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  1. #1
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    Bangladesh bans mobile phone access to almost a million Rohingya refugees living in refugee camps

    Bangladesh ordered telecommunications companies to stop selling SIM cards and shut down mobile phone services to almost one million Rohingya refugees living in sprawling refugee camps.

    The order resonated across the camps on Monday, where it threatened to disconnect Rohingya from several settlements that stretch for kilometres in the border district of Cox's Bazar. The communication blackout will also isolate Rohingya from family still in Myanmar from where they fled a brutal military crackdown.

    Telecommunications operators have seven days to submit reports to the government on the actions they took to shut down networks in the camps, said Zakir Hossain Khan, spokesman for the Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission.

    "Many refugees are using mobile phones in the camps. We've asked the operators to take action to stop it," Khan told the AFP news agency, saying the decision was made on "security grounds".

    The decree follows what the government describes as a series of violent crimes in the camps in recent weeks.

    About 700,000 Rohingya fled into Bangladesh from Myanmar's Rakhine State beginning in August of 2017, following a military crackdown on the majority-Muslim Rohingya minority, an apparent systemic purge described by the United Nations as a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing".

    They joined about 200,000 Rohingya who fled years earlier.

    The mobile phone crackdown comes just days after tens of thousands of Rohingya rallied on the two-year anniversary of the exodus.

    No way to communicate

    While Bangladesh officially banned mobile phones in the camps in 2017, the measure was never wholly enforced and mobile phone sets and SIM cards remained easily available in a thriving market in the camps.

    Refugees relied on the technology, along with radio broadcasts, to disseminate information and connect with family.

    "We won't be able to communicate with our relatives living in Myanmar or other parts of the world," a Rohingya leader, who did not want to be named, was quoted as saying.

    The leader added many Rohingya who rely on remittances sent by their diaspora usually receive phone calls informing them of the money transfers.

    A UN official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the move would "would further isolate and victimise the already persecuted people".

    "Seeking to limit their communication amongst themselves, with Bangladeshis and people abroad, will serve to push them towards negative coping habits be it crime, violence or extremism," he said.

    'Positive impact'

    Ikbal Hossain, a police spokesman, hailed the decision saying the refugees had been "abusing" mobile phone access to conduct criminal activities such as trafficking of methamphetamine pills, worth hundreds of millions of dollars, from Myanmar.

    "It will definitely make a positive impact. I believe criminal activities will surely come down," he told the AFP.

    Police also cited a string of criminal incidents as justification, including nearly 600 cases of drug trafficking, murders, robberies, gang fighting, and family feuds, since the refugees arrived.

    Police also recently killed four Rohingya refugees while investigating the murder of a local ruling party official, Omar Faruk. Authorities have said Rohingya criminals are suspected to be behind the killing.

    Faruk's murder led hundreds of furious locals to block a highway leading to a refugee camp for hours on August 22, burning tyres and vandalising shops visited by refugees.

    In total, Bangladeshi security forces have shot dead a total of at least 34 Rohingya over the past two years, mostly for alleged methamphetamines trafficking.

    Rohingya refugees have said the recent bloodshed has created an atmosphere of fear in the camp, where security has been tightened. Rights groups have accused Bangladesh police of extrajudicial killings.

    Bangladesh has struggled with the massive influx of Rohingya, which has caused a financial strain on the country's already economically depressed south.

    A repatriation agreement signed by Myanmar and Bangladesh in November 2017 has foundered, with several attempts scuttled amid resistance from Rohingya and condemnation from the international community.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/...194154637.html


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  2. #2
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    ethnic cleansing... happening around the world unfortunately..

  3. #3
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    I think it is wrong to cut down mobile communication. BD government should reverse the decision.

    Having said that, I have seen report of Rohingyas committing crimes. I don't know if it is true but if true then they should stop too.


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  4. #4
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    Also, I must add that Rohingyas should go back at one point. Bangladesh is a tiny country that is way overpopulated. We don't have enough space for our own people; how can we accommodate so many refugees?

    UN should step in and give these refugees shelters somewhere else.

    Also, Myanmar should receive sanctions.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    I think it is wrong to cut down mobile communication. BD government should reverse the decision.

    Having said that, I have seen report of Rohingyas committing crimes. I don't know if it is true but if true then they should stop too.
    Here’s a hint, why don’t you do some research so you do know, rather using such language to demonise the victims.

    Suddenly your affinity for the ummah is waning.

    Not surprising.

  6. #6
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    The Rohingyas have no luck. The two Muslim nations in South Asia are Bangladesh and Pakistan. On the one hand, Bangladesh doesn't really want them and are doing stuff like this; on the other, Pakistan are selling JF-17s to the Myanmar Air Force so they can be hunted from the air.


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  7. #7
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    Bangladesh has done more for Rohingya refugees then any other nation on earth.

    But they deserve more help from the UN and wealthier countries.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by miandadrules View Post
    Here’s a hint, why don’t you do some research so you do know, rather using such language to demonise the victims.

    Suddenly your affinity for the ummah is waning.

    Not surprising.
    You have comprehension issue. I have never demonized them. My love for Ummah is still intact and I am glad BD gave them shelters. Bangladesh is the only nation on Earth who gave these vulnerable Rohingyas shelter.

    I want my Rohingya brothers and sisters to be safe but we are a tiny (and very overpopulated) country ourselves. To put it bluntly, we don't have the resources/spaces to host 2-million refugees indefinitely. Other countries and UN can step in and relieve our burden a bit.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 4th September 2019 at 19:29.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    You have comprehension issue. I have never demonized them. My love for Ummah is still intact and I am glad BD gave them shelters. Bangladesh is the only nation on Earth who gave these vulnerable Rohingyas shelter.

    I want my Rohingya brothers and sisters to be safe but we are a tiny (and very overpopulated) country ourselves. To put it bluntly, we don't have the resources/spaces to host 2-million refugees indefinitely. Other countries and UN can step in and relieve our burden a bit.
    The ummah is a burden?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    The Rohingyas have no luck. The two Muslim nations in South Asia are Bangladesh and Pakistan. On the one hand, Bangladesh doesn't really want them and are doing stuff like this; on the other, Pakistan are selling JF-17s to the Myanmar Air Force so they can be hunted from the air.
    Don't worry, the Jewish lobby is diverting some funds from the JF-17 sales to Zionist states, so looks like your dream of Pakistan/Israel partnership is in the embryonic stage by one means or the other.


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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    Don't worry, the Jewish lobby is diverting some funds from the JF-17 sales to Zionist states, so looks like your dream of Pakistan/Israel partnership is in the embryonic stage by one means or the other.
    That unsubstantiated speck of rumour is hardly the foundation for Pakistan - Israel relations.


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    I think it is wrong to cut down mobile communication. BD government should reverse the decision.

    Having said that, I have seen report of Rohingyas committing crimes. I don't know if it is true but if true then they should stop too.
    You just generalized an entire ethnicity.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Also, I must add that Rohingyas should go back at one point. Bangladesh is a tiny country that is way overpopulated. We don't have enough space for our own people; how can we accommodate so many refugees?

    UN should step in and give these refugees shelters somewhere else.

    Also, Myanmar should receive sanctions.
    Rohingyas are Bengalis too so they're technically your people, a true ethnic state takes anybody from their ethnicity.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pakistanian View Post
    You just generalized an entire ethnicity.
    I meant the ones who were causing troubles (allegedly).

    Quote Originally Posted by Pakistanian View Post
    Rohingyas are Bengalis too so they're technically your people, a true ethnic state takes anybody from their ethnicity.
    Bangladesh is about 5 times smaller than Pakistan while population is almost same. You do the math.

    Our own people can't live well in that country. Way too populated.

    Rohingyas are currently living in cramped shelters; very bad conditions. If a natural disaster happens, many can die.

    I am all for keeping them for a few years but a portion of them needs to be shifted somewhere else. It is not dignifying for them and it is not financially sustainable for us.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  15. #15
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    Akter, 20, expelled from university for being Rohingya

    Rahima Akter hid her Rohingya identity to enrol at a private university in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar, but her dreams of pursuing higher education were dashed after she was suspended by her university earlier this month.

    The 20-year-old from Kutupalong refugee camp has become the face of the struggle of Rohingya refugees who want to study, as Bangladesh does not allow Rohingya to enrol in schools or colleges.

    Last October, she was featured in a video story by the Associated Press in which she talked about being a Rohingya and her dream to study human rights so she could raise her voice for her persecuted community.

    Nearly a year after it was published, the video went viral after which she was expelled from Cox's Bazar International University where she was studying law.

    "I was in college when the video started showing up on people's phones. Suddenly, everyone was asking me, 'Are you Rohingya?' Some people started a negative campaign, saying I should be sent back," Akter told Al Jazeera over the phone.

    "I was hiding my identity only so I could study. I feel guilty but I did not have an option. Is getting an education a crime?" she asked.

    "It's a fundamental human right. I have learned that. Being a Rohingya is not my fault."

    She has been in hiding at her aunt's house in Cox's Bazar, worried about her safety since her identity was revealed.

    When she was 12 years old, Akter's father tried to stop her from going to school and wanted to marry her off instead, she said. She pleaded with him to let her study and he relented.

    Akter was born and raised in Bangladesh. Her parents fled in 1992 during the mass exodus of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar. She is one of 33,000 registered refugees in the country.

    Rohingya children are only allowed to study in non-formal primary schools in refugee camps. Some Rohingya families obtain forged documents for their children to study in Bangladeshi educational institutions.

    For years, schools and colleges in Bangladesh admitted these students without causing a furore. That started to change from January 2019, as Bangladeshi authorities began to track down and expel Rohingya refugee students, according to a report by the Human Rights Watch (HRW) in April this year.

    Bangladesh distinguishes between "registered" Rohingya refugees and those who arrived since August 2017 whom it refers to as "forcibly displaced Myanmar nationals".

    More than 700,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar in August 2017 after the military launched a bloody crackdown on the community that had long been stripped of their citizenship and other basic rights.

    "Under international law, Bangladesh has an obligation to provide access to education to all children on its territory without discrimination, regardless of their refugee status," said Bill Vans Esveld, associate director of children's rights at HRW.

    Al Jazeera reached out to government officials in Dhaka, but could not get a response.

    Mahbub Alam Talukdar, the refugee relief and repatriation commissioner, refused to comment. "I'm not in a position to comment. We are observing the situation," he told Al Jazeera.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/...060043568.html


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  16. #16
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    Bangladesh's job is to give them shelter. If Bangladesh have given them that, that's good enough.

    When it comes to education, there are limited seats. So, I can see why BD may not allow these refugees to study.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th September 2019 at 01:54.


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  17. #17
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    I dont understand how Burma can get away with this. Focus should be on Burma really. With the issues with refugees in the Middle East no one else wants to allow more refugees to come to their country.

    Bangladesh seems to have allowed them to atleast take shelter. It is more important that these people are allowed safely to their own country as it seems they would like to return.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by imrankhannsu View Post
    I dont understand how Burma can get away with this. Focus should be on Burma really. With the issues with refugees in the Middle East no one else wants to allow more refugees to come to their country.

    Bangladesh seems to have allowed them to atleast take shelter. It is more important that these people are allowed safely to their own country as it seems they would like to return.
    Myanmar has its own reasons. Rohingyas started a separatist movement to cede from Myanmar, which finally went violent with the formation of ARSA.ARSA started killing minority hindus and then attacked Myanmar Army.

    This started the retaliation of Myanmarese forces who used disproportionate force and percipitated this crisis.

    Thing is countries wont support any armed separatist movements.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricketjoshila View Post
    Myanmar has its own reasons. Rohingyas started a separatist movement to cede from Myanmar, which finally went violent with the formation of ARSA.ARSA started killing minority hindus and then attacked Myanmar Army.

    This started the retaliation of Myanmarese forces who used disproportionate force and percipitated this crisis.

    Thing is countries wont support any armed separatist movements.
    But isnt that because the Rohingya people have been subject to alot of issues since the 1960s? But nevertheless such a drive to expul poor people IMO is shocking.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by imrankhannsu View Post
    But isnt that because the Rohingya people have been subject to alot of issues since the 1960s? But nevertheless such a drive to expul poor people IMO is shocking.
    Actually the issue started in late 40s or early 50s. Rohingyas started their separatist movement way back in 40s, they initially wanted to be part of pakistan and had requested M A Jinnah to do the same. He rejected it as it would have complicated the entire pakistan issue.

    In late 40s or early 50s(,Can remember the exact year) Myanmar hit back with aborogating the voting rights of the separatist Rohingyas.


  21. #21
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    Bangladesh to build barbed wire fences around Rohingya camps

    Bangladesh is planning to install barbed-wire fencing, guard towers and cameras around Rohingya refugee camps, raising fears of prison-like conditions in the already bleak settlements.

    The move comes amid growing security concerns and rising impatience in Dhaka that no solution has been found to repatriate or rehouse some one million refugees who have fled from Burma’s Rakhine state to the Bangladeshi port of Cox’s Bazar, most during a murderous military crackdown in 2017.

    "There are three large camps. We'll fence the three camps with barbed wires," Home Minister Asaduzzaman Khan told reporters this week.

    "Watch towers and CCTV cameras" would also be set up to monitor activity in the Cox's Bazar district settlements, he added, according to AFP.

    Tensions over the camps have increased since a repatriation bid to encourage refugees to return to Burma in August failed because of the minority’s fears that they would not be allowed back to their homes and would never be granted Burmese citizenship.

    Dhaka has been dialing up the pressure on the Rohingya, taking steps to restrict their activities, including the blocking of 3G and 4G mobile networks, confiscating SIM cards and mobile phones, reportedly over fears that criminal gangs are involved in murder and drug smuggling.

    Two refugees were killed in a gun battle with Bangladeshi border guards after failing to surrender when they were caught trying to cross over from Burma early on Friday and reportedly opened fire. The guards claimed the men were carrying 70,000 methamphetamine tablets.

    The movement of Rohingya refugees to and from the crowded Cox’s Bazar camps is already severely restricted, and families are unable to earn a livelihood and children cannot receive a higher education.

    Aid workers have indicated that conditions in the squalid settlements are rapidly becoming more desperate.

    “As tensions inside Cox’s Bazar mount, violence has become a daily occurrence and we know that there are many Rohingya refugees desperate to return to their homes,” Manish Agrawal, Bangladesh director for the International Rescue Committee, told The Telegraph earlier this month.

    “People find it impossible to look to the future and live beyond each day; they cannot access basic services and finding work is out of the question.”

    But Mr Agarwal added that despite the hardships, there was still “immense fear” of returning to Burma and that any repatriation must be done on a safe and voluntary basis.

    “This will only happen if the root causes of the crisis are addressed and the governments of Bangladesh and Myanmar work collaboratively with the international community; the Rohingya people must have a viable pathway to citizenship, have access to jobs and services and, most of all, protected from harm,” he said.

    Last year, a United Nations fact-finding team recommended the prosecution of top Burmese military commanders on charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Burma has rejected the allegations.

    In mid-September the team cited the lack of accountability for the perpetrators of the alleged crimes when it concluded that "that there is a serious risk that genocidal actions may occur or recur”.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.tel...gya-camps/amp/
    Sounds like an open air prison.


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  22. #22
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    Not good. I condemn this.

    However, I don't think they will be tortured or anything like the Chinese are doing. It is probably just to avoid unpleasant situations.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 28th September 2019 at 00:42.


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  23. #23
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    To be honest Bangladesh can not afford to take in so many people. It is a bit like how Pakistan can not keep taking in Afghan's.


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  25. #25
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    So glad pakistan separated from Bangladesh.

  26. #26
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    Rohingyas can leave Bangladesh if they don't like it. We are spending our resources to house them and feed them yet they complain.

    Some of the Rohingyas were accused of killing a local politician. If you commit crime in Bangladesh (as an outsider), you will probably find it tough. It is not some naive first world country who will put up with nonsense; BD cops are quite brutal.

    Rohingyas shouldn't try to take on law enforcement in BD. It is a foolish mistake. Solution is to follow all rules and not make troubles.


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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Rohingyas can leave Bangladesh if they don't like it. We are spending our resources to house them and feed them yet they complain.

    Some of the Rohingyas were accused of killing a local politician. If you commit crime in Bangladesh (as an outsider), you will probably find it tough. It is not some naive first world country who will put up with nonsense; BD cops are quite brutal.

    Rohingyas shouldn't try to take on law enforcement in BD. It is a foolish mistake. Solution is to follow all rules and not make troubles.
    What a vile, xenophobic post.

  28. #28
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    Banning mobile phones just sounds like a convenient excuse to make life more difficult for refugees. I wouldn't be surprised it it has been done to prevent news getting out of police atrocities. This is similar to the phone ban in Kashmir where Indian troops are alleged to have inflicted widespread torture and other forms of brutality on the local population.


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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by miandadrules View Post
    What a vile, xenophobic post.
    Nothing vile about it. If they cause troubles, they will find it rough. It is not some European first world country. Refugees should follow all the laws and not cause problems. It is not a wise idea to take on ruling party or law enforcement; you are asking for trouble.

    You wrote this post based on your UK perception. Bangladesh doesn't work like UK. We have our own laws.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    Banning mobile phones just sounds like a convenient excuse to make life more difficult for refugees. I wouldn't be surprised it it has been done to prevent news getting out of police atrocities. This is similar to the phone ban in Kashmir where Indian troops are alleged to have inflicted widespread torture and other forms of brutality on the local population.
    The situation is not like Kashmir. We have housed them and fed them for almost 2 years.

    If Rohingya doesn't like it, they can leave. We are not forcing them to stay. We are a third world country and our resources are limited.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th October 2019 at 20:20.


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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Nothing vile about it. If they cause troubles, they will find it rough. It is not some European first world country. Refugees should follow all the laws and not cause problems. It is not a wise idea to take on ruling party or law enforcement; you are asking for trouble.

    You wrote this post based on your UK perception. Bangladesh doesn't work like UK. We have our own laws.



    The situation is not like Kashmir. We have housed them and fed them for almost 2 years.

    If Rohingya doesn't like it, they can leave. We are not forcing them to stay. We are a third world country and our resources are limited.
    Why does BD govt need to ban mobile phone use for refugees? By all means you can refuse entry if there is no room, but what has mobile phone use got to do with anything?


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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    Why does BD govt need to ban mobile phone use for refugees? By all means you can refuse entry if there is no room, but what has mobile phone use got to do with anything?
    Please read the article again. Here is the quoted part:

    'Positive impact'

    Ikbal Hossain, a police spokesman, hailed the decision saying the refugees had been "abusing" mobile phone access to conduct criminal activities such as trafficking of methamphetamine pills, worth hundreds of millions of dollars, from Myanmar.

    "It will definitely make a positive impact. I believe criminal activities will surely come down," he told the AFP.

    Police also cited a string of criminal incidents as justification, including nearly 600 cases of drug trafficking, murders, robberies, gang fighting, and family feuds, since the refugees arrived.

    Police also recently killed four Rohingya refugees while investigating the murder of a local ruling party official, Omar Faruk. Authorities have said Rohingya criminals are suspected to be behind the killing.

    Faruk's murder led hundreds of furious locals to block a highway leading to a refugee camp for hours on August 22, burning tyres and vandalising shops visited by refugees.

    In total, Bangladeshi security forces have shot dead a total of at least 34 Rohingya over the past two years, mostly for alleged methamphetamines trafficking.

    Rohingya refugees have said the recent bloodshed has created an atmosphere of fear in the camp, where security has been tightened. Rights groups have accused Bangladesh police of extrajudicial killings.

    Bangladesh has struggled with the massive influx of Rohingya, which has caused a financial strain on the country's already economically depressed south.

    A repatriation agreement signed by Myanmar and Bangladesh in November 2017 has foundered, with several attempts scuttled amid resistance from Rohingya and condemnation from the international community.


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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Nothing vile about it. If they cause troubles, they will find it rough. It is not some European first world country. Refugees should follow all the laws and not cause problems. It is not a wise idea to take on ruling party or law enforcement; you are asking for trouble.

    You wrote this post based on your UK perception. Bangladesh doesn't work like UK. We have our own laws.



    The situation is not like Kashmir. We have housed them and fed them for almost 2 years.

    If Rohingya doesn't like it, they can leave. We are not forcing them to stay. We are a third world country and our resources are limited.
    You can package your bigoted views whichever way you like.

    The stench of bigotry remains ever present.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by miandadrules View Post
    You can package your bigoted views whichever way you like.

    The stench of bigotry remains ever present.
    First of all, I am not a bigot. I am glad BD sheltered them when nobody took them.

    Second of all, I am a man of law and order. I don't like criminals and lawbreakers.

    Third of all, not all refugees are as angelic as you claim to be. Our cops wouldn't just go after people for no reason.

    Last of all, don't derail this thread with off-topic rants and personal insults.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th October 2019 at 20:50.


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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Please read the article again. Here is the quoted part:
    I did read the article, but if banning mobile phones is the way to stop criminal activity, why not do that for whole of Bangladesh? Are you seriously going to argue that only refugees use mobile phones for crime, and Bangladeshi passport home grown criminals don't?

    If anything you can imagine that refugees need their mobiles more to keep in touch with stranded relatives on both sides of the border and in makeshift camps.


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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    First of all, I am not a bigot. I am glad BD sheltered them when nobody took them.

    Second of all, I am a man of law and order.

    Third of all, not all refugees are as angelic as you claim to be. Our cops wouldn't just go after people for no reason.

    Last of all, don't derail this thread with off-topic rants and personal insults.
    Save your threats for those it will work on, little man.

    Just because you say your cops (whilst sitting in Canada) wouldn’t do anything without cause is hardly justification.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th October 2019 at 21:19.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    I did read the article, but if banning mobile phones is the way to stop criminal activity, why not do that for whole of Bangladesh? Are you seriously going to argue that only refugees use mobile phones for crime, and Bangladeshi passport home grown criminals don't?

    If anything you can imagine that refugees need their mobiles more to keep in touch with stranded relatives on both sides of the border and in makeshift camps.
    You have a point. But, there have been some problems and BD is simply trying to contain it.

    I personally feel mobile service should be restored but that region needs to be monitored. Treat them well but be vigilant.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th October 2019 at 21:05.


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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    You have a point. But, there have been some problems and BD is simply trying to contain it.
    Bangladesh is merely acting altruistically whilst the refugees are the culprits?

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by miandadrules View Post
    Bangladesh is merely acting altruistically whilst the refugees are the culprits?
    Refugees are costing BD money. We have our own poor people and we can't afford millions of refugees. Maybe you should donate your whole life savings to Rohingya cause.

    Also, they should not bite the hands that fed them for the past 2 years.

    If they don't like it, they can leave.

    We are going in circles. Give it a rest. Don't derail the thread.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th October 2019 at 21:12.


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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Refugees are costing BD money. We have our own poor people and we can't afford millions of refugees. Maybe you should donate your whole life savings to Rohingya cause.

    Also, they should not bite the hands that fed them for the past 2 years.

    If they don't like it, they can leave.

    We are going in circles. Give it a rest. Don't derail the thread.
    Oh, now these refugees are biting the hand that feeds them? Excellent demonisation of the victims.

    Leave and go where?
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th October 2019 at 21:19.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by miandadrules View Post
    Oh, now these refugees are biting the hand that feeds them? Excellent demonisation of the victims.

    Leave and go where?
    Go where? That is something UN should figure out. We are being nice and keeping them despite our limitations.

    UN should intervene and solve this problem. Wealthy Arab countries should take them and feed them; they have enough resources.

    Your perception is based on first world viewpoint. Bangladesh is not first world. Things work differently over there which you are not understanding.
    Last edited by sweep_shot; 18th October 2019 at 21:22.


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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Go where? That is something UN should figure out. We are being nice and keeping them despite our limitations.

    UN should intervene and solve this problem. Wealthy Arab countries should take them and feed them; they have enough resources.

    Your perception is based on first world viewpoint. Bangladesh is not first world. Things work differently over there which you are not understanding.
    I have a far greater understanding than you could ever imagine.

    Look at the language you have used when referring to the refugees and the language you have used whilst referring to the Bangladeshi establishment.

    How gracious of you to act “nice” to these evil cretins that are facing a genocide.

    All this talk of ummah and brotherhood being exposed for what it really is.

  42. #42
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    Hasina never forcefully mentions that Rohingya should be safely relocated back to Myanmar, nor does she ask other Muslim leaders to advocate it on their behalf at every opportunity.

  43. #43
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    When middle east can employ millions of South Indians, why cannot they employ Rohingyas for the same positions? It will be win-win for both. Rohingyas will find a good place to live and Sheikhs get cheap labor.

    Middle east nations like UAE, Qatar, Saudi, Oman etc should be able to take on a million of these unfortunate people. Perhaps Pakistan can also pitch in and take a few thousand of them.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    First of all, I am not a bigot. I am glad BD sheltered them when nobody took them.

    Second of all, I am a man of law and order. I don't like criminals and lawbreakers.

    Third of all, not all refugees are as angelic as you claim to be. Our cops wouldn't just go after people for no reason.

    Last of all, don't derail this thread with off-topic rants and personal insults.
    What sounds disconcerting in your argument is that you seem (correct me if I'm wrong) to support punishing the many for the crimes of a few.

    How can anyone support banning mobile phones for everyone when presumably the percentage of criminals misusing phones are less than a fraction of a per cent? Or do you believe that they're all criminals?

    How would you feel is Bangladeshis in Canada were targeted the same way?

    Of course Bangladesh needs to be recognised for having housed the Rohingyas till now. I also understand this is a massive and complex problem.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cryin Out Loud View Post
    What sounds disconcerting in your argument is that you seem (correct me if I'm wrong) to support punishing the many for the crimes of a few.

    How can anyone support banning mobile phones for everyone when presumably the percentage of criminals misusing phones are less than a fraction of a per cent? Or do you believe that they're all criminals?

    How would you feel is Bangladeshis in Canada were targeted the same way?

    Of course Bangladesh needs to be recognised for having housed the Rohingyas till now. I also understand this is a massive and complex problem.
    I want mobile service to be restored. But, the troublemakers need to be dealt with. If they don't want to change, they should be sent back to Myanmar (troublemakers only).

    Good and law-abiding refugees should be treated nicely.


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  46. #46
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    The coast guard of Bangladesh says it has rescued at least 382 starving Rohingya refugees who had been drifting at sea for nearly two months.

    More than two dozen people died on the boat, which was trying to reach Malaysia, officials said.

    Some reports said the boat had been turned back by Malaysia because of the coronavirus pandemic.

    It is unclear whether the refugees had left from Bangladesh or from Myanmar, where they are originally from.

    In 2017, a crackdown by the Myanmar military left thousands of Rohingya Muslims dead and drove more than 700,000 to flee to neighbouring Bangladesh.

    "We have rescued at least 382 Rohingya from a big overcrowded fishing trawler and brought them to a beach near Teknaf," coast guard spokesman Lt Shah Zia Rahman told AFP news agency.

    "They were starving. They were floating for 58 days and over the last seven days [the boat] was moving in our territorial waters."

    Lt Rahman said authorities launched a three-day search for the boat after receiving a tip-off and found it at night off the south-east coast.

    Pictures on social media showed groups of emaciated people, mostly women and children, standing on a beach.

    "We have cordoned off the place where they have landed. We could not question them because of the fear they could be infected with the coronavirus," Lt Rahman said.

    In a separate development, leading aid agencies called on the governments of Bangladesh and Myanmar to restore internet access for hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees.

    The charities, which include Save the Children, Action Aid and the International Rescue Committee, say access is essential for obtaining life-saving information about the pandemic.

    The Bangladeshi government blocked internet access in its biggest camp last year, citing security concerns. The charities also want Myanmar to restore mobile internet access to nine communities close to the border.

    Rohingya Muslims are the largest community of Muslims in Myanmar, with the majority living in Rakhine state.

    But Myanmar's government denies them citizenship, seeing them as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.

    Over the decades, waves of Rohingya refugees have fled Myanmar for Bangladesh but their latest exodus began after the 2017 army crackdown.

    Myanmar, a predominantly Buddhist state, has always insisted that its military campaign was waged to tackle an extremist threat in Rakhine state.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-52305931


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  47. #47
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    Almost 25,000 to be freed under Myanmar prisoner amnesty

    Myanmar announced that it was releasing almost 25,000 prisoners under a presidential amnesty marking this week's traditional New Year celebration.

    The release for the Thingyan holiday was announced in a statement from President Win Myint's office. Mass amnesties on the holiday are not unusual, though the number this year was the highest in recent memory.

    The president’s statement did not say if the release was related to calls to free them because of the hazard of contracting COVID-19 in the close quarters of prison.

    Human rights groups estimate Myanmar’s overcrowded prisons hold 92,000 people, including those awaiting trial.


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  48. #48
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    These Rohingas are very daring, now they are fleeing to Malaysia via boat
    Rohingas are getting clothes, money, food, cosmetic everything from Ngos to rich businessmen from Bangladesh, they are selling the rice and other items for taka and trying to make fake passport and run for malaysia, saudi etc. Genuises


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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful_Rox View Post
    These Rohingas are very daring, now they are fleeing to Malaysia via boat
    Rohingas are getting clothes, money, food, cosmetic everything from Ngos to rich businessmen from Bangladesh, they are selling the rice and other items for taka and trying to make fake passport and run for malaysia, saudi etc. Genuises
    thats kinda smart tbh

  50. #50
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    Dhaka, Bangladesh - The Bangladesh government has refused to allow some 500 Rohingya refugees stranded on board two fishing trawlers in the Bay of Bengal to come ashore, drawing criticism from rights groups.

    Foreign Minister AK Abdul Momen told Al Jazeera on Saturday that the Rohingya refugees, who are believed to have been at sea for weeks, are "not Bangladesh's responsibility."

    "Why you are asking Bangladesh to take those Rohingyas? They are in the deep sea, not even in Bangladesh's territorial water," Momen said, adding that there are at least eight coastal countries surrounding the Bay of Bengal.

    "It's your duty to ask Myanmar government first because those are their citizens," Momen told Al Jazeera.

    The two trawlers - carrying an estimated 500 Rohingya women, men and children - are in the Bay of Bengal after being rejected by Malaysia, which has imposed restrictions on all boats in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

    According to the United Nations refugee agency, UNHCR, the stranded Rohingya might "have been at sea for weeks without adequate food and water."

    Momen said that just weeks ago, Bangladesh rescued a total of 396 Rohingya people from a vessel that had been adrift for about two months after also failing to reach Malaysia.

    "Why should Bangladesh take the responsibility every time? Momen asked. "Bangladesh has already taken more than a million of Rohingya. We are running out of our generosity now."

    On Saturday, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said the government of Bangladesh should immediately allow stranded refugees ashore and provide them with the necessary food, water, and healthcare.

    "Bangladesh has shouldered a heavy burden as the result of the Myanmar military's atrocity crimes, but this is no excuse to push boatloads of refugees out to sea to die," said Brad Adams, Asia director at HRW.

    "Bangladesh should continue to help those at grave risk and preserve the international goodwill it has gained in recent years for helping the Rohingya."

    'No such boats'
    Bangladesh's coastal authorities meanwhile, denied the presence of any trawlers carrying Rohingya refugees in its territorial waters.

    Speaking to Al Jazeera, Lieutenant Commander Sohail Rana, Teknaf station head of Bangladesh coastguard said they had not seen any "boats carrying Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh's territorial water in the past few days".

    "The areas that we patrol have no such boats," Rana said.

    A Bangladeshi fisherman, however, told HRW that on April 20 he saw "two trawlers full of Rohingya coming toward the shore while I was at sea in my fishing trawler with others".

    The same day, a local resident posted on Facebook: "Again, trawlers full of Rohingya are heading to Baharchara Union [in Cox's Bazar]. They are waiting at sea to enter into Bangladesh."

    It is believed that most of the Rohingya refugees on board the trawlers had left refugee camps in Bangladesh in an attempt to reach Malaysia, according to HRW.

    The organisation reported that it had spoken to 10 families who said their family members had left the camps and they had not heard from them since.

    A mother from Kutupalong extension camp told HRW: "One of my sons left the camp some two months ago. Around 20 days back, I got a phone call from my son to pay money to smugglers. We paid. But we have not heard anything since."

    'Bangladesh alone can't take responsibility'
    In a statement, HRW said, "Bangladesh should continue to uphold its international obligations not to return refugees to places where they face persecution, and not to return anyone to where they would face a risk of torture or other ill-treatment."

    HRW also said that "all countries, including Malaysia and Thailand, have the responsibility under international law to respond to boats in distress, enact or coordinate rescue operations within their search and rescue operations, and not to push back asylum seekers risking their lives at sea."

    Amnesty International last week called on Southeast Asian governments to launch immediate search and rescue operations for potentially hundreds more Rohingya refugees languishing at sea.

    The COVID-19 pandemic, Amnesty International said, cannot be a pretext for governments to abandon their responsibilities towards refugees.

    "All countries in the region have a responsibility to ensure the seas do not become graveyards for people seeking safety. Bangladesh cannot be left to address this situation alone. The fact that it is upholding its own obligations is not an excuse for others to abandon theirs," said Biraj Patnaik, South Asia director at Amnesty International.

    The Bangladeshi foreign minister, however, pointed out that other countries need to come forward to help the Rohingya.

    "Please ask UN and other countries like USA, UK and Canada to shoulder some responsibility. We are ready to send Rohingya people to their country if they are willing to take them," Momen told Al Jazeera.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...082607464.html


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  51. #51
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    A boat carrying hundreds of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar has been turned away from Malaysia, with the government citing fears over coronavirus.

    One survivor estimated between 20 and 50 refugees died before Bangladeshi coastguards rescued the boat, with witnesses saying they saw bodies "thrown into the sea".

    It is believed hundreds of refugees are still stranded at sea, while it is unclear if Bangladesh will accept them.

    The refugees, who originally fled persecution in Myanmar, left camps in Bangladesh, according to some accounts.


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  52. #52
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    Dozens of Rohingya believed to be from one of several boats stuck at sea due to coronavirus restrictions have landed on the coast of Bangladesh, according to a government official.

    Some of the 43 people who arrived were sent to Bhasan Char, a remote island where authorities had previously planned to house Rohingya, the official told Reuters.

    Chris Lewa, director of the Arakan Project monitoring group, said the group that landed on Saturday had likely come on a small boat from one the larger vessels still at sea, believed to be carrying hundreds of people.

    Hundreds of Rohingya are stranded on at least two trawlers between Bangladesh and Malaysia, rights groups say.

    The United Nations has urged authorities to let the boats land, but anti-refugee sentiment is surging in Malaysia.

    Another boat, carrying hundreds of Rohingya who were starving after weeks at sea, landed in Bangladesh in mid-April. Survivors said several dozen died on board.

    For years, Rohingya from Myanmar and Bangladesh have fled by boat for Thailand and Malaysia when the seas are calm between October and April.


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  53. #53
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    COX’S BAZAR, Bangladesh/BANGKOK (Reuters) - Rohingya refugee Shahab Uddin thought the wooden trawler he boarded in February would be his ticket out of a camp in Bangladesh to a better life in Malaysia.

    Shahab Uddin, 20, a Rohingya refugee poses for a picture in the transit camp in southern Bangladesh after surviving two months at sea on a wooden trawler, in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, April 30, 2020. Picture taken April 30, 2020. /Handout via REUTERS
    Instead, the voyage nearly killed him.

    The 20-year-old was among almost 400 survivors pulled from the water, starving, emaciated and traumatized after the boat failed to reach Malaysia and spent weeks adrift before returning to Bangladesh in mid-April.

    Hundreds more refugees are stranded on at least two other trawlers, rights groups say, as Southeast Asian governments tighten borders to keep out the new coronavirus, threatening a repeat of a 2015 boat crisis when hundreds of people died.

    The United Nations has implored authorities to let the boats land, but anti-refugee sentiment is surging in Malaysia and governments say borders are sealed to keep out the coronavirus.

    In interviews with Reuters, seven survivors from the rescued boat recalled two harrowing months.

    Estimates of the number of people who died on the boat ranged from several dozen to more than 100 - nobody kept count - but their accounts were consistent.

    The survivors described hundreds of men, women, and children crammed on the boat, unable to move, squatting in rain and scorching sun until, as food and water ran out, they began to die of starvation, thirst, and beatings, their bodies tossed overboard. Some wept as they spoke.

    “I thought I would not come back home alive,” said Uddin. “I missed my family, especially my parents.”

    The group Fortify Rights said in a statement last week the operators of the boat “held their victims in conditions similar to slavery for the purposes of exploitation”.

    Reuters was unable to identify or contact the crew for comment.

    Amnesty International urged governments to protect stranded Rohingya and allow them to land. It estimated 800 more people were at sea. Several dozen people from one boat landed on the south coast of Bangladesh on Saturday.

    Malaysia defends its policy of turning boats away. Authorities have acted lawfully to defend the country’s sovereignty and are ready to do so again, its minister for internal affairs said in a statement on Thursday.

    More than a million Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority from Myanmar, live in camps in southern Bangladesh after fleeing from largely Buddhist Myanmar’s Rakhine State.

    Most fled an army crackdown in 2017 that the United Nations says was carried out with genocidal intent. Myanmar denies genocide and says it was responding to insurgent attacks.

    ‘BETTER OFF IN MALAYSIA’
    Although the Rohingya people trace their ancestry in Rakhine back centuries, Myanmar says they are illegal immigrants from South Asia.

    For years, Rohingya from Myanmar and Bangladesh have fled by boat for Thailand and Malaysia when the seas are calm between October and April. Hundreds died in 2015 after a crackdown in Thailand led smugglers to abandon their human cargo at sea.

    In Bangladesh, Uddin made a little money driving motorized tuk-tuks but said refugees were becoming more confined.

    The government restricts internet and cell phone access and has begun putting up barbed-wire fences around the camps, citing security. Uddin said it began to feel like prison.

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    “I thought going to Malaysia by whatever way would at least save me. Many have made it to Malaysia and are better off.”

    He said he and several friends met a man in a shanty town who took them by boat to a trawler where hundreds of people were already crowded on board - men on the lower deck, women on the top. Many of the young women were due to be married in Malaysia.

    Another refugee, Enamul Hasan, also 20, said an uncle in Malaysia urged him to go there. “I wanted to go to Malaysia to end my family’s poverty,” he said.

    Six of the seven survivors Reuters interviewed said they had gone willingly. The seventh, aged 16, said he was taken by unknown men against his will.

    The misery began as soon as they set out.

    “We ate almost nothing,” said Uddin. “Little kids would cry for water.”

    After a week the boat arrived off Malaysia, where it waited for several days before the crew said they could not disembark and would have to return to Bangladesh.

    They crossed back over the Bay of Bengal.

    “We faced storms three times,” said Uddin.

    He said he was made to serve as an enforcer for the crew and beat anyone who stepped out of line. “If I didn’t want to beat them, I myself would be beaten,” he said.

    Meanwhile, some desperate passengers began to drink sea water.

    “By the wonderful grace of God, the water would seem sweet,” said Hasan.

    “Many jumped into the water ... everyone was saying that it was much better to die in the water than dying in the ship.”

    At night, the passengers held one another, weeping and praying.

    Eventually the boat stopped again, off Myanmar, survivors said, but again it could not dock.

    “People kept dying and would be thrown overboard,” said Hasan. “I began to wonder when I would die.”

    The refugees eventually forced the captain to take them back to Bangladesh where, one night, they made landfall.

    A coastguard official there at the time said they were a shocking sight: “Many of them were stick-thin, some unable to stand.”

    Muriel Boursier, head of mission for Doctors Without Borders in Bangladesh, who met survivors later, said many could not walk. Some grieved for lost relatives, staring blankly.

    Some survivors were taken to hospital but most went to a quarantine camp, unaware of the coronavirus that had taken hold during their voyage.

    “It’s difficult to understand that no state is able to open its doors,” Boursier said.

    Uddin said his parents hardly recognised him but he was thankful to be back, though he had little hope for his future.

    “It’s better to die here than to die at sea,” he said.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...-idUSKBN22F0QA


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  54. #54
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    Rights groups and aid agencies have raised concerns after dozens of stranded Rohingya refugees, who landed at Bangladesh's southern coast at the weekend, were sent to an inhabitable island in the Bay of Bengal.

    Authorities said the 29 Rohingya were relocated to the controversial Bhasan Char island late on Saturday to prevent a possible coronavirus outbreak in the refugee camps located in the Cox's Bazar district of Bangladesh.

    "Bangladesh faces the tremendous challenge of assisting Rohingya boat people while preventing the spread of COVID-19, but sending them to a dangerously flood-prone island without adequate health care is hardly the solution," said Brad Adams, the executive director of the Asian division of Human Rights Watch (HRW), in a statement on Tuesday.

    "Any quarantines need to ensure aid agency access and safety from storms, and a prompt return to their families on the mainland."

    Bangladesh last year constructed facilities for 100,000 people on Bhashan Char, a muddy silt islet in the cyclone-prone coastal belt, saying they needed to take pressure off crowded border camps that are home to almost one million Rohingya.

    They are the first group of Rohingya to be sent to the island, local government administrator Tanmoy Das told AFP, adding they were being looked after by navy personnel who had built the facilities.

    Officials said the group - including 15 women and five children - were detained after coming ashore on Saturday from one of two boats suck at sea while trying to reach Malaysia.

    The two trawlers - carrying an estimated 500 Rohingya women, men and children - were stuck in the Bay of Bengal after being rejected by Malaysia, which has imposed restrictions on all boats in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

    Bangladesh has refused to let the fishing boats land on its territory despite United Nations calls to allow them in as a powerful storm bears down on the region.

    Late last month, Foreign Minister AK Abdul Momen told Al Jazeera that the Rohingya refugees were "not Bangladesh's responsibility".

    "Why you are asking Bangladesh to take those Rohingyas? They are in the deep sea, not even in Bangladesh's territorial water," Momen said, adding that there are at least eight coastal countries surrounding the Bay of Bengal.

    So far, no coronavirus cases have been confirmed in the sprawling camps in Cox's Bazar that house Rohingya who fled a 2017 military crackdown in neighbouring Myanmar.

    The plan to move the refugees to Bhashan Char has been staunchly opposed by the Rohingya community.

    The UN refugee agency UNHCR said on Sunday comprehensive assessments were needed before anyone is moved to the island, spokeswoman Louise Donovan told AFP.

    "UNHCR has all preparations in place to ensure the safe quarantine of any refugees arriving by boat to Cox's Bazar, as a precautionary measure related to the COVID-19 pandemic," she added.

    In mid-April, 396 starving refugees were rescued from a trawler stranded in the Bay of Bengal for more than two months. At least 60 people died on the boat.

    The survivors were moved to transit centres near the border camps where they were quarantined.

    Thousands of Rohingya try every year to reach other countries, making the perilous journey on crowded, rickety boats.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...105338183.html


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  55. #55
    Debut
    Oct 2004
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    Now in Malaysia too

    Rohingya targeted in Malaysia as coronavirus stokes xenophobia

    For decades, Muslim-majority Malaysia welcomed Rohingya and largely turned a blind eye to their technically illegal employment in low-paying jobs.

    But, as in some other parts of the world, the novel coronavirus outbreak has turned sentiment against foreigners, who have been accused of spreading disease, burdening the state and taking jobs as the economy plummets.

    While the Rohingya have been the most obvious targets, other migrants are also worried in a country that relies heavily on foreign labour at factories, construction sites and plantations.


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