to come. Like I stated above, almost every scene and composition of the movie is worth a thousand words, but there are couple of tracking shots worth mentioning which stood out for me. One where the maid character is chasing after the kids on the crowded streets of Mexico City as they are heading towards a movie theatre. She loses them amongst the noisy hustle bustle of the city before miraculously finding them flipping through magazines at a newspaper stand. Then their is the tracking shot while the maid and the grandmother of the family is walking through a street while a student protest is going on, they are seen through the windows of large buses filled with soldiers seemingly bored and waiting for orders, as the camera follows them dwarfed and trivialized by the complexity of the whole situation. Lastly, the last great scene of the movie on the beach, as the maid who doesn't know how to swim, walks into the raging sea as she attempts of save the two kids helplessly being thrown around by the gigantic tides. Once again the motif of a small and insignificant individual thrown at the mercy of forces much larger and consequential then them. Their is also a single camera angle one long take no edit scene of child birth that is so heart-wrenching and powerful, it nearly took my breath away.

    But the movie is not a cry-fest. It's just a bitter dose of reality which could have come across much more morbid and dry if not for the beautiful camerawork and art direction which has managed to infuse the movie with a melancholic beauty and poignancy that is hard to find nowadays.

    Roma is a piece of art, a defining work of cinema. A personal movie that is also universal. A movie that not only questions and challenges our notions of society and hierarchy but also reflects the inanity and randomness of life. Yet, it also leaves us with a modicum of hope for the human race. That despite all the travails and challenges, ultimately we have to learn to live with each other, our survival hinges on being able to cope with our personal and environmental challenges through the bonds of family, friends and society.

    A masterpiece, highly recommended.

    Its out on Netflix but please watch it on a big screen if possible. Their is just so much to admire that a phone or laptop screen will not do justice to it. I never tag people in my reviews but I'm doing on this one as I feel movies likes these need to be watched, appreciated and pointed out amongst the avalanche of mediocrity that is accessible to us through our current media.

    @DeadBall @TM Riddle @James @JaDed @aliasad1998 @DHONI183 @
    Thanks. I’ll probably watch it tomorrow. Pretty excited. I love the director


    Waqt Kay Undheron Main
    Apna Aap Pehchano
    Yeh Watan Tumhara Hay

  13. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    Roma (2018)

    Witten and directed by Alfonso Cuarn, a Mexican writer and director best known for his controversial coming of age story Y Tu Mam Tambin , one of most thought provoking and harrowing science fiction movies of last 20 years Children of Men and his last and most well known commercially and critically successful movie Gravity starring Sandra Bullock.

    Roma is perhaps his most personal and introspective of all his movies. The story is told through the eyes of a domestic worker or maid serving a white collar family of 4 young children, their grandmother, the father who is a doctor and his wife, Sofia. They live in a middle class neighborhood of Mexico City called Roma. The year is 1970-71. One can sense the story being partly biographical since Alfonso was born in Mexico City in 1961 and grow up their in the late 60's and 70's. Perhaps that is the reason why the imagery, sounds and atmosphere of the movie has such poignant resonance and nostalgia. He manages to not only realize the images of his childhood from his imagination on to the screen, but also infuse us with the sense of innocent foreboding embodied by the main character by simply using the sounds and images of the daily mundane of life from that time. This showcase the mastery of Cuarn direction who is able to visually and spiritually engross the audience in the story with classic film techniques from the likes of Antonioini and Farhadi without dwelling much into dialogue or the storyline.

    Shot in gorgeous black & white, the richness of the art direction is absolutely stunning and mesmerizing. Each scene and composition reminds of the elusive and artful photography of that era from the likes of Lee Friedlander who captured the snapshot of Americana from the early 60's through his lens.

    The story in brief is about the maid who is going through her own travails of rejection and isolation as she is witness to her employer's seemingly perfect but slowly unravelling household. The doctor husband goes on a long out of country assignment leaving the wife and kids to celebrate New Years on their own. As word comes out that he has taken a mistress and will not be returning back, the lady of the household breaks down before building herself back up carrying the kids along. All this family turmoil is happening while political unrest has permeated the city as witnessed by the images and sounds of riots and protests. The breaking of social order surrounds the main protagonists of the movie while their own personal lives are turned upside down. But the movie is not about the political turmoil or the social movement at that time, rather its told brilliantly from the perspective of the family and their daily struggles. We witness the mayhem through their eyes as the maid and the grandmother goes to the main city to select a baby crib from a furniture store, a riot breaks out and we watch with them one of the most visually stunning scenes of the movie. The feeling of helplessness is not suffice to explain the situation, its as if the protagonists are trapped in an avalanche of tragedies, too big and grand for them to comprehend or deal with, all they can do is for the storm to pass over so they can get back to their own personal monsoons.

    As a cinephile, their is a lot to admire and appreciate. The opening shot of a stone floor being washed with water and soap as the puddle of water reflects the flying plane above is enough to wet the appetite of the viewer for the visual feast to come. Like I stated above, almost every scene and composition of the movie is worth a thousand words, but there are couple of tracking shots worth mentioning which stood out for me. One where the maid character is chasing after the kids on the crowded streets of Mexico City as they are heading towards a movie theatre. She loses them amongst the noisy hustle bustle of the city before miraculously finding them flipping through magazines at a newspaper stand. Then their is the tracking shot while the maid and the grandmother of the family is walking through a street while a student protest is going on, they are seen through the windows of large buses filled with soldiers seemingly bored and waiting for orders, as the camera follows them dwarfed and trivialized by the complexity of the whole situation. Lastly, the last great scene of the movie on the beach, as the maid who doesn't know how to swim, walks into the raging sea as she attempts of save the two kids helplessly being thrown around by the gigantic tides. Once again the motif of a small and insignificant individual thrown at the mercy of forces much larger and consequential then them. Their is also a single camera angle one long take no edit scene of child birth that is so heart-wrenching and powerful, it nearly took my breath away.

    But the movie is not a cry-fest. It's just a bitter dose of reality which could have come across much more morbid and dry if not for the beautiful camerawork and art direction which has managed to infuse the movie with a melancholic beauty and poignancy that is hard to find nowadays.

    Roma is a piece of art, a defining work of cinema. A personal movie that is also universal. A movie that not only questions and challenges our notions of society and hierarchy but also reflects the inanity and randomness of life. Yet, it also leaves us with a modicum of hope for the human race. That despite all the travails and challenges, ultimately we have to learn to live with each other, our survival hinges on being able to cope with our personal and environmental challenges through the bonds of family, friends and society.

    A masterpiece, highly recommended.

    Its out on Netflix but please watch it on a big screen if possible. Their is just so much to admire that a phone or laptop screen will not do justice to it. I never tag people in my reviews but I'm doing on this one as I feel movies likes these need to be watched, appreciated and pointed out amongst the avalanche of mediocrity that is accessible to us through our current media.

    @DeadBall @TM Riddle @James @JaDed @aliasad1998 @DHONI183 @

    As much as I like reading your reviews, didn't read past the first para as I didn't know whether it would contain spoilers or not. Will read it after watching the movie for sure.

    I wanted to give it my full attention, so have it currently slotted for Sunday evening when I can watch it in peace after all the Christmas preparations humdrum is over. Hopefully I make can it, still haven't even gotten around to watching Phantom Thread as of yet due to one reason or another, mostly though that it may disappoint.

  14. #254
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadBall View Post
    As much as I like reading your reviews, didn't read past the first para as I didn't know whether it would contain spoilers or not. Will read it after watching the movie for sure.

    I wanted to give it my full attention, so have it currently slotted for Sunday evening when I can watch it in peace after all the Christmas preparations humdrum is over. Hopefully I make can it, still haven't even gotten around to watching Phantom Thread as of yet due to one reason or another, mostly though that it may disappoint.
    I don't think the later paragraphs contain any spoilers especially since the movie does not have a conventional storyline or narrative but I can understand why one would want to see a movie with a completely open and empty mind (in the sense of not having any pre-viewing biases or impressions). I do that as well and sometimes even skip the trailers. In my reviews, I usually just try to give a general idea of the movie and talk about some scenes that I liked in particular with the intention of keeping it vague. I could have gone into more details and perhaps we can do that once you've seen the movie as there is so much more I could have written about the movie and would love to discuss it with a fellow cinephile.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  15. #255
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    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    Roma (2018)

    Witten and directed by Alfonso Cuarn, a Mexican writer and director best known for his controversial coming of age story Y Tu Mam Tambin , one of most thought provoking and harrowing science fiction movies of last 20 years Children of Men and his last and most well known commercially and critically successful movie Gravity starring Sandra Bullock.

    Roma is perhaps his most personal and introspective of all his movies. The story is told through the eyes of a domestic worker or maid serving a white collar family of 4 young children, their grandmother, the father who is a doctor and his wife, Sofia. They live in a middle class neighborhood of Mexico City called Roma. The year is 1970-71. One can sense the story being partly biographical since Alfonso was born in Mexico City in 1961 and grow up their in the late 60's and 70's. Perhaps that is the reason why the imagery, sounds and atmosphere of the movie has such poignant resonance and nostalgia. He manages to not only realize the images of his childhood from his imagination on to the screen, but also infuse us with the sense of innocent foreboding embodied by the main character by simply using the sounds and images of the daily mundane of life from that time. This showcase the mastery of Cuarn direction who is able to visually and spiritually engross the audience in the story with classic film techniques from the likes of Antonioini and Farhadi without dwelling much into dialogue or the storyline.

    Shot in gorgeous black & white, the richness of the art direction is absolutely stunning and mesmerizing. Each scene and composition reminds of the elusive and artful photography of that era from the likes of Lee Friedlander who captured the snapshot of Americana from the early 60's through his lens.

    The story in brief is about the maid who is going through her own travails of rejection and isolation as she is witness to her employer's seemingly perfect but slowly unravelling household. The doctor husband goes on a long out of country assignment leaving the wife and kids to celebrate New Years on their own. As word comes out that he has taken a mistress and will not be returning back, the lady of the household breaks down before building herself back up carrying the kids along. All this family turmoil is happening while political unrest has permeated the city as witnessed by the images and sounds of riots and protests. The breaking of social order surrounds the main protagonists of the movie while their own personal lives are turned upside down. But the movie is not about the political turmoil or the social movement at that time, rather its told brilliantly from the perspective of the family and their daily struggles. We witness the mayhem through their eyes as the maid and the grandmother goes to the main city to select a baby crib from a furniture store, a riot breaks out and we watch with them one of the most visually stunning scenes of the movie. The feeling of helplessness is not suffice to explain the situation, its as if the protagonists are trapped in an avalanche of tragedies, too big and grand for them to comprehend or deal with, all they can do is for the storm to pass over so they can get back to their own personal monsoons.

    As a cinephile, their is a lot to admire and appreciate. The opening shot of a stone floor being washed with water and soap as the puddle of water reflects the flying plane above is enough to wet the appetite of the viewer for the visual feast to come. Like I stated above, almost every scene and composition of the movie is worth a thousand words, but there are couple of tracking shots worth mentioning which stood out for me. One where the maid character is chasing after the kids on the crowded streets of Mexico City as they are heading towards a movie theatre. She loses them amongst the noisy hustle bustle of the city before miraculously finding them flipping through magazines at a newspaper stand. Then their is the tracking shot while the maid and the grandmother of the family is walking through a street while a student protest is going on, they are seen through the windows of large buses filled with soldiers seemingly bored and waiting for orders, as the camera follows them dwarfed and trivialized by the complexity of the whole situation. Lastly, the last great scene of the movie on the beach, as the maid who doesn't know how to swim, walks into the raging sea as she attempts of save the two kids helplessly being thrown around by the gigantic tides. Once again the motif of a small and insignificant individual thrown at the mercy of forces much larger and consequential then them. Their is also a single camera angle one long take no edit scene of child birth that is so heart-wrenching and powerful, it nearly took my breath away.

    But the movie is not a cry-fest. It's just a bitter dose of reality which could have come across much more morbid and dry if not for the beautiful camerawork and art direction which has managed to infuse the movie with a melancholic beauty and poignancy that is hard to find nowadays.

    Roma is a piece of art, a defining work of cinema. A personal movie that is also universal. A movie that not only questions and challenges our notions of society and hierarchy but also reflects the inanity and randomness of life. Yet, it also leaves us with a modicum of hope for the human race. That despite all the travails and challenges, ultimately we have to learn to live with each other, our survival hinges on being able to cope with our personal and environmental challenges through the bonds of family, friends and society.

    A masterpiece, highly recommended.

    Its out on Netflix but please watch it on a big screen if possible. Their is just so much to admire that a phone or laptop screen will not do justice to it. I never tag people in my reviews but I'm doing on this one as I feel movies likes these need to be watched, appreciated and pointed out amongst the avalanche of mediocrity that is accessible to us through our current media.

    @DeadBall @TM Riddle @James @JaDed @aliasad1998 @DHONI183 @
    Thanks there is a music box theater releasing 70 mm near my current residence and runs from Jan 9-13 wondering if to go see it there or stream it.
    Last edited by JaDed; 20th December 2018 at 09:41.


    In cricket, my superhero is Sachin Tendulkar. He has always been my hero.
    -Virat Kohli

  16. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaDed View Post
    Thanks there is a music box theater releasing 70 mm near my current residence and runs from Jan 9-13 wondering if to go see it there or stream it.
    See it in theatre...even if you have the biggest TV and best home sound system set up. The visual and aural splendor of the movie can best be appreciated on the big screen.
    Last edited by saadibaba; 20th December 2018 at 09:56.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  17. #257
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    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    See it in theatre...even if you have the biggest TV and best home sound system set up. The visual and aural splendor of the movie can best be appreciated on the big screen.
    Thanks will do by any chance have you seen Shoplifters?


    In cricket, my superhero is Sachin Tendulkar. He has always been my hero.
    -Virat Kohli

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    Quote Originally Posted by JaDed View Post
    Thanks will do by any chance have you seen Shoplifters?
    No I haven't. Its playing here in an art theatre, any good?


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

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    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    No I haven't. Its playing here in an art theatre, any good?
    Yes, same here its playing in such a theater and want to do it for christmas weekend, mostly positive reviews but I kinda do only classics in Christmas , let me take the risk seems very good and heard good things about it.


    In cricket, my superhero is Sachin Tendulkar. He has always been my hero.
    -Virat Kohli

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    Quote Originally Posted by JaDed View Post
    Yes, same here its playing in such a theater and want to do it for christmas weekend, mostly positive reviews but I kinda do only classics in Christmas , let me take the risk seems very good and heard good things about it.
    Let me know how you like it.

    Speaking of Asian movies, have heard great things about Burning, a Korean movie. Since I'm a sucker for Korean cinema, cant wait to watch it once it gets available.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

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    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    Let me know how you like it.

    Speaking of Asian movies, have heard great things about Burning, a Korean movie. Since I'm a sucker for Korean cinema, cant wait to watch it once it gets available.
    Yes , again it's in an art theater show though and it seems very different but i heard it's not as good as critics are claiming..but again about taste.

  22. #262
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    Cinephiles movies discussion thread

    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    Roma (2018)

    Witten and directed by Alfonso Cuarn, a Mexican writer and director best known for his controversial coming of age story Y Tu Mam Tambin , one of most thought provoking and harrowing science fiction movies of last 20 years Children of Men and his last and most well known commercially and critically successful movie Gravity starring Sandra Bullock.

    Roma is perhaps his most personal and introspective of all his movies. The story is told through the eyes of a domestic worker or maid serving a white collar family of 4 young children, their grandmother, the father who is a doctor and his wife, Sofia. They live in a middle class neighborhood of Mexico City called Roma. The year is 1970-71. One can sense the story being partly biographical since Alfonso was born in Mexico City in 1961 and grow up their in the late 60's and 70's. Perhaps that is the reason why the imagery, sounds and atmosphere of the movie has such poignant resonance and nostalgia. He manages to not only realize the images of his childhood from his imagination on to the screen, but also infuse us with the sense of innocent foreboding embodied by the main character by simply using the sounds and images of the daily mundane of life from that time. This showcase the mastery of Cuarn direction who is able to visually and spiritually engross the audience in the story with classic film techniques from the likes of Antonioini and Farhadi without dwelling much into dialogue or the storyline.

    Shot in gorgeous black & white, the richness of the art direction is absolutely stunning and mesmerizing. Each scene and composition reminds of the elusive and artful photography of that era from the likes of Lee Friedlander who captured the snapshot of Americana from the early 60's through his lens.

    The story in brief is about the maid who is going through her own travails of rejection and isolation as she is witness to her employer's seemingly perfect but slowly unravelling household. The doctor husband goes on a long out of country assignment leaving the wife and kids to celebrate New Years on their own. As word comes out that he has taken a mistress and will not be returning back, the lady of the household breaks down before building herself back up carrying the kids along. All this family turmoil is happening while political unrest has permeated the city as witnessed by the images and sounds of riots and protests. The breaking of social order surrounds the main protagonists of the movie while their own personal lives are turned upside down. But the movie is not about the political turmoil or the social movement at that time, rather its told brilliantly from the perspective of the family and their daily struggles. We witness the mayhem through their eyes as the maid and the grandmother goes to the main city to select a baby crib from a furniture store, a riot breaks out and we watch with them one of the most visually stunning scenes of the movie. The feeling of helplessness is not suffice to explain the situation, its as if the protagonists are trapped in an avalanche of tragedies, too big and grand for them to comprehend or deal with, all they can do is for the storm to pass over so they can get back to their own personal monsoons.

    As a cinephile, their is a lot to admire and appreciate. The opening shot of a stone floor being washed with water and soap as the puddle of water reflects the flying plane above is enough to wet the appetite of the viewer for the visual feast to come. Like I stated above, almost every scene and composition of the movie is worth a thousand words, but there are couple of tracking shots worth mentioning which stood out for me. One where the maid character is chasing after the kids on the crowded streets of Mexico City as they are heading towards a movie theatre. She loses them amongst the noisy hustle bustle of the city before miraculously finding them flipping through magazines at a newspaper stand. Then their is the tracking shot while the maid and the grandmother of the family is walking through a street while a student protest is going on, they are seen through the windows of large buses filled with soldiers seemingly bored and waiting for orders, as the camera follows them dwarfed and trivialized by the complexity of the whole situation. Lastly, the last great scene of the movie on the beach, as the maid who doesn't know how to swim, walks into the raging sea as she attempts of save the two kids helplessly being thrown around by the gigantic tides. Once again the motif of a small and insignificant individual thrown at the mercy of forces much larger and consequential then them. Their is also a single camera angle one long take no edit scene of child birth that is so heart-wrenching and powerful, it nearly took my breath away.

    But the movie is not a cry-fest. It's just a bitter dose of reality which could have come across much more morbid and dry if not for the beautiful camerawork and art direction which has managed to infuse the movie with a melancholic beauty and poignancy that is hard to find nowadays.

    Roma is a piece of art, a defining work of cinema. A personal movie that is also universal. A movie that not only questions and challenges our notions of society and hierarchy but also reflects the inanity and randomness of life. Yet, it also leaves us with a modicum of hope for the human race. That despite all the travails and challenges, ultimately we have to learn to live with each other, our survival hinges on being able to cope with our personal and environmental challenges through the bonds of family, friends and society.

    A masterpiece, highly recommended.

    Its out on Netflix but please watch it on a big screen if possible. Their is just so much to admire that a phone or laptop screen will not do justice to it. I never tag people in my reviews but I'm doing on this one as I feel movies likes these need to be watched, appreciated and pointed out amongst the avalanche of mediocrity that is accessible to us through our current media.

    @DeadBall @TM Riddle @James @JaDed @aliasad1998 @DHONI183 @
    Hey Sad Man, hope youre well! Wish you & everyone else on the forum a very happy new year!

    As for the film, I just looked up to discover that it isnt anymore on the cinema listings. So Ill have to wait for it to be made available to be watched at home. However, be rest assured that Ill watch it and let you know about it. Ive added it to my list, with a note that a great man called Saadibaba recommended it to me.


    "It sounds like you have a great strength of character and strong will" - Ellyse Perry about me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by good guy View Post
    my favorite movie in recent times is the big short

    this movie show our global economy was about collapsed in 2008 if banks were not bailouts
    then today 7.5 billion people would be not alive

    btw here favorite scene of that movie
    love pitches like that, wish real life pitching was as fun as this instead of churning out usual slides and credentials and tombstones and why us slides!

    Side note:

    Adam McKay seems to know only one way of direction - Vice (Biopic on Dick Cheney) pretty much made on similar style - The sarcasm evident of rolling credits mid way through the movie vs big short scene that government heavily regulated the financial industry etc etc.

    Bale has done amazing work as Cheney, but the story line was missing a bite


    عبدي أنت تريد ، وأنا أريد ، ولا يكون إلا ما أريد ، فإن سلمت لي فيما تريد كفيتك ما تريد

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    Quote Originally Posted by DHONI183 View Post
    Hey Sad Man, hope youre well! Wish you & everyone else on the forum a very happy new year!

    As for the film, I just looked up to discover that it isnt anymore on the cinema listings. So Ill have to wait for it to be made available to be watched at home. However, be rest assured that Ill watch it and let you know about it. Ive added it to my list, with a note that a great man called Saadibaba recommended it to me.
    It's a Netflix movie, you would have it on Netflix..

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    @saadibaba @JaDed

    Watched Burning as you two were discussing it earlier. Definitely not a movie for everyone. A movie open to a hundred different interpretations. It starts of a bit slowly but the build up just increases with time. There are a lot of theories online about metaphors, interpretations, what actually happened etc which I have read about, some interpretations I agree with and some I don't.

    Don't want to give any spoilers but would like to discuss it with you guys when you've watched it.

  26. #266
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadBall View Post
    @saadibaba @JaDed

    Watched Burning as you two were discussing it earlier. Definitely not a movie for everyone. A movie open to a hundred different interpretations. It starts of a bit slowly but the build up just increases with time. There are a lot of theories online about metaphors, interpretations, what actually happened etc which I have read about, some interpretations I agree with and some I don't.

    Don't want to give any spoilers but would like to discuss it with you guys when you've watched it.
    Sure ll check and tell you..


    In cricket, my superhero is Sachin Tendulkar. He has always been my hero.
    -Virat Kohli

  27. #267
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    Fantastic article on the Dark Knight- http://www.comicsbeat.com/the-alcott...e-dark-knight/

    I finally somewhat understand it after watching it for the 100th time.

  28. #268
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadBall View Post
    @saadibaba @JaDed

    Watched Burning as you two were discussing it earlier. Definitely not a movie for everyone. A movie open to a hundred different interpretations. It starts of a bit slowly but the build up just increases with time. There are a lot of theories online about metaphors, interpretations, what actually happened etc which I have read about, some interpretations I agree with and some I don't.

    Don't want to give any spoilers but would like to discuss it with you guys when you've watched it.
    I haven't seen it yet, will have to wait till it comes on iTunes or Netflix etc. The movie is bases on a short story by Haruki Murakami, one of my all time favorite authors. He does deal with a lot of fantastical elements in his books, something called "magical realism". All of his protagonists are loners, cerebral but some what confused about their purpose in life. He is not for everyone but if you are one of those who like that kind of material then its truly a rewarding experience.

    I'm keenly looking forward to watching the movie.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  29. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by DHONI183 View Post
    Hey Sad Man, hope youre well! Wish you & everyone else on the forum a very happy new year!

    As for the film, I just looked up to discover that it isnt anymore on the cinema listings. So Ill have to wait for it to be made available to be watched at home. However, be rest assured that Ill watch it and let you know about it. Ive added it to my list, with a note that a great man called Saadibaba recommended it to me.
    Hi there. I think you will like this movie. It came out on Netflix so be sure to check it out.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  30. #270
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    Saw The Lobster yesterday.

    What an absolutely bizarre, hilarious, dark, disturbing, compelling and idiosyncratic movie.

    I loved "The killing of a sacred deer" by the same director Yorgos Lanthimos, whose current movie "The Favourite" is getting rave reviews and a lot of Oscar buzz. Needless to say the guy is super-talented who specializes in absurdist dark comedies that can also be quite terrifying at the same time. He is a true auteur and stands out among so many mediocre directors nowadays. I see some Kubrick in him which is probably the biggest compliment I can ever give to any new director.

    The premise is based in a not so futuristic world where any single person, even widow, have 45 days to find a mate or be converted to an animal of their choice. People who resist this rule end up running away to live as an outcast in the woods with like minded people. However, farcically, the outcasts are not allowed to engage in any romance or coupling, otherwise they are met with severe punishments. Its a world full of absurdities, contradictions and hilarious and at times painful consequences. I won't go into more details as some have complained how my lengthy reviews can contain spoilers for them. In short, I really liked the movie and would highly recommend it.


    “I am not young enough to know everything.”

    ― Oscar Wilde

  31. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by saadibaba View Post
    Saw The Lobster yesterday.

    What an absolutely bizarre, hilarious, dark, disturbing, compelling and idiosyncratic movie.

    I loved "The killing of a sacred deer" by the same director Yorgos Lanthimos, whose current movie "The Favourite" is getting rave reviews and a lot of Oscar buzz. Needless to say the guy is super-talented who specializes in absurdist dark comedies that can also be quite terrifying at the same time. He is a true auteur and stands out among so many mediocre directors nowadays. I see some Kubrick in him which is probably the biggest compliment I can ever give to any new director.

    The premise is based in a not so futuristic world where any single person, even widow, have 45 days to find a mate or be converted to an animal of their choice. People who resist this rule end up running away to live as an outcast in the woods with like minded people. However, farcically, the outcasts are not allowed to engage in any romance or coupling, otherwise they are met with severe punishments. Its a world full of absurdities, contradictions and hilarious and at times painful consequences. I won't go into more details as some have complained how my lengthy reviews can contain spoilers for them. In short, I really liked the movie and would highly recommend it.
    Liked The Lobster better, mostly due to Colin's deadpan delivery like in In Bruges I suppose. Watched the first 10 mins of The Favourite but had to stop due to some reason but looked very promising.

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    Revisited The Alan Partridge series(es) as was feeling down. How good are they? @Robert @James @Cpt_Rishwat


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