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  1. #1
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    Genetic DNA tests : Anyone tried them?

    I recently got a dna test from a fairly well known dna testing website.

    I wanted to know if i was carrier for any of the genetic diseases they have, and also check my dna mixture since i think it would be pretty cool if there was some random mix in there.

    Long story short, the genetic disease screening showed me to be clear on all counts which was nice to know, although the caveat is that the tests are tailored more towards european demographic, so im not sure how that would effect my results, if at all. (any doctors here feel free to let me know how seriously i should take these results)

    secondly my dna mix showed that im all south asian, like pakistani or indian, which was no surprise, but a bit of a boring result. only mildly interesting result was my maternal haplogroup is apparently rare amongst south asians, more common in Yemen.

    anyone else tried this? any surprise results?
    Last edited by ElRaja; 11th December 2018 at 16:43.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    I recently got a dna test from a fairly well known dna testing website.

    I wanted to know if i was carrier for any of the genetic diseases they have, and also check my dna mixture since i think it would be pretty cool if there was some random mix in there.

    Long story short, the genetic disease screening showed me to be clear on all counts which was nice to know, although the caveat is that the tests are tailored more towards european demographic, so im not sure how that would effect my results, if at all. (any doctors here feel free to let me know how seriously i should take these results)

    secondly my dna mix showed that im all south asian, like pakistani or indian, which was no surprise, but a bit of a boring result. only mildly interesting result was my maternal haplogroup is apparently rare amongst south asians, more common in Yemen.

    anyone else tried this? any surprise results?
    How much did it cost. A couple of friends were disappointed that there tests (cost around 100 pounds), came back with them being 100 per cent South Asians and not some more whiter genes in them lol.

    Surely cheap heritage tests are not accurate enough, that's my guess.

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    One of my cousins who looks somewhat Chinese ended up with a fully South Asian categorization. South Indians get the same, so I really don't want to spend that much money to get an expected result.

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    I done one a few years back, I posted my results on some thread on pp a while back.

  5. #5
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    It's a scam plus you're selling away your dna and privacy.


    "but but vut about da pundits?!?!?!?!?!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devilsadvokat View Post
    How much did it cost. A couple of friends were disappointed that there tests (cost around 100 pounds), came back with them being 100 per cent South Asians and not some more whiter genes in them lol.

    Surely cheap heritage tests are not accurate enough, that's my guess.
    It's disappointing because they lump all south asians in one category and don't do a breakdown like they do for Europeans.


    "but but vut about da pundits?!?!?!?!?!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    I recently got a dna test from a fairly well known dna testing website.

    I wanted to know if i was carrier for any of the genetic diseases they have, and also check my dna mixture since i think it would be pretty cool if there was some random mix in there.

    Long story short, the genetic disease screening showed me to be clear on all counts which was nice to know, although the caveat is that the tests are tailored more towards european demographic, so im not sure how that would effect my results, if at all. (any doctors here feel free to let me know how seriously i should take these results)

    secondly my dna mix showed that im all south asian, like pakistani or indian, which was no surprise, but a bit of a boring result. only mildly interesting result was my maternal haplogroup is apparently rare amongst south asians, more common in Yemen.

    anyone else tried this? any surprise results?
    yeh i did mine roughly 1 yr ago, i thought it could tell me more about tribes, results - 97% sub continent, 2% central asia, 1% polyneasian.

    boring - i wanted to know more, then on the website it gives you a list of other users who have very similar results- 4th cousin this and that- most of these people are really light skin - im darker like mo.asif the bowler.

    cost me 70 on offer, waste of money


    TGK 237.1 owner

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devilsadvokat View Post
    How much did it cost. A couple of friends were disappointed that there tests (cost around 100 pounds), came back with them being 100 per cent South Asians and not some more whiter genes in them lol.

    Surely cheap heritage tests are not accurate enough, that's my guess.
    yeh its about that much, i was pretty much certain id be a very high degree of south asian cos ive seen the family tree back a fair few generations and they were all from the same area in pakistan.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pakistanian View Post
    It's a scam plus you're selling away your dna and privacy.
    well, i did it because i was also interested in the medical profiling, and as far as im aware it seems like acceptably rigorous for what is a fairly cheap profiling, i wouldn't expect something super detailed for a hundred quid tbh.

    that's also why i was hoping some doc on here could shed light on how accurate they think such kinda tests are likely to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pakistanian View Post
    It's disappointing because they lump all south asians in one category and don't do a breakdown like they do for Europeans.
    they do, but its a process, like when i did the original test it 100% south asian with no breakdown, when i went on it recently it had a qualitative regional breakdown which was added a few months ago, so pakistani and indian was highly like, whereas there was no detection of afghan, bengali, nepali, mauritian and sri lankan dna.

    eventually when they have a large enough data set i'm guessing they will add a more granular breakdown and update it.

    Quote Originally Posted by finalfantasy7 View Post
    yeh i did mine roughly 1 yr ago, i thought it could tell me more about tribes, results - 97% sub continent, 2% central asia, 1% polyneasian.

    boring - i wanted to know more, then on the website it gives you a list of other users who have very similar results- 4th cousin this and that- most of these people are really light skin - im darker like mo.asif the bowler.

    cost me 70 on offer, waste of money
    my "closest cousins" all tended to be from similar places in pakistan, i contacted a few and i think there would possibly be some relation, but i thought it was getting a bit creepy and stopped.

    i also had a fair few european cousins, but i didnt explore that much tbh.

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    Quote Originally Posted by finalfantasy7 View Post
    yeh i did mine roughly 1 yr ago, i thought it could tell me more about tribes, results - 97% sub continent, 2% central asia, 1% polyneasian.

    boring - i wanted to know more, then on the website it gives you a list of other users who have very similar results- 4th cousin this and that- most of these people are really light skin - im darker like mo.asif the bowler.

    cost me 70 on offer, waste of money
    You are the first, I presume, South Asian, who has not been fully 100% South Asian, all that on a cheap test.

    It would be interesting to send in ones DNA and instead of an Asian name, you email from the account of a Leroy Anderson or Martin Chung or Mwensa Marley or Tabitha Ahmed, you get the picture. Otherwise they could be sending the fake results.

    Tribes? I guess those are complex and expensive tests, gonna take a few years before they cost 70 pounds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackShadow View Post
    One of my cousins who looks somewhat Chinese ended up with a fully South Asian categorization. South Indians get the same, so I really don't want to spend that much money to get an expected result.
    Always think that the chinese looking South Asians are descendants of Genghis Khan.

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    Download your raw data and upload it to GedMatch. Once on there use the Harappa Calculator, which is a genetic calculator geared towards mathematically modeling the various ethnicities of South Asia.

    Here is the results of my Punjabi Jatt cousins from the Sialkot-Gujranwala areas:
    Name:  CC9AC044-4673-43DA-A7B6-48125681B39F.jpg
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    As you can see its pretty accurate.

    Just a heads up categories such as NE Euro, SW Asian and Caucasian are indicative of ancient admixture unless you are scoring very high amounts which I can point out for you if you are willing to share your results here.

    On having Europeans in your cousins list this is because the database is primarily composed of European testers and there is simply not enough South Asians to have tested. Like youve done its best to just ignore it.
    Last edited by Ellipsism; 12th December 2018 at 06:15.

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    I had one done around last year from FTDNA and I got these results.



    Unfortunately, they don't really break down Asian DNA as much as European. However, if you upload to GEDMatch and use the Harappa calculator, it gives a South Asian breakdown like so:



    I also got a y-DNA test done. The reason I did this is that my family claims to be Syed, but I had serious doubts for a few different reasons. They-DNA test tells your origins by tracing up your father to father line, meaning it totally ignores your mother's contribution, and it goes back much further than the regular autosomal test. Instead of giving a genetic percentage, it gives you a happlogroup, which you can see on this map.



    My initial y-DNA test confirmed that I belong to the wider J-M267 Haplogroup (Middle Eastern/Arab; Pakistanis usually get R1a or L). After that, I joined the Syed DNA project on FTDNA, and the guy there told me to buy a test for Happlogroup J-FGC30416, which is apparantly usually only found in descendants of Imam Hussain. I tested positive. All in all, was totally worth it, I got my answers.





    It is not defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by defeat that destroys you.
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    Apparently it is not hard to find someome royal to be related to via ancestry.

    Apparently all European Europeans have Charlamagne the Great as an ancestor.

    Dont know how true that is but perhaps a lot more people are descendants of Imam Hussein than you would have thought.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devilsadvokat View Post
    Apparently it is not hard to find someome royal to be related to via ancestry.

    Apparently all European Europeans have Charlamagne the Great as an ancestor.

    Dont know how true that is but perhaps a lot more people are descendants of Imam Hussein than you would have thought.
    Quite probable, especially in Pakistan because a huge amount of Syeds fled the Middle East since they faced persecution.


    It is not defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by defeat that destroys you.
    ― Imran Khan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellipsism View Post
    Download your raw data and upload it to GedMatch. Once on there use the Harappa Calculator, which is a genetic calculator geared towards mathematically modeling the various ethnicities of South Asia.

    Here is the results of my Punjabi Jatt cousins from the Sialkot-Gujranwala areas:
    Name:  CC9AC044-4673-43DA-A7B6-48125681B39F.jpg
Views: 516
Size:  22.8 KB

    As you can see it’s pretty accurate.

    Just a heads up categories such as NE Euro, SW Asian and Caucasian are indicative of ancient admixture unless you are scoring very high amounts which I can point out for you if you are willing to share your results here.

    On having Europeans in your ‘cousins’ list this is because the database is primarily composed of European testers and there is simply not enough South Asians to have tested. Like you’ve done it’s best to just ignore it.
    How did you get that single populations sharing thing at the bottom?


    It is not defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by defeat that destroys you.
    ― Imran Khan

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    Quote Originally Posted by hussain.r97 View Post

    Your results are fairly interesting as your Y DNA points towards a Middle Eastern Origin you score nearly no SW Asian (A component that peaks in Arabs), around 1-2% is normal amongst NW South Asians (excluding Pashtuns who generally score more) due to a very small amount of common ancestry with Arabs (it’s hardly quantifiable, but present). But taking into account your Y haplogroup you should be scoring a lot more. The Caucasian component as well I’d expect you to score more than you do. You should post your results on Anthrogenica.

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    Did you know - Most European Europeans have Neanthedral DNA. I suspect even Asians might have Neanthedral DNA, after all Eurasians is a group too.

    The Eurasians group would extend to large parts of Europe and South Asia.

    The evidence for this is that all Eurasians stem from a single Proto Indo European tribe. All modern languages stem from a single Proto Indo European single mother tongue.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-Europeans

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    Quote Originally Posted by hussain.r97 View Post
    How did you get that single populations sharing thing at the bottom?
    Click on the oracle tab. Don’t take them at face value as it’s a mathematical evaluation.

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    Lol I'd never trust someone with my DNA but a close friend of mine tried it years ago. He is from Gujar tribe and basically since at least 500 yrs his family has settled in the same village and marriages would happen in the same village and other villages max 30 km away. The official site was of no good but GEDmatch did provide some interesting feedback.

    These are his results

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    and his mothers (yeah he gifted her one of the tests too Lol)

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    His main motivation was that his grandpa used to tell him that the forefather was a Sahaba who migrated to indo-pak area. Hence we were expecting some kind of proof of it. Couldn't find anything of relevance though it could also be that the test only goes back like last 600 years or so.

    Now we were expecting something like "Arab" to show up but what I read above is that SW-Asian is supposed to be high among Arabs.

    By looking at the results again I find it odd that his mother not just have a higher SW-Asian than him but also has a fair amount of W-African while he himself has none of W-Africa. So that part of DNA seems to be becoming less with next generation. And it must have been around 1400 years since that Sahaba moved in.

    On a side note I do find it interesting how his closes relatives are Kashmiri pandits and most significantly punjabi-brahmin. Putting a bit twist to the story that Muslims in pakistan are low caste hindu converts



    We didn't take much of ancestry analysis since it's so vague and also tales of the past. Like what the heck is even "Baloch" suppose to mean he has no recorded history of having to do anything with balochis.

    The more interesting findings were from health report and from Promethease where he found he had a rare gene which is most likely associated with blonde hair and blue eyes. It was hilarious since he has typical pitch black hair. It shows how much mixed we humans are and how the race superiority is a nonsense. He also had a cool and very rare gene associated with long life. I am going to share those exact genes some other time.

    We did this like 3 years ago are there any cool new DNA analysis sites up? Still have the raw data.

    Caution: Despite many interesting findings there were a bit of "bad" one to like increases risk of baldness, diabetes and potentially old age dementia. But he took it all with a grain of salt. Point being I don't think such tests are for you if you don't know how to handle the info. That's why I opt not to take one.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellipsism View Post
    Download your raw data and upload it to GedMatch. Once on there use the Harappa Calculator, which is a genetic calculator geared towards mathematically modeling the various ethnicities of South Asia.

    Here is the results of my Punjabi Jatt cousins from the Sialkot-Gujranwala areas:
    Name:  CC9AC044-4673-43DA-A7B6-48125681B39F.jpg
Views: 516
Size:  22.8 KB

    As you can see it’s pretty accurate.
    cool, will try it out and let you know. thx for the additional info

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirris View Post
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    His main motivation was that his grandpa used to tell him that the forefather was a Sahaba who migrated to indo-pak area. Hence we were expecting some kind of proof of it. Couldn't find anything of relevance though it could also be that the test only goes back like last 600 years or so.

    Now we were expecting something like "Arab" to show up but what I read above is that SW-Asian is supposed to be high among Arabs.

    By looking at the results again I find it odd that his mother not just have a higher SW-Asian than him but also has a fair amount of W-African while he himself has none of W-Africa. So that part of DNA seems to be becoming less with next generation. And it must have been around 1400 years since that Sahaba moved in.
    I made the same mistake getting the autosomal test, it only goes back 500 years. Being from a family that claim to be Rizvi Syed (descended from Imam Raza), I was expecting some Arab and Iranian type things to come up, but then I realised that the migration from Iran to India was probably a century or two earlier.

    I'm not sure if you can confirm direct descent from a specific Sahaba, but using a y-DNA test, you can definitely confirm whether or not you are directly descended from the Quraysh tribe or even a proto Quraysh tribe. As far as I know, the only company offering y-DNA (as well as mtDNA) is FTDNA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellipsism View Post
    Your results are fairly interesting as your Y DNA points towards a Middle Eastern Origin you score nearly no SW Asian (A component that peaks in Arabs), around 1-2% is normal amongst NW South Asians (excluding Pashtuns who generally score more) due to a very small amount of common ancestry with Arabs (it’s hardly quantifiable, but present). But taking into account your Y haplogroup you should be scoring a lot more. The Caucasian component as well I’d expect you to score more than you do. You should post your results on Anthrogenica.
    I should probably post on Anthrogenica. I guess, since the atDNA test only accounts for the last 500 years, the Middle Eastern 'blood' has probably diluted to a large extent. From what I know, Imam Hussain was married to a Persian, many of the Imam's after him married non-Arabs and also lived in Iran. My ancestors lived in Iran for a few centuries before moving to South Asia around 600-700 years ago. Considering all that, lack of any Arab footprint in my atDNA results is not surprising.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hussain.r97 View Post
    I made the same mistake getting the autosomal test, it only goes back 500 years. Being from a family that claim to be Rizvi Syed (descended from Imam Raza), I was expecting some Arab and Iranian type things to come up, but then I realised that the migration from Iran to India was probably a century or two earlier.

    I'm not sure if you can confirm direct descent from a specific Sahaba, but using a y-DNA test, you can definitely confirm whether or not you are directly descended from the Quraysh tribe or even a proto Quraysh tribe. As far as I know, the only company offering y-DNA (as well as mtDNA) is FTDNA.
    What's an autosmal test and what's the other option. He buyed the kit from 23andme.

    The sahaba is supposed to be from Yemen. So no Qureshi or prestige stuff which does give the thing a bit credibility cause if the old folks wanted to come up with a cool sounding story they could have easily used the Quresh route.

    On GEDmatch under HarappaWorld Oracle do you know what "Single Population Sharing" and "Mixed Mode Population Sharing" means and what's the difference between the two?

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    This is what I got for single population.


    It is not defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by defeat that destroys you.
    ― Imran Khan

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    Quote Originally Posted by hussain.r97 View Post

    This is what I got for single population.
    Congrats you are also close to kashmiri-pandits and punjabi-brahmin. Low caste hindu conversion theory debunked I guess.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirris View Post
    What's an autosmal test and what's the other option. He buyed the kit from 23andme.
    This site explains it really well.

    https://www.myfamilydnatest.com/ydna...na-comparison/

    The sahaba is supposed to be from Yemen. So no Qureshi or prestige stuff which does give the thing a bit credibility cause if the old folks wanted to come up with a cool sounding story they could have easily used the Quresh route.
    I would definitely suggest a y-DNA test for that. I'm pretty sure you can also pinpoint if your ancestor came from Yemen or not.

    On GEDmatch under HarappaWorld Oracle do you know what "Single Population Sharing" and "Mixed Mode Population Sharing" means and what's the difference between the two?
    I'm not 100% sure on this, but I think the single population sharing compares you to someone who is supposadly, for example, fully Kashmiri pandit, while mixed mode will compare you to someone supposadly, for example, 80% up-muslim, 20% Caucasian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirris View Post
    Congrats you are also close to kashmiri-pandits and punjabi-brahmin. Low caste hindu conversion theory debunked I guess.
    From what I know, there is a strong theory that upper class Hindus converted to Islam during Muslim rule in India, and took on the title of "Syed" in order to continue being a kind of "upper class" amongst Muslims. That is one reason that there are such a huge amount of Syeds in South Asia, many are fake. That is also why you have some 'Syeds' using their lineage to their advantage, and turning into big feudal lords.

    My father used to go hunting in interior Sindh with his father, and he tells me that if the people in interior Sindh find out you're Syed, they literally start kissing your hands, bringing you food, offering you protection, accommodation etc. That's why it's not really surprising that feudalism is still so prevailant in Sindh. Many PPP guys are 'Syeds', such as Qaim Ali Shah and Murad Ali Shah, these types play the Syed card to get people to serve them, and the uneducated public fall for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellipsism View Post
    Download your raw data and upload it to GedMatch. Once on there use the Harappa Calculator, which is a genetic calculator geared towards mathematically modeling the various ethnicities of South Asia.

    Here is the results of my Punjabi Jatt cousins from the Sialkot-Gujranwala areas:
    Name:  CC9AC044-4673-43DA-A7B6-48125681B39F.jpg
Views: 516
Size:  22.8 KB

    As you can see it’s pretty accurate.

    Just a heads up categories such as NE Euro, SW Asian and Caucasian are indicative of ancient admixture unless you are scoring very high amounts which I can point out for you if you are willing to share your results here.

    On having Europeans in your ‘cousins’ list this is because the database is primarily composed of European testers and there is simply not enough South Asians to have tested. Like you’ve done it’s best to just ignore it.
    so this is what i got, but im pretty sure im not balochi lol. so how do i interpret this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    so this is what i got, but im pretty sure im not balochi lol. so how do i interpret this?

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    Don't think Balochi literally means you are from Balochistan, nor does South India mean you at from Tamil Nadu. Both are just general geographic references, I think Baloch refers to modern day Balochistan, KPK, Punjab, Sindh, Kashmir, Gilgit-Baltistan, Afghanistan, Sistan and Western UP. South India refers to the rest of India. Caucasian refers to Iran and the Caucuses region (Armenia, Georgia)
    Last edited by hussain.r97; 13th December 2018 at 07:18.

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    The Baloch is a misnomer. It refers to ancestry from the Gedrosia region.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    so this is what i got, but im pretty sure im not balochi lol. so how do i interpret this?

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    High Baloch, low Euro and decent Caucasian so Im guessing your either an Arain or Gujjar or are from South Punjab and the surrounding Sindh areas; as your oracles hint at.

    Your SW Asian is relatively high so there is a possibility of ancestry from the Middle East or Iran. But Im not much of an expert so if you want to go further into that I suggest you post your results on an anthropology forum called anthrogenica

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirris View Post

    On GEDmatch under HarappaWorld Oracle do you know what "Single Population Sharing" and "Mixed Mode Population Sharing" means and what's the difference between the two?
    Single population sharing essentially shows you what ethnicitie you score like. The lower the distance the more you score like that population.

    Mixed mode tries to model you mathematically (it is important to remember this. It is not looking at your DNA so do not take it seriously) with two population groups. Take take my cousin for example:
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    What this is showing is that my cousin is slightly more Caucasian shifted than the Punjabi Jatt Sikhs in the database for this calculator. It does not literally mean he has Chechen ancestry. If you are looking into potential Arab ancestry you would want to see Arab populations or Iranian appear in your mixed mode which would suggest he is more Western shifted than what people of the same ethnicity (I’m guessing some sort of Pahari/Kashmiri type) are. If there is then it might be worth spending more money to investigate further. However, looking at his results I’m 99% sure there is no foreign ancestry and he scores exactly like how other people of his ethnicity score.

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    @hussain.r97

    Don't you guys have an ancestral lineage tree (shajra)? That's one way to check if you're a Syed.

    My father's cousin has one that goes all the way till Imam Raza AS. I'm probably the 51st/52nd descendant according to that lineage tree.

    I'd love to do a DNA test tho. Its always nice to know as much as you can about your ancestry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellipsism View Post
    Single population sharing essentially shows you what ethnicitie you score like. The lower the distance the more you score like that population.

    Mixed mode tries to model you mathematically (it is important to remember this. It is not looking at your DNA so do not take it seriously) with two population groups. Take take my cousin for example:
    Name:  A86A6025-2C64-4857-8081-BE1584306EC7.jpg
Views: 329
Size:  66.8 KB
    What this is showing is that my cousin is slightly more Caucasian shifted than the Punjabi Jatt Sikhs in the database for this calculator. It does not literally mean he has Chechen ancestry. If you are looking into potential Arab ancestry you would want to see Arab populations or Iranian appear in your mixed mode which would suggest he is more Western shifted than what people of the same ethnicity (Im guessing some sort of Pahari/Kashmiri type) are. If there is then it might be worth spending more money to investigate further. However, looking at his results Im 99% sure there is no foreign ancestry and he scores exactly like how other people of his ethnicity score.
    This is his mixed population result.

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    We are just not sure why one side is heavily showing kalash. When it wasn't in the single population result.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hadi Rizvi View Post
    @hussain.r97

    Don't you guys have an ancestral lineage tree (shajra)? That's one way to check if you're a Syed.

    My father's cousin has one that goes all the way till Imam Raza AS. I'm probably the 51st/52nd descendant according to that lineage tree.

    I'd love to do a DNA test tho. Its always nice to know as much as you can about your ancestry.
    I do have a family tree, but I had serious doubts about it. Imam Raza AS is only known to have had one son (Imam Taqi AS). However, according to my tree, he had 5 sons, and my ancestry goes through one of his sons that is not Imam Taqi AS. For this reason I thought that there is a chance that our family tree was forged, and we may not really be Syed.

    Now the DNA test has pretty much confirmed I am Syed, but my family tree remains a mystery. Either it is a forgery, either it has mistakes because maybe my ancestors did not start making a tree until a few generations later, or Imam Raza AS truly had many sons.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellipsism View Post
    Single population sharing essentially shows you what ethnicitie you score like. The lower the distance the more you score like that population.

    Mixed mode tries to model you mathematically (it is important to remember this. It is not looking at your DNA so do not take it seriously) with two population groups. Take take my cousin for example:
    Name:  A86A6025-2C64-4857-8081-BE1584306EC7.jpg
Views: 329
Size:  66.8 KB
    What this is showing is that my cousin is slightly more Caucasian shifted than the Punjabi Jatt Sikhs in the database for this calculator. It does not literally mean he has Chechen ancestry. If you are looking into potential Arab ancestry you would want to see Arab populations or Iranian appear in your mixed mode which would suggest he is more Western shifted than what people of the same ethnicity (I’m guessing some sort of Pahari/Kashmiri type) are. If there is then it might be worth spending more money to investigate further. However, looking at his results I’m 99% sure there is no foreign ancestry and he scores exactly like how other people of his ethnicity score.
    Thanks for explaining, I was confused about what it actually is too.


    It is not defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by defeat that destroys you.
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    @Ellipsism

    This is what I am getting for Mixed Mode. How would you interpret this?

    Seems like I am getting a lot of Turkic, Iranian, and Caucuses type mixtures.


    It is not defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by defeat that destroys you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellipsism View Post
    High Baloch, low Euro and decent Caucasian so I’m guessing your either an Arain or Gujjar or are from South Punjab and the surrounding Sindh areas; as your oracles hint at.

    Your SW Asian is relatively high so there is a possibility of ancestry from the Middle East or Iran. But I’m not much of an expert so if you want to go further into that I suggest you post your results on an anthropology forum called anthrogenica
    am actually pothwari, extended family has been based in northern punjab for around 200 years afaik. there tends to be a lot of variation of eye colour and skin colour in my family tho, lots of green and some blue eyed, some really light and some really dark skinned people, so i've always thought theres random genes in there.

    its entertaining but i don't know how much credence to give to these results, perhaps its best used as a comparative tool between others to judge relative mixtures.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    am actually pothwari, extended family has been based in northern punjab for around 200 years afaik. there tends to be a lot of variation of eye colour and skin colour in my family tho, lots of green and some blue eyed, some really light and some really dark skinned people, so i've always thought theres random genes in there.

    its entertaining but i don't know how much credence to give to these results, perhaps its best used as a comparative tool between others to judge relative mixtures.
    Go to codegene.eu and upload the DNA raw data and search for "eyes" and see what kind of results you get. It is a fully free service. Caution: it will also show medical results like risk of getting certain cancers. If you can take all of it as a mere speculation and suggestion than you should be able to handle too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirris View Post
    Go to codegene.eu and upload the DNA raw data and search for "eyes" and see what kind of results you get. It is a fully free service. Caution: it will also show medical results like risk of getting certain cancers. If you can take all of it as a mere speculation and suggestion than you should be able to handle too.
    If you are Eurasian and not got Neanthedral DNA, the tests are meaningless...


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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirris View Post
    Go to codegene.eu and upload the DNA raw data and search for "eyes" and see what kind of results you get. It is a fully free service. Caution: it will also show medical results like risk of getting certain cancers. If you can take all of it as a mere speculation and suggestion than you should be able to handle too.
    that is a crazy website man, serious information overload, will take a long time to make sense of it. how do they work all this stuff out, is this cross referenced against medical research or something?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    that is a crazy website man, serious information overload, will take a long time to make sense of it. how do they work all this stuff out, is this cross referenced against medical research or something?
    They just wanna bamboozle you with info. I would be surprised if it was legit but you aint gonna know, you are gonna think, money well spent.

    Neanthedral DNA ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by ElRaja View Post
    that is a crazy website man, serious information overload, will take a long time to make sense of it. how do they work all this stuff out, is this cross referenced against medical research or something?
    We used both the free service codegene and the paid one promethease. They both showed somewhat smiliar results.

    I didn't really dwell into it much but from my superficial understanding they work by comparing your genes with the latest research and calculate you risk factors and what not. For example according to the research certain genes make you more likely get alzheimer and they check your DNA for those genes etc.

    At the end of day they are all indications and current understanding of genes and their relation to certain traits including disease.

    For example my friend is color blind and codegene did found a gene in his DNA which is it likely to cause colorblindness. It also accurately told what blood group my friend likely has.

    At the same time it found a gene which speculated to be responsible for blonde hair and blue eyes while my friend has typical brown eyes and black hair.

    It found genes which increased the risk of alzheimer and also which is suppose to discrese the risk.

    So we just took it as novel info while being aware of certain potential risks.
    Last edited by Sirris; 15th December 2018 at 23:36.

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    so i did mine just out of interest and uploaded my raw data to Gedmatch to run the harappa admixture calculator, my results:

    Admix Results (sorted):

    # Population Percent
    1 Baloch 44.12
    2 S-Indian 26.06
    3 NE-Euro 13.41
    4 Caucasian 11.5
    5 SW-Asian 1.67
    6 Beringian 1.25
    7 Pygmy 0.78
    8 American 0.59
    9 Papuan 0.36
    10 Mediterranean 0.26

    All my family as far as I know is Punjabi Jat and looks like my results are consistent with other Jats who seem to have a higher NE-Euro component than other groups, not sure what it all means though overall other than is typical Punjabi admixture.

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    A new way of editing the code of life could correct 89% of the errors in DNA that cause disease, say US scientists.

    The technology, called prime editing, has been described as a "genetic word processor" able to accurately re-write the genetic code.

    It has been used to correct damaging mutations in the lab, including those that cause sickle cell anaemia.

    The team at the Broad Institute say it is "very versatile and precise", but stress the research is only starting.

    Can't we already edit DNA?
    Prime editing is the latest advance in the field of gene editing, which is developing at an incredible pace.

    Our DNA is the instruction manual for building and running our bodies. It is in nearly every one of our cells.

    Being able to tweak DNA through gene editing is already transforming scientific research, promising to revolutionise medicine and asking deep moral and ethical questions after the creation of babies who were gene-edited to have protection from HIV.

    Much of the excitement has centred on a technology called Crispr-Cas9, which was developed just seven years ago.

    It scans DNA for the right spot and then, like a microscopic pair of scissors, cuts it in two.

    This creates the opportunity to edit the DNA.

    However, the edits are not always perfect and the cuts can end up in the wrong place. Both issues are a problem for using the technology in medicine.

    The promise of prime editing is precision.

    How does prime editing work?
    The study, in the journal Nature, used prime editing to accurately insert or delete sections of DNA; as well as correct typos in a single "letter" out of the three billion that make up the human genetic code.

    One of the researchers, Dr David Liu, said: "You can think of prime editors to be like word processors, capable of searching for target DNA sequences and precisely replacing them.

    "Prime editors offer more targeting flexibility and greater editing precision."

    Prime editing is like pressing Ctrl-F to find the bit of text you want to change, then pressing Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V to copy over the new text (or the command key if you're a mac user).

    The technology uses a lab-made sequence of genetic code. This has two roles, one is to find the specific part of the DNA you want to edit and the other contains the change you want to make.

    This is paired with an enzyme (called a reverse transcriptase) which copies the relevant edits over into the DNA.

    It was developed by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Massachusetts.

    How can prime editing treat disease?
    The fundamental building blocks of DNA are the four bases adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine. They are commonly known by their respective letters, A, C, G and T.

    Three billion of these letters form the complete manual for building and maintaining the human body, but seemingly tiny errors can cause disease.

    A mutation that turned one specific A into a T results in the most common form of sickle cell disease.

    Tay-Sachs disease, a rare and fatal nerve condition, is often caused by the addition of four extra letters of code.

    Prime editing has been used to reverse both genetic errors in experiments on human cells in the laboratory.

    There are around 75,000 different mutations that can cause disease in people. Dr Liu estimates prime editing has the potential to fix 89% of them.

    The other 11% include times when people have too many copies of a gene (a genetic instruction) or when the whole gene is missing.

    "Prime editing is the beginning, rather than the end of a long-standing aspiration in the molecular life-sciences to be able to make any DNA change in any position of a living cell or organism, including potentially human patients with genetic diseases," Dr Liu said.

    How long will it take?
    The challenge - as with all other gene editing technologies - will be getting the molecular machinery that is capable of performing these edits into the right parts of the human body and to ensure they are safe.

    Like other gene-editing technologies, it is likely the first applications will be in diseases where cells can be taken out of the body, edited, checked to ensure they are safe and put back in.

    That would apply to some blood disorders like sickle cell or thalassemias, where bone marrow can be removed and put back in.

    "We may be able to 'fix' known human variants associated with disease, but the ability to do so in the right cell type and in a clinically relevant manner may be some time away," said Dr Hilary Sheppard, from the University of Auckland.

    What do the experts think?
    Prof Robin Lovell-Badge, from the Francis Crick Institute, told BBC News: "This is an excellent paper, typical of the careful step-by-step, clever and inventive approach used by David Liu.

    "Because the vast majority of human genetic diseases are due to the types of mutation that prime editing can correct, the methods will hopefully prove useful in therapies for such diseases.

    "Of course, much more work will be needed to optimise the methods and to find ways to deliver the components efficiently before they could be used clinically to treat patients, but they certainly offer promise.

    Dr Helen O'Neill, from UCL, said: "This exciting research displays yet another expansion of the genome editing toolbox which allows for ever-more precise editing ability and efficiency.

    "The research has been verified in vitro in human cells with an impressive 175 different editing examples including some of the more difficult to edit diseases."
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-50125843.


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