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  1. #1
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    Microchipped cricket ball may soon help umpires in Big Bash League

    A cricket ball with an embedded microchip could be the latest innovation to hit the Big Bash League this summer, with Kookaburra also keen to see it used at Test level soon.

    The Australian ball manufacturer is in the final stages of testing a new product that could give it a leg up on rival Dukes, whose balls are used during series in England.

    The SmartBall delivers instant statistics on speed – at release point, pre-bounce and post-bounce – that are more comprehensive and accurate than a normal radar.

    It also measures revolutions at the same points, which is unprecedented in-game data for spinners.

    Future plans are for the ball to assist the umpiring and Decision Review System (DRS) process by showing whether a ball has definitively hit the bat - or the grass, in the case of catches that are too close to call.

    SportCor, a firm chaired by Michael Kasprowicz, teamed up with Kookaburra to make the innovation happen.

    The companies are bullish that a SmartBall will be used in one of the world's many Twenty20 leagues in coming months, with the BBL firmly on their agenda.

    If there are no hiccups at that level then international games will be the next step.

    As opposed to stump microphones, this form of surveillance would help coaches and analysts at the highest level.

    "Absolutely," England star Jos Buttler said, when asked if he would like to see it used in Tests.

    "It'll be a great coaching tool and for viewers as well, it's amazing to see that instant feedback.

    "It seems to behave exactly the same as a regular ball."

    Ensuring the SmartBall is a like-for-like replica of a regular pill in match conditions loom as the ultimate test that will obviously determine whether the International Cricket Council considers its use at the highest level.

    Kasprowicz, Buttler and Marnus Labuschagne were on deck for Saturday's launch in the indoor nets at Lord's.

    Kasprowicz, bowling off a few steps, unsurprisingly topped the speed charts.

    "We should have got the St John Ambulance to sponsor the event. Hopefully there's no hamstring snapping," the 47-year-old former Test paceman laughed.

    https://www.theage.com.au/sport/cric...11-p52fyt.html


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  2. #2
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    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  3. #3
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    looks good

  4. #4
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    I hope they release it to public soon, and it is fairly affordable.

  5. #5
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    Would be amazing to see this in the international cricketing arena.


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  6. #6
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    These will be awesome for practice, they will give instant feedback on RPM and speed. I use one for softball manufactured by a company called rev fire, they were very expensive about 3 years ago, cost 400$, because it needed a hand held device to receive the information. But last year they can came up with a model that’s that transmittes info to the app in your phone and price dropped to 70$.

  7. #7
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    Will be useful for coaches to identify new young fast bowlers.Excited for the new technological advancements made in cricket.

  8. #8
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    Props to the Big Bash for always raising the bar from a technological standpoint.

    Zing bails and umpire cams were their ideas in the past too.


    Have some Sehwag in your life.

  9. #9
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    Has potential to be an excelllent addition.

    Players can track their progress this way and look for improvements in speed or revolutions.

  10. #10
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    Cricket Australia have reacted with cautious optimism to the development of a ball with an embedded microchip, saying it would require extensive independent testing before it could be considered for use in any top-flight competition.

    Last weekend, Australian ball manufacturer Kookaburra unveiled its 'SmartBall' that it claims can deliver instant statistics on speed – at release point, pre-bounce and post-bounce – that are more comprehensive and accurate than a normal radar.

    It also measures revolutions at the same points, which is unprecedented in-game data for spinners.

    Cricket Australia's Head of Cricket Operations Peter Roach said the organisation supported initiatives that could bring interest and excitement to the game, but any expectations that it could feature in this summer's KFC BBL may be premature.

    "A cricket ball that can gather data about things such as speed, movement and power is an extremely exciting innovation that will bring benefits to fans, but also coaches and players," Roach told cricket.com.au.

    "If this cricket ball is presented to us as a possible innovation to introduce into our competitions and matches, then our responsibility will be to ensure that the characteristics of how the cricket ball reacts in play will not be affected by the internal mechanisms required to support the technology.

    "To that end we would work with the manufacturers of both the ball and the technology to ensure that independent testing can provide confidence to players and teams that the ball will feel and behave the same as a normal cricket ball."

    SportCor, a firm chaired by former Australia fast bowler and CA director Michael Kasprowicz, teamed up with Kookaburra to make the innovation happen.

    The companies are confident that the 'SmartBall' will be used in one of the world's many Twenty20 leagues in coming months, with longer-term ambitions to feature at the international level.

    Future plans include making the ball able to assist the umpiring and Decision Review System (DRS) process by showing whether a ball has definitively hit the bat – or the grass, in the case of catches that are too close to call.

    England star Jos Buttler, who is sponsored by Kookaburra, said he would like to see the technology used in Test cricket.

    "It'll be a great coaching tool and for viewers as well, it's amazing to see that instant feedback," Buttler said at the launch event at Lord's last weekend, which was also attended by Australia's Marnus Labuschagne

    "It seems to behave exactly the same as a regular ball."

    2019 Qantas Ashes Tour of England

    Australia squad: Tim Paine (c), Cameron Bancroft, Pat Cummins, Marcus Harris, Josh Hazlewood, Travis Head, Usman Khawaja, Marnus Labuschagne, Nathan Lyon, Mitchell Marsh, Michael Neser, James Pattinson, Peter Siddle, Steve Smith, Mitchell Starc, Matthew Wade, David Warner.

    England squad: Joe Root (c), Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Jack Leach, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes (vc), Chris Woakes.

    First Test: Australia beat England by 251 runs at Edgbaston

    Second Test: August 14-18,Lord's

    Third Test: August 22-26, Headingley

    Tour match: Australians v Derbyshire, August 29-31

    Fourth Test: September 4-8, Old Trafford

    Fifth Test: September 12-16, The Oval

    https://www.cricket.com.au/news/kook...gne/2019-08-12
    Last edited by MenInG; 12th August 2019 at 13:40.


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  11. #11
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    very good, big bash always introduces new things in cricket

  12. #12
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    more data = more fun

    I love this approach of adding more sensors everywhere and collect more data. It will also help in the further development of techniques with marginal gains added and improving the overall quality of sports we see today.

    Kudos to that.


    جاگن والیاں رجّ کے لٹیا اے،
    سوئے تسیں وی او، سوئے اسیں وی آں۔

  13. #13
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    And that is all very well but Kookaburra should look to produce white cricket balls that last 50 overs first.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikhil_cric View Post
    And that is all very well but Kookaburra should look to produce white cricket balls that last 50 overs first.
    lol exactly. It’s a joke that ball manufacturers haven’t been able to come up with a good enough cricket ball for 50 overs. They need to fix up.

  15. #15
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    How much will it cost? If it's expensive then don't see much use of it, if at similar price as current balls then would be a great addition.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boi View Post
    lol exactly. It’s a joke that ball manufacturers haven’t been able to come up with a good enough cricket ball for 50 overs. They need to fix up.
    Yes. More data is definitely a good thing but kookaburra needs to get their priorities right.

  17. #17
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    ‘Smash Factor’: New technology to unlock secrets of batting

    A computer boffin from America has finally unpacked the mysteries of batting that have stayed a tantalising secret in cricket for over a century.

    Speculation over bat speeds and shot power, as well as the eternal search for ‘the middle’, has long fascinated cricket’s army of obsessed followers, commentators, and players from the backyard to the MCG.

    In a world first for cricket broadcasting, all will be revealed this summer as Fox Cricket launches its revolutionary ‘Smash Factor’ which will provide an unprecedented level of batting analysis for viewers in real time, all thanks to a tiny sensor hidden behind the sticker on the back of the players’ bat.

    Smash Factor will measure data such as bat speed, launch angle, shot power and timing, while the sensor will pick up vibrations off the bat to determine an accurate reading out of 100 for whether the player has hit the ball out of the ‘sweet spot’.

    Swing radars have been prominent in baseball and golf coverage for some time, but the 360-degree nature of cricket has made the technology impossible to replicate, until now.




    BELOW: DETAILS OF FOX CRICKET’S SMASH FACTOR

    Boston-based company Divino, in conjunction with Microsoft and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has solved the issue by creating a sensor that weighs no more than a credit card that can break down and demonstrate every element of a batter’s technique, from a booming Glenn Maxwell six to a perfectly timed David Warner cover drive.

    Fox Cricket is set to pioneer an innovation that will at last take the guess work out of determining how well a ball has been hit. Most Australian players this summer have already agreed to take part.

    “Any time you go against traditional conventions in cricket, it’s always very, very difficult to change people’s way of looking at things. So putting anything on a bat was always going to be difficult,” said Fox Cricket executive producer Brad McNamara, who has made the hunt for this technology a personal project of passion for several years.

    “Whatever we put on a players’ bat firstly has to not affect the integrity or the balance of the bat, which is not easily done.

    “Initially there were things in handles they put in there which put the balance of the bat off and the handle was longer and players didn’t like that. So they had to come up with something the players essentially didn’t know was there. That’s what this has done.

    “Smash Factor is not just all about big hits. We will also be able to get very technical with measurements of bat face angles and back lifts helping us dissect, demonstrate and tell the stories of individual batting techniques.”

    Recent breakthrough innovations like ball tracker and ‘snicko’ have focused on what the bowler is trying to do to get players’ out, but Smash Factor is technology purely dedicated to the art of batting.

    One of the key hopes for Smash Factor is that it won’t simply be a broadcasting hit, but also a retail sensation that will allow kids to measure their batting against the pros or other young players in any corner of the globe.

    “Cricket mad kids don’t go to sleep with their ball, they go to sleep with their bat,” said McNamara.

    “The whole idea is to balance up the technology side of things with having bat metrics.

    “For eight or nine years I’ve looked at how we can do this and the technology was just a bit behind. But we’ve finally got something that solves all those problems.

    “The other thing about this is it’s not just a game-changer for broadcast. The data can go into a cloud and a kid in the nets in Sydney can compare their data to a kid in the nets at the same time in Mumbai. Or to Chris Lynn.

    “Smash Factor sends bat data … via Bluetooth to an app, or in the case of our broadcasts, a specialist box housed at the base of the stumps.”

    FOX CRICKET’S SMASH FACTOR
    - Sends data in real time from a sticker sensor placed on just below the bat handle.

    - The sensor, created by US company Divinio, weighs no more than a credit card.

    - Measures data such as bat speed, launch angle and power of shots.

    - ‘Smash Factor’ is a measurement of how well a ball has been hit and timed.

    - Plan develop sensors and an app available to cricketers at every level so they can compare their ‘Smash Factor’ with the pros and players around the world.

    https://www.couriermail.com.au/sport...edf5dc7c4cf74a


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  18. #18
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    It's all fun and games until someone hacks the ball.

    In all seriousness, the innovations in Cricket are coming along nicely. Feels like Cricket is fairly advanced with its use of technology compared to other sports.

  19. #19
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    Australia is leading the way in cricket technology. The chip ball, now this. I was hoping the new technology could be used in the Pak vs Aus series.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by WC-Passion View Post
    It's all fun and games until someone hacks the ball.

    In all seriousness, the innovations in Cricket are coming along nicely. Feels like Cricket is fairly advanced with its use of technology compared to other sports.
    Yes, when I was watching football recently, I was surprised with the lack of use of technology. For example, many foul calls very unfairly not given and many were unfairly given (also cards). I was like, why can't a player use DRS or something to review referee's decision of giving or not giving foul call. I found out sometimes, reviews happen and the referee on the field has to review it himself: I was like why can't there be someone similar to 3rd umpire in cricket who uses technology frequently to make such decisions lol. Now in cricket, its mostly a fair game due to use of DRS and technology.

  21. #21
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    Funnily enough guy from NZ invented this technology because he got sick of losing golf balls and wanted a quick way to find them. However companies like Titleist liked the idea but wouldnt partner with him so he went to Kookabura.

  22. #22
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    So it’s not far before we see smart balls being hacked I’m guessing and Indian medium pacers clocking at 97/98mph in IPL — WWF style T20 cricket.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shoaib88 View Post
    Yes, when I was watching football recently, I was surprised with the lack of use of technology. For example, many foul calls very unfairly not given and many were unfairly given (also cards). I was like, why can't a player use DRS or something to review referee's decision of giving or not giving foul call. I found out sometimes, reviews happen and the referee on the field has to review it himself: I was like why can't there be someone similar to 3rd umpire in cricket who uses technology frequently to make such decisions lol. Now in cricket, its mostly a fair game due to use of DRS and technology.
    Exactly. As someone who is used to Cricket's level of officiating, watching VAR is quite a painful process. So many times bad decisions aren't overturned and strange justifications are given such as "play had moved too far too forward" or "the referee let play go on".

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WC-Passion View Post
    Exactly. As someone who is used to Cricket's level of officiating, watching VAR is quite a painful process. So many times bad decisions aren't overturned and strange justifications are given such as "play had moved too far too forward" or "the referee let play go on".
    yea this actually made me appreciate cricket more, i have seen videos of football games where referees were being extrememly biased and just watching these videos made me really angry lol, football can be a really unfair game which is surprising considering its most popular game and has so much money involved that you would think they could spend some cash on more technology based decisions. or maybe it is this huge amount of money involved in this game which is the reason why they dont actually try to make it more fair. cough fifa corruption cough

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shoaib88 View Post
    yea this actually made me appreciate cricket more, i have seen videos of football games where referees were being extrememly biased and just watching these videos made me really angry lol, football can be a really unfair game which is surprising considering its most popular game and has so much money involved that you would think they could spend some cash on more technology based decisions. or maybe it is this huge amount of money involved in this game which is the reason why they dont actually try to make it more fair. cough fifa corruption cough
    Corruption is probably a factor, but I feel like it's more incompetence and the lack of care given to the implementation of the technology.


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