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  1. #1
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    ICC World Cup 2019 Preview: Australia are arguably the most balanced team in the World Cup

    A year ago, Australia were in a serious crisis. They had lost their two best players in David Warner and Steven Smith. Many at that point had predicted them to bow out in the group stage of the 2019 World Cup. This view was reinforced by their abysmal ODI form between June 2017 and March 2019 which consisted of only 4 wins out of 26. But people had forgotten that this was the Aussie team they were talking about. They have won the World Cup title five times, and this is a team which thrives in challenging environments and relishes the big occasion. True to their reputation, the Australians picked themselves up and in the last few months, managed huge triumphs over India and Pakistan. In those series, they were able to fill some gaps in their squad left by absence of their two main players. Now with the return of Steve Smith, David Warner as well as Mitchell Starc, Australia look as strong as ever and are arguably the most balanced team in the World Cup. This has also serves as a reminder for the whole world, if it needed reminding that Australia are and have always been serious contenders for the World Cup.




    Strengths:

    Pace bowling has been Australia’s strength for some time. This time, it is no different. Pat Cummins has established himself in the past few months as one of the best LOI bowlers in the world. Giving him the new ball was a masterstroke as he possesses the pace and skill to pick up early wickets which will be key in the World Cup due to the abundance of hard-hitting openers on flat tracks. Let's also not forget Mitchell Starc, the top wicket-taker of the 2015 World Cup. His ability to bowl at express pace and reverse the ball will be an asset in these batting friendly conditions. It's then fair to assume that with the prospect of Starc and Cummins opening the bowling, there should be plenty of early scalps for Australia. It is not just pace bowling though, Adam Zampa’s wrist spin is equally as important in bringing important breakthroughs in the middle overs. The spinner has improved a lot and has the tendency to take big wickets which he did in case of Virat Kohli during the India series. Australia will continue to expect more crucial scalps from him.


    Weaknesses:

    Australia may struggle due to the fact they will most likely have to field 10 overs from Marcus Stoinis and Glenn Maxwell. This is concerning for them as despite the world class bowling attack they possess, this could be exploited by the opposition. What is of even greater concern to Australia is the lack of firepower towards the death overs. Glenn Maxwell provides a reliable hitting option, but Stoinis’ lack of form has been alarming. Since that breath-taking hundred against New Zealand, he has not kicked on and there has been a lack of consistency from him. In 2019, he averages 30 with a strike rate of 81 which should be much better for a player who is known to be destructive. Australia will hope that Stoinis regains form to provide the charge towards the last few overs of their batting efforts and gives the innings the push it requires.


    Players to watch:

    The world will be watching Steve Smith very carefully as his presence in a line-up with many destructive players will be crucial in case of a collapse. He is a man for the big occasion as highlighted by his match winning performances in 2015 World Cup and a lot will be expected from him.

    David Warner, his partner in crime is also back after another successful IPL stint where he was in top form. There will be an expectation from him to score quick hundreds to propel Australia to a big score and how well Warner does will define Australia's success in the World Cup.

    An improved player who is in rich form, Usman Khawaja had memorable series against India and Pakistan. His ability to score big makes him a valuable component of their squad and he perfectly balances the strength provided by Aaron Finch at the top of the innings.

    Nathan Coulter Nile is categorised as a support bowler, but he is what can only be described as an underappreciated player due to the pace and success of the other pace bowlers. If he gets his game right, he will be used to provide some control with the ball and is also a useful lower order hitter.


    Prediction:

    Australia are sure fire favourites to get into the semi-finals at the very least. Anything less will be considered a failure considering the squad that they possess.


    Full squad:

    Aaron Finch (c)
    Usman Khawaja
    David Warner
    Steve Smith
    Shaun Marsh
    Glenn Maxwell
    Marcus Stoinis
    Alex Carey (vc)
    Pat Cummins (vc)
    Mitchell Starc
    Kane Richardson
    Nathan Coulter-Nile
    Jason Behrendorff
    Nathan Lyon
    Adam Zampa
    Last edited by Abdullah719; 25th May 2019 at 05:27.

  2. #2
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    Warm up match against England today, should give us an indication of their batting lineup. Curious to see where Warner fits in, heard he's been batting at 3 recently.


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  3. #3
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    Stoinis looked horrible. He needs to sort his game out and at least rotate the strike at the start, otherwise he is going to cost Australia.

  4. #4
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    Batting looks in fine shape.

    Bowling has 2 x-factor players in Starc and Cummins.

  5. #5
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    They have come on leaps and bounds in the last 6 months in the way only Australia can. However, I do not think they are the most balanced side. The batting line up leaves a lot to be desired and starc has not recaptured the form of pre sandpaper.

    A lot will rest in Cummins, lyon and the back up bowlers if starccant pick wickets. If Warner and Smith don't get runs, the team depends hugely on a mediocre batting set up, the weakest I have ever seen.

    As a collective though, their fielding and fitness can save runs so I think, without the great individuals they once had, the can still progress. They may well be semi finalists.

  6. #6
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    Batting is quite good but bowling apart from starc and pat not that good I suppose.Kane Richardson and Nathan Coulter Nile are both garbage.They can make it it to the semis though

  7. #7
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    Australia
    New Zealand
    England

    These three will definitely be in top 3..

    India, Pakistan, WI and SA are not good enough like the above three so depending on consistency any of them can be the fourth semi finalist.

  8. #8
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    Definitely can't count out the current champions Australia in any cricket tournament, just on their competitiveness and legacy alone, and with the return of David Warner and Steven Smith they're a force to be reckoned with.
    Last edited by Zeeraq; 26th May 2019 at 21:11.

  9. #9
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    Australia will reach the final and they know how to win these finals.

  10. #10
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    Australia have a strong top order which know how to cash in on starts. Khawaja and Smith are able to adjust their game accordingly to the situation. Khawaja has turned his LO game around and is also a much improved player against spin. Steve Smith looks to be getting into good form , we all know how good he is under pressure. Maxwell and Stonis give power towards the end of the innings, although Stonis can take while to get going and his bowling isn't very convincing. He is a potential weak spot for Australia.

    Their bowlers know how to pick up wickets. Although they don't have an out and out death bowler so that is another area they could fall short. Zampa will be key in the middle overs , he has been in good form and I am expecting big things from. I think Alex Carey will improve and be a very good player for Australia. He makes the team on keeping merit and has done well in domestic cricket with the bat. He will get better with time.

    Overall a strong team for English conditions with experience of winning big games and winning the WC. They are in excellent form , I expect them to get to the final. I think Australia and England are the teams to beat in this tournament.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hasan123 View Post
    Australia have a strong top order which know how to cash in on starts. Khawaja and Smith are able to adjust their game accordingly to the situation. Khawaja has turned his LO game around and is also a much improved player against spin. Steve Smith looks to be getting into good form , we all know how good he is under pressure. Maxwell and Stonis give power towards the end of the innings, although Stonis can take while to get going and his bowling isn't very convincing. He is a potential weak spot for Australia.

    Their bowlers know how to pick up wickets. Although they don't have an out and out death bowler so that is another area they could fall short. Zampa will be key in the middle overs , he has been in good form and I am expecting big things from. I think Alex Carey will improve and be a very good player for Australia. He makes the team on keeping merit and has done well in domestic cricket with the bat. He will get better with time.

    Overall a strong team for English conditions with experience of winning big games and winning the WC. They are in excellent form , I expect them to get to the final. I think Australia and England are the teams to beat in this tournament.
    Thought Stoinis bowled really well at the death yesterday.

    Australia are hitting form at the right time. They should have enough about them to reach the SF at least.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markhor View Post
    Thought Stoinis bowled really well at the death yesterday.

    Australia are hitting form at the right time. They should have enough about them to reach the SF at least.
    He has improved but he doesn't have a proven record. He will start the 1st game.

    I said for months they will reach the semis. No surprise to me.

  13. #13
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    In a fifa wc you never write off germany!
    In an icc wc you never write off australia!

  14. #14
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    Australia strength is there ability to win on big occasions. 5 WC wins is not a joke.

  15. #15
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    Hate to say it but once again they look like one of the strongest teams. Even stronger than England in my opinion.

    They have hard hitting openers that can compare with England or are probably even better and more experiences than England's Openers in David Warner and Aaron Finch

    They have a solid middle order consisting of Khawaja, Smith, and Marsh. While not as hard hitting as England's they have lower order hitters in Maxwell and Carey who can always propel the team to big scores.

    Finally they're biggest strength for me comes in their bowling. The best bowling attack in the world cup if you ask me. They have Starc, Cummins, Richardson, and Nathon Lyon/Adam Zampa. Even without Hazelwood comftroably the best bowling attack in the World Cup.

    So yeah England may be the number 1 favorites but with such a balanced side, Australia are no pushovers. Plus it's Australia let's not forget so they know how to win these world cup's they've won it an insane 5 times.
    Last edited by QalandarFan; 26th May 2019 at 23:09.


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  16. #16
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    It is no surprise that they plan early for World Cups and always look one of the best on paper when the tournament starts. If Starc and Cummins have a great tournament then Australia will be very hard to beat.

  17. #17
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    Australia really look good at the moment. They are genuine contenders at the moment.

  18. #18
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    Cummins is very under rated.

    By the time he is done with his opening spell, most teams will be out of the game.

    Starc is a bonus.

    If he fires also, good luck.

    Australia have whispered themselves into contention just a fortnight before the World Cup and I wouldn't be surprised if they silently kill all teams to lift the title that seems like England's to lose.


    And I get so high.. And I just can't feel it....

  19. #19
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    Stoinis has no business in the team. He cabít bowl and canít bat. In fact Coulter Nille is much better.

    Also, Carey isnít strong enough to bat at 6.
    I really donít see the balance in their team.

    They will depend on some individuals to win the matches: Smith, Maxwell, Starc and Cummins!

  20. #20
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    The winning feeling is back in Australian cricket and batsman Usman Khawaja knows their form is no fluke.

    Khawaja scored a fluent 89 as Australia continued their ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup preparations in positive fashion, downing Sri Lanka by five wickets at the Hampshire Bowl.

    With a 3-2 series win in India also on their 2019 formbook, this upturn in performances has not come out of the blue.

    Confidence is therefore high as the defending champions look to hold onto their crown, hopeful a positive dressing room can translate to victories on the biggest stage of all.

    “Behind the scenes we’ve put in a lot of hard work, you need that to be able to compete at this level,” said Khawaja.

    “Everyone has put in a lot of effort. We had India over in our place for a series and while we lost, that was a big turning point for us.

    “They’re one of the best sides and we gave them a run for their money. Then we went to India, lost the first two matches and went on to win the series. We always had the confidence we could do that.

    “Winning is a habit, we say that a lot among the team. We want to keep that going, we might have lost that before, but we might have found that again heading into the World Cup.

    “I know what it feels like when you’re losing and I know what it’s like when winning, it’s obvious which one you want.

    “This time last year there was a lot of talk about our batting, everyone has their different plans – it’s just about winning games and we’re managing to do that.”

    Khawaja had a scare when a blow to the knee brought a premature end to his day in the field, recovering suitably to profit with the bat as Australia successfully chased 240.

    Lahiru Thirimanne was the only other player in the match to pass 50 with Khawaja enjoying his spell as an opener, despite watching skipper Aaron Finch depart early.

    The make-up of Australia’s top order remains up for discussion but whatever position the World Cup rookie takes, he remains happy to fulfil his role for the team.

    The 32-year-old added: “I wasn’t thinking about securing an opening berth, we’ve looked to be clinical and not take it lightly. We’ve won three warm-ups here, and it was more about us continuing the winning ways in Dubai and India.

    “I was concentrating on contributing to that winning run – some things are just out of your control

    “It’s a mindset thing, opening is slightly different to three which in itself is different to five.

    “The beauty of our team is that guys can bat in different positions, we’ve changed it around but we’ve all contributed which is the important thing.

    “I do love opening, that’s where I’ve batted my whole life in one-day cricket. But it’s about winning games and doing the best of the team – I’d rather score a duck and win than a century and lose.”


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  21. #21
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    World Cup: Shane Warne Makes Bold Prediction About Australia's Chances

    At the start of year, Australia were rank outsiders to lift the World Cup 2019. But a change in fortunes, beginning with a win against a formidable Indian team in the One-Day International (ODI) series in India, followed by a whitewash of Pakistan in the ODI series in UAE, has rejuvenated the team and Australia head to the 2019 World Cup in top form. The series wins over India and Pakistan, helped Australia register a eight-game win streak in ODIs before winning their "unofficial" three-game series against New Zealand in Brisbane 2-1. With Australia also welcoming back Steve Smith and David Warner, returning from their one-year bans for ball-tampering, the men from Down Under suddenly look as one of the big tournament favourites. The upturn in results, juxtaposed with the return of Smith and Warner, has led to legendary leg-spinner Shane Warne making a bold prediction.

    Warne said not only does he believe Australia can win the World Cup, but thinks "they will win win the World Cup".

    "I think everybody wrote Australia off because they were pretty ordinary and played some poor cricket over the last 12 months, but over the last couple of months, the ODI team has found its belief. They have started to think like all the Aussie sides of yesteryears and they think they can win it from anywhere. And you can't manufacture that. You have to do it a few times," Warne told IANS.

    "I think going into the World Cup, India and England have to be the favourites because they have played the best cricket in recent times. But if you look back at the history of how Australia performed at World Cups, they won the last World Cup and have won 4 of the last 6 tournaments so they enjoy the big tournament and I believe they can win the World Cup and I think they will win the World Cup."

    However, the former Australia star still believes India and England are among the favourites. The 49-year-old said Smith will be a "huge player" for Australia and his one-year ban was a big loss for the team.

    "However, they have to get past a very strong India and England side. If you ask me who are the favourites, it is India and England, but I just think Australia have come back together at the right time and you put Warner and Smith in that mix, it is suddenly looking a very good side.

    "He (Smith) is a huge player. If you look back at the time in March last year and you say who were the top five players in the world, you would say Kohli, AB de Villiers, Steve Smith, David Warner and Kane Williamson. So Australia had two of the top five players and to lose them was a big loss," he said.

    Australia beat New Zealand by seven wickets on home turf to be crowned champions in 2015 and extend their record as the tournament's most successful team. From the 11 World Cups played, they have won five and were losing finalists on two other occasions.

    Coach Justin Langer and Aaron Finch have not only steadied the ship after the ball-tampering scandal in South Africa but emphatically turned it around.

    Now they have potential game-changers Smith and Warner back, confidence is sky-high.

    Australia begin their 2019 World Cup campaign against Afghanistan in Bristol on June 1.

    https://sports.ndtv.com/world-cup-20...hances-2043471


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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr_Bassim View Post
    Cummins is very under rated.

    By the time he is done with his opening spell, most teams will be out of the game.

    Starc is a bonus.

    If he fires also, good luck.

    Australia have whispered themselves into contention just a fortnight before the World Cup and I wouldn't be surprised if they silently kill all teams to lift the title that seems like England's to lose.
    He certainly is and imo he's Australia's no.1 bowler in formats. No one can match his ability to move the ball at sheer pace. When he announced himself in international cricket at 17/18, he was bowling huge 150k outswingers.

  23. #23
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    Agree with title

  24. #24
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    With a formidable bowling attack and their form of late, I predict the Aussies to win the WC. They just know how to raise their game when they need it the most on the big stage.

    In this competition we will see many big players crumble under the pressure, but it brings the best in the Aussies.

  25. #25
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    Seriously don't want aus to win the world cup again. They've won 5 already, how many more do they want to win??

  26. #26
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    Definitely the most balanced team along with England. The only potential, albeit minor, chink in their armor seems to be the lower middle order. I am assuming they will play with Maxwell, Carey and Cummins or Coulter Nile at 6,7 and 8.

  27. #27
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    It is crazy, they go through these phases where they look completely out of sorts and you think wow maybe finally Australia will go through a weak number of years but then bounce back right during the World Cup. 2011 WC is the only one I recall where they were poor.

    Terrible at CT13, can’t remember them at CT17, looked hapless few months ago in ODIs, but then 2 months ago kicked into gear and now look the 2nd best team or even the best.

    England vs Australia final.

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    Finch will be a liability. Exposed again against Sri Lanka.
    The sooner we can get Finch out of the time with Khawaja opening the better.


    Quote Originally Posted by Saqs on Steve Smith
    And who taught him to bat? Chris Martin? Is he the Australian equivalent of ....wait, I'm struggling to think of another useless player of his calibre.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Convict View Post
    Finch will be a liability. Exposed again against Sri Lanka.
    The sooner we can get Finch out of the time with Khawaja opening the better.
    He's the kaptaan?

  30. #30
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    Aussies look the most balanced team in the world cup.They have power hitters, batsmen who can play anchor role, quality pacers & spinners in more or less equal proportions. Both England and India are not that balanced when all factors taken together.

  31. #31
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    Deadly with the bat and controlled with the ball, Glenn Maxwell is a vital cog in this Australia side and Pat Cummins insists he holds the key to their hopes of landing a sixth World Cup.

    The defending champions prepared for their opener against Afghanistan on Saturday with a comfortable five-wicket win against Sri Lanka to back up their 12-run victory against England on Friday.

    The manner of those wins has re-affirmed what many knew before the tournament - that after a four-year struggle in ODI cricket, Australia are back as one of the form sides in the world.

    Series wins in India and against Pakistan have rightly filled Justin Langer’s side with confidence and Maxwell has played a huge role, hitting three half-centuries in their 5-0 series win in the UAE.

    A spell at Lancashire has also seen him adjust to English conditions prior to the tournament and vice-captain Cummins expects him to hit the ground running.

    “I think the way he has turned games around for us in the last couple of months has been impressive with the bat and then he is also an option to bowl ten overs,” he said.

    “He is also able to get run-outs and take catches. You get all three facets out of him and he is always there in tough situations.

    “He is probably our sixth bowler but on a good day he can get through all ten. He’s in good form.

    “Fans always expect us to do well and we are the same. Luckily, we have had a lot of success in the last 30 or 40 years so we are confident.”

    Australia were forced to field at the Hampshire Bowl but made steady progress throughout Sri Lanka’s innings, restricting the Lions to 239/8 from their 50 overs.

    Five of those wickets came via spin but Cummins and his fellow fast bowlers also caused Sri Lanka a mountain of problems.

    Usman Khawaja’s 89 helped steer Langer’s men safely to the target and the 26-year-old insists they are in a perfect place.

    “We have played consistent cricket for the last few months. It can be hard to go from Test cricket to ODI cricket and adjust and build a settle team,” he added.

    “But in the last six months, we have built a special team and everyone has found their roles. If you asked us six or 12 months ago who would be in the side, there would have been far more question marks.

    “Everyone feels like we are all in a good place, we have played a lot of games now. We are ready to play tomorrow.

    “We will just to through the usual routines now, nothing specific, just some low-key bits to make sure we are ready.”
    Last edited by MenInG; 28th May 2019 at 18:45.


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  32. #32
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    Smiths playing cricket like hes never been away so if hes firing like this all world cup then the Aussies will put up big totals, there bowlers have the ability to take wickets at any time. The fringe performers in the side will need to really have good world cups if they are to win it, they cant just depend on the 2/3 world class players in side to carry them all tournament.

  33. #33
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    Similar to calling Pakistan an unpredictable team, the notion that Australia always rises to the occasion in tournaments is a lazy cliche.

    Since the 1999 World Cup, they have not won a single tournament where they havenít been heavy favorites.

    They failed to rise to the occasion in the 2011 World Cup, all the WT20s, and the Champions Trophy 2013 and 2017.

    Since the 1999 World Cup, they have won three World Cups and two Champions Trophies, and they have been favorites on each occasion.

    This perception that Australia always comes good in tournaments is based on the performance of their invincible side in the 2000s, but the later generations of Australian sides have failed to show that quality (when they havenít been favorites).

    Nevertheless, this current Australian team is shaping up to be quite a good one. They are strong in all departments and the inclusion of Lyon can make quite a difference in the middle-overs.

    Their pace attack looks great on paper, but the Australian pacers donít seem very threatening on English pitches. Without the extra bounce which they donít get in England, they can be ineffective.

    Starc hasnít done very well in England and Cummins got smashed in the Champions Trophy two years ago. I believe it was a mistake on their part to ignore Hazlewood. Injury problems not withstanding, he is their best bowler for England because he bowls the right length.

    I donít expect Australia to win the tournament or even make the final, but they certainly stand an excellent chance of making the semifinals.

  34. #34
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    Aus are my strong faves to win it. Balanced and stacked with quality in all departments.

  35. #35
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    australia will surely win their 6th world cup

  36. #36
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    Justin Langer is sweating over the fitness of David Warner but insists he will take no chances over the health of his opener.

    Australia kick off their ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2019 campaign against Afghanistan in Bristol on Saturday, with Warner hoping to shake off an injury to his glute muscle.

    Langer confirmed that Warner will open if fit, but he will need to come through more tests to take his place in the side.

    He said: “He was a bit sore on Wednesday. He’s just a bit sore in his right glute. He is desperate to play, he’d love to play like all 15 players would.

    “He’s jumping out of his skin, his energy is up and he’s laughing a lot which is a good sign. He’s really keen but we’ve got to make sure he can move, particularly in the field.

    “What I’ve expressed to him is that it’s really important to be fair to the other players as well. We don’t want to get to Saturday morning then make a call with a couple of guys wondering if they are going to play. The earlier the better, he knows that and collectively we’re really strong on that.

    “We’ve got to make sure we don’t aggravate it early in a long tournament. He will open the first game if he’s fit.”

    If Warner is available, Langer will make a decision between Usman Khawaja and Shaun Marsh for the final spot in the Australian top order, while both would play if the 32-year-old is not quite ready.

    The other big call will be in the bowling attack, where Pat Cummins and Mitchell Starc look to have two places wrapped up.

    Kane Richardson is one of three players fighting for the remaining spot, and Langer paid tribute to the progress the 28-year-old has made over the last year.

    He added: “Twelve months ago we came here and got beaten 5-0 by England. That was probably a wake-up call for where we were at. What I can say is I’ve been very proud of the progress of the players.

    “I think of someone like Kane Richardson, I sat next to him after the T20 game at Old Trafford and I never thought he would play cricket for Australia again. I didn’t think he had the bottle and we talked about it.

    “You see how he’s come, he’s had a red-hot dip with everything he does. He’s a great role model for our players, to come from where we were 12 months ago, he’s standing tall and he’s having a go.”

    A 3-2 series win in India, having trailed 2-0, appears to be a turning point for this Australian side, and the former opener is confident his team are in good shape coming into the tournament.

    He added: “We’ve had a brilliant lead-up, with our games in the UAE (against Pakistan), our games in India. We’ve had some good practice games here.

    “It means nothing but it means everything. We all start again but you build up confidence, camaraderie within the group, that’s really positive within the group.”
    Last edited by MenInG; 31st May 2019 at 21:27.

  37. #37
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    Australia captain Aaron Finch has warned his side they cannot afford to take Afghanistan for granted after hailing the improvements they have made over the past four years.

    The defending ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup champions romped to a 275-run victory against the Afghans at the WACA in Perth en route to winning the title for a fifth time back in 2015.

    But the Afghanis have gone from strength to strength since then and possess the best white-ball bowler in the world in Rashid Khan.

    And despite the odds being stacked heavily in the favour of Australia for their World Cup opener, Finch is well aware of the potential banana skin that awaits his team in Bristol.

    “Afghanistan have turned into a really world-class side at times, they’ve got some of the best bowlers in the world and their batting is improving all the time,” he said.

    “You can never take a side like that for granted and if you look back at 2015 we played them at the WACA, which was probably the furthest from their conditions you could probably get.

    “They are a dangerous side, they are very dangerous, and we’ve seen around the world some of the performances their players are putting up in very strong domestic competitions.

    “If you take your foot off you gas for a second they will hurt you and you still have to play at your absolute best to beat them. To see their growth in the last four years has been huge.

    “Even winning their warm-up game against Pakistan, they played brilliantly. They bowled excellent, they batted excellent, and for the world game they have such a huge following of fans.

    “They have some huge marquee players that are so sought-after around the world. The cricket is growing quicker and quicker over there and it’s a great story.

    “I was talking to their captain the other day and he was saying how passionate their fans are and how they have support all over. It’s huge for cricket, not just Afghanistan but for world cricket.”

    Finch confirmed all 15 players are in contention for the starting XI after revealing that David Warner will be fit for selection for Saturday’s game after recovering from a sore right glute.

    He also highlighted the importance of team unity as Australia look to put their last visit to England, which saw Finch’s side suffer an ODI series whitewash to the hosts, behind them.

    “It was a really tough series last time we played here, a 5-0 loss, but everyone is really enjoying each other’s success which is a huge part of it, especially building up to a World Cup,” he said.

    “There’s so much talk about selection and there are guys really pushing to get that last spot or last couple of spots, teams can go insular at times and start to look after your own performance.

    “One thing we’re really conscious of and we’ve talked of quite a lot in the build up to the last couple of series is that as soon as you start playing for yourself it can go against you.

    “If you can do everything you can for the team that’s looked favourably on and if you look back on the history of cricket, guys who have continually hung around as 12th man they get that extra tour.

    “If they are doing everything that the team needs and then they get that opportunity. If you think back to the 2003 World Cup and Andy Bichel, he was just around all the time and got a chance.

    “He played some really key roles in winning the tournament for Australia and that was a message that you do everything you can for the team and never put yourself before the team.”


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  38. #38
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    Australian pace bowler Nathan Coulter-Nile is already looking forward to the challenge of the West Indies and a possible duel with formidable opener Chris Gayle.

    The defending champions’ second ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup match will take them to Trent Bridge on Thursday, with both they and the West Indies tasting wins in their opening contests.

    Aaron Finch’s side enjoyed a convincing seven-wicket win over Afghanistan in Bristol on Saturday – but Coulter-Nile is not wasting time setting up the plans for powerful opener Gayle, who is playing in his fifth World Cup.

    “Oh Starcy (Mitchell Starc) will knock his off pole out,” Coulter-Nile joked of the 39-year-old Gayle. “It will be easy.

    “You know he’s going to hit your good balls for four and hit your bad balls for six. Just keep as bowling as many good balls as you can we’ll stick a few up him.

    “I think you just need to be aggressive at him. He’s still smacking them but he is getting older. I don’t know if he’s faced too much of Starcy and Paddy (Pat Cummins) recently but they’re bowling quick. So we’ll see how he handles that early.”

    Fast bowling has been an early theme of the World Cup and Coulter-Nile is expecting this game to be no different.

    But the quick knows that is not the only weapon Australia have in their bowling armoury with leg-spinner Adam Zampa revelling in a three-wicket showing against Afghanistan in his tournament opener.

    “He’s got a few big scalps recently,” added Coulter-Nile.

    “You’ve got to give it to the Windies, otherwise they just get on the front foot. We’ll definitely give it to them, we give it to every team. The grounds are so small and the wickets are generally pretty flat.

    “We didn’t bowl at the death against Afghanistan but they came back pretty hard. We stuck to our lengths pretty well, we tried to get up then a little bit. On that wicket, 200 you will take that any day of the week.”

    Coulter-Nile’s selection was not a given with Australia’s bowling stocks in rude health, affording them the chance to leave out the likes of Kane Richardson and Jason Behrendorff from their XI.

    But having made the most of the opportunity, the 31-year-old is relishing the chance to back up Starc and Cummins on more occasions in this tournament.

    “Luckily I got the nod, we’re pretty lucky that we’ve got three pretty good bowlers sitting on the sideline,” he added. “I think it’s good, it’s good to have competition for your spot. Especially with the guys sitting on the bench.

    “If they take early wickets my job is just to keep going, bowling second is a real advantage to me, I know I’m either defending or attacking. They set the tone and I just come on and try and follow them.”


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  39. #39
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    Taking the rough with the smooth is all part of the job for a wrist spinner, admits Australia’s Adam Zampa, after taking three wickets in his side’s triumph over Afghanistan.

    The 27-year-old was favoured over Nathan Lyon in the XI and repaid the faith by finishing with figures of 3/60 in the defending champions’ seven-wicket victory.

    Zampa did not have it all his own way though, as Afghanistan smashed one of his overs for 22 runs, after he had already taken the wickets of Rahmat Shah and Hashmatullah Shahidi.

    But the leg-spinner bounced back to dismiss Rashid Khan before Australia chased down the target of 208 in 34.5 overs thanks to half-centuries for David Warner (89 not out) and Aaron Finch (66).

    And while Zampa was frustrated with the way he bowled at times during the middle overs, he believes he will only get better as the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup progresses.

    “It is tough sometimes, particularly as a wrist-spinner,” he said. “You know sometimes that is going to happen and the ball didn't come out as well as I would have liked, but that’s going to happen.

    “I already had two wickets under my belt and I knew I had a huge role to play coming up. We were getting towards bowling to the tail, especially after Marcus Stoinis got those two big wickets.

    “I always forget about that stuff really quickly and try and keep it simple. I probably over-complicated that over a bit and I knew if I had the opportunity again, I would really simplify it.

    “I bowled one more over, I got one more wicket, but I just try and let that go quickly otherwise if you let it dwell on you too much as a wrist-spinner, the next three overs of your spell are dangerous.

    “The way the ball has been coming out lately, I'm really happy with. The way I have been preparing for this tour, I'm happy with and it was good to get out there and make a contribution.

    “I don't think we played as well as we would have liked through those middle overs bowling-wise, but to get out of it at the other end and take wickets, it's a confidence booster.”

    Zampa was also full of praise for the way Afghanistan played after they found themselves 77/5 in the 20th over and expects Gulbadin Naib’s side to cause a few upsets during the tournament.

    “I think credit is due to Afghanistan as they came out and played some fearless cricket,” said Zampa. “They could have gone into their shell.

    “Everyone has been talking about them so much lately about how much they have improved and, to be fair, they have. They come out and played fearless cricket.

    “They lost wickets at times when they wouldn't have wanted to, but the middle order came out and kept swinging and playing shots.

    “So if they keep playing cricket like that, particularly with the bowling attack they have got, they will cause some upsets this World Cup.

    “The wicket today probably didn't suit them as much as it might later down the track. The ball skidded on a bit.

    “I think with the aggressive mindset with the bat, if they can get anywhere around the 250, 260, 270, with their bowling attack later down the track in the World Cup they will cause upsets.”


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  40. #40
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    A blistering Oshane Thomas-led pace attack swept Pakistan away for a dismal 105 in under 22 overs on Friday as West Indies wrapped up an easy seven-wicket victory at Trent Bridge.

    Aaron Finch-led Australia also notched up a convincing seven-wicket victory over Afghanistan in Bristol on Saturday and will next face the exciting West Indies.

    “You’ve got to give it (bouncers) to the Windies, otherwise they just get on the front foot and pogo you everywhere,” the 31-year-old told reporters.

    “We’ll definitely give it to them, we give it to every team. You’ve got to use your two (permitted bouncers per over).

    “The grounds are so small and the wickets are generally pretty flat, so you’ve got to use bouncers when you can.”

    Early matches have shown that short-pitched bowling could be a recurring theme in England and West Indies all-rounder Andre Russell said his team would take a similar approach against Australia.

    The defending champions will also have to contend with an explosive West Indies batting line-up led by opener Chris Gayle.

    The former captain recently returned to the ODI fold and proved he has lost none of his touch, despite approaching his 40th birthday, with a 34-ball 50 against Pakistan.

    But with fast bowlers Mitchell Starc and Pat Cummins also in the side, Coulter-Nile was confident Australia had the firepower to neutralise him.

    “Oh Starcy will knock his off pole out,” Coulter-Nile joked. “It will be easy.

    “You know he’s going to hit your good balls for four and hit your bad balls for six. Just keep bowling as many good balls as you can.

    “I think you just need to be aggressive at him. He’s still smacking them but he is getting older. “

    https://in.reuters.com/article/crick...-idINKCN1T3073


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  41. #41
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    Australia all-rounder Marcus Stoinis said he had enjoyed his role bowling early in the Afghanistan innings as captain Aaron Finch switched his bowlers around frequently in his team’s seven wickets win over Afghanistan in Bristol.

    Stoinis picked up two wickets with his medium-pacers from eight overs after Mitchell Starc and Pat Cummins had dismissed both openers without scoring. Selected to fill the number seven spot, he was not required to bat.

    Asked if the ball had still been hard when he took up the attack, Stoinis replied: “Yeah it was and there was still a little bit of swing as well, which is unusual. Apparently it hasn’t been swinging here.”

    Stoinis said he expected the pitches to be batsman friendly during the tournament, although he added it was still early in the competition.

    “I think you’ve got to be cagey with your variations, with your field. Perhaps my yorker, it’s going to be needed at some stage in the tournament. Then you make sure that you’re competing, putting energy on the ball as much as you can.”

    He also praised opener David Warner, who was unbeaten on 89 at the close of play after an uncharacteristically slow start.

    “I liked that knock, just do what needs to be done for the team. Perfect to be not out, get the job done, nice and clinical. That’s what the best players do, they have off-days and they still make 80 odd not out, 90 not out.

    “Good start for him good to spend that time in the middle. you have to do for it the team. Davy is a determined individual every single day. I don’t think that will change.

    “I thought it was a good wicket, maybe a bit two-paced but like a good wicket. They bowled pretty well too, they’ve got good spinners, they bowled pretty well with the new ball too.

    Asked if Finch had been consulting with former captain Steve Smith on his return to the team, Stoinis replied:“I’m sure he’s talking to him, I haven’t spoken to him about it. You’d be silly not to call on those guys, there’s probably about six, seven players that have enough experience to know what’s going out there. So Finchy is good enough to call on a bit of advice and make his own decision.”


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  42. #42
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    Even a weak Australian team is more competitive than the other teams.


    Australia has got good leaders. If you watch the game agiant Afghanistan, Finch didn't try to go after them or attack with his bowlers. All he did was wait for the Afghani's to make mistakes. Thats it.

    WHile on the other hand, Pakistan kept on going after them and lost at the end.


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  43. #43
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    Steve Waugh: Australia must be wary of West Indies threat

    Speaking to Justin Langer ahead of this World Cup I reminded him of the players that had success in 1999 in England.

    It was the battle-hardened proven Test match performers that excelled and influenced the outcome.

    I believe the same will happen in this tournament purely because the pitches give both the bowler and the batsman an opportunity to showcase their class.

    If you are good enough, you can utilise the conditions to swing the match in your team’s favour more so than the bland cookie-cutter pitches that are so often rolled out for one-day cricket that totally favour the batsman.

    As such you will see phases of the game that resemble a Test match, such as a short-of-a-length fast-bowling barrage, a measured innings from a top-order batsman and more than one slip fielder being employed.

    I’m sure both the players and spectators will relish this type of cricket as it is an even contest that can be unpredictable.

    I still expect large scores to be the norm purely because of the fast outfields, high quality bats, small boundaries and the physiques of the modern-day players but high-class bowling can and still win matches in pressure situations.

    With that in mind, Saturday’s seven-wicket win over Afghanistan was a thoroughly professional performance from Australia.

    It was exactly what they would have wanted to achieve from their first outing and an excellent way to ease themselves into what is going to be a long and exhausting schedule.

    It was a tricky first opponent who had nothing to lose and everything to gain while Australia were expected to dominate and dispose of Afghanistan with minimum fuss.

    In particular, Dave Warner stood out with an innings that was less memorable but infinitely more significant than any innings he’d previously played for Australia.

    For them to win the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup, Warner needs to be a shining light and for him to spend quality time in the middle was exactly what he needed after a 12-month absence.

    By no means did Australia play at their full potential and nor would they want to or expect to. World Cups are won by the teams that gather momentum and confidence as the tournament unfolds.

    The West Indies will provide a more realistic gauge on how the team are tracking, for they possess a squad full of match winners that can dominate if they gain any sense of ascendency in a match.

    They are the most watchable team in the tournament with a batting line-up that can kidnap any bowling attack with brute force.

    No ground is big enough when this behemoth of a batting order clicks into overdrive but they also have a vulnerability against high-quality bowling as they tend to play one dimensional at times.

    For the first time in a long while they have fast-bowling depth vindicated by Friday’s win against Pakistan without their finest in Kemar Roach and Shannon Gabriel.

    Their Achilles heel however will be their lack of mobility in the field and this is where Australia can influence the outcome.

    Every side in this tournament will be wary of playing the Windies and I wouldn’t want to face them in a knock-out match.

    They are the sort of team that, if they get on a roll and build some momentum, then they could win it all like the ICC Men’s World T20 back in 2016.

    All things considered, I think this stands as a very important game for both sides. After comfortable opening wins, both want to get an idea of where they really stand – and this will be the perfect sounding board.
    Last edited by MenInG; 4th June 2019 at 20:27.


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  44. #44
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    4 June - Nottingham - Australia coach Justin Langer pre-match press conference



    Q. lots of talk of bumpers going in - have you been preparing for that?
    JUSTIN LANGER: From us to them or from them to us?

    Q. From you to them.
    JUSTIN LANGER: No, not really. We've got a couple of world class bowlers. Got a good leggy. He won't be rolling in any bumpers.

    Nathan Coulter-Niles is getting better with every game, so every batsman, West Indies batsman will have a different game plan against him. Yeah, a lot of talk about that, but not specifically.

    Q. Andre Russel has come out and says he's pumped and ready to bowl at the Australian batsmen - what do you make of that?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Yeah, one thing that we have to adapt to, and we talked about in this morning is that we've probably spent four months thinking and playing against spin bowling. If you think about we played India throughout the summer in the back end of the one-days. Went to India played T20 and one-days there, then in Dubai -- sorry, in the UAE.

    So our focus is almost solely made on playing spin bowling. Now we have to change. We've seen in this testimony that there has been some good, fast bowling so far.

    We have to adapt to West Indies no doubt who have got a number of good, fast bowlers. South Africa will be same. England will be the same.

    Have to adapt our game plan and adapt pretty quickly. The wicket here is pretty good though. The Outfield is fast. The squares are fast as well. Just have to adapt a little bit to that. But our blokes have spoken about that and they'll be ready for it.

    Q. Did you watch Andre Russel's three over spell and what did you make of it?
    JUSTIN LANGER: We did, and we also played against them in our practise game on the nursery ground in Hampshire, so got a little taste of it. Good feeling what we'll get from them.

    Obviously a very dangerous team the way they bat and aggressive bowling, but they've got weaknesses as well and we're playing pretty good cricket. Look, I say if we can adapt and be ready, nice and sharp, hopefully we'll be okay.

    Q. How is the PTSD walking back in this stadium [Trent Bridge]?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Yeah. It was, yeah. It was actually. Had some really good times here at Trent Bridge and last year was a down -- I mean, I remember we turned up and everyone was pretty -- the spirits were pretty high. That was unbelievable.

    I remember walking down to the gate at the end almost wanting to give all the boys a hug because it was brutal. No doubt about that. England, we saw it again yesterday. Very high scoring games here at Trent Bridge.

    Certainly a few more smiles at the moment in the camp than there was whatever, 12 months ago, so, yeah.

    Q. So you didn't have a go at the boys after that one?
    JUSTIN LANGER: No, no, no. Not after that one. I think after Cardiff I did. I had a red hot dip with the boys. I think it will become legendary ten years' time.

    But not in this one. Trent Bridge last year was just a very flat wicket and we had a young bowling attack. Last thing I need was another smack when I'd been smacked for three and a half hours.

    Q. What sort of changes might we see for this game?
    JUSTIN LANGER: I would say none at this stage. I think we're going with the same team. We haven't had a look at the wicket yet, but my gut feelings is against the West Indies, having won the first game as well, had a bit of a break in between, so start the same 11.

    Q. Tempted to pick Nathan Lyon?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Yeah, there is because they're left handers. That said, we probably won't bowl two spinners here against the West Indies. There is always thoughts about Nathan Lyon. Every game there is thoughts about playing Nathan Lyon, but Adam Zampa is doing a really good job for us.

    There is thinking about it because they're left-handers, but Adam Zampa is a very good top spinner. Glenn Maxwell is bowling well, so hopefully get some balance there. Some of the other grounds we might look to play two spinners or the matchups for -- the off spinner will be more appropriate, but properly not here.

    Q. Just, how did you assess Dave's innings the other day?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Good sign, isn't it? David Warner gets 99 out and didn't hit many in the middle and his feet weren't moving like they could be. That's a good sign for me.

    You can see the look in his eyes. A lot of people are talking, looks determined. For him to battle through 90 or 80, whatever it was, and to still be there at the end and get the job done for the team, that's a great sign for us.

    Q. How far away is he to get on his feet moving?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Who knows? Hopefully the more time he spends in the middle facing fast bowling. Again, he's just come off playing cricket in India, like a lot our guys. Very good player and confidence is a beautiful thing.

    So who knows? But that all said, not as if he batted badly. Just wasn't as dynamic as you've seen in the past. He did a brilliant job for the team.

    And all talk has been for the last 12 months about Dave, how is he going to fit back in the team. He could not have played a better ten innings than they did the other day. Energy in the field was brilliant. Smiling a lot.

    Q. Just on that game at Trent Bridge last year - i know the side is very different but how will they cope under the pressure of that situation if it arises here again?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Yeah, it's a very different team if we look back on it. I don't imagine -- well, any of our bowlers that were here last year are in the team. We've got David Warner and Steve Smith back in the team. Usman Khawaja is in the team, so six or seven already.

    Yeah, we're better equipped for it.

    Q. Are you able to reel back in that panic?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Yeah, of course. Try and stay as calm as possible. We expect some fireworks from the West Indies. Going to be times when the boys are going to have to take a deep breath and keep smiling and bowling their best ball. That comes with experience and that's what great teams and great players do.

    Q. One on the Ashes, how much of a set back is seeing Joe Burns heading back to Australia?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Yeah, it was really sad to hear he had to go from Lancasshire. I think there is some good process in place. I'm over it -- not over it as in had enough of it. I'm over the processes. But he's one player we were hoping would play six, seven, eight games of red ball cricket. That was the plan initially.

    Sometimes players change, and we'll just have to monitor that over the next a little bit.

    Q. Does that leave the door wide open for Marcus Harris?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Well Marcus Harris had an 1,100 run shield year. He played six test matches. Did a pretty good job and he's on the contract list, so he's a good young player. Took his opportunity.

    Again, like we've said all along, there is competition, which is really good. I guess the tough thing for (indiscernible) is having not played any cricket leading up to whether he comes back to England or not. Like I said, fair bit to happen before we make a decision on that.

    Q. You made your debut playing against the West Indies - what is like now facing them again on the big stage?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Hit in the head that many times I can't remember it very well. (Laughter.) I made a lot of money out of telling that story.

    Yeah, always nice. One thing we know about the West Indies, and particularly with Andre Russell and Chris Gayle back in, going to be exciting cricket, isn't it? When I was a kid it was Calypso cricket, and I think we're seeing plenty of signs of Calypso cricket. Running and bowling fast.

    They're not necessarily going to be bowling the same spot every ball, but going to be exciting to watch. They all try to hit 6s most balls so Darren Bravos probably a little bit more unorthodox. Always exciting playing the West Indies. When I was growing up they were my heros. They're not my heros today because I hope we beat them on Thursday.

    But always nice to watch West Indies play cricket. Great spirit. Always been my favourite tour going to the West Indies. Love the Caribbean. They way they go about their business. They love the cricket. It's always exciting to watch. Hopefully that's not that exciting on Thursday.

    Q. How much talk has their been around Chris Gayle - are you thinking of how you get him out?
    JUSTIN LANGER: Yeah, I mean, he's been a brilliant player for a long time. Dangerous, we all know that. Like he'll have his plans against our bowlers; we'll have our plans against him as well.

    We know he's dangerous. They got a number of dangerous players. With him on the team they seemed to grow a leg. They take confidence from him. Again, hopefully don't take too much confidence on Thursday.


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  45. #45
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    Aussies are always amongst the favourites. Their sporting culture is to be admired and envied.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  46. #46
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    5 June - Nottingham - Australia Captain Aaron Finch pre-match press conference

    Q. Aaron, you've had a look at the wicket. Is there anything to suggest you won't go in with an unchanged 11 for tomorrow?
    AARON FINCH: Probably not at this stage. I think we'll sit down and have a chat about it as a selection group after training. Got some guys that are still finishing up training now, but yeah, looks like a pretty similar wicket to what we expected it to be.

    Q. Aaron, you played a lot against the West Indies over the years, but is this the first time there's almost an edge to this contest - in one day cricket- , you've got a lot more talk about execution, and there's so much talk about an Australia-West Indies game?
    AARON FINCH: They're a very dangerous side, and I think whichever team comes out and executes it from the start of the game, I think it's important that you start really well, whether you bat or bowl first in the first 10-over periods are going to be really crucial, because we how damaging West Indies can be during that period. But also, equally, I think if we get off to a good start, then we can start to try and to get into our work a bit. I think if we are tentative and if we are a bit standoffish and wait for things to happen, that's when they can dominate you from the start. It's important that you turn up with the right attitude and the right intent in them first 10 overs, bat or ball.

    Q. Obviously this pitch, it's known as a world record pitch; it's all about the runs scored here. A, when you looked at it today, does it look like it's so batter friendly? And B, do you have to change things at all as a captain, knowing how run friendly it can be?
    AARON FINCH: It's probably a little bit drier than I expected it to be, the wicket. Obviously I can't imagine they would have put a huge amount of water into it over the last couple of days with there being so much weather around. No, I'm not surprised how it looks, but I think you have to understand that in conditions like this you're going to go for boundaries, so the key to bowling I think is to make sure that they're hitting your best ball. I think if you're executing your best ball over and over and they're playing good shots in our percentages, then you have to wear that. We know how fast the outfields are here in England. We know how flat wickets can be at times, so you have to be prepared to suck up some pressure and soak up a few boundaries here and there, as long as we're getting hitting in our areas and we often talk about now good execution versus poor execution, and that's all it is. Did they hit a good ball for 4? Yeah, so don't worry about that. If it's poor execution or a poor plan on my behalf, then it's something to reassess at the end of the game.

    Q. I wondered how much discussions there had been about last year about what happened at Trent Bridge?
    AARON FINCH: None. I think just before we turned up to the training yesterday, a few boys talked about their previous experiences here, which obviously haven't been overly pleasant, but we're in the home change rooms, which is a first for everyone, which is nice.

    Q. Obviously West Indies did a lot of damage against Pakistan with the short ball. I'm just wondering if you've prepared for that?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, we have prepared for it. It's something, we played them in a warm-up game down at Southampton on the Nursery Ground there, and they bowled very similar. Also had a lot of success with it last game and got off to a really good start, so I expect that they will come with a similar-type plan. But the follow-up from bouncers in short bowling is the key, I think, at the end of the day. I think if you just stick to one plan, then teams get on top of you pretty quickly or they adjust quick enough. So I think it's important you follow-up deliveries, and that goes for us, as well. If you do go with a short plan, keep them on the hook, keep them guessing with good bowling. I think if you over-attack and continue to go too short or you continue to go too full, whatever it might be, it's about your follow-ups from them balls. But we're well and truly prepared, no doubt.

    Q. Aaron, what do you think when you look at that very, very short boundary from the perspective of having to defend it or being out there able to attack it?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, it's going to be -- it's going to play a big part, no doubt. I think when teams have got left- and right-hand combinations, they've always got somebody able to target that boundary, so that's something that will be taken into account, no doubt, throughout the game. And as a bowling unit, it's about defending the big side.

    We saw the other game, England-Pakistan, there was a lot of 2s out to that long side, so I think it's about using that running game and not neglect that at all because if you're just one-paced focused, you're just boundaries or 6 focused, you miss out on a lot of scoring opportunities. So I think we can use our speed between the wickets to that long side and try and put some pressure on it, and on the other side build some pressure by cutting off them 2s and really restricting easy runs out there.

    Q. Just on your first time in the home dressing room, anything different about it that you've noticed?
    AARON FINCH: Like all dressing rooms and all county cricket the guys have played, they're a bit bigger. They're a little bit more spacious than the away rooms. I think it's a tactic.

    Q. Pat and Nathan have been quite vocal about Australia's plans to go to Chris. He's been scoring runs. What is your take on that?
    AARON FINCH: Well, each bowler will have individual plans. I think when you come up against someone as dangerous as Chris, you have to be prepared, like I said before, that he's going to hit boundaries. So it's about trying to attack his weaknesses early and making sure that we're putting the ball in the areas that we want to be bowling. I think if you're -- again, if you second-guess yourself, if you're a bit tentative, if you're a bit nervous with the ball in hand, he'll get all over you, and once he's going, he's so hard to stop. So I think it's important that you come prepared to take the contest to him because he definitely does that the other way.

    Q. The ICC is deciding whether to introduce concussion subs. Do you think the time has come to have that in international cricket?
    AARON FINCH: I haven't thought too much about it, but I know that it has worked in Australia in domestic cricket. I think it gives the medical officers and the coaching staff, whoever makes that final -- the doctor, the person who makes that final decision, easier knowing that somebody can come in and replace. The last thing you want is people getting hit, obviously, but if there is -- you also don't want the game to be determined by someone getting hit and then being out of the game. If that happens in the first over, that's a huge disadvantage. Potentially something to look at, no doubt.

    I think that in Australia playing for Victoria, we've had a few instances where it's happened one or two to Will Pucovski, where he's been hit by a bouncer and someone else has come in. We had a situation where Dan Christian came in as batter, but we chose not to bowl him because Will obviously didn't bowl, so it was one of those things that we thought was fair and reasonable to not take advantage of the rule and bring an allrounder in when that was the only option we had at the time.

    If everyone plays ball, I think it's a good decision. It's all about the safety of the player, and at the end of the day, the game of cricket isn't as important as someone's health.

    Q. Just on Chris Gayle, his record against Australia isn't great. I think he averages 26 in one-day cricket, never scored a century against Australia. Any reason why that might be, and if so, what do you take from that into tomorrow?
    AARON FINCH: I think the West Indies aren't a side that we tend to play year in, year out. Those stats would be over a really long period of time, so it's hard to put a definite reason why because you might play two games here -- and with some injuries that Chris has had the last time that they played in Australia was a few years ago, and he played the first two and then didn't play the rest of the series. He had a back issue.

    So it's tough to put something right on it, to say this is the reason why. It's just it comes down to some good planning, no doubt, but also one or two games here and there over a long period of time, it probably doesn't give you a full picture, either.

    ICC Media


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  47. #47
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    I have a feeling West Indies will win this one. Teams with quality spinners can challenge them a lot more. I donít think West Indian batsmen are threatened by pace and bounce much.

  48. #48
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    Aaron Finch says Australia are not scarred by last year’s Trent Bridge nightmare


    Australia’s Trent Bridge nightmare is far from forgotten but captain Aaron Finch is confident his team is no longer the scarred side of old.

    Finch was in the field last June watching England pile on a massive 481/6 against them in Nottingham, an ODI world record total which no side has come close to matching.

    A year on and his side are back at the ground with West Indies the opponents this time around, as both teams search for a momentum-building second win of the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup.

    Change has certainly been afoot in that time for Australia, with just Finch, Marcus Stoinis and Glenn Maxwell likely to play in both matches.

    With personnel shuffling comes an attitude adaption as well for the captain, looking to make his memories of the ground positive ones after a confident start to their World Cup campaign.

    “A few boys talked about their previous experiences here, which obviously haven't been overly pleasant,” he said. “But we're in the home changing rooms, which is a first for everyone, which is nice.

    “Like all dressing rooms and all county cricket the guys have played, they're a bit bigger. They're a little bit more spacious than the away rooms. I think it's a tactic.

    “We know how fast the outfields are here in England. We know how flat wickets can be at times, so you have to be prepared to suck up some pressure and soak up a few boundaries here and there.

    “As long as we're getting hit in our areas and we often talk about now good execution versus poor execution, and that's all it is.

    “Did they hit a good ball for four? Yeah, so don't worry about that. If it's poor execution or a poor plan on my behalf, then it's something to reassess at the end of the game.”

    Australia downed Afghanistan by seven wickets in their opening World Cup game, the five-time world champions beginning in ideal fashion in Bristol.

    But with West Indies putting on a destructive short-bowling show in dismissing Pakistan for 105, a step-up is in store if Finch’s side want to stay perfect.

    Unsurprisingly, bouncers and short-pitched bowling have been the order of the day when it comes to net sessions leading into Thursday’s contest.

    But Finch believes it’s the mental side of preparations that Australia need to get right, warning his side not to hold back with either bat or ball against Chris Gayle and co.

    “I think if we are tentative and if we are a bit standoffish and wait for things to happen, that's when they can dominate you from the start,” he added.

    “It's important that you turn up with the right attitude and the right intent in them first ten overs, bat or ball.

    “They're a very dangerous side, and I think whichever team comes out and executes it from the start of the game, I think it's important that you start really well.

    “When you come up against someone as dangerous as Chris [Gayle], you have to be prepared that he's going to hit boundaries.

    “So, it's about trying to attack his weaknesses early and making sure that we're putting the ball in the areas that we want to be bowling.

    “If you second-guess yourself, if you're a bit tentative, if you're a bit nervous with the ball in hand, he'll get all over you, and once he's going, he's so hard to stop.”


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  49. #49
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    Alex Carey impressed by Steve Smith’s temperament under pressure

    Australia wicket-keeper Alex Carey got to witness Steve Smith’s coolness under pressure first-hand and has commended the former captain for helping spark the turnaround against West Indies.

    Carey came to the crease with Australia in trouble at 79/5 but combined with Smith for a battling sixth-wicket partnership of 68 that helped get the innings back on track.

    The keeper made a handy 45, as Smith anchored the innings with 73 off 103 balls, before Nathan Coulter-Nile produced the fireworks with an ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup record score for a number eight of 92 to help post 288 from 50 overs.

    That helped propel the world champions to a 15-run triumph at Trent Bridge and Carey pinpointed Smith’s knock as the one that held everything together.

    “He batted beautifully. His tempo with lots of wickets falling was outstanding, he showed his class,” Carey explained.

    “Personally, I felt OK. I gave myself a fair bit of time to get my innings going. Speaking to Smudge [Smith] there was plenty of time left on the board. It was a matter of trying to absorb a bit of pressure, just bat and scrap through as many as we could.

    “And then to have a guy [Coulter-Nile] playing probably the innings of his life is something you guys probably enjoyed as well.

    “I know he is capable of striking the ball very cleanly, he showed that here. Some days you go on a roll and he did that. He batted to help Smudge firstly. Personally, it was nice to get a partnership going.”

    And despite being the junior presence at the crease, Carey claims Smith didn’t give him any particular advice on how to turn things round.

    “He didn’t say a lot,” added Carey. “I suppose when I was two off 23 balls he gave me no indication I was doing something wrong, backing up what I was trying to do out there.

    “There was no pressure from him, so we were fine just going together. I think we know at Trent Bridge, if we give ourselves a bit of time we can score freely.

    “I didn’t think it was a bad thing at the time, I guess if you get out we’re 80/6 I gave myself a bit of time to assess the conditions and give the tail a chance.”

    Carey confessed he had been both nervous and excited at the prospect of playing in his first World Cup but is now relishing the challenge of facing India, and their inspirational wicket-keeper MS Dhoni, on Sunday.

    “Playing against him [Dhoni] in India and Australia, he’s very calm,” said Carey. “He always gives himself a chance to finish off the game.

    “He gives himself time out in the middle. They’re pretty calm heads, they give themselves a chance to finish off an innings.

    “It’s a World Cup, so I didn’t know too much what to expect. Rolling to the first game in the bus and seeing all the crowd gave me some goosebumps. I thought it was a pretty cool feeling."


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  50. #50
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    Australians are very competitive in every sport.In Commonwealth and Olympic games they always win a lot of medals.In cricket there is always someone to rescue them.Against WI they were 70/5 but ended up scoring 288 and won the match.WI were in the match most of the time due to their rashness they lost the match.

  51. #51
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    Nathan Coulter-Nile sweating on place in Australia XI despite heroics with the bat

    Tournament records and personal bests came by the bucketloads but Nathan Coulter-Nile fears his West Indies heroics may not be enough to make Australia’s next XI.

    The bowling all-rounder made 92 with the bat to dig his side out of trouble en route to hitting a record score for a No.8 in the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup.

    But a lack of impact with ball in hand has left the man himself concerned, returning figures of 0/70 in the 15-run victory at Trent Bridge in what is his strongest discipline.

    Two wicketless games have so far come his way and while a maiden half-century in ODI cricket is in the bag, Coulter-Nile knows selection for the game against India on Sunday rests on other factors.

    “We’ve got two world-class bowlers in Jason Behrendorff and Kane Richardson waiting to play and I’m not in the team to score runs, hopefully the top order can do that,” he said.

    “I wouldn’t be surprised if I didn’t play the next game – my job is to take wickets and I’ve had two wicketless games so we’ll have to see how we go.

    “I think it’s good to have competition and it wouldn’t be good if we had no one pushing you trying to get better so again I love it.”

    Coulter-Nile’s efforts lifted Australia from 38/4 to 288 all out, a total that proved narrowly too good for Jason Holder’s West Indies, with Mitchell Starc finishing the job with a five-wicket haul.

    Having a total to defend wasn’t just down to the 31-year-old, however, with Steve Smith playing the anchor role in scoring 73 and occupying the crease for nearly three hours.

    That allowed Coulter-Nile to play a free-flowing game he himself has rarely seen, failing to take stock of his achievements until the innings headed towards its conclusion.

    “I must have looked up and realised my score when I got to 90 – then I started thinking about it, that stuffed it,” he added. “I saw the score and thought ‘that’s a lot of runs’, I didn’t think about the century.

    “I actually broke my bat in one of my shots, I middled a pull shot off [Sheldon] Cottrell and it split down the bottom, but I didn’t want to swap it.

    “I like to play the pull shot and get on the back foot, it’s part of my game but it’s also what they were giving me so it was nice.

    “The past two years I’ve had some stress injuries so all I’ve really been able to do is bat, I’ve tried to play red-ball cricket but when I went mostly to white-ball cricket, that was all I could really do.”


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  52. #52
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    Australia assistant coach Ricky Ponting believes that the top-order's struggles facing short-pitched bowling against West Indies could be a wake-up call for the five time World Cup Champions, ahead of their third match in the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2019.

    The West Indies pace attack – relying on judicious use of short-pitched bowling – rocked the Australian top order to reduce them to 38/4, and later to 79/5 at Trent Bridge on Thursday. Ricky Ponting hopes that the batsmen lean from their mistakes before they take on India at The Oval on Sunday.

    "It could very well be … a wake-up call," Ponting told cricket.com.au. "Just understanding that if you are under pressure in big games like World Cup games, finding a mechanism or a way to get through (is important). It could be just a good learning curve for those guys at the top and hopefully they'll bounce back strong."

    Usman Khawaja, who had been hit by a bouncer in a practice match last month by Andre Russell, struggled against the same bowler at Trent Bridge, before being dismissed to a rash shot. Ponting, one of the best players of the pull-shot during his playing days, is determined to help Khawaja overcome the failure.

    "I've got some notes written in my book about that exact thing. Usman got hit again … so he's had a few hits in the last few weeks. I haven't spoken to him (to see) if he's rattled, but that's part and parcel of top order batting against brand new balls against guys who are bowling 140 kph an hour. You've got to find a way to cope and a way to get through hostile spells knowing that it's not going to last forever."

    The two time World-cup winning captain wasn't too impressed by the manner in which Glenn Maxwell conceded his wicket, playing a mistimed pull shot off the second delivery he faced. "It's a bit of an uncharacteristic shot from (Maxwell) as well, he's not a natural hooker and puller of the ball anyway. These are the things I want to ask him about as well when we finish up tonight, just get inside their heads a little bit."

    Ponting feels Jasprit Bumrah, India's strike bowler, with his variations in length, would be a tough challenge for Australia. "Bumrah, we know, is a very good new ball bowler and I'm sure he'll mix it up and bowl some short stuff and some full stuff," he said.

    "Do they maybe go with only the one spinner and use Kedhav Jadav as a second spinner and play another fast bowler? We'll worry about that in the next couple of days and make sure all the boys are prepared," Ponting concluded.

    https://www.icc-cricket.com/news/1238747


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  53. #53
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    8 June - Oval - Australia Captain Aaron Finch pre-match press conference

    Q. Aaron, after the 18 months for Australian cricket, how important was the win against the West Indies fighting back when you were in a tough spot?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, I think it was really important, especially in the context of the competition. I think when you're in a tournament play, I think winning them close ones, especially early in the tournament is really important, to keep the momentum going. But as you know, the weather could play a part at some point in this tournament, so to be able to get two points where we didn't play our best cricket was really crucial.

    Q. After his match-winning effort against West Indies, Coulter-Nile had apprehended that he could be dropped from the game even after his beautiful 70. Did you speak to him or will you be able to announce the 11?
    AARON FINCH: We don't have an 11 just yet, but I think it's great that there's so much competition for spots in the team. To be able to have a look at a guy who's batted No. 8 and got 92 and then got us out of a great hole that we were in early in the game, to get us to a match-winning total was really important. But I think what is really important is that the guys who haven't been in their first two playing 11s are still putting a lot of pressure on with the way that they're training and the way they're going about it. That's a real positive for us. It's a way that keeps everyone on their toes that you have to keep performing game after game to keep guys out who have been in really good form when they had their chance, and also putting pressure on for the balance of the side, but also for them valuable spots.

    Q. Finchy, next up India, big game. Do you think it's a match-up between your pacers and the Indian pacers?
    AARON FINCH: Well, I think it's not just the pace bowling. Obviously both sides have had a bit of success with their spinners in the past couple of months in particular, so what it comes down to is execution. I think on a pretty good Oval surface that's going to be another used wicket, so the second time in three games that we've played on a used surface, it's going to come down to who executes. It's as simple as that. I think both teams have got very good world-class fast bowlers. Whether India played the two plus the all-rounder or go with an extra quick bowler, we're not sure. When you look at Bumrah, Bhuvi, Shami, Hardik, they're world-class bowlers, and then you go Starc, Cummins, Coulter-Nile, Behrendorff, Richardson. There's so many options there. So that's a good question. But I think it's just going to come down to early wickets. I think that's going to be a real key.

    Q. Aaron, how much of a confidence does this Australian team carry, the way you played Chahal and Kohli in India and also the way you particularly played Kedar Jadhav. How much of that helps the Australian team going into tomorrow's match?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, I think winning them last three games is really important for us in India, to one, get some self belief that we can beat this Indian side in their home conditions. For that, I think when you look back, it comes down to taking them key moments in games and making sure that no matter what situation of the game or the series or the tournament, whenever you're playing India, you have to believe that you can beat them because they're a world-class side. They've got some all-time great players, no doubt about that. So to be able to beat them in their home conditions three times in a row was really important for the confidence of the side, especially going into a game like this.

    Q. Bit of a scary incident just now. How is Dave after that, and can you tell us what happened and if it shook any of the players up?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, Dave was obviously pretty shaken up. The young guy seems to be in pretty good spirits at the moment. He's obviously been taken off to hospital and will continue to be assessed just to make sure that everything is okay. But yeah, Dave was pretty shaken up, no doubt. It was a decent hit to the head. Yeah, hopefully everything keeps going well for the youngster and he's back up and running shortly. Yeah, it was tough to watch.

    Q. Finchy, it's a bit of a quirky one, I guess, but there's --
    AARON FINCH: I wouldn't expect anything different from you.

    Q. Three times in the tournament so far, the balls hit the stumps, but the bails haven't fallen off of them. It happened to Chris Gayle a few days ago. Are there any concerns it could cost the team a win?
    AARON FINCH: I think you take the good with the bad in that situation. I suppose with the new -- the light-up stumps, the bails seem to be a lot heavier, so it does take a bit of a force. I've seen it a handful of times now in IPL and Big Bash and stuff where the ball rolls back onto the stumps, where the bails traditionally, one of them will pop off. But yeah, I think it's just one of those things that you are aware that when you're on the right side of it, you are aware of it a bit easier than when you're not.

    Q. Just on the incident with the net bowler, is there anything around net safety that could be improved, kind of grounds all around the world? Is this something you've been concerned about before?
    AARON FINCH: Well, it's quite rare that somebody gets hit, and it's obviously very unfortunate. The medical staff that were on hand, obviously our own medical staff, doctor and physio and also the medical staff, paramedics at the ground, did a great job in being there very quickly to assess and make sure that all the right protocols and right processes were put in place. Yeah, maybe -- it is a difficult one because you get some guys that are coming in and who probably aren't as well-equipped with their game to be able to deal with that.

    That's a tough one. I don't really have a -- I haven't thought about it a hell of a lot to be honest. It's a tough one to answer.

    Q. I think Jimmy Anderson has even talked about wearing helmets for the net bowlers. That probably wouldn't be a bad idea?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, that could be a decent idea. Again, it's a bit like everything; it's such a personal preference for net bowlers, and we're very lucky to have so many of them come in and want to bowl to us and help us prepare as best we can for the game. But I think it's going to be a personal preference, and like I said, it's lucky that there were so many good medical team on standby.

    Q. What was the talk of the top order obviously following the -- approaching things differently if you lose early wickets or anything like that?
    AARON FINCH: In reflection of last game?

    Q. Yeah, in reflection after West Indies.
    AARON FINCH: Well, the chat was around that we were probably -- we thought we were really well-prepared, but we probably just didn't stick to our game plan for long enough. I think guys individually had their own plans and own ways to play what we knew was coming, and sometimes it can be harder to play when you know it's coming. But at the end of the day, we just didn't commit to our plan for long enough.

    We saw Steve had a really clear plan. He got under the bouncer until he tried to play one around in the 33rd over, I think, and hit it up in the air and nearly got caught. So then he just took that out of his game again and kept ducking under them, so that was a really good lesson to all our batters that the best player in the world stuck to his game plan for a long time and was successful and probably swallowed his pride a little bit in terms of having to put a shot away that you'd look to score heavily off in a one-day game. That was a really good lesson for our batters, to just keep sticking to it and have the courage to stick to your game plan for longer.

    Q. How key is it getting Steve Smith and David Warner back?
    AARON FINCH: Well, when you've got world-class players coming back into your side, it's unfortunate for the guys who have missed out and the guys that have played some really good one-day cricket in the past. But Steve is the best batter in the world in my opinion over all three forms of the game. I think that when you have David who's so destructive at the top of the order, his record shows how destructive he is. To have them to come back, yes, it's great for the side and our batting lineup and for experience in World Cups and great help for me as a leader, as well, in terms of tactics and stuff out on the field.

    But I think we've always believed that we've got a side that can win the World Cup. Even when we didn't and we started this run of form or run of wins, I guess, from the third game in India, we still believed that we had the side then that could do it, and we feel as though this has just boosted that.

    Q. Slight change of pace, Ronnie, amazing start to his coaching career. Do you think he's got what it takes to coach at international level, and can you talk through what his strengths are?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, absolutely. I think he definitely at some point in his career will coach an international team. The great strength of his -- the ability to communicate with every player in a list, thinks through every situation really well, doesn't make emotional decisions on anything, which I think is a huge plus as a coach, to be able to take that time to reflect and see what's best for the group in every decision that you make. He's tactical -- the tactical side of his coaching is second to none, and I think that he's as well-planned as a coach as I've ever seen. I've obviously known him a lot longer and dealt with him for a huge amount of time, so I'm a little bit biased in my opinions at times, as well, because he is such a great coach when it comes to all facets of the game.

    Q. Rohit Sharma averages over 60 against Australia in One Days, Kohli over 50. They're obviously quality players and they're going to score runs, but is there anything you note from that or anything you try to do differently to try and stop them in this game and in the tournament?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, I think that you have to be right on from ball 1. I think when we've seen over the last -- having played in India so much recently, there's times when we probably let Virat get off to a bit of a flyer with being just a bit too straight to him or a bit too full or just letting him off the hook early, and we know once he gets into his innings he's so hard to stop, so you can't afford to play catch-up against great players, and Rohit is the same. When he's taking his time early in his innings, if you don't get him in that period it builds up and builds up, and he's so destructive when he decides to really start putting the pressure on you.

    So I think you have to be right on from ball 1. You can't afford to give them freebies early on, and that goes for their whole order. You can't put too much focus just on two players because Shikhar Dhawan has had some good success against us, Dhoni we saw -- we found it tough to get him out in Australia. When we'd get India into a bit of trouble, he would dig them out of a hole and bat right to the end and bat really deep, and even the first two ODIs in India he was instrumental in getting them across the line in a couple of them.

    You can't afford to weigh too much or put too much weight on one or the other in terms of your preparation and focus, so I think just the first 10, 15 balls you have to be right on. You have to make them try and take a risk to get a way to a flier and put the odds in your favour.

    Q. They've got a fast bowler called Jasprit Bumrah. Are you putting in any sort of extra technical or mental preparation for facing him?
    AARON FINCH: Not any extra. You do your due diligence on every bowler every game. He's a world-class bowler. He's had a lot of success, especially over the last 18, 24 months. I think all the guys are as well-prepared mentally and technically as they can be, and it's not about -- in-tournament play like this, it's too quick to be tinkering with technique and things like that in my opinion. Well, it is for me anyway. Some guys can do it really well and do it quickly. Steve Smith seems to change his technique every couple of balls at times, depending on what he's facing. That's just not a huge strength of mine, to be able to do that. I think it would be silly to try and go away from my game plan and try and change particular things in my game that add strength to my game, as well.

    It will be just about sticking to my plan, sticking to what started to work at the back end of that Indian series and just be confident. As soon as you're not committed 100 per cent against these guys and particularly Bumrah, Bhuvneshwar, as well, Shami, they're all world-class bowlers, spinners. It's too hard if you're not 100 per cent ready.

    Q. Did you have a close look at Chahal during the South African match, and is there any kind of a plan, especially in the Oval wicket?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, he bowled very well against South Africa. Obviously he got some wickets early in his spell, which is a leg-spinner's dream. We all know that if you can deny leg-spinners wickets early, they start to go searching. I've never met a leg-spinner that doesn't.

    It's about guys' individual plans. It's different strengths and weaknesses for every player. Again, like I talked about with Bumrah and Bhuvi and these guys, you can't afford to worry about somebody else's plan. You have to commit 100 per cent to what you're doing and be brave enough to stick to that regardless of what the outcome might be. Sometimes you wear the consequences of sticking to your game plan, but the majority of the time it'll work for you.

    Q. Aaron, obviously you've got a huge amount of respect for the Indian players you're up against tomorrow, but would it be fair to say that in tournament play, this is a pretty good time for Australia to get India given you're on a roll, you won a really good game the other day, and India have only played one game in the tournament so far?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, I don't think you can read a huge amount into that. I think India, most of their players have come off an IPL preparation and still had their couple of warm-up games and no doubt would have been training as hard as they ever do. So there's never a time when you think that you've got one over them. It's all about on the day.

    We saw in the latest series we played against them that regardless of what the score line might be, whoever turns us and produces their best on the day will win, no doubt about that. It's about everyone chipping in and contributing as best they can to help Australia win tomorrow.

    ====

    Australia captain Aaron Finch plans to fire up his pace attack to put India under immediate pressure at the Oval.

    Finch’s team made hard work of their last ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup match against the West Indies while Virat Kohli’s India ruthlessly brushed aside the challenge of South Africa.

    And that means something has got to give, when the two sides thought most likely to challenge favourites England this summer go head-to-head at on Sunday.

    Rohit Sharma and Kohli both average over 50 against Australia in one-day cricket but Finch is taking inspiration from their recent match up in India, which saw the defending World Cup champions come from two games down to win the series.

    “Having played India so much recently, we sometimes let Virat get off to a bit of a flier and let them get off the hook early,” said Finch.

    “Once he gets into a rhythm he’s so hard to stop and you can’t afford to play catch up against great players and Rohit is the same.

    “He’s so destructive when he starts to really put the pressure on you. You can’t afford to give them too much freedom but we can’t focus on just two players either, look at the rest of their batting line up.

    “Those first ten or 15 balls it’s about making them take a risk and early wickets will be a real key.

    “Winning those last three games in India gave us some self-belief we can beat this side in their home conditions and that gives us real confidence coming into a game like this.

    “It comes down to seizing the key moments. You have to believe you can beat them, because they are a world-class side with some all-time great players.”

    Mitchell Starc took five wickets against the West Indies but it was Nathan Coulter-Nile who hogged the headlines, with 60-ball 92 - not bad when you consider he previously averaged just 12 - to rescue Australia who were reeling on 38/4.

    However, it was a performance that exposed the Australia’s top order to hostile bowling, something that will have Indian seamer Jasprit Bumrah even more pumped up than normal as he watches Kohli stride out for the toss.

    Kohli recently claimed rivals were ‘clueless’ when it came to facing his star man, who rattled out South African openers Hashim Amla and Quinton de Kock for a combined 16, establishing total dominance over the game from the opening over.

    “We’ve done our due diligence on every bowler but Bumrah’s obviously world class and he’s had a lot of success in the last 18 months,” added Finch. “All the guys are as well prepared mentally and tactically as they can be face everything we expect from them, they’ll be no surprises.

    “We need to stick to what worked at back end of that series in India. You’ve got to be confident and if you aren’t committed 100 percent against a side like India they will punish you.

    “It’s not just about pace bowling, both sides have had some success with their spinners in the past couple of months. What it comes down to is execution, especially on a pretty good Oval wicket.

    “We thought we were well prepared for what the West Indies threw at us but sometimes it’s harder to play when you know what’s coming. We just didn’t commit to our plans for long enough that’s a lesson we need to learn.”


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  54. #54
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    Supreme test of Australia's abilities today - they come out smiling and we could be looking at the next world champions


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  55. #55
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    Australia in World Cup 2019 - Their worst bowling attack for any World Cup?

    Although it might be a bit early for this question but I guess we can reflect on this as the tournament matures: Is this the worst world cup Australia has fielded in world cup history?

    Not taking any credit away from Indian batsmen for such a tremendous performance but Australian bowling attack in world cups has never looked so weak!

    Starc has not been playing for a while, performance has dipped hugely since the sandpapergate cough cough
    Zampa was really off colour today,
    Stoinis is medium pacer whos highly ineffective on flat decks,
    NCN has had too many injuries and seems more like a batsman who bowls a bit
    Cummins was the only decent bowler but he cant do it all by himself,
    What happened to Jhye Richardson?

  56. #56
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    1 bad performance and it is the worst attack. Just relax. Give credit to Indian batters.

    Jhye Richardson is out of the WC with an injury.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hasan123 View Post
    1 bad performance and it is the worst attack. Just relax. Give credit to Indian batters.

    Jhye Richardson is out of the WC with an injury.
    I guess things will become clear as tournament progresses. But if your take away the recent streak, Australian bowling has really declined since the sandpapergate, not to forget they almost conceded 500 against english team!

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shoaib88 View Post
    I guess things will become clear as tournament progresses. But if your take away the recent streak, Australian bowling has really declined since the sandpapergate, not to forget they almost conceded 500 against english team!
    This wasnt the attack that conceded 500.

    Indian batters played well. Not every time someone fails it's the worst in history especially when the bowlers in question have had success.

  59. #59
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    Cummins is the key for Aus. Starc hasnt been the same for past couple of years while Coulternile is decent as support but not someone who can tear through the batting lineups. Stoinis, Zampa and Maxwell are just mediocre.

    Overall if Cummins is having a bad day and Starc continuing his inconsistent form, you will see this attack going for runs more often than not.

  60. #60
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    Let's come back to this question after they play against Pakistan.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by geraltofrivia View Post
    Let's come back to this question after they play against Pakistan.
    Didnt they just smash Pak in a series.

  62. #62
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    It will be world class against Pakistan😁

  63. #63
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    Big-hitter Glenn Maxwell defended the decision to keep him kicking his heels in the pavilion as Australia fell short of a tough Indian target at the Oval.

    India produced a textbook batting display in their ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup clash, cautiously prodding at Australia’s opening attack and then accelerating with wickets in hand - all their top order contributing.

    It meant Aaron Finch’s side needed a World Cup record 353 run chase, a demanding task not made easier by his opening partnership with the normal aggressive David Warner, who appeared to struggle for fluency, at one stage facing 14 dot balls.

    Steve Smith and Usman Khawaja also struggled to get boundaries and it wasn’t until Maxwell’s arrival - he scored 28 in just 14 balls - that India’s bowling attack felt any concerted pressure.

    And World Cup winner Sachin Tendulkar was among those who thought Australia missed a trick not promoting free-scoring Maxwell - with his 122.45 ODI strike rate - up the order.

    “I don’t think we need to change anything and I don’t think we were that far off, we just need some tinkering here and here, a bit of luck going our way. On another day a couple would have cleared the fence or missed the fielders and we’d have been away,” said Maxwell, who eventually holed out to nemesis Yuzvendra Chahal as the run rate rooted itself in double digits.

    “We were trying to keep up with the run rate but they bowled really well and fielded out of their skins. Their tactics were really good and the built pressure on us too quickly. I was just waiting for my turn and hoping they could keep up with the run rate so I could do my job done at the back end.

    “It was about being completely clear in what I was trying to do and I was able get crisp boundaries in the first ten balls and I felt like I was in really good rhythm and playing with a good tempo. Unfortunately I had to take a few more risk off the spinners than I would have liked to.”

    In the end Australia were only 37 runs short of their big target but, in truth, they were never really in the match - the scorecard not necessarily telling the full story of India’s dominance across all departments.

    Warner, one of the game’s biggest hitters, scored 56 in 84 balls, a slower half century than his equally uncharacteristically cautious performance against Afghanistan in his team’s tournament opener.

    The tactic of curbing natural scoring instincts and protecting wickets in the opening overs, and then unleashing with wickets in hand clearly worked for India.

    But Finch denied Warner’s new conservatism is part of a long-time game plan, with Pakistan the next opponents at Taunton on Wednesday.

    “They bowled really well to him early and I think playing on a used wicket again for our second time in three games played a little bit of a part in that,” he said.

    “It hasn't been a plan, a team plan or an individual plan for David. Their bowling plans were pretty simple but really effective on a wicket like that.”


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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilly View Post
    Didnt they just smash Pak in a series.
    So did England.


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  65. #65
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    India against Australia was always going to be a highly charged encounter between two teams that have met on numerous occasions over the past 12 months.

    This rivalry has revealed no clear dominance by either but India’s victory in the pressure cooker of a World Cup clash will provide them with enormous confidence as they move forward in this tournament.

    It was an important toss to win for India as the Oval pitch had previously been used and was clearly one that slowed down as the match went on.

    India’s batting display was both measured and calculated with their plan clear and well executed. Their plan is to lay a foundation by not losing wickets and they stuck to it.

    When they get off to solid opening partnership, as they did against Australia, they then have the luxury of seeing Virat Kohli orchestrate the remainder of the innings.

    But it’s the innings of Hardik Pandya that will send shivers down opposition spines.

    This guy might just be the equivalent of Lance Klusener in the 1999 World Cup. He has the ability to begin his innings like most finish with clean hitting that no opposing captain can protect.

    If that’s not enough, the cunning and sheer brilliance of MS Dhoni rarely fails to deliver and again he timed his assault on Australia to post a 350 plus target.

    Australia will be disappointed that they missed some crucial chances in the field and their bowling was at times loose and not as disciplined as expected.

    Chasing such an imposing total requires a solid platform before launching an all-out assault in the last 15 overs. You have to stay in touch when you’re chasing such a big score.

    Australia were never quite on track to create history with David Warner and to a lesser extent Steve Smith struggling for their usual rhythm and control at the crease.

    To win against the odds everything must fall into place and the turning point came early in the innings with the run out of Aaron Finch who looked in imperious touch and looked set for a big hundred.

    Both he and Alex Carey showed superb shot selection to suggest they will be crucial to Australia’s chances in this campaign.

    The cameo of Glenn Maxwell will increase calls for his elevation up the batting order as he is a match-winner that can turn a game in a few overs.

    Leadership reveals itself in many forms but I though Virat Kohli’s gesture in calming down the rough reception given to Steve Smith from the Indian spectators was a class act that calmed a volatile situation.

    India will walk away from this match full of confidence as most of their key players did exactly what needed to be done under extreme pressure and their game plan was executed perfectly.

    Australia won’t be too disappointed as they have time to dissect this loss, fine tune their process, tinker with batting orders and bowling options and manoeuvre things around before the semi-finals come around.

    This World Cup is wide open right now with up to six teams believing they have a chance to lift the Cup at Lord’s.

    ICC Media Release


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  66. #66
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    Allan Border: Australia are yet to hit their stride but that's exactly why the rest should worry

    Australia aren’t playing at their best but they are winning matches - that’s the way I saw the win over Pakistan.

    They hung in there, rode out some pressure and came out with the victory.

    The bottom line is there's room for improvement from Justin Langer’s team, and that's a good thing that will only worry every other side in this ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup.

    Australia were 126 without loss from 22 overs in Taunton, so they will have been disappointed to only post 307. It’s a very good score, but they should have got more.

    You can't knock the innings David Warner played. A few people have been saying he's scoring too slowly, but the ball was doing a bit and there was a little bit of swing and seam.

    He was typically belligerent and upped the scoring rate. Aaron Finch was his usual aggressive self, hitting the ball here, there and everywhere.

    In the middle overs, Australia need to be a bit smarter. When you get a flying start, like they did at Taunton, you’re desperate to keep that momentum going and it’s hard to do.

    Someone has to be prepared to just knock the ball around for a few overs but Pakistan didn’t really let them do that. Mohammad Amir bowled beautifully and gave his team a chance.

    I’ve got no problem with batting Glenn Maxwell at four, given the start Australia had. He’s so dangerous.

    He might not stick around, like Steve Smith, Usman Khawaja or Shaun Marsh, but he can take the game away from you and I think his team understand that a bit more than they did in the past.

    The bowlers did the job up front. Pat Cummins bowled fantastically well and that's a good sign, that him and Mitchell Starc are carrying the fight at the top.

    Pakistan had their tails up at one stage with Sarfaraz and Wahab at the crease and it was when Finch had to bowl either himself or Maxwell that you saw a sign of weakness.

    The fifth, and even the fourth, bowling option is looking like a slight concern for them.

    Nathan Coulter-Nile bowled pretty well and got the big wicket of Babar, while Kane Richardson was a bit expensive.

    Finch’s low full-toss did the job in the end, but I think they should look at Steve Smith having a bowl, I really do.

    Leg spin takes wickets and whether it’s Adam Zampa coming back in or Smith trying a bit of his spin, that should improve the attack dramatically.

    All sides are working towards putting in that perfect, 100-over performance.

    In the early stages of the World Cup, you want to be right amongst the pacesetters after four rounds and Australia very much are.

    They’re building nicely and all ten teams will feel the total package is still in them.

    Australia play Sri Lanka on Saturday and they won't want to relax at all.

    They'll talk about being relentless and consistent in their team meetings and they can create momentum for some of the big teams they still have to play.

    You want to be building confidence, not dropping your bundle against any team.

    Sri Lanka are dangerous but Australia will be confident they can get across the line at The Oval.

    ICC Media Release


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  67. #67
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    This was such a stupid team selection They got away thanks to Hafeez
    Missing out on a full toss against their part timer

  68. #68
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    Cummins urges greater concentration after finally seeing off Pakistan

    Pat Cummins admitted relief as Pakistan mounted a brave rearguard effort to nearly pull off an improbable victory at Taunton.

    After they were set 308 to win, Sarfaraz Ahmed’s side scored steadily but Australia held their nerve to keep picking off batsmen.

    An eighth-wicket stand between Sarfaraz and Wahab Riaz, who scored 45 from just 39 balls, made it nervy for the defending champions until the last three wickets fell for just two runs – securing a third victory at the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2019.

    “It goes to show that everyone can bat these days,” said Cummins, who took his tournament tally to nine wickets with figures of 3/33.

    “It was a bit closer than we would have liked, so it was good to get those couple of wickets and finish it off. We gave them a bit too much width and suddenly they were back in the game, it’s a good lesson to learn.”

    Cummins and strike partner Mitchell Starc have 18 wickets between them in the tournament while the rest of the team have a combined 12, underlining the importance of the top-line attack to captain Aaron Finch.

    Cummins is ranked the number one Test bowler in the world and number six in ODIs, statistics he underlined with a wicket in his second over and later the key scalp of big-hitting opener Imam ul-Haq for 53.

    Pakistan lost three top order wickets in just 15 balls, Finch removing the dangerous Mohammad Hafeez when he fired a full toss straight a fielder on the boundary and Cummins dismissing Shoaib Malik caught behind.

    But it was the dot balls - not the wickets - that secretly pleased Australia’s vice-captain. It’s a nerdy stat for bowlers - and no-one currently has a better record at the tournament.

    “That’s the big improvement in my game in the last couple of years, the ability to hold a length and make it difficult to get runs,” added Cummins.

    “If you give away easy singles then 300 becomes quite an achievable score. Cutting out the singles is huge, it means if you give away a boundary it might not be that big over of ten or 11, it may just be a five or a six.

    “This was as good a bowling wicket as you’ll get. If you didn’t bowl well then you’d get smashed but if you put it in the right places you were always in the game.”

    Cummins is increasingly looking like the workhorse of this Australian team, plugging away with the wickets while others hog the headlines.

    Against Pakistan it was David Warner, whose man of the match winning innings of 107 was something special.

    “We were so pumped for him, he was really open and honest after the Oval game,” added Cummins.

    “He was playing more timid than normal but we saw his mindset change from the start here.

    “I think if you look over the transition of his career, he’s become more measured in his approach. He’s energy out in the middle is still an example, the way you see him sprinting hard for singles and bouncing down the wicket. He looks really sharp in this tournament, which is great for us.”


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  69. #69
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    Australia's Richardson determined to grab World Cup chance with both hands

    Australian seamer Kane Richardson is determined to seize every chance that comes his way at the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup.

    Richardson was a late call up when namesake Jhye was ruled out with a dislocated shoulder, capping a dramatic change in fortunes for the 28-year old South Australian.

    On the eve of the tournament captain Aaron Finch admitted he thought Richardson’s international career was over after a run of disappointing performances.

    But some attention-grabbing performances in the Big Bash for Melbourne Renegades earned his slot for the defending champions.

    With the Taunton track favouring pace, he was picked ahead of Jason Behrendorff to replace spinner Adam Zampa, as Australia claimed 41-run win over Pakistan at Taunton.

    And he took two wickets to stake his claim for another shot when Australia take on Sri Lanka at the Oval this weekend.

    “Anytime someone questions your bottle its tough but I was pretty disappointed in my performances at the time and knew something had to change,” he said.

    “I knew he (Aaron) thought that because I remembered sitting down with him and talking about it.

    “I remember going on a tour to Zimbabwe and not playing a game, you learn pretty quickly that you are outside the pecking order.

    “I’ve tried to stop caring about selection and just focussed on doing my best and playing cricket. Throughout the summer I took some wickets and a few blokes fell down and I’m the next man in.

    “There was no point crying about it. I just thought I’ll do everything I can, if I do end up not playing again then so be it.

    “It’s good to know the guys think I’ve made progress and have confidence in me.”

    ICC media release


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  70. #70
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    Australia are sitting pretty in the top four as they approach the mid-point of the group stage and yet skipper Aaron Finch knows his side have not played anywhere near their best yet.

    With three wins from four, including a thriller last time out against Pakistan at Taunton, the defending ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup champions have made a solid start to proceedings here in England.

    At the top of the order Finch, David Warner and Steve Smith, have hit the ground running with big scores aplenty.

    But the middle order has yet to fire – with Marcus Stoinis’s side strain that will keep him out of the Sri Lanka clash at the Oval on Saturday not helping matters.

    While in the bowing department, Pat Cummins and Mitchell Starc remain two of the world’s best but behind them spots are still up for grabs.

    But with so much cricket still to come, Finch is confident that their best cricket is just around the corner.

    “I don’t think we have gone anything near our best which is still a good thing,” said the 32-year-old.

    “We have six points on the board but are not playing anywhere near our best cricket which is a real positive.

    “But as long as we are improving and continue to go up and not backwards, I think that is the key.

    “You are coming up against different opposition all the time.

    “You don’t get into a rhythm, there are different challenges every time. India were spin heavy through the middle, West Indies were all about pace through the middle.

    “But I was a bit disappointed we left a few out there at Taunton, on a ground that is so hard to defend once a team gets a run on.”

    On the bowling side of things, Glenn Maxwell has become a key cog with his off-spin while Finch himself even turned his arm over at Taunton and claimed the key wicket of Mohammad Hafeez with a rank full toss.

    Finch added: “Have I been working on my bowling? Not much! I’m just trying to land them! My bowling is not great to be honest, it is pretty ordinary but I just got a bit lucky.

    “When you play four specialist bowlers and rely on your fifth, what I would call a good part-timer is Maxy, he has shown last World Cup he was our spinner, he has shown he can do it.

    “But it is tough without guys, especially all-rounders who balance out your side really well.”

    Other than Stoinis’ side strain – with Mitchell Marsh now in camp as back-up should the all-rounder fail to recover – Australia are at full fitness. But Finch is not going to be underestimating Sri Lanka adding “You look down their side and there is a lot of experience there and world-class players. You can never take any team in this competition lightly.

    “The fact we have been playing consistently every three days has been really positive, we are in cricket mode, play, travel, play travel, which keeps the flow going.

    “Then it slows down a bit for us at the back end of the tournament.

    “Some of our guys would no doubt be after a bit of a rest, it can wear you down.

    “But it’s good to be in this phase, playing all the time. Sri Lanka will be very tough opposition though, no doubt.”


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  71. #71
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    14 June - Oval - Australia Captain Aaron Finch pre-match press conference

    Q. Can you give us an update on Stoinis, and if he's not available for tomorrow, whom have you got in mind?
    AARON FINCH: He won't be available again for tomorrow. He hasn't bowled yet in his recovery over the last couple of days.

    So having four days between this game and the next game, I think that will be the ideal time to really test him out and assess him. But I think over the over the next five, six days, there will be a call made on that, just based on what he can and can't do. We've seen him batting and running, no problem. Just he hasn't tried to bowl yet. Just waiting for the injury to settle down a bit more.

    Q. And who is tomorrows replacement for him?
    AARON FINCH: We're not naming our team just yet.

    Q. Is it a concern that you guys don't quite know, or maybe you do, know your best 11 yet?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, it's tough when guys, especially all-rounders who balance out your side really well give you that extra fast-bowling option, as well as a top six batter. So it's a little bit difficult trying to decide whether you go the extra batter or the extra bowler, depending on conditions.

    So I think it does make it a little bit tougher, a bit more of a challenge, no doubt. But we also did plan for that, if it did happen throughout the tournament, before you sit down and you start planning out what happens if X, Y, Z happens.

    So it wasn't a total surprise. Obviously it's not ideal, but it's not a surprise to us because we had already thought about things like that. But just game-to-game, it totally changes depending on the conditions.

    Q. Sri Lanka have not played any cricket for the last ten, 11 days. Do you think it's an advantage for you guys that you have been playing consistently, and Sri Lanka have not been able to play the same, as well, in the first two games, which the Aussies have a fast-bowling attack?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, it's not ideal, is it, when rain plays a big part in a tournament like this. I think Sri Lanka have been unlucky with a couple of games they have had watched out. You look down their side, and there's a lot of experience there. There's a lot of world-class players.

    You can never take any team in this competition lightly, but I think the fact that we've been playing consistently, basically every three days for the last two weeks, has been -- last week and a half, has been really positive that we're in cricket mode at the moment. We just play, travel, play, travel, which gives you a good opportunity just to keep the flow going and we get an extra day between this and the next game, and then it slows down a little bit toward the back end of the tournament.

    While some of our boys no doubt will be after a bit of a rest and recharge of the batteries, because that can wear you down travelling a lot; travel, try and play all the time. I think it's good, though, that when you're in that phase of the tournament, you're just playing all the time. So Sri Lanka, they are going to be a very tough opposition, no doubt.

    Q. We saw Mitch Marsh around the squad today. If Marcus can't get up for the next game, are you confident that he could potentially come many straightaway for the Bangladesh game?
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, that's why he's here, obviously, just a couple of days before. I think Australia side land today in the U.K., as well, later today. So it's just a couple of days before.

    But as a bit of a precaution more than anything, if Stoinis doesn't recover well enough over the next couple of days. So it just comes down to -- the answer, the short answer is yes. There is confidence that Mitch will come in and do well if selected, if Stoinis doesn't recover properly.

    Q. Just on your bowling, if you'll give me another one here,/ saw you in the nets and obviously we'd like to you talk us through that wicket in the last game. Can you tell us what you've been working on with your bowling?
    AARON FINCH: Not much (smiling) trying to land them, for a start.

    Yeah, when you play four specialist bowlers and rely on ten out of your fifth bowler, your good part-timer I'll call Maxie, he's shown last World Cup he was our spinner for most of the game. So we know that he can do it. When he's relied on to bowl ten, you have to chop him out with a few overs here and there, especially at a ground like Taunton, and the wicket played really well. It didn't spin or anything.

    So you had to try and chop him out with a few here and there, because you saw whenever our phase decided to attack him, it was tough going. Tough to defend on such a small ground and a quick outfield. Yeah, my bowling, it's not great. It's pretty ordinary to be fair. I just got a bit lucky.

    Q. I noticed David Warner wasn't there today. He's still with the elbow sort of bandaged up and misses the odd over there in the field. Anything going on there with him?
    AARON FINCH: Not at all. Not at all. I can't remember the last time that he does train the day before a game. The game we played against India, we had a quick fielding session as a group, so that's why he would have been here. Other than that, the day before a test match, one-day game, he doesn't train. Usman doesn't really train.

    The quicks will very rarely be at training if not required at all. Saw Coults here today having a hit. He's probably one of a few guys, a few quicks that comes down. No, it's not concerning at all. He goes off to get his elbow re-taped every now and then because when he's throwing a fair bit, it can come loose. But apart from that, there's no issues whatsoever with him.

    Q. Just to confirm quickly, there's no other injuries or issues going into tomorrow?
    AARON FINCH: None at all. Just Stoinis. That's it.

    Q. Going off last game, would you be more confident or less confident going four quicks again? How difficult did you find as a captain having to manipulate Maxie's ten overs, or the ten overs from a part-time spinner, so to speak, including your own?
    AARON FINCH: Like I said it's really tough at a ground like Taunton being so small. I thought that the wicket would actually spin a little bit as the game went on, but it didn't. The cloud stayed in, stayed over the ground and it was a really nice wicket the whole time, after that -- after the new ball sort of wore off.

    So that was probably tougher at a ground like Taunton. I think here at The Oval, you see one that there's a lot bigger side so you can play a little bit more defensive with your fifth bowler, as opposed to having to try and attack with him. And that's what the four quicks allows you to do. It gives you an opportunity to attack from one end while being defensive at the other. It's just that, so small, Taunton, that it's tough to even be defensive as a spinner there.

    Q. Compared to 12 months ago, this team looks a lot sharper fielding-wise. If that's a fair observation, can you talk us through the work put in and maybe some of the guys who you really think are -- I know there's a lot of good fielders on the team, but some of the ones that are sort of world-class.
    AARON FINCH: Yeah, I think having Smith and Warner, back in the ring there, that creates a huge amount of presence. They are both -- or Dave, in particular, is so quick. He mightn't have the best arm at the moment but he's so quick to the ball that you can't run.

    Smith is like a flytrap there at slip, and also when he gets in that short cover, he reads angles and he anticipates so well.

    Maxwell, we know how good he can be. He's up there with the best in the world when he's hitting the stumps like he did the other day, at a crucial time. If Sarfaraz bats to the end there, they probably get really close, if not home. They are the three that in the ringer, are so dynamic. And then you have Coulter-Nile who is a gun fielding on the boundary, Stoinis when he's fit is unbelievable on the boundary. He's quick. He's got an unbelievable arm. We feel there's a lot of bases covered there. All our quick bowlers are really good. All our spinners are good. Zams has really safe hands.

    So it gives you an opportunity that you can keep the guys in; the fast guys, the guys who anticipate the play, you can keep them in the circle for longer. I think when you're trying to fill some holes in the field, your good fielders have to go to the boundary to try to cut off them twos, which then makes it easier to get the ones in the ring.

    But when you have got confidence in everyone, anyone can field all around the grounds. That's been a big change is to get them world-class fielders staying in the ring for longer.

    Q. You've been hitting the ball well through this tournament. Do you think a good World Cup can put you back The Ashes frame, and do you hope to play that --
    AARON FINCH: I doubt it.

    Q. -- Australia game in Hampshire just before it's picked?
    AARON FINCH: I haven't honestly thought about it whatsoever. I think -- I'm not sure what they are planning with the squad or anything like that.

    Obviously I'd love to play if the opportunity comes up. I think being The Ashes is way down the list, or I'm way down the list, having missed my opportunity throughout the summer.

    But the guys who come in, the young guys come and played really well. Kurtis Patterson played beautifully. Heady has done a great job. We saw him evolve over the summer and changed his game or changed his mental attitude, I think really quickly to test cricket, which was a real positive from such a young guy.

    Will Pucovski, he's an absolute superstar in the making. I think that between them guys, and you've got Bancroft who started off the summer over here really well. Joe Burns unfortunately had to go home for some personal reasons. But they are all guys that are right there in the mix with Steve and Dave coming back into the frame, as well.

    The short answer is, no. I would love -- of course I'd love to. But the young guys have come in and done such a good job, and they have got such bright futures, all of them. Whether they all get picked or whether one or two misses out, I don't think that will be the end of the world for them.

    Yes, there will be some short-term disappointment, but they are going to have long careers, all of them, I can tell you. There's some seriously good players in Australia, especially them young guys who have had a little taste. Obviously Will missed out selection them two tests against Sri Lanka.

    But they are all seriously good players. I think them guys will be -- will be really well placed to take the spot The Ashes and make it their own for a long time.

    Q. And I know you obviously want to build towards your best cricket in World Cup and you don't want to peak too early, when do you want to see the batting lineup click?
    AARON FINCH: Every game. Every game would be nice.

    Obviously it's tough. Obviously you are coming up against different opposition all the time and I talked about it in terms of changing your preparation, and adapting game by game because you don't get into a original many against the same team like you do for three and a half years in between World Cup.

    To come up against different opposition, you're facing different challenges all the time. We saw against India, they are spin-heavy through the middle. West Indies are quicks-heavy through the middle. Played Afghanistan; they mixed up spin and quicks. You're constantly faced with different challenges.

    So it would be nice for our batting to just keep improving. I don't think we've gone anywhere near our best, which is still a good thing; that we've got six points on the board while not playing anywhere near our best cricket, which is a real positive.

    But as long as we're improving, and continue to go up and not go backwards, I think that's the key. What per cent of 100 per cent game that you get to, I think is irrelevant as long as it's improving along the way.

    Q. How much of a concern was it the middle order left 50 runs out there at Taunton, and what's the ideal role you see for Glenn Maxwell? Is it the high-impact innings, or just last 15 overs of an innings, or longer, proper middle order batsman type?
    AARON FINCH: It was a little disappointing to leave a few out there, because we saw on a ground that's so hard to defend like Taunton, that once a team gets a run on it, it can be hard to stop regardless of who is playing.

    I think we just looking to a little bit too hard too soon after the start that we had, I think that we probably forced it a little bit too much, and probably left it to somebody else. We thought that somebody else was going to do the job but at the same time we still got ourselves into a great position.

    We got guys a little bit of time in the middle that allowed them to get the feel of the game and get a bit of a flow into the World Cup, particularly Shaun had not played, Shaun Marsh had not played a game; to come in and get some time in the middle.

    It would have been great if he spent a bit more time there and took the game a bit deeper, but when you're playing seven batters, it's probably the risk versus reward. If that comes off, then do you get that huge total, but at the same time, I was probably just a little bit disappointed that we failed to learn throughout the innings.

    There was times, looked like every time we tried to hit it down the ground, a big shot down the ground in the air, it went straight up. A couple of guys still made that same mistake after a few guys before them had, as well. So that was a bit disappointing. All.

    In all, I thought that the position that we got ourselves into was a really positive one. And with Maxie, again, that's just -- that's just a call you make on the day. That's not -- we love Max at about 15, 20, 25 overs, but he also doesn't -- he also doesn't have to play the high-risk innings, and we saw the other day, he come in and had a really big impact quickly. If that can go on a bit longer, great. Whether that's from the 35th over, from the 20th over, again that's just game-by-game, and that was my decision to send him on in, and probably just look to -- probably didn't make the right call on how tough the wicket was to walk in and really up the ante. So that was my bad mistake, especially after being out there for 20 overs. It was probably a wicket that we could have built for a little bit longer and tried to have maximum impact right at the end, rather than maximum impact for 25 overs (laughing).

    Q. Are you going to win a coin toss (laughter)?
    AARON FINCH: I don't know. I'd like to. I don't seem to -- I don't think I won in the warmup games either. I had a good run at the start of the Pakistan series and lost a couple towards the end, so it's been awhile since I've won a toss. Good question.


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  72. #72
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    19 June - Nottingham - Australia player Alex Carey pre-match press conference


    Q. After the West Indies-Bangladesh match (indiscernible) against Bangladesh?
    ALEX CAREY: Good question. Obviously Bangladesh are playing some really good cricket at the moment and it's led by Shakib. So we've obviously put our time into Shakib and all the players at the top of the order as well as their bowling.

    So in terms of, have we changed our planning around the West Indies game? Not really. We sort of go through the same process for most teams. We assess each player and basically prepare accordingly for that.

    So, like I said, they're playing really good cricket. So we've got to rock up tomorrow and play really well. We've got to start really well and continue our good form as well, which has been working for us.

    Q. Is Australia scared of Bangladesh's spin attack?
    ALEX CAREY: Of who?

    Q. Is Australia scared of Bangladesh's spin attack?
    ALEX CAREY: No, we're not scared of the spin attack. We've obviously, again, we've done our preparation. We know Shakib's a big threat and has done a lot of the work for Bangladesh at the moment as well as Mehedi and a couple of the other spinners.

    So, again, we've prepared accordingly for the spin attack as well as the same attack as well. Mushfiq is bowling really well at the moment as well. So we've prepared for the conditions and for the attack.

    Q. Domestically you're usually a top-order batsman, opening batsman and now you're obviously batting in the middle. What did you have to do to change the game plan to move into the middle?
    ALEX CAREY: I guess just assessing the situation. If it's in the first innings, obviously last time we were here we were in a bit of trouble. So there was, I guess, a chance to just bat for a little while and I guess try to change the momentum.

    I guess chasing it, you know the score and you know who you're batting with to sort of plan how we attack a run-chase. So I think the scoreboard dictates a lot of my role when I go back down the order, who I'm batting with. It's sort of laid out in front. And then go out and try and execute as best I can.

    So I've really enjoyed the role down at the bottom of the order working alongside Steve Smith the last time we were here. Maxie is a really good to bat with along with Stoinis and all the other guys.

    Hopefully I'm not in until the last five, ten overs and the top order has done the job, but at the moment I'm really enjoying the No. 7 position.

    Q. Australia have so far won four matches in this tournament, but they could have lost three of them very easily. Do you think Australia is playing their best cricket in this tournament? If not, what will it take to bring their best?
    ALEX CAREY: I think we're playing really good cricket. I think we've got areas where we can still improve and be more consistent at. I think the top of the order, batting-wise, have done a lot of the work and making a lot of the runs which is great. It's their job.

    And hopefully they can continue to do that. I think we're bowling through the middle really well and at the back end, obviously Starc, Cummins, the guys that have come in have done their job.

    But there's little areas we can do better at. Obviously Sri Lanka came out and played really well in the first 10 overs the last game. So, obviously we'd like to take wickets up front. There's been times where we probably would like to finish the innings off with a bat.

    Although we're getting the results, we're still striving hard to try to find that perfect game and put a full 50 or 100 overs together. But the guys are working really hard. We're aware of the areas to keep improving.

    Q. Really (indiscernible) starts here, white ball, international cricket, vice captain of the World Cup already. What are your red ball aspirations (indiscernible). Do you have a plan mapped out for how you'll advance that format over the next few years?
    ALEX CAREY: No, I guess at the moment my experience at the international level has been with the white ball and I guess limited opportunity back in Australia in shield cricket. But I wouldn't change anything. If I'm playing white ball cricket for Australia, then I'm really happy to do that.

    So, but moving forward I'll continue to improve in all three formats in my game hopefully, and hopefully one day play test cricket. I think every cricketers -- or everyone that I've spoken to every cricketer's dream is to play test cricket. I'm no different.

    At the moment it's keep improving in this team, the T20 team as well and hopefully one day down the track there's an opportunity there. But at the moment I'm really loving playing white ball cricket for Australia, working with Brad Haddin, obviously Tim Paine's keeping really well at the moment as well.

    I'll keep striving to play test cricket. It's the dream, the goal. But it's with the white ball and try to get better and hopefully we get some more success here is the short-term goal.

    Q. I guess it's following on from that, Alex, do you feel like a strong World Cup can put you ahead of (indiscernible) for the back-up role come the Ashes?
    ALEX CAREY: I haven't really thought about it to be honest. I'm not sure what the selectors will go with there. He's obviously over playing in the Australia A set-up. But I want to play group cricket here for sure and I guess the rest of it will take care of itself.

    At the moment, I don't know, it's pretty cliché but it's as simple as Bangladesh tomorrow for me. Try to I guess be clean behind the stumps and make runs is my job. So I'll keep it quite simple for now.

    Q. So far, Bangladesh batsmen are doing well in this tournament. Do you think it is going to be a battle between Bangladeshi batsmen versus Australian pace bowlers?
    ALEX CAREY: Bangladesh are playing really well. Yeah, it's exciting to come up against a team that's in good form. And I think we're in really good form as well. So it's going to be a great game tomorrow.

    Conditions here normally suit batters. And it's normally high-scoring events here, which is exciting. But hopefully we obviously rock up tomorrow and play really well. And, like I said, Shakib is in really good form. He's one guy we want to get out early. But along with the other guys as well, they've come in and done really well.

    And I think for us it's keep focusing on what we're doing really well up front with the new ball, Starc and Cummins, and then through the middle, we'll see which way selection goes but there's lots of options to do that. And the back end has been a strength of ours closing out an innings. It's going to be a great contest, I recon.

    Q. Aaron Finch has lost seven straight coin tosses in a row, do you have any advice for him?
    ALEX CAREY: No, I don't. It's interesting, though. I think we've lost a lot of tosses, but the last seven games we've played some pretty good cricket. So I guess in a tournament like this, although you want to win the toss, I don't think it matters too much in terms of the outcome. If we get sent in, we know it's going to be a good wicket; or if we're chasing, we know what we've got to chase.

    But it would be nice for Finchy to choose what he wants to do for once. Maybe I should do the toss tomorrow. (Laughter).

    Q. Any specific planning regarding Shakib Al Hasan, since he's looking unstoppable in the tournament? Any specific planning against Shakib Al Hasan, since he seems unstoppable in this tournament?
    ALEX CAREY: Any specific batting against him?

    Q. Planning.
    ALEX CAREY: Sorry. We've had a look at the vision. Yeah, I think again he's in probably career best form with the white ball. So we sort of know the areas and line and length we want to bowl to him and I guess out there we'll assess the conditions as well.

    So, yeah, no extra planning, I don't think. We normally have our plans going into every game and we assess each player accordingly.

    So, yeah, in terms of what we're going to bowl, we leave that up to the bowlers and the captain to do that, but we'd love to get him out early. Like you mentioned, he's in great form, along with the other players. And then Liton Das comes in and played an incredible inning. Like I've said, we've gone through all the batting list and hopefully plans go accordingly.

    Q. How is Marcus Stoinis, is he 100 percent right to go; and if so, what kind of difference does that make middle overs bowling and that extra sixth bowler?
    ALEX CAREY: I think he's a really good chance to play. Again, leave that up to selection. But it is nice having that extra option with the ball through the middle and obviously batting at 6, it's a really crucial role.

    So hopefully he pulls up -- he had a bowl yesterday and he was fine today. So I think he's a really good chance to come back into the side. And again, it just gives that flexibility with the overs.

    Obviously Maxwell bowled really well against Sri Lanka. And Bangladesh has top order left-handed batters, so it could be a good matchup there.

    And it will be great to have Stoinis to come back into the side. And I know he's worked really hard off the ground to be ready to go, and he's smacking the ball in the net. It will be exciting to get him back out there, obviously.

    Q. You've talked about the video footage, and JL has as well. Obviously Australia haven't played Bangladesh that much at all outside of Bangladesh for quite a long time. Can you give us a sense of how different it is just trying to go off video footage when you actually have to face bowlers, though, how quickly can you really assess it based on video footage?
    ALEX CAREY: I guess that's the beauty of the game, too. It's a lot up to the individual that, I guess, problem solve out in the middle as well.

    So we've watched a lot of the games throughout this tournament. We've obviously watched a lot of vision of the Bangladesh side. But in every game, there's little curve balls that come up. And it's up to the players, I guess, to really problem solve out in the middle, in the contests. And everyone goes about it differently.

    So if guys want to sit down and watch hours of vision, that's available. I do like to watch bowlers. I haven't played against Bangladesh myself, personally. And so we leave it up to the individual. We trust their preparation. And at the moment I think that's working really well.


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  73. #73
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    Shakib Al Hasan is the name on all Bangladesh supporters’ lips and wicketkeeper Alex Carey admits the star all-rounder is earning extra attention behind the Australian scenes.

    Shakib boasts an unmatched 384 runs this ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup but batting is far from the only string to his bow, taking five wickets in his four matches to date.

    It’s those types of performances that have seen him ranked third or higher in the MRF Tyres ICC ODI Rankings for all-rounders every week since first topping the charts in 2009.

    So when it comes to Thursday’s meeting at Trent Bridge, Australia have every right to fear a man who guided the Tigers to an impressive seven-wicket win over West Indies with an unbeaten 124 last time out.

    “Bangladesh are playing some really good cricket at the moment and it's led by Shakib,” said Carey. “We’ve put our time into Shakib and all the players at the top of the order as well as their bowling.

    “We know Shakib's a big threat and has done a lot of the work for Bangladesh at the moment as well as Mehedy (Hasan Miraz) and a couple of the other spinners.

    “He’s probably in career-best form with the white ball. We know the areas and line and length we want to bowl to him and we'll assess the conditions as well.

    “But there’s no extra planning, I don't think. We normally have our plans going into every game and we assess each player accordingly.

    “We've prepared accordingly for the spin attack, they’re bowling really well at the moment so we've prepared for the conditions and for the attack.”

    While Carey knows the threat of the 32-year-old, the assessment is not borne out of personal recollection – set to face Bangladesh for the first time in an ODI when behind the stumps at Nottingham.

    Indeed this whole World Cup has provided entirely new experiences for the South Australian, featuring in his first global tournament 18 months after making his debut in the 50-over format.

    It’s so far so good for the 27-year-old with his last Trent Bridge outing rewriting Australian record books, reaching 50 in just 25 balls for the fastest half-century for his nation in World Cups.

    But the unfamiliarity far from stops there for a man who made his name batting at the top of the order domestically, making the most of slotting in at seven for Aaron Finch’s side.

    “I've really enjoyed the role down at the bottom of the order, working alongside Steve Smith the last time we were here,” he added

    “Hopefully I'm not in until the last five, ten overs and the top order has done the job, but at the moment I'm really enjoying the No.7 position.

    “In the middle it’s about assessing the situation, last time we were here we were in a bit of trouble, there was a chance to just bat for a little while and try to change the momentum.

    “When chasing you know the score and you know who you're batting with to sort of plan how we attack a run-chase.

    “So I think the scoreboard dictates a lot of my role, it’s laid out in front of me and then I go out and try and execute as best I can.”


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  74. #74
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    If we can topple the Aussies, I will start to dream big. I am an old pessimist (realist!), but even I may afford myself a moment of joy.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by bujhee kom View Post
    If we can topple the Aussies, I will start to dream big. I am an old pessimist (realist!), but even I may afford myself a moment of joy.
    I said it many times (but this time it won't be trolled here, I am sure) - couple of world class players in peak, backed by a group of good players at their prime .... and no baggage to carry - one such team can achieve miracles with a little bit of luck. The best example is SRL of 1996 (though a bit over blown in praise though - they got walk over against AUS & WIN, which availed them a top spot and a pathetic Pom side in QF, then to my surprise Azhar decided to bowl first on a 5th day like Test wicket - that format also helped them).

    So yes, if things go in favor - why not? We need to execute two critical tactics - 1. get Finch out inside 1st PP, so that 20 overs of off-spin hurts Aussies later and 2. don't allow Strac, Cummins more than 3 wickets in the game with preferably zero or max 1 wicket in 1st spell combined.

  76. #76
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    Shakib Al Hasan is the name on all Bangladesh supporters’ lips and wicketkeeper Alex Carey admits the star all-rounder is earning extra attention behind the Australian scenes.

    Shakib boasts an unmatched 384 runs this ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup but batting is far from the only string to his bow, taking five wickets in his four matches to date.
    It’s those types of performances that have seen him ranked third or higher in the MRF Tyres ICC ODI Rankings for all-rounders every week since first topping the charts in 2009.
    So when it comes to Thursday’s meeting at Trent Bridge, Australia have every right to fear a man who guided the Tigers to an impressive seven-wicket win over West Indies with an unbeaten 124 last time out.
    “Bangladesh are playing some really good cricket at the moment and it's led by Shakib,” said Carey. “We’ve put our time into Shakib and all the players at the top of the order as well as their bowling.
    “We know Shakib's a big threat and has done a lot of the work for Bangladesh at the moment as well as Mehedy (Hasan Miraz) and a couple of the other spinners.
    “He’s probably in career-best form with the white ball. We know the areas and line and length we want to bowl to him and we'll assess the conditions as well.
    “But there’s no extra planning, I don't think. We normally have our plans going into every game and we assess each player accordingly.
    “We've prepared accordingly for the spin attack, they’re bowling really well at the moment so we've prepared for the conditions and for the attack.”
    While Carey knows the threat of the 32-year-old, the assessment is not borne out of personal recollection – set to face Bangladesh for the first time in an ODI when behind the stumps at Nottingham.
    Indeed this whole World Cup has provided entirely new experiences for the South Australian, featuring in his first global tournament 18 months after making his debut in the 50-over format.
    It’s so far so good for the 27-year-old with his last Trent Bridge outing rewriting Australian record books, reaching 50 in just 25 balls for the fastest half-century for his nation in World Cups.
    But the unfamiliarity far from stops there for a man who made his name batting at the top of the order domestically, making the most of slotting in at seven for Aaron Finch’s side.
    “I've really enjoyed the role down at the bottom of the order, working alongside Steve Smith the last time we were here,” he added
    “Hopefully I'm not in until the last five, ten overs and the top order has done the job, but at the moment I'm really enjoying the No.7 position.
    “In the middle it’s about assessing the situation, last time we were here we were in a bit of trouble, there was a chance to just bat for a little while and try to change the momentum.
    “When chasing you know the score and you know who you're batting with to sort of plan how we attack a run-chase.
    “So I think the scoreboard dictates a lot of my role, it’s laid out in front of me and then I go out and try and execute as best I can.”



  77. #77
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  78. #78
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    After making a significant impact in his comeback match for Australia, Marcus Stoinis revealed that he had originally resigned himself to missing the ICC Men’s World Cup 2019 after injury struck him earlier in the tournament.

    The all-rounder had been out with a side strain that he picked up when bowling in the match against India 11 days ago and his initial fear was that it would keep him out of the rest of the competition.

    Yet after taking the field again at Trent Bridge and picking up the crucial wicket of Bangladesh’s player of the tournament Shakib Al Hasan in Australia’s convincing 48-run victory, the powerful Stoinis was all smiles again.

    “It’s been exciting, a bit of a roller-coaster but I was a bit down in the dumps when I hurt myself the other day. So again now, I’m really stoked that I’m back,” said the 29-year-old, who scored a brisk unbeaten 17 at the end of Australia’s massive 381/5 before then taking 2/54 in eight overs.

    Recalling how he had gone down with the injury in his second over against India, Stoinis admitted that he had immediately feared the worst.

    “Your mind goes there (that you’re out of World Cup) but once everything had sort of settled, you think everything’s going to be all right,” he said. “Yet my initial thought when I did it was ‘I’m out of the World Cup’.”

    Over the past week and a half, he admitted, it had been an anxious wait to see if he would recover and he had persuaded himself that Thursday’s match in Nottingham was effectively his last chance saloon.

    “I spent a lot of time with the physio and the doc and we were doing a few exercises on the side, a lot of icing at night. There’s not too much you can do outside that but you have to get the muscles moving as much as you can,” he said.

    “We didn’t put a time on the recovery period. Support staff did a really good job to not overreact and at least gave me a chance. I think going into this game, this was probably the deadline.

    “But it’s different bowling in the nets, compared to when the adrenaline gets going in the game. So we weren’t really sure how I’d go today.”

    As it turned out, he went well, with a Stoinis slower ball drawing a leading edge and trapping Shakib, who had started the day as the tournament’s top scorer, for 41 when the brilliant all-rounder had looked in the mood to record a third successive century.

    “Bangladesh are a good team, they’re good players and have made some good runs over the tournament. So we definitely respected them and they were threatening today with a good partnership,” said Stoinis, laughing that he had bowled more than a few slower balls in a bid to not push himself too hard on his return.

    He is looking forward to making an impact in the rest of the tournament now and revealed how Australia’s assistant coach Ricky Ponting had been helping him in the nets during his rehabilitation.

    “If I could have one person in the world, if I could have picked anyone to coach me with my batting, it would have been Ricky Ponting,” said Stoinis. “He’s an absolute legend, he’s got a lot of knowledge about the game, so we’ve been speaking about the game and where he thinks I can go to the next level with my batting.

    “It’s more of an open discussion, raising points, problem solving as we go and coming up with different ideas.”

    As for how he’s feeling, with England next in line at Lord’s next Tuesday, he said: “I’m better than I thought I’d be.”


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  79. #79
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    The 381/5 that Aaron Finch’s Australia amassed in Nottingham, in what proved a 48-run victory over a spirited Bangladesh side, set up a match featuring more runs - 714 - than we’ve ever witnessed before at a single ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup encounter.

    Built upon David Warner’s fine tournament-high 166, where he became the only man ever to record two 150s in the competition, this was the second highest total the five-times champions have ever accumulated at any World Cup, also a figure that only England have bettered in the current edition, twice.

    Yet for all that, the Australian batsmen’s collective effort, there was a feeling that they could have racked up a total that might have threatened their all-time World Cup record of 417/6, compiled against Afghanistan in Perth four years ago.

    Warner really began to look his old liberated self near the conclusion of his 147-ball knock, and Finch, whose latest fifty - the eighth in his last 11 ODI innings - provided another ideal launchpad.

    Usman Khawaja hit a 72-ball 89, a knock that became more fluent and impressive as it progressed. What will have frustrated the Australians, though, was that he did not sacrifice his wicket in a run-out mix up with the best part of five overs still left and Glenn Maxwell at the other end wreaking havoc in the crazy grand manner that only he can.

    We had been in the middle of a classic cameo from the man they call ‘The Big Show’. Maxwell, who had careered on to 32 from only 10 balls, seemed in one of his unplayable moods, with the excited chatter around the ground all about whether he might have his sights on AB De Villiers’ world record ODI fastest half-century, gleaned off just 16 balls.

    One of Maxwell’s three glorious maximums almost defied description as he somehow managed to contort his body while moving across his stumps and rocked back on one leg to crash Rubel Hossain’s full ball over mid-off. A unique stroke from a unique talent.

    A talent, too, that needed to be indulged for the rest of Australia’s innings when the run-out came. Maxwell was scampering for a quick single and Khawaja responded, only then to pull up and leave Maxwell high and dry, allowing Rubel to run him out.

    Seeing Smith, arguably the world’s best batsman, only entering the fray at number six with three overs left, again raised the question of whether Australia ought to have their best player coming in at three, just as England do with Joe Root, India with Virat Kohli and New Zealand with Kane Williamson.

    Bangladesh too these days have their best man now occupying that spot but once Shakib Al Hasan’s magnificent World Cup journey was finally derailed here when he chipped a leading edge to Warner at mid on for 41 - the only time he’s failed to make at least a half-century during the competition - it felt as if mission wholly improbable would be upgraded to impossible, despite the best distinguished efforts of their diminutive centurion Mushfiqur Rahim and the big-hitting Mahmudullah, who struck three sixes in his 69.

    The good news for Australia was that the key breakthrough had been engineered by a clever slower one from Marcus Stoinis, whose return after injury did, as coach Justin Langer had hoped, give the side more balance.

    And with Warner rampaging again and both Mitchell Starc, who ended Tamim Iqbal’s dangerous contribution, and Pat Cummins back in familiar enforcer mode, it looks like the champions are hitting form at the most propitious time.


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  80. #80
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    David Warner is scoring runs for fun at this ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup but the Australian opener is longing for the days when he stops finding fielders.

    Warner starred with a tournament-best 166 in victory over Bangladesh at Trent Bridge, with 14 fours and five sixes helping him to a sizeable innings.

    But it wasn’t all plain sailing en route to his second century this World Cup, forced to play a watchful game in reaching his century from 110 balls.

    It’s a situation that has become rather familiar for Warner but after learning the lessons from his performance against Pakistan, when scoring 100 and getting out soon after, the 32-year-old was pleased to see patience pay off.

    “I don't mean to go out there and bat slow. I've tried to get a calculation of how many fielders I've hit in the first ten overs,” he explained.

    “It gets a bit frustrating because you middle one and it goes full pace to the fielder and you can’t even get off strike. That's been a bit annoying but I've just hung in there.

    “I got frustrated against India. I got frustrated against Afghanistan. And then today, Finchy [Aaron Finch] kept telling me to hang in there and bat deep and bat time. And that was in the eighth or ninth over.

    “It’s generally not my game to stick in there – I usually try and go after it a little bit come down the wicket or something. Must be a bit more maturity, I think.

    “The way I played against Pakistan was in the back of my mind – I think I faced 120 balls before I got to 110.

    “You've got to treat each ball as it comes, as I did, and from there try and accelerate and bat smart, take those risks to the right areas.”

    Warner’s fourth 50+ score of the tournament takes him to the top of the run-scorers chart, with no batsman matching the 447 runs he has accumulated so far.

    The knock also saw him become the first man to hit two 150+ scores in World Cup cricket while he drew level with Adam Gilchrist with most ODI centuries for an Australian opener with 16.

    History is therefore coming thick and fast but just doing a job for his country means the world for Warner, as Australia close in on a place in the semi-finals.

    “I'm just so grateful for being able to have the opportunity to play for Australia and to be in the same sentence as Adam Gilchrist is fantastic and it's overwhelming,” he added.

    “But for me, it's just about going out there and to give my best, to be honest, and that's all I want to be remembered for, is someone who gives 110 percent when I go out in the field and be myself.

    “It keeps getting better for us – it’s another two points, which is fantastic.

    “This was a good hit-out for us batters, I think it was a very good wicket, a challenging wicket for bowlers to get wickets. I felt that we just had to keep going deep and we were able to do that.”


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