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  1. #1
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    Christchurch mosque shootings: Who were the victims?

    Christchurch mosque shootings: Who were the victims?

    Forty-nine people are confirmed to have died in Friday's attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

    Officials are now carrying out the difficult task of identifying those who have died. No victims have yet been named officially.

    But it's becoming clear they came from countries around the world, and that many of them were refugees who thought they had found safety in New Zealand.

    Many families who have not yet made contact with their loved ones are enduring a terrible wait for news.

    Here are some of the people reported as dead or missing so far.

    Mucad Ibrahim, three
    Mucad has not been seen since shooting began at Deans Avenue mosque.

    He was visiting with his brother, Abdi, and their father, both of whom fled the attack.

    The family have checked hospitals treating the injured but have not found him.

    "We're most likely thinking he's one of the people who has died at the mosque ... at this stage everyone's saying he's dead," his brother Abdi told local news site Stuff.

    "It's been pretty tough, a lot of people are ringing me asking if you need help. It's been hard at the moment, [we've] never dealt with this."

    He said Mucad was "energetic, playful and liked to smile and laugh a lot".

    Police have confirmed only that at least one child was killed and many were injured. None has been named.

    Cashmere High School in Christchurch has confirmed that two of its current students and one graduate are missing. Another student is in hospital.

    Daoud Nabi, 71

    Daoud Nadi was the first of the victims to be identified. He was born in Afghanistan but moved his family to New Zealand in the 1980s to escape the Soviet invasion.

    He was an engineer, reportedly with a love of vintage cars, but in his retirement was a community leader in New Zealand. He was president of a local Afghan association and a known supporter of other migrant groups.

    Daoud Nadi is believed to have thrown himself in front of other people in the mosque to protect them when the gunman burst in.

    His son, Omar, told NBC News: "Whether you're from Palestine, Iraq, Syria - he's been the first person to hold his hand up."

    Sayyad Milne, 14
    Sayyad Milne wanted to be a footballer when he grew up.

    On Friday he was at the Al Noor mosque with his mother. His father told New Zealand media on Saturday: "I haven't heard officially yet that he's actually passed but I know he has because he was seen.

    "I remember him as my baby who I nearly lost when he was born.... A brave little soldier. It's so hard... to see him just gunned down by someone who didn't care about anyone or anything.

    "I know where he is. I know he's at peace."

    His half-sister Brydie Henry earlier told reporters he had last been seen "lying on the floor of the bloody mosque, bleeding from his lower body".

    "He's a regular, typical, Kiwi kid," she said.

    Naeem Rashid, 50
    Naeem Rashid was originally from Abbottabad in Pakistan. He was a teacher in Christchurch.

    In the video of the attack at the Al Noor mosque, Naeem Rashid is at one point seen attempting to tackle the gunman.

    Mr Rashid was badly injured. He was taken to hospital and Pakistan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) has confirmed his death. He is being widely hailed as a hero.

    His brother, Khurshid Alam, said he was proud of his actions after seeing the video.

    "He was a brave person, and I've heard from a few people there, there were few witnesses… they've said he saved a few lives there by trying to stop that guy," Mr Alam told the BBC.

    "It's a still a shock for us, whatever hero he becomes… it's our pride now, but still the loss. It's like cutting your limb off."

    He will be buried in Christchurch instead of his home town, according to Pakistan's MOFA.

    Talha Rashid, 21
    Talha was Mr Rashid's oldest son. He was 11 when the family moved to New Zealand.

    Pakistan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has confirmed his death.

    Friends said Talha had just got a new job, and was hoping to get married soon.

    "A few days ago when I spoke to Naeem Rasheed, he told me about his plans to come to Pakistan and get his son married," said Talha's uncle in Lahore.

    "But now we are making arrangements to bring the dead bodies of both father and son back to Pakistan."

    Another of Mr Rashid's sons is being treated for his injuries.

    Farhaj Ahsan, 30
    An Indian national, Mr Ahsan moved from Hyderabad 10 years ago and worked as an electrical engineer.

    He was married with two young children: a three-year-old daughter and six-month-old son.

    His family had been informed of his death by the New Zealand authorities, his brother Kashif told the BBC.

    "Nobody was imagining in New Zealand - which is a peace-loving country - such situation arises," his father Sayeeduddin told BBC Telugu.

    Hosne Ara, 42
    Bangladesh consular officials in New Zealand say three people of Bangladeshi origin were killed. They have not given details.

    Some relatives of people who were at the two mosques have been speaking to the media.

    Social media races to take down attack video
    Hosne Ara is reported to have been in the women's area of the Al Noor mosque when she heard gunfire. Her husband, Farid Uddin, uses a wheelchair and was in the men's area.

    "Immediately after hearing the sounds of shooting, she rushed to the spot to find out and save her husband, but received bullets and died," her nephew told Bangladesh's New Age newspaper. Her husband reportedly survived.

    Khaled Mustafa
    The group Syrian Solidarity New Zealand says Khaled Mustafa was killed at the Al Noor mosque.

    Mr Mustafa was a refugee from the war in Syria and moved with his family in 2018 to New Zealand, which they considered a safe haven, said the group.

    One of his teenage sons, who has not been identified, is still missing. Another son was badly injured and has undergone surgery.

    Amjad Hamid, 57
    The doctor has not been seen since the attack at the mosque where he prayed every Friday. His family told New Zealand media they had checked the hospital and anywhere else they could think of, but hadn't found him. They believe he is dead.

    "It's terrible... we were hoping to find a better future for us and for the children we were planning to have," his wife, Hahan, told the New Zealand Herald. She described him as "a very kind man".

    The couple moved to New Zealand 23 years ago, and had two sons. Mr Hamid specialised in cardiorespiratory illnesses for the Canterbury District Health Board.

    "This is meant to be a safe country. New Zealand is changing forever," his son Husam Hamid said.

    Afghan national, unknown name and age
    The Afghan Association of New Zealand says the death of a second Afghan has been confirmed. Their name and age is not yet known.

    Hussain al-Umari, 35
    Each Friday, Hussain al-Umari would go to the mosque then would go to his parents' house for dinner.

    He last spoke to his parents on Thursday. He was excited because they had just bought a new car.

    Janna Ezat and Hazim al-Umari, who moved to New Zealand from the United Arab Emirates in the 1990s, have not heard from him since the attack.

    Stuff.co.nz quoted them as saying he was "a kind guy" who "always tried to help people".

    Lilik Abdul Hamid, unknown age
    Also known as Muhammad Abdul Hamid, Mr Hamid is the first Indonesian confirmed dead in the attack.

    Seven other Indonesians were at the two mosques.

    Five have reported their safety to Indonesia's embassy in New Zealand, according to the country's ambassador Tantowi Yahya.

    Four other Pakistani nationals, unknown ages
    Pakistan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has confirmed the deaths of four other men: Sohail Shahid, Syed Jahandad Ali, Syed Areeb Ahmed and Mahboob Haroon. Their ages are all unconfirmed.

    Three others reported missing are "still being identified", according to spokesman Mohammad Faisal.

    Four Egyptian nationals
    Egypt's Ministry of Manpower and Immigration has confirmed the deaths of four men.

    They were named in a Facebook post as Munir Suleiman, Ahmad Gamaluddin Abdel Ghani, Ashraf al-Morsi and Ashraf al-Masri.

    Four Jordanian nationals
    Jordan's Foreign Ministry has announced the deaths of four of its nationals but not named any victims.

    Five other citizens were wounded and are receiving treatment.

    Those missing have been listed as originating from countries including Jordan, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Fiji and Saudi Arabia.

    At least four people from Somalia were killed in the attacks. One of the buildings targeted, the Al Noor mosque, is co-run by Somalis.

    The Red Cross website has listed people who were caught up in the shootings.

    Survivors can register that they are alive to reassure relatives, while those looking for someone can record them as missing.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-47593693

  2. #2
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    Inna Lillahi Wa Inna Illahi Rajiyoon.


    Heartbreaking reading above names.


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  3. #3
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    RIP

    Wish Pakistan did this to every victim of terrorism.


    "i'M sOrRy, i'M nOt sUpPosED tO teLl yoU tHiS"

  4. #4
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    The truth is always the real victim. These unfortunate people are the victims as well as "shaheeds" although at this point their families will be hurting too much to see it this way.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  5. #5
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    Life can be so cruel

    May Allah give patience to the loved ones of the shaheeds and keep us all on the right path. Ameen!

  6. #6
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    May they all rest in peace.

    The reaction by the people here in New Zealand has been extremely reassuring for us Muslims living here. From big turnouts at vigils, to people bringing us flowers, everyone is shocked and extremely sympathetic towards the Muslim community. While recognizing this as an attack on Muslims, the people here are treating it like an attack on New Zealand, New Zealand values, and all New Zealanders, and are equally as shocked and in grief as the Muslim community.


    “It is not defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by defeat that destroys you.”
    ― Imran Khan

  7. #7
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    Christchurch shootings: Atta Elayyan, New Zealand futsal goalkeeper, among dead

    Atta Elayyan, the goalkeeper for New Zealand's futsal team, was one of those killed in Friday's mosque attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand Football (NZF) has confirmed.

    Fifty people were killed and 50 injured in shootings at two mosques in what is New Zealand's deadliest attack.

    The Kuwait-born Elayyan, 33, played 19 times for the Futsal Whites.

    "There is huge hole in our hearts," said Josh Margetts, NZF's futsal development manager.

    "Atta was a great man and well liked by everyone in the Futsal Whites squad and the futsal community. There are no words to sum up how we are all feeling. He will be sorely missed."

    Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, has been charged with carrying out the shootings.

    New Zealand's top professional football team, the Wellington Phoenix, paid tribute to Elyyan and the other victims at their A-League match against the Western Sydney Wanderers, which went ahead after police consultation.

    The third cricket Test between New Zealand and Bangladesh that was due to start in Christchurch on Saturday was cancelled after the tourists witnessed the mass shooting.

    "My heart goes out to the futsal community," NZF chief executive Andrew Pragnell said.

    "They are a very tight-knit group and this news of Atta's death will be devastating for all involved in the game. We feel their pain and their grief."

    https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/47601040



  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    Slouched against a wall and surrounded by a dozen of people in a small room of a middle-size house located in Karachi, Syed Ayaz Ahmad was receiving condolences over death of his son, who was among dead in Friday’s terror attacks at New Zealand mosques.

    Syed Areeb Ahmad, 27, was his only son who went to offer Friday prayers at Al-Noor Mosque Christchurch, one of the two mosques, where a terrorist shot him together with 49 other Muslims in a cold-blooded shooting — another sign of rising Islamophobia in the West.

    Among dead, nine belonged to Pakistan — four of them from Karachi — whereas several Pakistanis were also injured in the gruesome attack, the bloodiest in New Zealand's peace time history.

    Pakistanis observed a day of mourning on Monday to show solidarity with victims of the terror attacks, with national flag flew at half-mast on the parliament and all other government buildings.

    Family members of some of the victims have departed to New Zealand to attend their funerals.

    Naeem Rasheed, one of the victims who tried to stopped the attacker and secured his fellow Muslims, has been declared a hero by Pakistani government and the international media.

    His mother and a brother have left for New Zealand as his family has decided to bury him in Christchurch.

    Prime Minister Imran Khan on Sunday announced a national award for Naeem for his heroic work.

    ‘Dreams shattered’
    Areeb had visited his hometown Karachi just one and a half months before the tragedy to attend the engagement of his younger sister.

    “He was very happy [on the occasion], and keenly discussed his only sister’s wedding plan with us,” Muzzaffer Khan, Areeb’s maternal uncle, told Anadolu Agency.

    The family was informed of the tragedy by Areeb's colleague, who himself was present at Al-Noor Mosque at the time of the terror attack but luckily survived unhurt.

    "He (colleague) was not sure about what happened to Areeb. He could only tell us that Areeb was missing after the incident. It was after two days when Pakistani High Commissioner to New Zealand confirmed his death," Ayaz said.

    Areeb's untimely death turns out to be dream shattering for his family as he was the only son and the lone bread earner.

    A chartered accountant by profession, Areeb was offered a job by a chartered accountant firm and he moved to New Zealand in 2017.

    "The news (of his death) was no less than a bombshell. We could not believe that initially as it was not in our wildest imagination that such terrible things could happen in a country like New Zealand", Ayaz told Anadolu Agency.

    Hailing from a low income family, Areeb was a fine example of self-making. He did tuitions and other part-time jobs to support his father — a taxi driver — but never compromised on his studies.

    He got chartered accountant degree with flying colors from Pakistan's top-ranked institute, and was offered a lucrative job in Christchurch soon after completion of his studies.

    "He (Areeb) was a pure self-made person. When he got a job in New Zealand, we thought our tough days were over. We were very happy for his successes," Ayaz said while trying to fight back his tears.

    "But we never knew what future had stocked for us.

    "It seems that all our dreams have been shattered.", Ayaz said as tears rolled down his cheeks.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1470576/ne...kistani-family


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  10. #10
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PakLFC View Post
    The truth is always the real victim. These unfortunate people are the victims as well as "shaheeds" although at this point their families will be hurting too much to see it this way.
    What is a Shaheeds?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by light View Post
    What is a Shaheeds?
    Martyrs.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  13. #13
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    Friday's call to prayer in Christchurch's Hagley Park was especially meaningful for three men with horrific stories about the shooting last Friday. If that day was a day of hate, this Friday was a day of love for them.

    About 1.40pm last Friday, Mustafa Boztas, 21, was lying under a pile of bleeding corpses at the Masjid Al Noor.

    Amin Yasir, 35, was running for his life through a motel car park in Deans Ave as the shooter pulled up and shot his father in the back and chest.

    Faisal Abbas, 35, hid in a toilet and heard the gunman's footsteps. He prayed as he prepared to die.

    This Friday, the survivors went to Hagley Park to hear Islamic prayers ringing through the trees and across the playing fields. They joined hundreds of believers to express their faith out in the open, and to commune with thousands of Christchurch people showing their solidarity with their fellow Muslim citizens.

    "This was an extraordinary day to be a Muslim. We never expected so much compassion and love from the people of Christchurch," Yasir said.

    "We realise the community really care about us. It is not as though we are from other worlds. I feel proud to be here. The first thing you see here is humanity."

    Yasir had come to the Hagley Park prayers straight from Christchurch Hospital where his father Muhammad Amin Nasir, 67, lies in a semi-coma as he is treated for bullet wounds to his lungs and kidneys.

    As he recovered some consciousness on Friday, Yasir told him about his own survival and that he [Nasir] was in good hands.

    "Next moment, I saw tears coming from his eyes and he started to move his hands a little."

    Yasir, a software analyst who is the only person from his Pakistani family in Christchurch, said he was not feeling alone because of the care he was getting.

    As the mosque shooter drove from the carnage he left in Deans Ave last Friday, he spotted Yasir and his father heading towards the mosque.

    As they both fled, Yasir turned around to tell his father to get on the ground. But his father had been shot, with blood pouring from his side and lower back.

    He was conscious and in pain but not talking.

    "His eyes were telling the story," Yasir said.

    Boztas said the call to prayer on Friday had been deeply moving.

    "[The shooter] made us even stronger. He made people realise Islam has no terrorism, Islam is about peace and love.

    "It was an amazing feeling, I'm not scared to go back to the mosque."

    Boztas, who is originally from Turkey and has been in New Zealand for ten years, moved to Christchurch to study about six weeks ago. His call to the mosque last Friday was only his fifth or sixth visit.

    He was listening to the sermon when the shooting began.

    "We all got shot and we all just dropped and then we started piling up on each other. We all fell to the ground and someone's hand went on my body and all I hear was lots of blood coming out.

    "At that moment I'm just speechless, I just don't know what to do. In my head I'm, like, this isn't real, this isn't happening. I'm so calm, I'm not screaming ... I was so calm because I was in God's house. This is the best place to get shot and go to heaven."

    After escaping through a broken window he saw a boy.

    "I couldn't run past him, I had to stop. I thought I could save his life but he was already dead. I couldn't save him."

    Faisal Abbas also felt strengthened by the call to prayer at Hagley Park.

    It was an "amazing feeling" to pray near the Deans Ave mosque with thousands of people from Christchurch gathered nearby, he said.

    "That's what the world needs right now . . . peace and love."

    But the terror attack would haunt him.

    Abbas, the Pakistani Association of Canterbury general secretary, moved to New Zealand several years ago for a better life and worked as a software developer for Orbica.

    On March 15, he arrived at Masjid Al Noor several minutes late for prayers and was in a toilet not far from the front door when he heard several loud bangs.

    The father-of-two unlocked the door thinking he'd heard an electrical fault. Then the "continuous shooting" started.

    Abbas quickly secured the door to his hiding place and began praying.

    "I was worried if there were … two or three people they'd search the rooms. I was just reciting … the prayer because I was trying to prepare myself for death."

    He texted friends and colleagues, telling them there was a shooting and to stay away from the mosque.

    "The shooting was ongoing and everyone was screaming. I could hear his footsteps."

    Abbas spent 14 minutes and 34 seconds on the phone to police. He remembered the relief he felt when armed police stormed the building.

    "They were yelling 'we're police, we're police. Is anyone alive?' … and then I said, 'I'm in the toilet'."

    As he ran from the building, he passed three bodies.

    Outside, Abbas, who was trained in first aid, helped several people with gunshot wounds. People used pieces of clothing, ties, shirts and socks as make-shift tourniquets.

    "Everyone was yelling at the police 'please let the ambulance in' but they were not letting anyone in because it was an ongoing operation."

    Abbas helped a construction company worker load some of the injured into a truck and went with them to Christchurch Hospital.

    He later learned that some of his friends had died.

    Despite the terrifying events of March 15, Abbas hopes to visit the Masjid Al Noor as soon it opens.

    "You have to move on – you have to stay strong. We believe [the people who died] are in a better place."

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/chr...-the-past-week


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