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  1. #1
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    What Kind Of Pet Do You Like?

    I am a massive animal lover. I love all animals but I love cats and hamsters the most.

    What about you? Do you have a pet? What kind of pet do you like?


    Bangladeshi Fan

  2. #2
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    Bangladeshi Fan

  3. #3
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    I've always wanted a German Shepherd dog however don't think it's fair leaving a dog to live outside in a kennel (especially a single dog on it's own) and I wouldn't be comfortable having a dog around the house (for hygiene and cleanliness reasons). Perhaps in the future I could redesign the house so that a dog could have access a couple of rooms only and then it would be feasible to have one but who knows.

    Also have a soft spot for Labradors and Golden Retrievers too.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    I've always wanted a German Shepherd dog however don't think it's fair leaving a dog to live outside in a kennel (especially a single dog on it's own) and I wouldn't be comfortable having a dog around the house (for hygiene and cleanliness reasons). Perhaps in the future I could redesign the house so that a dog could have access a couple of rooms only and then it would be feasible to have one but who knows.

    Also have a soft spot for Labradors and Golden Retrievers too.
    So, you are a dog lover.

    I love dogs too but I got attacked by dogs before. So, I don't want a dog.

    I am an extreme cat lover.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  5. #5
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    Parakeet


    Quote Originally Posted by Arsal_AK View Post
    If Hafeez can get two hundreds in a game anyone can.

  6. #6
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    Bangladeshi Fan

  7. #7
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    No pets. Animals belong in the wild, leave them be.


    Does cricket survive off of it's money or does it survive for it's money?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    I've always wanted a German Shepherd dog however don't think it's fair leaving a dog to live outside in a kennel (especially a single dog on it's own) and I wouldn't be comfortable having a dog around the house (for hygiene and cleanliness reasons). Perhaps in the future I could redesign the house so that a dog could have access a couple of rooms only and then it would be feasible to have one but who knows.

    Also have a soft spot for Labradors and Golden Retrievers too.
    You’ll like my profile pic then ��

    He’ll be 8 in November..

  9. #9
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    Hate pets. Nothing against animals as Allah SWTs creations but dont like the smell and mess they make.? Humans first for me/

  10. #10
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    Not sure if this qualifies, but Marine Fish!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by aloo paratha View Post
    No pets. Animals belong in the wild, leave them be.
    Many do but many also are great living with humans such as dogs and horses. I would love one of each but dont have the time.

    Im thinking of getting a parrot. We have had birds before but I was put off because they really should be flying but now I think those that are already tamed wont fly so should get one. Is there anyone who can give some advice for buying a parrot?


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  12. #12
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    Bangladeshi Fan

  13. #13
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    Im opposed to the very idea of pets. Why spend all that money on an animal, when there are starving human beings you can help with that money?

    At least that has been my approach thus far. The kids have finally forced us to get a kitten. Weve applied for it: its a female Domestic Short Hair, two months old, black and white, and so cute it melted even my icy cold heart.

    The breeder has named it Feta, but that wont do. Our three kids all have classically Muslim names beginning with S, so weve asked for it to be renamed Salma before she gets too familiar with Feta. We will have to wait until shes spayed before bringing her home.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    Many do but many also are great living with humans such as dogs and horses. I would love one of each but dont have the time.

    Im thinking of getting a parrot. We have had birds before but I was put off because they really should be flying but now I think those that are already tamed wont fly so should get one. Is there anyone who can give some advice for buying a parrot?
    You may already be aware but parrots can live for seventy years, its a big commitment.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    Many do but many also are great living with humans such as dogs and horses. I would love one of each but dont have the time.

    Im thinking of getting a parrot. We have had birds before but I was put off because they really should be flying but now I think those that are already tamed wont fly so should get one. Is there anyone who can give some advice for buying a parrot?
    Birds stink up the house. I haven't visited any bird owners house that doesn't stink.

  16. #16
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    I love all animals including birds.

    However, I feel that having pet bird is morally wrong. I believe birds belong in sky and they shouldn't be in cages.

    Cats are different. Cats don't mind inside homes (I think).


    Bangladeshi Fan

  17. #17
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    Cats.

    Particularly Norwegian Forest Cats. Big friendly beasts.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by aloo paratha View Post
    No pets. Animals belong in the wild, leave them be.
    At this point, I think domesticated cats and dogs probably won’t last too long in the wild. But yeah wild animals should not be kept as pet.

  19. #19
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    Bangladeshi Fan

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilly View Post
    You may already be aware but parrots can live for seventy years, its a big commitment.
    Yes, I think this is one of the nice aspects of keeping birds. Most dogs dont live longer 15 years and you have to say goodbye to them which can be very tough.



    Quote Originally Posted by Pakistanian View Post
    Birds stink up the house. I haven't visited any bird owners house that doesn't stink.
    Depends on the house.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep


  21. #21
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    Scorpions and the honey badger

  22. #22
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    @Mamoon

    Cheetah?




    Sua cuique voluptas.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by uberkoen View Post
    @Mamoon

    Cheetah?
    When it comes to big cats, leopard is the best option. I have wanted one ever since I saw one at Abrar-ul-Haqs (the singer) house. Unfortunately he gave it to Lahore Zoo because his family were scared of it.

    Cheetahs is more docile and friendlier, but you will need a big farmhouse because you have to cater to its need for sprinting. That may not be feasible.

    Lions/tigers are too expensive to keep because of their massive appetites, but I guess if you can afford to buy one you can also afford to feed it. However, you will also need a pool for tigers because they love to swim.

    Leopards - my personal favorite it. Beautiful, beautiful beast, and also less needy than others. They dont need large spaces, just a few tall trees. They are excellent swimmers but dont love to swim unlike tigers, and they dont need to eat as much as tigers and lions.

    There is a good reason why they are more popular as pets than the other three. I have given up on my dream because it that ship has sailed.

  24. #24
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    To add to the above, people generally say that big cats are very dangerous and they will end up attacking their owners.

    That is both true and false. If you have passion for big cats, you are knowledgeable and you study about them, you can actually make them work as pets provided that you are willing to put in the effort.

    However, it requires a lot of dedication and you cannot let someone else do the job for you.

  25. #25
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    Cats
    @Muhammad10 views?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    To add to the above, people generally say that big cats are very dangerous and they will end up attacking their owners.

    That is both true and false. If you have passion for big cats, you are knowledgeable and you study about them, you can actually make them work as pets provided that you are willing to put in the effort.

    However, it requires a lot of dedication and you cannot let someone else do the job for you.
    People keep big cats? I thought that was illegal

  27. #27
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    Bangladeshi Fan

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arham_PakFan View Post
    Cats
    @Muhammad10 views?
    Same. Cats have always been my favourite animal, but I've never had any pets. I guess they need a fair bit of looking after as do all pets.

  29. #29
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    they can be expensive, noisy and annoying, yet today’s pampered pets have never been more cossetted and adored. Now new research reveals that it is the Victorians who were responsible for changing attitudes towards domestic animals.

    Historians are combing the historical archives for evidence of when familial, emotional attachments to pets became commonplace and socially acceptable in Britain. The work is part of a five-year project that will culminate in a book and an exhibition at the Geffrye Museum in east London.


    Guardian Today: the headlines, the analysis, the debate - sent direct to you
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    “We thought we would find that there has been an increase in people’s emotional investment in pets in recent times, but what we’ve actually found is that people in the early 19th century were also very emotionally invested in their animals. They just expressed that in a different way,” said Jane Hamlett, professor of modern British history at Royal Holloway, University of London, who has been leading the study for the past three years along with Professor Julie-Marie Strange at the University of Durham. “They had a different cultural sense of what a pet should be.”

    Until the 19th century, keeping pets was frowned upon and would crop up in satirical prints criticising the elite and aristocracy. “Quite often, you get pictures of 18th-century ladies dressed in ostentatious, over-the-top costumes with a lapdog,” Hamlett said.

    Pet owners, particularly when they were female, were seen as frivolous consumers who spent their money in absurd ways: animals were generally expected to earn their keep or be eaten by their owners.

    “What seems to happen in the late 18th century and early 19th century is that pet-keeping becomes culturally more acceptable,” Hamlett said. Writers and artists in the 19th century assigned a new “moral value” to pets, and consequently saw keeping them as beneficial for children.

    Pet ownership began to be seen as character building, particularly for boys, because it taught children to be caring and responsible. Pets were also thought to enhance the domesticity of a home for a potentially valuable social purpose.

    “The Victorians were very interested in the home and domestic life, and bringing up children was seen as very important for creating the right kind of morality in society,” Hamlett said. “And one of the things that children could do to develop morality was to keep a pet – so you get quite a lot of advice manuals from the mid-19th century onwards suggesting that children should keep pets to improve themselves and their moral qualities.”

    Even poor working-class families would capture wild birds like blackbirds, linnets and thrushes to keep as pets, often hanging the cages outside their windows and feeding them scraps, while aspirational middle-class families would buy more expensive pets, such as pedigree dogs, to signal their higher wealth and status.

    “Pedigree dog breeding really takes off in the Victorian period. Dogs were very popular for Victorians, partly because they embody cultural values Victorians were really keen on: they’re seen as steadfast, loyal, plucky and courageous,” Hamlett added.

    Wild parrots and monkeys imported from the colonies were popular choices for the wealthiest families, as the Victorians did not perceive anything cruel or immoral about keeping such pets.

    Rabbits were popular too – boys could be expected to build hutches from scratch and look after the animals single-handed – but cats were viewed less positively. “Many people kept cats during the Victorian period and felt affectionate towards them, but they were still very much seen as utility animals, which kept mice and vermin down,” Hamlett said.

    As a result, cats weren’t as well-fed as other pets and developed a reputation for being sly and calculating. This wasn’t helped by their traditional association with witches. “It’s only in the 20th century that cats start to be seen wholeheartedly as pets.”

    As pets became integrated into family life, contemporary publications and handwritten diaries show just how emotional the Victorians could be about their pets, triggering a new form of consumerism well-known to animal owners today. Self-help books on how to care for specific pets, particularly difficult exotic ones, such as monkeys, began to be published from the 1850s onwards. Health remedies such as “cough pills” for dogs and cats were sold widely and pet food began to be manufactured. Pet cemeteries were even created in London.

    Surprisingly, the love Victorians felt for their pets and the role of pets in family life has been largely ignored by historians in the past. “No historian has written about that topic and no research had been done specifically on the history of pets in people’s homes,” said Hamlett. Some of the historical documents her team has looked at have never even been studied before. “But actually, people wrote about their pets quite a lot.”
    Source: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...s-best-friends.


    Bangladeshi Fan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    To add to the above, people generally say that big cats are very dangerous and they will end up attacking their owners.

    That is both true and false. If you have passion for big cats, you are knowledgeable and you study about them, you can actually make them work as pets provided that you are willing to put in the effort.

    However, it requires a lot of dedication and you cannot let someone else do the job for you.
    Big cats can never be truly domesticated and made into pets, no matter how much effort one puts in. It is impossible to train their natural instincts out of them and they are extremely temperamental in nature. While they are intelligent and can be friendly to people, it doesn't take much effort to arouse their natural instincts. When that happens they are extremely dangerous.

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    I love cats and would really like to keep one. But I'm allergic to them.
    You get to buy hypoallergenic kittens here in France but they are extremely expensive.

    I love dogs too. Had one when I was growing up and it used to be my best friend. But the problem with dogs is that you will almost always outlive them, and when they die you will feel you have lost a sibling. Best friends cannot be replaced.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    To add to the above, people generally say that big cats are very dangerous and they will end up attacking their owners.

    That is both true and false. If you have passion for big cats, you are knowledgeable and you study about them, you can actually make them work as pets provided that you are willing to put in the effort.

    However, it requires a lot of dedication and you cannot let someone else do the job for you.
    Big cats can never be truly domesticated and made into pets, no matter how much effort one puts in. It is impossible to train their natural instincts out of them and they are extremely temperamental in nature. While they are intelligent and can be friendly to people, it doesn't take much effort to arouse their natural instincts. When that happens they are extremely dangerous.

  33. #33
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    Dogs.

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    I have 3 dogs, 1 cat, 1 Goffin Cockatoo, bunch of love birds and finches in outside aviary and pigeons. I live in the suburbs with land around my house. I also have a saltwater aquarium.

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    Cats are the only asocial animal we have successfully domesticated. We’re disappointed that we don’t bond with them as easily as dogs. But are we just missing the signs?

    Dogs seem almost biologically incapable of hiding their inner moods – shuffling, snuffling, tail-wagging clues to contentment, nervousness or sheer, unadorned joy. Despite what the famous painting might want to tell you, dogs would be terrible poker players. We pick up their cues all too easily.

    Cats also have sophisticated body language – their moods are signalled through twitching tails, ruffled fur, and the position of ears and whiskers. A purr usually (but not always) signals friendliness or contentment. They’re a usually reliable method of working out if the cat is in friendly mode or best left alone.

    While we can reasonably be sure of a dog’s bond with us, despite the thousands of years domesticated cats have kept us company, they still suffer something of a bad PR image. The independence that many see as a bonus is seen by others as aloofness or selfishness. Their detractors claim they only really show affection when a food bowl is empty.

    Cat owners will claim this is all nonsense, of course, and that their bond with their cat is as strong as any dog owner’s. But why does this image of the aloof, unfriendly cat remain? And is there any truth to it?

    At the very least, the image of the “independent” cat has done it little harm in terms of popularity as a pet. It’s thought there are as many as 10 million domestic cats in the UK alone. Some 25% of households were believed to have at least one cat when a study was undertaken in 2012.

    One clue to the cat’s image may come from how they were domesticated in the first place. It was a much more gradual process than that of dogs – and cats were very much in the driving seat. The earliest domesticated cats started appearing in Neolithic villages in the Middle East around 10,000 years ago. They didn’t depend on their early human hosts for food – they were encouraged to fetch it themselves, keeping crops and food stores safe from rats and other vermin. Our relationship with them was, from the outset, a little more at arms’ length than dogs, who helped us hunt and relied upon humans for a share of the spoils.

    The cat that may be currently curled up on your sofa or glaring at you from its vantage point on top of the bookcase shares many of its instincts with that of its pre-domestic ancestors – the desire to hunt, to patrol territory, guarding it from other cat; they are much closer to their old selves than dogs. Our taming of cats has only partly removed them from the wild.

    “Mostly, it’s just human misunderstanding of the species,” says Karen Hiestand, a vet and trustee of International Cat Care. “Dogs and humans are very similar and have lived together a long time. In a way it has been co-evolution. With cats, it is way more recent. They come from a solitary ancestor that isn’t a social species.”

    The African wildcat we domesticated our housecats from, Felis lybica, tends to lead a solitary life, mostly meeting when it is time to mate. “Cats are the only asocial animal that’s been domesticated. Every other animal we’ve domesticated has a social bond with other members of its species.”

    Given that cats are such an outlier among the animals we live with, it’s no wonder that we might have been getting their signals wrong.

    “Because they are so self-determined and can take care of themselves, cats are becoming more and more popular,” Hiestand says. “But whether the lifestyle suits them is another question. Humans are expecting cats to be like us and like dogs. And they aren’t.”

    Research into cats’ emotions and sociability has long lagged behind that on dogs, but in recent times it has gathered pace. Much of it is in its early stages, but already research has shown that cats’ sociability towards humans is quite a complicated spectrum.

    “It is highly variable, driven by genetics, and the sociability part can come from what they experience in the first six or eight weeks. If they have positive experiences in the early part of their lives, they’re probably going to like humans and want to hang out with us.”

    Just like dogs, cats do a lot of communication with their bodies rather than through sound
    Even the domestication of cats itself is a spectrum. Feral strays often hide or flee from humans, behaving far more like their wild ancestors. In places such as the Mediterranean and Japan, colonies of “community cats” thrive in fishing villages, friendly enough to ingratiate themselves with locals who feed them. In Istanbul, for instance, the semi-stray cats are fed and looked after by locals, and have become part of the city’s identity, even spawning a recent documentary film.

    Then there are the cats that live with us, but even this subset is a spectrum; some keep a relative distance, while others positively thrive with human company.

    So, if we’re wanting a strong bond with our cats, what should we be looking out for?

    Just like dogs, cats do a lot of communication with their bodies rather than through sound. “I think it’s a lot harder for people to read their body language compared to dogs,” says Kristyn Vitale, a PhD researcher studying cat behaviour. That’s not necessarily the cat’s fault.

    One vital feature may have allowed dogs to leapfrog cats to our affection. A study from Portsmouth University found that dogs have learned to mimic the expressions of infants, which triggers a desire to nurture in their human owners. The change seems to have been the development of a muscle which raises the inner eyebrow – and it’s not something found in their wolf ancestors. “Puppy dog eyes” aren’t just a clich, they’re an evolutionary trick which has strengthened the bond between dogs and people.

    The bad news for cats? They lack this muscle. As a result, cats’ stares can look cold and unfriendly, and two cats staring at each other can often be a prelude for fisticuffs. But a slow blinking stare – one that your cat probably gives towards you from the other side of the room – is something else entirely; it’s their way of expressing love. Even turning their heads to one side isn’t necessarily disdain, but a sign of their relaxation.

    Vitale draws attention to her study at Oregon State University, in which cats and dogs were left in a room by their owner, with the owner suddenly returning some time later. “One interesting thing is that the majority of cats who were secure with their owners, when they returned, they greeted them and went back to exploring the room, with little moments of coming back. Dogs did similar,” Vitale says. “If the dog has run around the room, playing with toys and occasionally coming back to the owner, we wouldn’t worry so much.” Researchers called this “secure attachment” – calmness when the owner returned, suggesting a strong emotional bond.

    “Humans’ expectation bias for the animal impacts their behaviour,” says Vitale. By trying to force cats to behave more like dogs – showering us with attention – we’re trying to push them away from their natural behaviour.

    Hiestand says that out historic inability to see cats’ temperament as different to dogs is part of the issue. Even experts with years of training are not immune. “I went to a conference in 2007 and felt like an absolute idiot,” she says. “There was all this basic information about cats that I didn’t know, such as that they like their water and their food in separate places. This research is all quite new, but once you have the humility that what you thought you knew about them is wrong, you start to learn stuff that’s interesting.”

    Take the way cats rub themselves against their owners. This used to be thought of as a kind of territory marker, like wild cats might do on trees or other landmarks in their territory. But when they do it on people, it’s usually a sign of affiliation – the cat is transferring its scent onto your skin, and at the same time transferring yours onto its fur. This is what feral cats do with other cats they are allied with. It is a way of creating a “common scent” which distinguishes friend from foe.

    Ultimately, Hiestand says, one thing is key – relaxed cats are more likely to want to make friends. “They want their water and their food and their sleeping arrangements and their litter tray just right, and when they are right, they’re able to start exploring those social bonds.”

    So, the next time you come home to find a cat quietly surveying you from the couch, or lazily yawning as they pad their way into the hallway, don’t be disappointed. In their own, quiet way, they’re letting you know it’s good to see you.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...are-unfriendly.


    Bangladeshi Fan

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    Dogs, particularly border collies.

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    Take care of your pets also!

    ===

    Weve read a lot about the race to improve and speed up testing. Maybe, mans best friend could help. A British charity has teamed up with scientists to see whether dogs could help detect coronavirus with their good sense of smell.

    Previous research has suggested dogs can indeed sniff out malaria and so the group Medical Detection Dogs said it would work with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Durham University to see if that would work for Covid-19 as well.

    The charity has previously trained dogs for illnesses such as cancer, Parkinson's and bacterial infections by sniffing samples taken from patients.

    "The aim is that dogs will be able to screen anyone, including those who are asymptomatic, and tell us whether they need to be tested," the charity's chief executive Claire Guest, said.

    Source bbc


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  38. #38
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    I was initially heading towards a dog but then decided to get a cat. Easier to take care off, less dependent and always fun to watch them

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by light View Post
    I was initially heading towards a dog but then decided to get a cat. Easier to take care off, less dependent and always fun to watch them
    Dogs are really loud. Never liked them as pets.

    Cats are lovely. I can pet a cat all day.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Dogs are really loud. Never liked them as pets.

    Cats are lovely. I can pet a cat all day.
    These days, am a cat guy. I only like dogs when they are other people's pet LOL

  41. #41
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    I absolutely hate dogs with core of my dog.Never liked them and I hate those girls who says awwwww Kitna pyara doggi hai.As I'm a gujjar i love buffalo and I find buffalo's calf very adorable.They are sweet and very loving.I used to have so much fun with them in my childhood.Used to run around the fields and jump and stuff.Lovely animal. best on the planet.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Invincible Gujjar View Post
    I absolutely hate dogs with core of my dog.Never liked them and I hate those girls who says awwwww Kitna pyara doggi hai.As I'm a gujjar i love buffalo and I find buffalo's calf very adorable.They are sweet and very loving.I used to have so much fun with them in my childhood.Used to run around the fields and jump and stuff.Lovely animal. best on the planet.
    goats especially the baby one they are better in my opinion
    but conventional pets have expressions I think

  43. #43
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    Dog is more loyal than cat. Can't deny that.

    But, dog can also be vicious. Many dogs have attacked owners in the past.

    Cat is harmless. Even if cat attacks, you should be able to handle it.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Dog is more loyal than cat. Can't deny that.

    But, dog can also be vicious. Many dogs have attacked owners in the past.

    Cat is harmless. Even if cat attacks, you should be able to handle it.
    Depends on how you raise and train them. I have seen very bad tempered Labradors who are normally considered as playful and family dogs. I have one lab and one GSD. My GSD is as gentle as they can be. Obedient and well mannered, on the other hand Lab is on the naughty side. Harmless but very mischievous.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babu Bhaiya View Post
    Depends on how you raise and train them. I have seen very bad tempered Labradors who are normally considered as playful and family dogs. I have one lab and one GSD. My GSD is as gentle as they can be. Obedient and well mannered, on the other hand Lab is on the naughty side. Harmless but very mischievous.
    Nice.

    I have nothing against dogs. They are beautiful creatures. I just don't like them as pets because I got attacked by dogs before (twice actually).

    I wasn't injured as the dogs weren't too large.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Nice.

    I have nothing against dogs. They are beautiful creatures. I just don't like them as pets because I got attacked by dogs before (twice actually).

    I wasn't injured as the dogs weren't too large.
    I understand. Raising a dog is like raising a human baby. Takes a lot of hard work and patience. Ignored or abused dogs can be dangerous.

    Same goes with stray dogs. In most cases They attack or bite when they are provoked unless the dog has rabies or something like that.

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    Cheetah!!

    @Mamoon

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigboii View Post
    goats especially the baby one they are better in my opinion
    but conventional pets have expressions I think
    goats are also pretty adorable.we used to domesticate goat for qurbani.qurbani waala din kaafi emotional hota hai.Yeah these pets are like family members.Once our buffalo calf died in my childhood I really cried hard and couldn't eat properly for a week.

  49. #49
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    I love cats.

    Dogs need too much attention.


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