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  1. #1
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    Lost Boys: What's going wrong for Asian men [BBC Documentary]

    Anyone see this, https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bg2k06, was on bbc tonight.

    have my two cent over this but no point gassing if no one else watched it.

    also misleading doc title, was abt british pakistanis.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    Anyone see this, https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bg2k06, was on bbc tonight.

    have my two cent over this but no point gassing if no one else watched it.

    also misleading doc title, was abt british pakistanis.
    Mehreen meets young men such as 17-year-old Luqman, who lives in one of the most deprived areas of the country, and who has been supporting his family since the age of 13 by working six days a week.

    How is that even possible

    As for Leicester and others such as Manchester

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mani1 View Post
    Mehreen meets young men such as 17-year-old Luqman, who lives in one of the most deprived areas of the country, and who has been supporting his family since the age of 13 by working six days a week.

    How is that even possible

    As for Leicester and others such as Manchester

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    im not 100% sure but think his dad wasn't around, either way he was working instead of studying which is what they were getting at methinks.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    im not 100% sure but think his dad wasn't around, either way he was working instead of studying which is what they were getting at methinks.
    Which is illegal the program was based on 0 factual evidence just the usual Jackonories which have been spread for decades by "Urban" Pakistani's.

    She would of been better of making a program about why certain Asian's in London are scraping the bottom of the barrell considering that is where she is from.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mani1 View Post
    Mehreen meets young men such as 17-year-old Luqman, who lives in one of the most deprived areas of the country, and who has been supporting his family since the age of 13 by working six days a week.

    How is that even possible

    As for Leicester and others such as Manchester

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    What a load of rubbish; this is not true. I am from Manchester and these figures are inaccurate.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Misbah View Post
    What a load of rubbish; this is not true. I am from Manchester and these figures are inaccurate.
    They come from the Office for National Statistics they are correct as per 2016

    The UK's largest independent producer of official statistics and the recognised national statistical institute of the UK.
    Last edited by mani1; 12th August 2018 at 23:47.

  7. #7
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    Same old same old....

    Gujratis are one of the most insular communities you will find in UK, the program will have you believe otherwise based on some who don't adhere to their community traditions, but then you can find them amongst Pakistanis too. The presenter herself would be one.

    Why don't they compare African gujratis to African Pakistanis.... they Might just find a different picture. That would be the fair comparison.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagle_Eye View Post
    Same old same old....

    Gujratis are one of the most insular communities you will find in UK, the program will have you believe otherwise based on some who don't adhere to their community traditions, but then you can find them amongst Pakistanis too. The presenter herself would be one.

    Why don't they compare African gujratis to African Pakistanis.... they Might just find a different picture. That would be the fair comparison.
    IMO African Gujaratis should ideally be similar to term as Indian Gujaratis(now) or Pakistani Gujaratis.(Mr.Jinnah being an example or once from Junagadh).

    African Pakistanis is whole term as such ,more equivalent to African Indians since both countries will larger communities under them( Gujarathis,Biharis,Punjabis,Rajputs etc).

    Pakistan and India are not like Bangladesh which is more of a single identity w.r.t regional identity.


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  9. #9
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    Got it recorded, will maybe watch it tonight, haven't got round to it yet.


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  10. #10
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    We have to acknowledge that the Pakistani community has problems. Yes Pakistanis not Asians!


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

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    I have to say that I do not like Mehreen Baig, the presenter of this show. Nothing personal against her in any way, but this is not the first time I have seen a programme from her where she starts from a biased foundation. Her belief is that British Pakistani men are unsuccessful. She then makes a programme to prove her point.

    She did the same thing with women and Islam. She believes women are oppressed. She therefore made a programme to prove her point.

    As to the programme itself, I do not deny that a lot of young Pakistani men struggle in 21 century Britain. That is not universally true however as the programme insinuated - not a single successful British Pakistani was shown in the programme. One Pakistani family was shown who had moved back to Pakistan and had lots of cars and a big house, but the point was clear that in Britan Pakistani men don't succeed when they live in Britain.

    I for one know plenty of successful, hard working Pakistani men in this country, but not one such person was interviewed. Instead, a bunch of kids from Bradford were filmed and a big point was made about how they chase get-rich-quick schemes and can't be bothered to work. I'm sorry, but in a city like Bradford where opportunities are few and far between, which community does thrive? The reality is that wealth is concentrated here in the south, so every community struggles in the north, Pakistani or not.

    That said, my own observation of Pakistani communities here in the UK is that youngsters of murpuri background struggle more than those from cities. This I believe is because the elders from the small villages of Mirpur generally have not integrated in this country (most murpuri women for example will not know any English despite living here for 30/40 years), and have not placed the same emphasis on education as faith-based Pakistanis have. These murpuri kids lacking a proper direction in their home life act out in school, leave school with no GCSEs and enter a downward spiral from there. There are no easier answers on how to fix this but as ever, there are plenty of Pakistanis of murpuri origin setting an example for the youngsters to follow.

    What government needs to do is offer these kids jobs, apprenticeships, whatever it takes to stop the continuing downward spiral. Give these kids something to focus on, something which they can do and which will lead to a career and let them climb their way out of their current situation. This is especially important in places like Bradford which, 40 years ago, were thriving but today are run down without job prospects. Just sitting around blaming young Pakistani men, like Baig does in her documentary, achieves nothing.
    Last edited by Usman; 14th August 2018 at 00:32.

  12. #12
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    That's *city-based Pakistanis, not faith-based. Darn autocorrect!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usman View Post
    I have to say that I do not like Mehreen Baig, the presenter of this show. Nothing personal against her in any way, but this is not the first time I have seen a programme from her where she starts from a biased foundation. Her belief is that British Pakistani men are unsuccessful. She then makes a programme to prove her point.

    She did the same thing with women and Islam. She believes women are oppressed. She therefore made a programme to prove her point.

    As to the programme itself, I do not deny that a lot of young Pakistani men struggle in 21 century Britain. That is not universally true however as the programme insinuated - not a single successful British Pakistani was shown in the programme. One Pakistani family was shown who had moved back to Pakistan and had lots of cars and a big house, but the point was clear that in Britan Pakistani men don't succeed when they live in Britain.

    I for one know plenty of successful, hard working Pakistani men in this country, but not one such person was interviewed. Instead, a bunch of kids from Bradford were filmed and a big point was made about how they chase get-rich-quick schemes and can't be bothered to work. I'm sorry, but in a city like Bradford where opportunities are few and far between, which community does thrive? The reality is that wealth is concentrated here in the south, so every community struggles in the north, Pakistani or not.

    That said, my own observation of Pakistani communities here in the UK is that youngsters of murpuri background struggle more than those from cities. This I believe is because the elders from the small villages of Mirpur generally have not integrated in this country (most murpuri women for example will not know any English despite living here for 30/40 years), and have not placed the same emphasis on education as faith-based Pakistanis have. These murpuri kids lacking a proper direction in their home life act out in school, leave school with no GCSEs and enter a downward spiral from there. There are no easier answers on how to fix this but as ever, there are plenty of Pakistanis of murpuri origin setting an example for the youngsters to follow.

    What government needs to do is offer these kids jobs, apprenticeships, whatever it takes to stop the continuing downward spiral. Give these kids something to focus on, something which they can do and which will lead to a career and let them climb their way out of their current situation. This is especially important in places like Bradford which, 40 years ago, were thriving but today are run down without job prospects. Just sitting around blaming young Pakistani men, like Baig does in her documentary, achieves nothing.
    Where do these City based Pakistanis live?

    In London despite getting good gcse results they are scraping the bottom of the barrel along with Bengali's.

    The same is true for Scotland stats have been posted many a time.

    City based Pakistani's in London and Scotland not only are the least in employment along with Bengalis they are also paid the least when in employment the same is true for Manchester.

    As for the article Leicester is not doing too well people are paid much less than in Bradford
    Last edited by mani1; 14th August 2018 at 03:49.

  14. #14
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    Not watching the BBC and stopped paying the license fee. I'm not going to fund that biased pro-govt bull crap anymore!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mani1 View Post
    Where do these City based Pakistanis live?

    In London despite getting good gcse results they are scraping the bottom of the barrel along with Bengali's.

    The same is true for Scotland stats have been posted many a time.

    City based Pakistani's in London and Scotland not only are the least in employment along with Bengalis they are also paid the least when in employment the same is true for Manchester.

    As for the article Leicester is not doing too well people are paid much less than in Bradford
    I agree that even the British Pakistanis whose parents came from big cities in Pakistan struggle. But I can only speak from my own experience, which is that I know lots of very successful British Pakistanis whose origins are in big cities in Pakistan. That's not to say that those from villages aren't successful - there are plenty of those too and many have become very wealthy from running their own successful businesses which cater for the immigrant Pakistani population. However my own experience of Pakistanis working in professional jobs is that they tend to come from the cities of Pakistan (again, by no means all Pakistanis, but most, in my experience). I genuinely believe that is because these people tend to live in the south of England rather than the north where there are greater opportunities, and because their parents are more integrated into life in Britain.

    A lot of Pakistani youth 'act out' because of the way they are brought up, meaning they shoot themselves in the foot when it comes to getting the appropriate GCSEs, which then leads to not having any job prospects. It's a downward spiral that's difficult to stop.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usman View Post
    I agree that even the British Pakistanis whose parents came from big cities in Pakistan struggle. But I can only speak from my own experience, which is that I know lots of very successful British Pakistanis whose origins are in big cities in Pakistan. That's not to say that those from villages aren't successful - there are plenty of those too and many have become very wealthy from running their own successful businesses which cater for the immigrant Pakistani population. However my own experience of Pakistanis working in professional jobs is that they tend to come from the cities of Pakistan (again, by no means all Pakistanis, but most, in my experience). I genuinely believe that is because these people tend to live in the south of England rather than the north where there are greater opportunities, and because their parents are more integrated into life in Britain.

    A lot of Pakistani youth 'act out' because of the way they are brought up, meaning they shoot themselves in the foot when it comes to getting the appropriate GCSEs, which then leads to not having any job prospects. It's a downward spiral that's difficult to stop.
    I guess we have different experiences.
    In my experience in most City Pakistani's are Asylum Seekers or dodgy Students.

    Many from have moved up North and the Midlands due to being kicked out of London due to the benefits cap.

    During my last visit to "West London"
    Southall Lol I meantioned the state of it to some Sikhs and they reckon many Sikhs have moved out and City Pakistani and Afghan Sikh asylum seekers have moved in and ruined it.

    As for proffesional jobs in Bradford there are so many pharmacists that the wages have dropped. Leeds which is probably as close to Bradford as Ilford is to Barking has the most proffesional jobs outside of London many Pakistanis in Bradford work there hence why they are paid more than Indian Leicester and Manchester where most Pakistanis claim City.

    If GCSE's meant any thing in London Bengali and Pakistani's would not be the least paid. Afro Caribeans would be, they despite getting the worst grades of any ethnicity other than Gypsies were less likely to be in low pay in London than Indians whom many Pakistanis claim middle class.

    As for Pakistani Businesses certain take aways are taking away 10k a week after expenses imagine what much bigger Bradford based businesses such as Nawaabs amongst many many much more successfull ones are doing.

  17. #17
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    Not a fan of the documentary which seemed to promote negative stereotypes of British Pakistanis

    Yes there are issues in certain certain communities but to pretty paint the whole community as lacking integration, with failed youths, jobless and living in ghettos is ridiculous and fairly prejudiced

    Surely a more balanced view showing some of the many successful educated businessmen should’ve been highlighted too but I guess that wouldn’t have fitted into the agenda that was being portrayed


    If pakistan cricket is to move forward they need to stop going back

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaz View Post
    Not a fan of the documentary which seemed to promote negative stereotypes of British Pakistanis

    Yes there are issues in certain certain communities but to pretty paint the whole community as lacking integration, with failed youths, jobless and living in ghettos is ridiculous and fairly prejudiced

    Surely a more balanced view showing some of the many successful educated businessmen should’ve been highlighted too but I guess that wouldn’t have fitted into the agenda that was being portrayed
    I agree that many a time such instances can paint a picture where they are going OTT but in most cases they are on point but agreed we need to show both sides of the coin anyhow. Also, many can get defensive or try to prove issues do not exist but it wont make the problems go away. There are people who are doing well in a variety of fields and this is increasing in recent times but the same problems remain in the inner city regions, hopefully things will be better within the next 10 years.


    Ah, so this is what it feels like

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaz619 View Post
    I agree that many a time such instances can paint a picture where they are going OTT but in most cases they are on point but agreed we need to show both sides of the coin anyhow. Also, many can get defensive or try to prove issues do not exist but it wont make the problems go away. There are people who are doing well in a variety of fields and this is increasing in recent times but the same problems remain in the inner city regions, hopefully things will be better within the next 10 years.
    It was a ridiculous documentary. Gujaratis, who rarely marry outside of their immediate family were shown as some sort of Cameron-esque dream of integration...just because they drank a pint lol

    The reality is, Pakistanis from poverty stricken areas are saddled with the same problems that white people in poverty stricken areas, AFricans, Caribbeans, and any other group - namely problems of drugs, poor housing, healthcare, lack of jobs and criminality/lack of education. This is not unique to British Pakistanis at all.

    It was especially shocking in the age of increased number of British Pak doctors, politicans (mayor and secretary), nurses, school teachers and business owners. A typical BBC hack job perpetuated by a typical BBC coconut.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by barah_admi View Post
    It was a ridiculous documentary. Gujaratis, who rarely marry outside of their immediate family were shown as some sort of Cameron-esque dream of integration...just because they drank a pint lol

    The reality is, Pakistanis from poverty stricken areas are saddled with the same problems that white people in poverty stricken areas, AFricans, Caribbeans, and any other group - namely problems of drugs, poor housing, healthcare, lack of jobs and criminality/lack of education. This is not unique to British Pakistanis at all.

    It was especially shocking in the age of increased number of British Pak doctors, politicans (mayor and secretary), nurses, school teachers and business owners. A typical BBC hack job perpetuated by a typical BBC coconut.
    Yeah but they are talking about British Pakistani's here not those groups, everyone gets a turn; for example knife crime being synonymous with Afro-Caribbeans, clearly this is a big problem and it exists but that's not to say that there are people from that community who are not doing well.


    Ah, so this is what it feels like

  21. #21
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    Watched it last night, definitely a big emphasis on the immigrants from Mirpur in Pakistan who settled in northern towns like Bradford. The most striking take away was that they were very segregated areas where most of the population were working class and had grown up probably not interacting with people outside their own community. I suppose you could compare them to the Pakistani version of low income white or black council estates in London inner cities.

    The Gujerati section was interesting mainly because I haven't ever had much interraction with them personally, probably because they are more prevalent down south. I found them slightly weird if I am honest, but might be because they were Indians ( I think) and shared some of their traits.


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  22. #22
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    Saw this article on the topic.

    --------------------------------

    The story of British Pakistani men, told by a native informant

    Two nights ago I found myself gripped by BBC Two's new, "Lost Boys? What's Going Wrong for Asian Men?" presented by Mehreen Baig. I was initially dubious that a one-hour documentary would be able to dissect the identity "Asian men" with much nuance, or to address them as multifaceted beings. I was also concerned about Mehreen's positionality as a presenter who gained her name through appearing in the reality show "Muslims Like Us", rather than for being an investigative journalist. But I was gripped because what I saw was much more disappointing than merely unnuanced or unrigorous, Lost Boys? was a lazy reproduction of racist, culturally essentialist stereotypes approved by an "insider".

    The "Asian men" the documentary focused on were specifically those of the Kashmiri, or "Mirpuri", diaspora in Bradford. This is a diaspora which has been historically demonised in the British media, as my family, based in Bradford for fifty-five years, well know. From representations of the 1988 "Rushdie affair" which internationally portrayed Bradford's Pakistani men as militant, fundamentalist and "backwards", to the 2001 riots blamed on their gang mentality, and post-7/7 narratives around Yorkshire's so-called "parallel communities" being linked to terrorism, Pakistani men in Bradford are a demographic consistently disparaged and demonised. To my mind, documenting them for TV would require a sensitive approach taking account of the history and context of their lives. However, the production team behind Lost Boys? appear to have thought otherwise.

    Indeed, the central problem with the documentary is that throughout an entire hour focused on a racialised, largely working-class, Muslim minority; questions of race, racism or class were never explicitly mentioned or interrogated in a structural way. Instead, a narrative was spun that approached the men as if they lived lives devoid of context. They were derided as "princelings" who were not business-minded enough to get very far in life - as contrasted with one random Gujerati family from Uganda who Mehreen has a pint with (proof they, as compared with the "Mirpuris", are better assimilated, by the way).

    I sat, awestruck that this laughable narrative was framed as an explanation for the challenges in "Asian men's" lives. There was no comment on the effects of structural disadvantage and racism in the employment market, racism and being "written off" at school, or the deindustrialisation of Bradford which has harmed employment for multiple generations. There was no mention of austerity having removed social services and support from young people's lives. No hint that intergenerational cycles of poverty may play a role. In fact, there was no appreciation that to compare the Ugandan-Gujerati diaspora with the Mirpuri diaspora is to disingenuously homogenise "Asians" and make a false comparison.

    Ugandan-Gujeratis largely migrated from different class backgrounds with more social capital than migrants from Kashmir who came to the UK specifically due to the colonial link and the metropole's calls for unskilled industrial labourers after the second world war. If this had been a rigorous investigation Swann Productions could have included these factors and further explored the fascinating pattern of resource divestment from young Pakistani boys since 2003 as part of the government's counterterrorism strategy which instead (bizarrely) funnelled money to Muslim/Asian girls (conflated in policy) on the assumption they were neglected. All of these factors were absent from the documentary in favour of an easy narrative of victim-blaming. In fact, Mehreen's reflections throughout the show insinuated that the solution to problems facing "Asian men" seemed to lie in making it down to the local pub more often and just thinking as if they had more social capital.

    What is perhaps even more frustrating than this absurdly reductive analysis, is that the documentary was evidently made with a hypothesis to be proved, not tested. After I tweeted about my frustrations with the show I received responses from two separate men who informed me that they had been filmed extensively for the production - only to find out recently that they had been dropped because, as the producers told them, their lives reflected "what's going right", not "what's going wrong".

    These experiences reveal the human side of the selective narrative Lost Boys? presented. Far from being rigorous, it was an investigation presenting an argument, not findings. By erasing stories of financial success, educational attainment or defeating the structural odds, participants were disrespected and a selective story was told which is lazy at best, and exploitative at worst - bringing me to my final grievance.

    The topic of how Mehreen conducted her investigation was the issue of most frustration to the hundreds who liked and retweeted my critique online. She distances herself as much as possible from other British-Pakistanis, particularly the working-class Mirpuris she finds in Bradford - whose terraced housing she incredulously comments on as "so close together" - positioning herself as someone with less proximity to the community she is investigating, and more to a middle-class, white voyeur.

    This explains the often patronising anthropological tone she uses in the documentary which is reminiscent of ethnographers exploring "native" subjects 150 years ago. Crucially though, while occupying this "outsider" position makes her relatable to an audience with no personal experience of being Pakistani in Bradford, Mehreen simultaneously reaps the rewards of being an ethnic "insider". She gains the trust of participants and viewers because of this, making her findings - which reproduce racist, classist tropes vilifying Pakistani men - appear valid to a wider audience. In colonial times, people positioned in this way were known as "native informants" - used to validate the dehumanising views the coloniser already held. In this case, Mehreen's positionality helps bolster liberal racism and Islamophobic tropes about Pakistani men as lazy and uniquely misogynistic (she repeatedly asks whether the women in these men's lives cook for them to the point that one would assume non-Pakistani men in England must never benefit from patriarchal norms and women's domestic labour).

    By the end of the show, it was not the boys who were lost, but me. I cannot fathom what the documentary achieved other than to consolidate racist, victim-blaming accounts of Pakistani men in Yorkshire. Such an outcome is not only disappointing but actually harmful since those very tropes are ones used to justify the maltreatment of Pakistani and Muslim men in the justice system, demonise them in the media, and even inform the "science" behind the government's radicalisation thesis which rests on culturalist assumptions that have been deemed barely valid by the psychologists who wrote the study themselves. And yet, it is the mass belief in tropes such as this documentary put out that keep the stigma, racism and Islamophobia, going.

    This documentary should have been presented as the opinion piece of an uninformed outsider arriving to Bradford with only the knowledge of media tropes as reference. A rigorous insight would actually give the mic to "Asian boys" to speak on their own terms, accept contradictory viewpoints, investigate the context and history, and question the role of masculinity among young men more generally. But unfortunately, yet again, Bradford's boys have been spoken over, tokenised and disparaged in the name of giving a green light to white liberals that racism, cultural essentialism and stereotyping have been thumbed-up by an "insider".

    https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/op...085534623.html


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  23. #23
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    The topic of how Mehreen conducted her investigation was the issue of most frustration to the hundreds who liked and retweeted my critique online. She distances herself as much as possible from other British-Pakistanis, particularly the working-class Mirpuris she finds in Bradford - whose terraced housing she incredulously comments on as "so close together" - positioning herself as someone with less proximity to the community she is investigating, and more to a middle-class, white voyeur.

    I thought she was okay, although ironically she was describing the Mirpuri boys as Princelings, when she herself came across as the typical desi girl with the princess syndrome. But she deserves some props for mingling quite happily with the disadvantaged ( but handsome) Kashmiri boys. The show's premise was to show what was wrong with the Pakistani community so I guess you would have to ask whether that narrative was controlled by her or the producers.


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    TGK 237.1 owner

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaz619 View Post
    Yeah but they are talking about British Pakistani's here not those groups, everyone gets a turn; for example knife crime being synonymous with Afro-Caribbeans, clearly this is a big problem and it exists but that's not to say that there are people from that community who are not doing well.
    No, everyone does not get a turn. We do not see consistent, almost permanent negative imagery of British Indians, in particular Hindus, who have become some of the biggest friends of the modern right wing, or Jews or English white men from the middle classes.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by barah_admi View Post
    No, everyone does not get a turn. We do not see consistent, almost permanent negative imagery of British Indians, in particular Hindus, who have become some of the biggest friends of the modern right wing, or Jews or English white men from the middle classes.
    Those issues are being highlighted but don't let it get to you; you are obviously doing very well for yourself and you should be proud. However, problems do exist and there are plenty of people who are struggling; if this show highlighted them rather then the positives I see it as a good thing because it is a good first step in trying to tackle those problems by raising awareness; the same with regards to knife crime.

    And I say that as one of those people who comes from those gutters and slums but while I have not seen that show yet am not offended by criticism directed at those from my community and in the inner city regions, the criticisms are not directed at people like you who are doing well it is great that you're in a position now where you can look at the rest of us and point out how we are the ones who do not provide the best representation. I rather have people highlight the issues personally then turn a blind eye completely, it doesn't bother me if the positives are not showcased; it doesn't take away from all your success or how one turns things around.

    I understand that it surely will rustle some egos, but in the grand scheme it doesn't matter to me. Am not sure why people feel that it is a good thing if issues in other communities are not highlighted enough . It's all about ego, but some of us live in the real world and we have stripped ourselves of all that is superficial.


    Ah, so this is what it feels like

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    Quote Originally Posted by shaz619 View Post
    Those issues are being highlighted but don't let it get to you; you are obviously doing very well for yourself and you should be proud. However, problems do exist and there are plenty of people who are struggling; if this show highlighted them rather then the positives I see it as a good thing because it is a good first step in trying to tackle those problems by raising awareness; the same with regards to knife crime.

    And I say that as one of those people who comes from those gutters and slums but while I have not seen that show yet am not offended by criticism directed at those from my community and in the inner city regions, the criticisms are not directed at people like you who are doing well it is great that you're in a position now where you can look at the rest of us and point out how we are the ones who do not provide the best representation. I rather have people highlight the issues personally then turn a blind eye completely, it doesn't bother me if the positives are not showcased; it doesn't take away from all your success or how one turns things around.

    I understand that it surely will rustle some egos, but in the grand scheme it doesn't matter to me. Am not sure why people feel that it is a good thing if issues in other communities are not highlighted enough . It's all about ego, but some of us live in the real world and we have stripped ourselves of all that is superficial.
    You should may be watch the show before commenting on it, because there is a world of difference between an in depth, scholarly documentary and a hatchet piece.

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    This Documentary was a bit of a Sham. The producers changed the title and subject mater for the final cut.
    Listen to the BBC report relating to this at around 11mins 22 secs
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00005sm#play


    Pakistan Cricket: Exciting, Entertaining, Unpredictable, Dangerous and Unique.


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