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View Poll Results: Is it time to say goodbye to using saliva for polishing cricket balls?

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  • Yes

    3 60.00%
  • No

    2 40.00%
Results 1 to 62 of 62
  1. #1
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    Coronavirus : Is it time to say goodbye to "spit and polish" on the cricket ball?

    While sports events around the world, from soccer to sumo, are being held behind closed doors because of the novel coronavirus outbreak, the India cricket team’s home game will be a damp squib if held without its army of fanatical supporters who act as the twelfth man.

    Thursday’s ODI between India and South Africa, the first of a 3-game series, will witness crowds not just from Dharamsala and elsewhere in Himachal Pradesh but also from neighbouring states. However, that raises the threat of coronavirus in a state that depends a lot on tourism for revenue and thankfully hasn’t seen a single positive case.

    Both teams, carrying instructions from their doctors, are taking precautions—Proteas will not shake hands—but there are certain things they cannot avoid. Like using saliva to shine the ball or being rude to fans who approach them.

    India pace bowler Bhuvneshwar Kumar, returning from injury, put things in perspective.

    “You can’t say it is dangerous because it has just started in India, but we are taking whatever precautions we can. We have a team doctor who is telling us the dos and don’ts. We are hoping it doesn’t go beyond a limit,” he said on Wednesday.

    The team doctors have given some basic advice like washing hands often and keep extra focus on personal hygiene. However, in a game of cricket, players can’t be that choosy.

    For example, maintaining the condition of the ball to get it to swing matters a lot. Swing is bread and butter for Bhuvneshwar. To ensure it swings—it can even reverse in a 50-over game—players have to work on the ball using saliva, which can be fraught with risk.

    Asked about this, Bhuvneshwar made his clear where his priority lies.

    “We have thought about it but if we don’t use saliva, how will we shine the ball? And then we’ll get thrashed and you will say we are not bowling well. But yeah, we have a team doctor travelling with us, we’ll discuss with him and we’ll go with his advice,” he said.

    “When it comes to (avoiding) fans, these things we can’t do. In these times, we should try and not go very close to them on our own,” he added, although cricketers rarely get close to fans given the ring of high security.

    Hosts Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association has put out information. It has put up boards listing on the precautions to be taken, like avoiding large crowds, although it is a bit out of place as fans will flock to the stadium. It advises people to wear the mask properly. Other directions are to wash hands regularly and get body temperature checked.

    HPCA realises a single positive case can hurt the state’s tourism. While the report of all arrivals at the Dharamsala airport is being sent to the Chief Medical Officer, the number of doctors on duty at the HPCA Stadium for the match have gone up from four to 10.

    “We are doing this to spread awareness as there will be a mass gathering. There are special thermal thermometres (with infra-red rays) kept in medical areas. Anyone having problems can have temperature checked and the report can be sent to Pune (laboratory),” said a HPCA official.

    https://www.hindustantimes.com/crick...eMhec407M.html
    Last edited by MenInG; 19th April 2020 at 23:51.


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  2. #2
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    "How will we shine the ball? And then we’ll get thrashed and you will say we are not bowling well..."

    Yes condition of the bowl is really important but not using saliva to shine, can it really be the difference between good bowling and thrashing?

    Unless we are talking about some particular kind of gum or saliva that can produce some magic.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titan24 View Post
    "How will we shine the ball? And then we’ll get thrashed and you will say we are not bowling well..."

    Yes condition of the bowl is really important but not using saliva to shine, can it really be the difference between good bowling and thrashing?

    Unless we are talking about some particular kind of gum or saliva that can produce some magic.
    time to use sandpaper

  4. #4
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    To be honest, I have found that practice pretty disgusting.


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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    To be honest, I have found that practice pretty disgusting.
    This. I always found it disgusting.

  6. #6
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    Well if someone in the team has they`ll probably catch it well before they get onto the field.


    Does cricket survive off of it's money or does it survive for it's money?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The cricket enthusiast View Post
    time to use sandpaper
    Yes and do that with elite honesty

  8. #8
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    Players avoided handshakes after the match during Karachi vs Lahore game and were fist punching, kicking with shoes with eachother

  9. #9
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    Lol why? If a player has illness Coronavirus he won't be playing in the first place.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    Lol why? If a player has illness Coronavirus he won't be playing in the first place.
    Not necessarily, it can be asymptomatic in many cases.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    Lol why? If a player has illness Coronavirus he won't be playing in the first place.
    Symptoms can take 14 days to show, and it is contagious well before symptoms show.

  12. #12
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    Cricket is the first game that should have been stopped and I also dont know how we can resume that unless we have total eradication of the virus.


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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Last Monetarist View Post
    Not necessarily, it can be asymptomatic in many cases.
    Barely any cases and those who are asymptomatic are usually kids not adults.

  14. #14
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    Perhaps umpires can use 2-3 drops of oil/saltwater etc on the ball at the start of the over.


    Aaj ka kaam kal karo, Kal ka kaam parson. Aisi bhi jaldi kya hai, Jab jeena hai barson.

  15. #15
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    Never liked the concept of spitting on the ball. It is pretty disgusting and possibly unhygienic.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweep_shot View Post
    Never liked the concept of spitting on the ball. It is pretty disgusting and possibly unhygienic.
    A lot of the time in teams they have a ball shiner, usually the best at ball shining, that was me in my team.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danyaalr01 View Post
    A lot of the time in teams they have a ball shiner, usually the best at ball shining, that was me in my team.
    But would you that in today's world?


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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    But would you that in today's world?
    Obviously not.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danyaalr01 View Post
    Obviously not.
    To be honest, thinking about it now - even in old times it was a disgusting thing to do.


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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    To be honest, thinking about it now - even in old times it was a disgusting thing to do.
    Yeah, even if no one else has used their saliva, you still are getting dirt in your mouth, plus a bit of sweat from the other bowlers.

  21. #21
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    In our club cricket, we are using sweat to shine the ball

  22. #22
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    Think a lot will change once this crisis goes away and standards of personal hygiene etc will become more stringent.


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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    Think a lot will change once this crisis goes away and standards of personal hygiene etc will become more stringent.
    It's bad enough that people are having to be forced to wash their hands, like what did they do before. It's disgusting seeing people walk out of bathrooms without washing hands in any situation. People that didn't wash hands before this crisis aren't going to start anytime soon.

    There are also these dumb theories going around that washing hands and showing is bad for you and we should live the way of the cavemen, how dumb do people have to be to believe stuff like that.

  24. #24
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    Ball maintenance is likely to be on the agenda of administrators and captains whenever cricket resumes, with pace great Jason Gillespie suggesting the use of saliva will have to be examined amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    The Cape Town cheating saga, in which Cameron Bancroft attempted to scuff the ball with sandpaper, prompted an International Cricket Council crackdown on ball-tampering.

    The ICC instituted harsher penalties, wanting to clean up an element of the game that had prompted an ugly arms race between teams wanting to push the envelope and generate unplayable reverse-swing.

    Shining the ball with sweat and saliva remains commonplace and entirely legal, provided mints aren't used to gain an illicit advantage.

    The coronavirus, thought to be spread via respiratory droplets, could complicate matters.

    Cricket Australia, having stood down the majority of its workers on 20 per cent pay, have far greater issues to worry about at the moment.

    But whenever CA and other cricket boards edge closer to staging games it shapes as a likely conundrum.

    "I don't think it's a quirky question. It's an actual genuine thing to be considered," Gillespie, who snared 259 Test wickets, told ABC Grandstand radio.

    "I don't think anything is off the table. It could be a point where at the end of each over, the umpires allow the players to shine the ball in front of them but you can only do it then.

    "I don't know. Is it just sweat? Can you only use sweat?

    "I don't have an answer to that but it certainly will be a conversation that will be had. If you think about it, it is pretty gross."

    Australia spearhead Pat Cummins revealed the topic was discussed prior to last month's trans-Tasman ODI at the SCG.

    That game, Australia's final hit-out before the health crisis brought a halt to all international cricket, was played behind closed doors.

    "It's a tough one," Cummins said earlier this month.

    "If it's at that stage where we're that worried about spread ... I'm not sure we'd be playing sport and bringing ourselves out of isolation.

    "The one-dayer, we made it clear we're obviously really keen to play, but ... the way we shined the ball didn't change.

    "Obviously different with red ball. As a bowler I think it would be pretty tough going if we couldn't shine the ball in a Test."

    https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/spo...19-p54l6l.html


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  25. #25
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    NEW DELHI: Bowlers using saliva to shine the ball is a common sight in cricket but in a post COVID-19 world, they might have to reconsider the practice, making their lives tougher in what, many believe, has already become a batsman's game.
    In the wake of the 2018 ball-tampering scandal, the scrutiny on ball maintenance has only increased but using sweat and saliva on it remains legal.

    Given the worsening COVID-19 situation, it is unlikely that cricket will resume anytime soon and when it finally does, former players, including Venkatesh Prasad, Praveen Kumar and Jason Gillespie, feel the game's custodians might have to suspend the use of saliva.

    "When the action resumes, they should use only sweat for some time as safety of the players is paramount," former pacer Prasad, who played 33 Tests and 161 ODIs for India, told PTI.

    He reckons it will be tough for the bowlers to stop using saliva to work up the ball but it is the need of the hour.

    "When you are in the thick of things, you tend to forget it. You have to get the upper hand over the batsmen as you can't use anything else besides sweat and saliva.

    "The question is what do you do when the batsman is pulping you? You need to swing the ball and what helps swing the ball is the aerodynamics," the 50-year-old explained.

    In fact, it had become a big talking point in the Indian dressing room last month when they were to take on South Africa in a three-match ODI series last month.

    Bhuvneshwar Kumar had hinted at limiting the use of saliva but the bowlers were not really tested on that front as the series was called off due to the rising threat from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Without saliva, sweat remains the only other legal source to shine the ball but that can be tricky, according to Prasad.

    "Because not everybody sweats. In that case, you have to keep throwing the ball to someone who sweats. I am someone who doesn't sweat that much whereas Rahul Dravid does," he recalled.

    Praveen Kumar, known for his prodigious swing, said putting the right amount of saliva on the ball aided his art immensely.

    "For the first few months after action resumes, they will have to ban the use of saliva. As bowlers, we will have to look for some other source," he said with a laugh.

    "...it is very important for the fast bowlers, also for the spinners, as it helps them generate drift. For an off-spinner, the shiny side on the left will drift the ball away in the air before coming back. It tests the batsman," he reasoned.

    "For me, saliva was of great help while opening the bowling as well as reversing the old ball," said Kumar, who took a five-wicket haul at Lord's in 2011.

    The world will never be the same even when it is able to overcome the current crisis. In such a scenario, the way the game is played is also likely to change.

    Former Australia pacer Gillespie said time has come to reconsider the use of saliva in the game.

    "I don't think it's a quirky question. It's an actual genuine thing to be considered," Gillespie, who took 259 Test wickets, told 'ABC Grandstand'.

    "I don't think anything is off the table. It could be a point where at the end of each over, the umpires allow the players to shine the ball in front of them but you can only do it then. I don't know. Is it just sweat? Can you only use sweat?

    "I don't have an answer to that but it certainly will be a conversation that will be had. If you think about it, it is pretty gross," said the cricketer-turned-coach.

    Prasad, however, reminded that bowling is not just about using sweat and saliva, conditions also matter immensely.

    "It doesn't matter if you use saliva or not as long as you apply appropriate amount of sweat and shine it off. If the other side tends to get rough (due to dryness), automatically you get reverse swing.

    "When I got 6/33 against Pakistan in Chennai (1999), the reverse (swing) happened because of the condition of the ball, pitch and the weather. So, it is not just about saliva. A lot of other factors also come into play," he said.

    He reiterated that the use of saliva should be stopped even though it would be difficult for the bowlers to let go of a practice they are so used to.

    "For everyone's safety, it should be suspended but if you are getting smashed, you will sub-consciously try to do your best to swing the ball and that might include (using) saliva.

    "If you are not able to swing the ball like you used to, you risk getting dropped. How do you address that?" Prasad asked.

    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...w/75247415.cms


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  26. #26
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    Shoaib Akhtar


    "You should not put saliva on the cricket ball - I raised this point about 10-11 years ago, in a meeting that we share a ball after applying saliva to it which can go to the fielders and bowlers; If someone has a disesase it can be passed on like that"

    "Everybody laughed and said Shoaib Akhtar was saying useless things and who would want to listen to him - and they pushed away my ideas"

    "Today I have heard on the news that ICC have said that bowlers can no longer put saliva on the cricket ball"

    "So what are we going to allow the bowlers to use to shine the ball now?"

    "There could be glycerine in the pockers of fielders so that without use of saliva they could shine the ball"

    "But will you be able to use sweat? but then we are touching our face etc so how far can we take this?"

    "Should we start bowling wearing gloves?"

    "The fact is Cricket is a game where there will always be contact with the ball with sweat and saliva, so how will the ICC tackle this?"

    "Maybe a subtsance which is approved and manufactured by the ICC will be used on the ball - maybe such a law could be passed by the ICC"

    "How can we arrange sports events until it is confirmed how many people have Covid-19"

    "I dont see the world functioning properly for a year so how will cricket be played then"

    "I would like to appeal to the PCB and to my friends also, is that there are former cricketers who are in desperate need for help, and it would be good if they had a source of pension or some people would come forward to help first-class cricketers and ancilliary staff"

    Last edited by MenInG; 21st April 2020 at 01:09.


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  27. #27
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    Officials have flagged up concerns about holding personal items due to Covid-19

    Bowlers will be asked to throw clothing and other items over the boundary rope

    Umpires will not be instructed to wear gloves — medical or otherwise

    Umpires will be allowed to refuse to take bowlers' caps and sweaters when the new season eventually gets under way.

    Officials have flagged up concerns about holding on to personal items during recent discussions with the ECB's umpires' manager, Chris Kelly.

    As a result, if cricket returns while Covid-19 is still a threat, bowlers will be asked to throw clothing and other things such as sunglasses beyond the boundary rope.

    Umpires will be allowed to refuse to take bowlers’ caps and sweaters when cricket returns

    However, umpires will not be instructed to wear gloves — medical or otherwise — to reduce the chances of contracting coronavirus by handling the ball.

    Officials are required to check the state of the ball in Twenty20 matches every time a six is struck, and when the ball is feared to have gone out of shape in first-class cricket, meaning they regularly come into contact with it. Balls thrown back by spectators would potentially increase the risk.

    But it will remain the umpire's choice as to whether they want to cover their hands, in line with ECB policy on protective gear such as arm guards, helmets and shin pads for their officials.

    The ECB only made the wearing of helmets mandatory for batters and close fielders in 2016 after a British standard was introduced and Sportsmail understands a similar process would need to take place before another firm directive on other specialist equipment is made.

    Meanwhile, it will be the responsibility of individual boards rather than the MCC, the sport's lawmakers, to decide whether the use of saliva to shine the ball is increasing the potential for contamination and adjust their playing regulations accordingly.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cr...t-returns.html
    Last edited by MenInG; 24th April 2020 at 01:44.

  28. #28
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    MUMBAI (Reuters) - From shining the ball to celebrating a dismissal - certain things may never be the same again when cricket restarts after the novel coronavirus pandemic, Indian batting great Sachin Tendulkar told Reuters.

    Cricketers use the age-old method of shining one side of the cricket ball with a combination of saliva and sweat, ostensibly to help bowlers generate more swing in the air.

    But with increased focus on social distancing and personal hygiene to contain the spread of the virus, the sport stares at a changing landscape.

    “Shining the ball will change I think,” Tendulkar, who will turn 47 on Friday, told Reuters in a telephone interview. “Everyone will be conscious of maintaining social distancing, giving high-fives to each other and hugging after celebrating the fall of a wicket.

    “I don’t think those things are going to happen. It may happen instinctively but consciously players would want to make sure that they follow certain norms. During this period personal hygiene has been at the forefront.”

    Cricket like all other sport has come to a grinding halt as countries closed borders and enforced lockdowns to fight the virus that has infected more than 2.66 million people globally and killed more than 186,000.

    Australia, South Africa and England have been among many who have been forced to postpone cricket tours to other countries while the cash-rich Indian Premier League Twenty20 tournament has been indefinitely suspended.

    With several bilateral series being wiped out, the new World Test Championship (WTC) is in doubt with its final between the top two sides scheduled in June next year at Lord’s.

    The nine top-ranked sides are scheduled play three series each at home and away to determine the finalists and Tendulkar feels everyone should get a fair chance.

    “I would like to believe that some tours are getting postponed rather than being called off,” said Tendulkar, who will not be celebrating his birthday as a mark of respect for frontline workers involved in the health crisis.

    “The whole world has come to a standstill, it applies to all cricket playing nations. The whole calendar can be moved forward a little bit without altering too many things.

    “I know the timings of the cricket season are different in different continents and that needs a closer look at.”

    Australia is scheduled to host the Twenty20 World Cup starting from October but Tendulkar feels it will be impossible to predict the fate of the tournament at this stage.

    “It’s not just about Australia, it’s also about making sure that the rest of the teams are also feeling safe enough to travel there,” he said.

    MENTAL HEALTH

    Tendulkar, the only cricketer to score 100 centuries across all formats, amassed 34,000-plus international runs in his glittering career and remains the most prolific scorer in both test and one-day internationals.

    Number of players have recently opened up on mental health issues and Tendulkar, who carried the burden of expectation of a cricket-mad nation for 24 years before retiring in 2013, advises striking the right balance.

    “I had a team around me all the time who would absorb most of the pressure so that I could be focussed only on the game and nothing else. That helped me,” he said, adding he still missed the camaraderie of the dressing room.

    “Every individual has to go through ups and downs. If one is going to get carried away with success and celebrate till the cows come home, that’s not going to work. There has to be a balance between celebration and disappointment.

    “The moment you start finding balance, the pressure automatically reduces. There’s multiple things happening around players and with social medial everything gets amplified so keeping that balance is crucial.”

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-he...-idUKKCN2252H2


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  29. #29
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    Responding to speculations that cricket is considering legalising ‘ball tampering’, so as to do away with bowlers shining the ball with their sweat or saliva, former India cricketer Ashish Nehra said artificial things like vaseline cannot give bowlers the desired effect and spitting on the ball is necessary for conventional swing.

    “Get one thing clear at the onset. The ball will not swing if you don’t apply sweat or saliva on the ball. That’s basic necessity of swing bowling. The moment ball gets scuffed up from one side, sweat and saliva must be applied on the other side,” Nehra, who completely shot down the idea of using external substances, told PTI.

    According to reports, the ICC is contemplating legalising ball tampering after play resumes after the coronavirus-induced stoppage by using artificial substances to prevent virus spread.

    Nehra said why vaseline or other artificial substances like bottle caps or sandpapers alone can’t help a pacer.

    “Now let’s understand why do you need saliva? Sweat is heavier than saliva but both are heavy enough to make one side of the ball heavier for reverse swing. Vaseline comes into the picture only after sweat and saliva, not before that.

    “It is lighter and doesn’t even ensure conventional swing. It can keep the shine but doesn’t make the ball heavy,” the World Cup-winning former pacer said.

    Whether it was advisable for bowlers to use their saliva to shine the ball had become a talking point in the Indian dressing room last month when they were to take on South Africa in a three-match ODI series. Bhuvneshwar Kumar had hinted at limiting the use of saliva but the bowlers were not really tested on that front as the series was called off due to the rising threat from the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Sachin Tendulkar had earlier said that not using saliva or sweat to shine the ball may be one of the many basic changes cricket could see after resumption. “Shining the ball will change I think,” Tendulkar, who will turn 47 on Friday, told Reuters. “Everyone will be conscious of maintaining social distancing, giving high-fives to each other and hugging after celebrating the fall of a wicket.

    https://indianexpress.com/article/sp...swing-6379086/


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  30. #30
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    Gentlemen never spit on the ball. It is a tradition which was brought to the game by some teams and sadly everyone's started following it.

  31. #31
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    I have a question which is this: if someone have covid 19, wouldn't they pass it on anyway regardless of saliva being used or not?


    SM

  32. #32
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  33. #33
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    Substitutions for players infected by COVID-19 and legalising the use of artificial substances to shine the ball are reportedly among measures being considered by the International Cricket Council as the game looks towards a resumption of play.

    While Cricket Australia negotiates the possibility of exemptions for international teams to tour with the government, attention is also focused on the on-field effects of the coronavirus.

    One of the main conundrums facing administrators is how to allow fielding teams to maintain the ball, with the traditional use of spit and saliva under the microscope due the increased risk of transmitting the disease.

    A chorus of former fast bowlers, including Australians Jason Gillespie and Shaun Tait and New Zealand great Richard Hadlee, have all suggested the use of saliva to shine the ball could be a thing of the past once cricket resumes.

    But Australia opener David Warner believes a ban on using saliva would be unnecessary, arguing that being in close confines to fellow players would be just as much of a risk factor.

    "You're sharing changerooms and you're sharing everything else, I don't see why you have to change that," Warner told cricket.com.au.

    "It's been going around for hundreds of years now, I can't recall anyone that's got sick by doing that.

    "If you're going to contract a bug, I don't think it'd necessarily be just from that.

    "I'm not too sure but it's not my place to comment on whether or not we should or shouldn't (use saliva to shine the ball). It's up to the ICC and the governing bodies to decide."

    Warner’s comments come after an ESPN report that said authorities are considering the possibility of allowing artificial substances to be used to maintain the ball instead of saliva and sweat.

    Gillespie recently labelled the traditional ball-shining practice "pretty gross" and suggested umpires could be asked to police the shining of the ball, while Tait also expects the practice to be scrapped once games resume.

    "I've never been a huge fan of the saliva on the ball, it's not very nice really," Tait said. "We have to open to some possible changes there."

    Hadlee, meanwhile, called for an "enlarged seam to give the bowlers more assistance".

    The issue is less of an issue in limited-overs cricket, but Australia quick Josh Hazlewood says "Test cricket would be very hard" if the ball could no longer be shined.

    "Bowlers rely on any sort of sideways movement in the air. If you didn’t maintain the ball at all for 80 overs it would be quite easy to bat after that initial shine has gone," he said.

    “Whether you use saliva or sweat, maybe one person can do it. I’m not sure. It’s something that will have to be talked about when we get back out there and hopefully come up with a solution."

    Another idea to emerge is to allow players to be isolated and substituted out of a Test match if issues arise mid-game, much like how concussion substitutes were introduced to the game last year.

    An ICC spokesperson said: "This is something that is expected to be discussed by the cricket and medical committees as part of the move of trying to get cricket back on."

    Meanwhile, Australia's plans to secure exemptions for international teams to visit this summer has gained traction.

    Fifteen international teams are due to arrive for the T20 World Cup in October, before the highly-anticipated Border-Gavaskar Test series against India.

    A spokesperson from the Prime Minister's office said this week: "The Prime Minister and the government have always had a strong relationship with Cricket Australia given the partnership on the annual PM's XI fixture.

    "The government will continue to engage with Cricket Australia on its plans to recommence play at both a professional and community level, including any requests for exemptions to be applied by the Australian Border Force."

    It has been reported international teams may be required to isolate for 14 days either side of their journey to Australia, while the potential for the creation of a 'biosecure' hub - possibly at the Adelaide Oval's soon-to-be-completed 128 bed hotel built into the eastern grandstand - has been discussed.

    https://www.cricket.com.au/news/coro...iva/2020-04-29


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  34. #34
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    Melbourne, May 2 (IANS) In Australia, the use of saliva or sweat to shine the ball will be restricted once cricket training returns in the post coronavirus world. The federal government in Australia has released a framework regarding the staged return of sports amid the pandemic under the title "The Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) Framework for rebooting sport in a COVID-19 environment" available on the official government website.

    AIS, in consultation with medical experts, sporting bodies and federal and state governments, has come up with guidelines wherein they have restricted the use of saliva and sweat to shine the ball.

    The framework, which outlines a staged return to play, has three stages -- Level A, Level B and Level C. Currently, sports is outlined as being at "Level A", which restricts all training except that of the individual kind. "Running/aerobic training (solo), resistance training (solo), skills training (solo)."

    However, in probably a week''s time, it will move to "Level B" which will allow the following: "Nets -- batters facing bowlers. Limit bowlers per net. Fielding sessions -- unrestricted. No warm up drills involving unnecessary person-person contact. No shining cricket ball with sweat/saliva during training."

    The third and final "Level C", to be permitted later in the year, is outlined as: "Full training and competition. No ball shining with sweat/saliva in training."

    Meanwhile, Cricket Australia also welcomed Prime Minister Scott Morrison''s announcement regarding national principles for the recommencement of community and professional sport, as agreed by the national cabinet.

    "As and when restrictions are lifted, CA will seek advice from medical experts including our own Chief Medical Officer, John Orchard, and relevant government agencies to support the cricket community with protocols and guidelines that allow community cricket to recommence as early and as safely as possible," CA said in a statement.

    "Cricket Australia will continue to work with government to prepare a comprehensive biosecurity plan to ensure we are as prepared as possible to deliver elite cricket content on Australian soil, including an exciting summer of cricket highlighted by the ICC T20 World Cup 2020 and the Border-Gavaskar Test series between Australia and India," it added.

    In the framework, there are also guidelines for training and management of illness in elite sports.

    "Individuals should not return to sport if in the last 14 days they have been unwell or had contact with a known or suspected case of COVID-19.

    "Athletes returning to sport after COVID-19 infection require special consideration prior to resumption of high intensity physical activity.

    "Resumption of sporting activity may not be linear. Increasing restrictions may be required in response to fluctuating numbers of COVID-19 cases."

    The government has said that the AIS framework is a "timely tool" for ''how'' reintroduction of sport activity will occur in a cautious and methodical manner, to optimise athlete and community safety.

    https://www.outlookindia.com/newsscr...y-plan/1821398


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  35. #35
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    Australian manufacturer Kookaburra has developed a wax applicator that would allow cricket balls to be shined without using sweat or saliva and believes it could be ready to use within a month.

    The time-honoured methods of polishing - which are crucial to the art of swing bowling - appear to be incompatible with health advice regarding transmission of Covid-19 and there is a possibility the use of bodily fluids could be temporarily banned when top-level cricket finally returns.

    The laws of cricket explicitly state that fielders must not use "artificial substances" to alter the condition of the ball but the idea that umpires would oversee the process, or even use the sponge applicator on behalf of the bowling team, provides a possible solution.

    Inspired by existing products used in the footwear industry, Kookaburra has been busy working on a compound that would help bowlers avoid becoming disadvantaged in a post-coronavirus context.

    Brett Elliott, group managing director of the brand, told the PA news agency: "The most effective mitigating action to avoid risk would be to introduce a temporary ban on the traditional shining method. This could be immediately introduced, enabling cricket to resume as soon as it is safe.

    "Kookaburra's research and development centre in Australia has been working on a product to replace the traditional methods of polishing a ball that could be controlled and managed by the match umpire. We have developed a unique wax formula for polishing a cricket ball.

    "The pocket size sponge applicator would enable umpires or players to apply a thin layer of wax which could then be rubbed and polished in a traditional manner to enhance the shine on the ball.

    "This could be available within a month, however has it yet to be tested in a match conditions as the ability to complete real trial matches at the moment is inhibited.

    "It may not be something we need to make forever, it's designed to get cricket back and give administrators time to make decisions. Nobody was calling out for this 12 months ago so maybe it is more of an interim measure."

    Chief among the company's thinking has been a desire to preserve the existing balance between the game's various disciplines.

    "It's important that a change to the method of ball polishing does not provide favour to one bowling discipline over another; the beauty of cricket is that it encourages teams to use a range of bowling skills and it would be a shame to lose any of them," said Elliott.

    "The ultimate objective and challenge faced by manufacturers and administrators is to ensure the balance between bat and ball is preserved."

    Elliott also referred to an idea longer in gestation, a ball made from entirely artificial materials. In the past that has primarily attracted interest from animal rights group and vegan activists but has now entered the current pandemic conversation.

    "Kookaburra has been working for several years on the development of a synthetic ball to avoid the use of leather. This ball would not require traditional polishing," he added.

    The England and Wales Cricket Board use Dukes as supplier of their red Test balls, as do Ireland and the West Indies, India use SG and the rest of the full member nations opt for Kookburra, which makes all white balls for limited-overs cricket.

    Elliott confirmed the new product would be available for use by any international boards on either red or white balls.

    As guardians of the laws, MCC will surely take a keen interest in developments, while the International Cricket Council have a number of steps it could take before signing off.

    A report from its medical committee advising against the use of sweat and saliva would be first, followed by consideration by the cricket committee and finally a go ahead from international chief executives. PA

    https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/...-a9497826.html


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  36. #36
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    Shane Warne has suggested using weighted cricket balls to help ensure bowlers can generate swing when the game resumes post-coronavirus.

    Sweat and saliva are generally used to keep one side of the ball shiny but bodily fluids could yet be temporarily outlawed on health grounds once the game restarts after the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Australian cricket-ball manufacturer Kookaburra are developing a device - which could be available within the month - that would allow a thin layer of wax to be added to the ball.

    But Warne has suggested an alternative, one he feels will help bowlers on flat tracks and eradicate any future danger of ball-tampering.

    https://www.skysports.com/cricket/ne...st-coronavirus

  37. #37
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    Added poll.


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  38. #38
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    Former India opener Gautam Gambhir reckons that cricketers will have to learn to live with the coronavirus and that they will have to observe social distancing.

    However, he doesn't think that cricket will ring in changes in rules apart from probably finding an alternative to saliva to shine ball.

    "I don't think a lot of rules and regulations will be changed, you can probably have an alternate for the usage of saliva apart from that I don't think so many changes will happen," Gambhir said on Star Sports' Cricket Connected.

    All major cricket events across the world have been suspended with no definite timeline set for resumption.

    However, Gambhir says then once the action resumes, unless a vaccine has been found, everyone will have to adjust to the new environment triggered by the deadly virus.

    "Players and everyone else need to live with this virus; probably they have to get used to it that there is a virus and that it will be around. Players might end up catching it, and you got to live with it," said Gambhir who scored over 10,000 runs during his international career.

    He does feel that while cricket may find it easier to observe the social distancing measures but in other contact sports it will be a big challenge. "Social distancing and other rules may not be easy for any sport to maintain. You can still manage to do it with cricket, but how will you do it in football, hockey and other sports as well. So, I think you just have to live with it, probably the sooner you accept it, the better it is," he said.

    https://www.cricketcountry.com/news/...mpression=true

  39. #39
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    Australia speedster Pat Cummins isn’t worried about the prospect of banning the practice of applying saliva as long as there are other options available to shine the cricket ball.

    There’s an ongoing raging debate on whether International Cricket Council (ICC) should legalise ball-tampering so that the bowlers can continue to generate swing in the eventuality that saliva is banned in the backdrop of coronavirus pandemic.

    “Things will change in all sports, I agree. But I think there has to be some other option. Saliva or any another substance, as long as we are able to shine the ball, I am okay,” Cummins told Kolkata Knight Riders during an online chat from Australia.

    He added, “As a fast bowler, you gotta be able to shine the ball. The reason why everyone loves Test cricket is because it has so much art to it. You have swing bowlers, spinners, you have all these different aspects that make Test cricket what it is.”

    With the game heavily titled in the favour of batsmen, Cummins is in no mood to give more leeway. “I think if you can’t shine the ball, it takes away swing bowling, reverse swing bowling…so much really. Honestly, I wouldn’t want to give batsmen any reason to score more runs,” the 27-year-old said.

    KKR picked Cummins for a record-breaking Rs 15.5 crore during December auction last year and thus made him the costliest overseas player in IPL history.

    He thanked KKR coach Brendon McCullum among others for showing faith in him. “I owe Baz (McCullum) and the rest of the staff who picked me a few dinners at least. Someone like Baz, I have played against him, is a great cricketer and an international captain,” he said.

    “To get that kind of reassurance that ‘you’ve got something that I really want in the team’ is great for me. I think a big contract brings big responsibilities, but more than anything, it brings a lot of excitement,” he added.

    However, the ICC Test Cricketer of The Year says he won’t be bogged down by his hefty price-tag. “Once you are out there, you forget about the contract really quickly, and it’s mainly about being with the team and trying to win. I am really excited to be with the squad we put together for this season,” he said.

    Cummins is staying put at his farmhouse during the coronavirus lockdown and is enjoying the down time away from what otherwise is a punishing schedule being a professional cricketer.

    “Over here, I can still go for runs, and I have a basic weights setup. We have some cows here, who I have been feeding. I have also been doing some gardening jobs. So yeah, enjoying the fresh air quite a bit. There is absolutely no cricketer here on the farm. Hopefully it stays that way, it is my getaway spot from cricket. We are on the road so much usually, I come here to take those breaks,” he said

    https://www.cricketcountry.com/news/...cummins-928869


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  40. #40
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    NEW DELHI: According to reports, the International Cricket Council (ICC) is considering legalising the usage of artificial substances under the supervision of the umpires, instead of saliva and sweat to shine the ball. Australia has already banned the use of saliva and sweat on cricket balls.

    Former India pacer Venkatesh Prasad is not in the favour of using any external substance on the leather. Prasad, who played 33 Tests and 161 ODIs for India and was one of the key bowlers in the side, feels the one alternative of saliva, when cricket resumes, can be sweat.

    “Whether it's the International Cricket Council (ICC) or BCCI or other sports bodies, they need to find some sort of a framework. For example, I'm talking about IPL. Probably, what I would do is, if this has to go on, if the show has to go on, then I would probably ask the players to travel on chartered flights instead of on regular flights. So, that's one way of distancing oneself, having a social distance and maintaining the hygiene aspect as well. So, those are the things that one can work around,” Prasad told Timesofindia.com in an exclusive interview.

    “And obviously completely taking saliva out of the equation. Nobody can use saliva of course. No matter how healthy, no matter how fit one is, I think for the time being saliva should be really removed. Yes, it is a major weapon for a fast bowler and especially a swing bowler and one thing for sure (is) that you cannot allow any external object or any external things to be used on the leather (ball). I'm completely against it. You cannot use anything. Probably the only thing that can be allowed or that would be possible is to apply is sweat," the 50-year-old veteran pacer said.

    Bowlers use saliva to shine one side of the ball in an attempt to generate swing or movement in the air. Prasad said the ban of saliva will affect fast bowlers and medium pacers to a great extent. He also said the ban of saliva will snatch a weapon from a fast bowler’s armoury.

    “It's 100 percent. It is going to totally take the most crucial part out of a bowler's skills. But then again, you've got to go by the environment, you've got to adapt. That's what the sportsmen are. They should know how to adapt. You should be able to adapt to different conditions, different environments. So, this is one such environment, which is very unfortunate. But then what's very important is the safety of people, safety of players, safety of the spectators. So, whenever cricket resumes, it will take some time for people to think about what has happened and how serious the situation is or was and adapt to those changes. Every single individual needs to adapt to changes. They need to change their lifestyle now. They've got to be extremely hygienic. They have to maintain social distancing and we have been talking about it. So, in that sense, we are fortunate that cricket is not a sport which has much contact. It's not like rugby or football. So, in that sense, when things settle down, I think cricket should start very soon. I don't know how long it's going to take, maybe two months, maybe four months, six months, I'm not very sure about it," Prasad said.

    “It's also important for the board (BCCI) to think about. Yes, of course the health aspect that they have thought about, no doubt about it. But also, they need to look at the money coming into the coffers as well. It's not just the cricket or football federations or any sport for that matter or tennis federations, they all are losing money. So, whichever is a non-contact sport, I think that should be allowed,” he said.

    Since there is no decision on the cash-rich Indian Premier League (IPL) 2020 season and the upcoming T20 World Cup yet, the players around the world are eagerly waiting to hit the field. IPL was scheduled to start on March 29 but the tournament was first postponed to April 15 and then suspended till further notice due to the COVID-19 pandemic

    Will it be difficult for the players to get their mojo back once they hit the field after the lockdown is over? Prasad, who played 33 Tests and 161 ODIs for India advised players to spend as much time in the gym and work out rigorously as possible.

    “You might not be physically involved in anything but there is something that you can always visualise - the mental side of the game. Keep playing those scenarios in your mind, visualise those scenarios. And if you're recording any of your matches or your performances - bowling or batting, whatever, try and watch those batting and bowling performances. And try to recreate those moments when you tackled the pressure and how you came up victorious. So, try and create those mentally. Visualising helps a lot in terms of getting your performances to another level,” the former India fast bowler said.

    “I would say enjoy the break. Enjoy the lockdown. Enjoy as much as time with your family. Our cricketers spend so much time away from family. They travel most of the time and are busy in meeting the expectations of billions. I think this is a good time to take a break, (get over) injuries and niggles, if you have got. Spend as much time in the gym in your home and work out. You can do a lot of video calls and stuff like that with your trainers and physios. You don't have to really go and visit them so you can always do it on your own, using technology. And also, even if you don't have any gym set up, if you don't have any training equipment, just go up and down the house. If you're living in an apartment, climb the stairs. I will advise them to cover about 10 kilometers a day,” he said.

    “You got to experiment and you've got to come up with some ideas. The thing is that you can't be practicing. You don't have the bowling or the batting opportunities to go and practice your skills, but then that is how it is. This is all I want to convey to the budding and professional cricketers,” the 50-year-old, who took 96 Test and 196 ODI wickets said.

    Indian fans will always remember Prasad, who formed an attacking new ball bowling partnership, with Javagal Srinath, for the infamous 1996 World Cup incident, when he after being hit for a boundary and sledged by Pakistan’s Aamir Sohail, clean bowled the Pakistan batsman off the very next ball.

    Prasad, who last played for India in 2001 also spoke about his life under lockdown.

    “I am helping my wife. I'm working on a course which is affiliated to the University of London. It is called International sport management. That's exactly what I'm doing. It's a post-graduation certificate of international sports management. And at the moment, I'm doing sports strategy governance and leadership. That's one module. And the other one that I'm doing is international sport development. I'm positioning myself for certain things. Let's see how it goes,” Prasad signed off.

    https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...9.cms?from=mdr


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  41. #41
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    West Indies fast-bowling great Michael Holding has expressed doubts about the proposed use of artificial substance to shine the ball in the post-COVID-19 world.

    Holding said it was natural for bowlers to apply saliva or sweat to the ball to make it shine and thereby gain swing.

    “It is going to be difficult [for bowlers]. The natural inclination for any bowler, once he gets that ball in his hands is to apply saliva or apply sweat and then put it on the ball, that’s natural,” the legendary pacer said on the Sony Ten Pit Stop show.

    Australian ball-manufacturer Kookaburra recently started developing a wax applicator as an alternative to saliva or sweat to shine the ball, but Holding said it could be a logistical nightmare. “Obviously over a period of time, you will learn and you will adjust. I’m hearing talks about producing some sort of polish that the umpires will take, will keep and you shine the ball in front of the umpire. I am not too sure on how that’s going to work, to be honest,” he said.

    'Logistical nightmare'

    “What sort of polish is that going to be, will it be something that stick on your fingers, will it be slippery, because if that is something that is slippery, you don’t want to be having slippery fingers, to grip the ball it is going to be more difficult, I am waiting to hear all the details. It is going to be a different world and as far as I am concerned it will be a logical nightmare to keep all those things in place,” he said.

    Holding said he didn’t understand the fuss about using saliva when the idea was the resume cricket in a biosecure environment.

    “At the moment when you are talking about playing in a biosecure environment ... no spectators, everyone has to be in two-week lockdown before they get into the venue. So that means everyone inside that venue should be free of COVID-19. Then I am not sure why you have to worry about saliva or perspiration ... if you are not confident about the two-week period proving enough that you are free of COVID-19, you should not be playing,” he said.

    https://sportstar.thehindu.com/crick...le31572333.ece


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  42. #42
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    There will be changes with attitudes towards health and hygiene after Covid and Cricket will be no exception.

  43. #43
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    CRICKET COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS PROHIBITION OF SALIVA TO SHINE THE BALL

    The ICC Cricket Committee today recommended changes to ICC regulations to mitigate the risks posed by the COVID-19 virus, and protect the safety of players and match officials.

    The Committee, chaired by Anil Kumble, concluded a conference call convened to specifically address issues related to COVID-19 including maintaining the condition of the match ball and the appointment of non-neutral umpires and referees to international cricket. The recommendations of the Cricket Committee will now be presented to the ICC Chief Executives’ Committee in early June for approval.

    Match Ball

    The ICC Cricket Committee heard from the Chair of the ICC Medical Advisory Committee Dr Peter Harcourt regarding the elevated risk of the transmission of the virus through saliva, and unanimously agreed to recommend that the use of saliva to polish the ball be prohibited.

    The Committee also noted the medical advice that it is highly unlikely that the virus can be transmitted through sweat and saw no need to prohibit the use of sweat to polish the ball whilst recommending that enhanced hygiene measures are implemented on and around the playing field.

    Non-Neutral Umpires and referees to international matches

    The current regulations that apply to the appointment of match officials to men’s Test, ODI and T20I matches are summarised below. Since 2002, officials appointed by the ICC must not be from the same country as the participating teams.


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    Given the challenges of international travel with borders being closed, limited commercial flights and mandatory quarantine periods, the Committee recommended that local match officials be appointed in the short-term.

    The appointments will continue to be made via the ICC from local Elite and International Panel referees and umpires. Where there are no Elite Panel match officials in the country, the best local International Panel match officials will be appointed.

    The Committee also recommended that the use of technology is increased to support the appointments of a wider pool of umpires from around the world and has proposed an additional DRS review per team per innings is introduced in each format as an interim measure.

    ICC Cricket Committee Chair Anil Kumble said: “We are living through extraordinary times and the recommendations the Committee have made today are interim measures to enable us to safely resume cricket in a way that preserves the essence of our game whilst protecting everyone involved.”
    Last edited by MenInG; 18th May 2020 at 21:44.


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  44. #44
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    Temporarily, yes it should be banned but once things get back to normal it should not be prohibited in my opinion. It has been apart of the game for many years, no need to change.

  45. #45
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    Rules are the same for both teams so nothing wrong with it

  46. #46
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    Michael Holding suggested it should be allowed because if you are creating a bio secure environment and asking players to isolate and testing them regularly there is no reasons why they should be transmitting an infection.

  47. #47
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    A key focus as and when cricket resumes. Bowlers will need to adapt accordingly.

  48. #48
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    MELBOURNE, May 20 (Reuters) - Cricket Australia (CA) is exploring the possibility of disinfecting the ball during matches to minimise the health risk to players during the COVID-19 pandemic, the head of its medical team said on Wednesday.

    Player health is a major concern as the game seeks to return from the coronavirus shutdown and the International Cricket Council's cricket committee has recommended a ban on shining the ball with saliva.
    "Disinfecting the ball is a consideration," CA Sports Science and Sports Medicine Manager Alex Kountouris said in a video-conference.

    "We don't know the impact on the ball because we haven't tested it. We'd obviously have to test it, we'd have to speak to the ICC and get permission..."
    "The ball being leather, it's harder to disinfect because it's got little nooks and crevices.
    "So we don't know how effective it's going to be, we don't know how infected the ball is going to get and we don't know if it’s going to be allowed.

    "But it's absolutely a consideration. Everything is on the table at the moment, everything is being considered."

    Kountouris said the proposed ban on shining the ball with saliva would be difficult for players to get used to.

    "Some people are used to licking their fingers before they grab the ball. People are used to shining the ball with their fingers ... there are going to be mistakes at some point," he added.

    "I imagine we are going to take a commonsense approach and understand that people make mistakes and things are not going to be perfect." (Reporting by Amlan Chakraborty in New Delhi; editing by Peter Rutherford)

    https://www.eurosport.co.uk/cricket/...25/story.shtml
    Last edited by BoomBoomCricket; 20th May 2020 at 13:58.

  49. #49
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    SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australia quick Josh Hazlewood says the proposed ban on cricketers using saliva to shine the ball will be difficult to police but ultimately might not make much difference to the art of swing bowling.

    The International Cricket Council’s (ICC) cricket committee has recommended the ban on the use of spit when the sport returns after the coronavirus shutdown because of fears it could lead to the spread of COVID-19.

    Cricketers have long used saliva and sweat to shine one side of the ball, altering the aerodynamics in an attempt to generate movement in the air as it flies towards the batsman.

    Sweat, which carries less risk of transmission, will still be allowed if the ban is enforced but Hazlewood thought it would be tough for umpires to end the practise of applying a bit of spit to the ball.

    “I’d like saliva to be used obviously but if that’s what they’ve put forward, I guess everyone is playing the same game,” he told Sydney’s Daily Telegraph.

    “Once it comes back to you as a bowler, it’s second nature to just give it a little touch up if you see something, and that’s going to be hard to stop to be honest. And it’s a tough thing to monitor for sure.”

    Hazlewood, while admitting he had no medical training, questioned whether the measure was necessary at all given that players live in each other’s pockets during matches.

    As to whether it would make much of a difference to the effectiveness of pace bowling, Hazlewood was uncertain.

    “Sweat probably makes (the ball) a bit wetter if that makes sense. Makes it a bit heavier,” he added.

    “I think you’ll use very small amounts because people have sweaty hands anyway and it gets on the ball ... I don’t think this will have as big an impact as what people think.”

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-he...-idUKKBN22W043


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  50. #50
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    SYDNEY, May 20 (Reuters) - Australia quick Pat Cummins wants cricket’s lawmakers to approve the use of an artificial substance to shine the ball after a ban on the use of saliva was recommended in the wake of the COVID-19 health crisis.

    The International Cricket Council’s (ICC) cricket committee has recommended the ban on the use of spit when the sport returns after the coronavirus shutdown because of fears it could lead to the spread of COVID-19.

    Cricketers have long used saliva and sweat to shine one side of the ball, altering the aerodynamics in an attempt to generate movement in the air as it flies towards the batsman.

    "If we remove saliva, we have to have another option," Cummins told the cricket.com.au website here

    “Sweat’s not bad, but I think we need something more than that, ideally. Whatever that is, wax or I don’t know what.

    “If that’s what that science is telling us, that it’s high risk using saliva ... as long as we’re keeping other options open, whether that’s sweat or something artificial.”

    Earlier this month, Australian cricket-ball manufacturer Kookaburra said it had developed a wax applicator to enhance shine and aid swing.

    Cummins’ team mate and fellow quick Josh Hazlewood said the proposed ban on saliva would be difficult to police.

    “I’d like saliva to be used obviously but if that’s what they’ve put forward (a ban), I guess everyone is playing the same game,” he told Sydney’s Daily Telegraph.

    “Once it comes back to you as a bowler, it’s second nature to just give it a little touch up if you see something, and that’s going to be hard to stop to be honest. And it’s a tough thing to monitor for sure.”

    Cricket Australia (CA) is also considering disinfecting the ball during matches to minimise the health risk to players, the head of its medical team said on Wednesday. (Reporting by Nick Mulvenney and Amlan Chakraborty, editing by Peter Rutherford and Ken Ferris)

    https://www.reuters.com/article/heal...-idUSL4N2D22OZ


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  51. #51
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    India's premier spinner Ravichandran Ashwin feels putting saliva on the ball is a habit and it will take some practice to get rid of it when cricket resumes in the post COVID-19 world. The ICC Cricket Committee recommended a ban on use of saliva in its meeting earlier this week. "I don't know (when is) the next time I go out there. It is natural for me to put saliva. It's going to take some practice (to not apply saliva). But I think, if we all have to co-exist, which is the DNA of human race, we will have to try and adapt to this," Ashwin said during an Instagram chat with Delhi Capitals.

    Talking about his carrom ball, Ashwin said it roughly took him four years to develop it.

    "It's more about trying these variations and the disappointments you get with it. Imagine try to play carrom with your middle finger and you're trying to push a cricket ball of that weight that cannot be compressed and you are trying to push it with velocity and trying it to spin.

    "It's no mean achievement. Your finger, body need to understand it so on and so forth," said the man who has taken 365 wickets in 71 Tests.

    "For me, when I was trying this carrom ball, I was expecting it to get it right everyday. But everyday despite bowling hundreds of deliveries, I will return home with disappointment of not being able to achieve what I had set out to achieve.

    "That was a very very annoying state because you go through the practice and all with a dream in your head. But it does not pan out as quickly as you expected."

    And then he tried reverse carrom. "I tried the reverse carrom, which I bowl at will now. I have been trying the googly. All these things tested my patience. But I feel when it tests your patience is when you need to be extra hard working, extra rudimentary and extra confident of your skills."

    The social distancing norms in the post COVID-19 world will be a throwback to the 70's and 80s when there were no exaggerated celebrations.

    "If you watch those classic games of 1970 or 80s, wicket celebration was people use to stand away from each other and keep clapping, you never really had high five's and wrist pumps. It developed much later in the game."

    On a pragmatic note, Ashwin said that COVID-19 is nature's way of showing that human race needs to respect planet earth.

    "I probably think, this is the whole way the elephant in the room - COVID19, is probably a lesson for humanity in the whole - of trying to tell us - hey you know what try and take a back step, you know you are stamping my feet all the time, you are spoiling nature, you are not listening to what is required, because humanity thrives - our race is thrived because of what planet is.

    "It is unfair how much we have inflicted damage on it, so I think that is an extension what the game should be like. We should also understand that we need to appreciate all these things, maintain a certain sense of decorum and dignity, probably," he said.

    https://sports.ndtv.com/ipl-2020/rav...of-it-2232394?


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  52. #52
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    Balaji fears for bowlers with ban on use of saliva


    Cricket has favoured batsmen since inception. And in the COVID-19 era, where natural body fluids, including saliva, will not be allowed to shine the ball with, the bowlers are likely to be marginalised even more.

    Now there are calls for ‘ball-tampering’ to be legalised to restore a semblance of balance between the bat and the ball.

    A feeling of deja vu is unavoidable considering the uproar Sandpapergate involving two of Australia’s biggest names, Steve Smith and David Warner, caused not too long ago.

    Former India paceman and Chennai Super Kings bowling coach L. Balaji fears for the bowlers in these times.

    Polished and shiny
    Balaji said to The Hindu, “From a young age, bowlers are trained to use sweat and saliva on the ball to keep one side polished, shiny and lighter while the other side gradually becomes heavier.”

    Balaji, among the heroes of India’s historic Test series triumph in Pakistan in 2004, elaborated, “In fact, the entire team ‘works’ on the ball to ‘maintain’ it. And the use of sweat and saliva is mandatory and legal.”

    The lanky former paceman observed, “For the pacemen to achieve conventional and reverse swing, or seam movement, and even for the spinners to get the ball to drift, the weight of the ball and how one side is maintained is vital.”

    He added, “Once the ball is looked after, factors such as crosswind, headwind, bowling with the breeze and the cloud cover play a part.”

    Fascinating conversation
    Balaji recalled a fascinating conversation with Pakistani legend Wasim Akram on the subject.

    “Akram told me once the ball started doing something, the Pakistani pacemen would not even allow the fielders to touch a part of the ball with their palm.”

    He elaborated, “Akram revealed the palm would be very sweaty and would make one side very heavy, disturbing the delicate balance needed for reverse swing.”

    As it is
    Balaji said, “You see, the ball only swings conventionally and reverses for a few overs and at that point, when the sphere reaches that state, you have to leave the ball as it is to inflict maximum damage during those phases.”

    He added, “The heavy and sweaty palm would alter that delicate balance. It’s a science where the weight of the ball is crucial.”

    What are the options before the cricketing world now? Balaji is against legalising ball tampering.

    “When you start tampering, where would you draw the line? How can you say so much tampering is legal and after that it is illegal.”

    He is unsure about ICC allowing external substances such as Vaseline to shine the ball. There have been cases when the ball has swung excessively with Vaseline.

    Balaji said, “We have to go by trial and error method. Perhaps a substance such as a sanitiser with which you clean tables and other surfaces can be tried on the ball. But I am not sure.”

    These are unprecedented times and the answers are complicated.

    https://www.thehindu.com/sport/balaj...le31634664.ece


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  53. #53
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    Maybe manufacturers and law makers should begin looking at the balls too. These Kookaburras, especially the white ones don't give bowlers as much assistance as they used to. Exaggerating the seam or something to get more movement might help compensate for lack of polishing?

  54. #54
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    With an eye on the coronavirus pandemic, the International Cricket Council’s (ICC) Cricket Committee has recommended banning the use of saliva to polish the match ball. While all former and current players believe that it important to ensure safety at this time, they also believe that it will be slightly difficult to keep off the natural habit of using spit to shine the ball.

    Speaking on Star Sports’ show Cricket Connected, Brett Lee said: “When you have done something your whole life from 8,9, 10 years of age where you lick your fingers and you put on the ball, it’s very hard to change that overnight too. So, I think there’s going to be a couple of occasions, or there’s going to be some leniency I think from the ICC, where there may be warnings. It’s a great initiative, it’s going to be very hard to implement I think, because cricketers have done this for their whole life.”

    The ICC in its statement said: “The ICC Cricket Committee heard from the Chair of the ICC Medical Advisory Committee Dr Peter Harcourt regarding the elevated risk of the transmission of the virus through saliva, and unanimously agreed to recommend that the use of saliva to polish the ball be prohibited.

    “The committee also noted the medical advice that it is highly unlikely that the virus can be transmitted through sweat and saw no need to prohibit the use of sweat to polish the ball whilst recommending that enhanced hygiene measures are implemented on and around the playing field.”

    Interestingly, Australia pacer Josh Hazlewood has also said that it is almost second nature to use saliva to keep shine on the ball to help it to swing. “I’d like saliva to be used obviously but if that’s what they’ve put forward, I guess everyone is playing the same game,” he told Sydney’s Daily Telegraph.

    “Once it comes back to you as a bowler, it’s second nature to just give it a little touch up if you see something, and that’s going to be hard to stop to be honest. And it’s a tough thing to monitor for sure,” he added.

    https://www.hindustantimes.com/crick...4cSIQQtqO.html


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  55. #55
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    ICC cricket committee chairman Anil Kumble says the recommendation to ban saliva for shining the ball is only an interim measure and “things will go back to normal” once the COVID-19 pandemic is brought under control.

    The Kumble-led panel recommended a ban on saliva to minimise the risk of infection. On Friday, the ICC, in its guidelines for resumption of the game, also suggested a bar on the practice.

    ”This is only an interim measure and as long as we have hopefully control over COVID in a few months or a year’s time then I think things will go back to as normal as it can be,” Kumble told Star Sports show ‘Cricket Connected.’

    The ban on saliva has elicited a mixed response from the bowlers, who said it would definitely come in the way of generating swing. But most have also acknowledged the health risk that it might pose.

    There have also been discussions on whether the ICC would allow usage of external substances like wax to shine the ball. Kumble said there were discussions on the usage of external substances.

    ”If you look back at the history of the game, I mean we have been very critical and we have been very focused on eliminating any external substances coming into the game,” Kumble said of the speculation.

    “Whether you are literally legalising, if you are looking to do that now which obviously has had a great impact over the last couple of years,” he added.

    He cited the 2018 ball-tampering scandal, which led to bans on Australian cricketers Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft.

    “ICC took a decision but then cricket Australia took, even a more tougher stance on what happened during that series between South Africa and Australia, so we did consider that,” he said.

    https://sportstar.thehindu.com/crick...le31663288.ece


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  56. #56
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    Cricket "Will Become Even More Batsmen Friendly" With Saliva Ban, Says Irfan Pathan

    Irfan Pathan reckons that the ban on using saliva for shining the ball is a significant blow to bowlers and authorities should ensure the preparation of bowling-friendly Test wickets to prevent complete domination of the game by the batsmen.

    Irfan Pathan was one of the best exponents of swing bowling in Indian cricket.

    1. Irfan Pathan called saliva ban a significant blow to bowlers
    2. He asked authorities to ensure preparation of bowling-friendly wickets
    3. ICC cricket committee has recommended a ban on use of saliva

    Former India pacer Irfan Pathan reckons that the ban on using saliva for shining the ball is a significant blow to bowlers and authorities should ensure the preparation of bowling-friendly Test wickets to prevent complete domination of the game by the batsmen. The ICC cricket committee, led by former India captain Anil Kumble, has recommended a ban on use of saliva as an interim measure to combat the coronavirus threat. Pathan feels the ban could even stretch up to two years and will give undue advantage to batsmen.

    "You will to have make sure that pithes are more suitable to the bowlers than batsmen to negate the advantage (of not being able use saliva). If you are not able to shine the ball properly, you will not be able to cut the air because of scientific reasons.

    "And if you are not able to swing it, the batsman will have it easy because nobody fears just pace, it is the combination of pace and swing that troubles them," Pathan, one of the best exponents of swing bowling in Indian cricket, told PTI on Sunday.

    "It (ban) will affect bowlers a lot in Test matches. It won't be an issue in white-ball cricket as the bowlers anyway don't shine the ball after the first few overs, they want to make it soft (to make strokeplay tougher for the batsman).

    "But in red-ball cricket, whether you are a fast bowler or spinner, you need to shine the ball. Spinner relies on shine to drift the ball. That will be a big advantage for batsman. The game will become even more batsmen friendly," said the first Indian pacer to take a Test hat-trick.

    More than grass on the pitch, Pathan would prefer moisture beneath it.

    "If you look at England and Australia, there is not much grass but there is moisture and it helps bowlers.

    "You need to make sure that something happens for the bowler. If not through the ball, then through the conditions. If the conditions are helpful for bowlers they don't look for reverse swing, they go for conventional swing," said the 35-year-old.

    Pathan said reverse swing only works with extreme pace, which according to him is rare in modern-day cricket.

    "For reverse swing, if you can't hide the ball, then the batsman knows which way the ball would come unless you are bowling 150 kmph plus and there are very few bowlers currently who generate that kind of pace.

    "You can still apply some sweat and swing the ball normally but the ban would more or less take reverse swing out of the the game," Pathan added.

    https://sports.ndtv.com/cricket/cric...pathan-2234415
    Last edited by MenInG; 25th May 2020 at 12:33.

  57. #57
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    England captain Joe Root feels the ban on using saliva to shine the ball to combat the COVID-19 threat might improve the skills of the bowlers, who will have to work harder to get something out of the pitch. Root said it could ‘work in our favour and up-skill levels’. The Anil Kumble-led ICC cricket committee has recommended banning the use of saliva to shine the ball when play resumes. The ICC has also barred the practice in its guidelines for the resumption of cricket.

    “Not having the assistance that you might normally have meant your accuracy has to improve,” he was quoted as saying by metro.co.uk.

    “Guys will have to find another way to get something out of the surface, whether that’s a bit more effort, changing angles on the crease, using the wobble seam they might not have in their locker.

    “It could develop our bowlers in a four or five-week period.”

    The issue has led to divided opinions among past and present cricketers across the globe.

    While Australian fast bowler Pat Cummins has urged the game’s custodians to come out with an alternate option to strike a balance between bat and ball, former West Indies pacer Michael Holding has cast doubts on the use of the artificial substance.

    Spin legend Shane Warne has suggested that one side of the ball be made heavier to ensure that it doesn’t need any shining.

  58. #58
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    Former India pacer Zaheer Khan felt the ban on the usage of saliva by bowlers, recommended by the ICC Cricket Committee, will massively tilt the scales in favour of batsmen.

    Speaking in a webinar moderated by former Indian Premier League COO Sundar Raman on Sunday, Zaheer said, "It is going to be very hard for bowlers to swing the ball. If you are going to disinfect the ball every time, at least they should keep a solution with the umpires, which the bowlers can use officially and get some sort of practice going. Otherwise, it is heavily in favour of the batsmen."

    The coronavirus pandemic has brought forth challenging times and Zaheer believes that "mental adjustment" will play a huge role now. "An active sportsperson will find it very tough during this time. It is definitely going to be very challenging... the adjusting. I think the real focus for every athlete during this time would be to do the adjustment mentally. It is going to play a huge role."

    When asked what can a sportsperson do to keep oneself going during this phase, Zaheer, who is the Director of Cricket Operations at Mumbai Indians, compared the prevalent situation to a rain-delayed Test match.

    He said, "In all our careers we had these rain-affected Test games and it went on for five days. The situation right now is similar. Only maybe the situation would extend for a year right now... you never know. The situation has affected our routines, our times and like in rain-affected games we have a different mindset now.

    "There the umpires go out and inspect the field and here you have government officials who we are depending upon to chart out a course. As a sportsperson, you cannot really switch off and have to adapt to a new plan. Yes, there was a certain rhythm going but you have to build your strategy around the new plan. That is going to be the key."

    He added, "It will be about how you can find comfort in the new normal. We can only control the controllables. Once you accept those challenges, things will be a bit smoother. Initially, there will be a bit of struggle because no one knows what's coming their way. No one knows the difficulties you will face in adapting to these challenges. It will be a trial-and-error which will get better with time."

    With a cloud of uncertainty over major tournaments like the T20 World Cup and IPL and the postponement of events like the Olympics, the 41-year-old Zaheer said, "When it comes to major tournaments like the Olympics, which comes once in four years and the World Cup which has a similar case, as an athlete, you always peak during the time. So now you have to readjust and be in pristine shape physically and mentally whenever the time comes.

    "Your whole routine and practice should be building towards that. But, now you may not know when the tournaments will happen. So, that is something you will have to be flexible with. You have to go back to the drawing board and find new goals."

    Zaheer, who has 282 ODI scalps from 200 ODIs, said the manner in which he bounced back in the 2011 World Cup final was his favourite cricketing memory. "In 2003 (World Cup), I was close to making an impact but that didn't happen. It was a young Zak running in, losing his way, letting his emotions get to him and not really doing what was needed to be done. How many do get the opportunity to get over this nightmare? In 2011, I got the opportunity. I bowled three maidens and then took two wickets. That set the tone for the match."

    https://sportstar.thehindu.com/crick...le31665314.ece


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  59. #59
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    Australian paceman Mitchell Starc warned Tuesday that cricket risks becoming “pretty boring” if ball-tampering rules are not relaxed in response to a coronavirus-linked ban on using saliva to shine the ball.

    The International Cricket Council (ICC) is set to implement the ban in June after receiving medical advice that spit poses a COVID-19 transmission risk.

    Bowlers traditionally get the ball to move in the air, deceiving the batsman, by shining one side using sweat or saliva.

    Starc said swinging the ball in such a manner was a crucial part of the contest between bowler and batsman.

    “We don't want to lose that or make it less even, so there needs to be something in place to keep that ball swinging,” he told reporters in an online press conference.

    “Otherwise people aren't going to be watching it and kids aren't going to want to be bowlers.

    “In Australia in the last couple of years we've had some pretty flat wickets, and if that ball's going straight it's a pretty boring contest.”

    Anil Kumble, chairman of the ICC cricket committee, said this week that the saliva ban was only intended to be a temporary measure during the coronavirus crisis.

    The former Indian Test spinner suggested cricket regulators did not want to open the door to using foreign substances to alter the condition of the ball.

    Starc said he understood such reluctance, given the clear rules that exist against ball tampering.

    But he said if bowlers were disadvantaged by a saliva ban, they should be given more leeway elsewhere.

    The 30-year-old said ground staff could be ordered not to produce batsman-friendly flat wickets, or ball-tampering rules could be changed allowing a substance such as wax could be applied to the ball.

    “It's an unusual time for the world and if they're going to remove saliva shining for a portion of time they need to think of something else for that portion of time as well,” he said.

    “(Either) with the wickets not being as flat or at least considering this shining wax.”

    Australian cricket ball manufacturer Kookaburra is developing a wax applicator that allows players to shine the ball without using saliva.


    https://sportstar.thehindu.com/crick...le31676629.ece


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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abdullah719 View Post
    CRICKET COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS PROHIBITION OF SALIVA TO SHINE THE BALL

    The ICC Cricket Committee today recommended changes to ICC regulations to mitigate the risks posed by the COVID-19 virus, and protect the safety of players and match officials.

    The Committee, chaired by Anil Kumble, concluded a conference call convened to specifically address issues related to COVID-19 including maintaining the condition of the match ball and the appointment of non-neutral umpires and referees to international cricket. The recommendations of the Cricket Committee will now be presented to the ICC Chief Executives’ Committee in early June for approval.

    Match Ball

    The ICC Cricket Committee heard from the Chair of the ICC Medical Advisory Committee Dr Peter Harcourt regarding the elevated risk of the transmission of the virus through saliva, and unanimously agreed to recommend that the use of saliva to polish the ball be prohibited.

    The Committee also noted the medical advice that it is highly unlikely that the virus can be transmitted through sweat and saw no need to prohibit the use of sweat to polish the ball whilst recommending that enhanced hygiene measures are implemented on and around the playing field.

    Non-Neutral Umpires and referees to international matches

    The current regulations that apply to the appointment of match officials to men’s Test, ODI and T20I matches are summarised below. Since 2002, officials appointed by the ICC must not be from the same country as the participating teams.


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    Given the challenges of international travel with borders being closed, limited commercial flights and mandatory quarantine periods, the Committee recommended that local match officials be appointed in the short-term.

    The appointments will continue to be made via the ICC from local Elite and International Panel referees and umpires. Where there are no Elite Panel match officials in the country, the best local International Panel match officials will be appointed.

    The Committee also recommended that the use of technology is increased to support the appointments of a wider pool of umpires from around the world and has proposed an additional DRS review per team per innings is introduced in each format as an interim measure.

    ICC Cricket Committee Chair Anil Kumble said: “We are living through extraordinary times and the recommendations the Committee have made today are interim measures to enable us to safely resume cricket in a way that preserves the essence of our game whilst protecting everyone involved.”


    ICC Cricket Committee chairman Anil Kumble says the inexperience of local umpires, who are expected to officiate in Test matches once action resumes post the COVID-19 pandemic, is the reason behind recommending an extra review, which according to him will give a level playing field to both the teams.

    Besides recommending the ban of using saliva on the ball, the Kumble-led ICC Cricket Committee has also suggested for local umpires and additional review in Test matches in the post COVID-19 scenario.

    Reasoning the ICC Cricket Committee’s recommendations, the former India captain said the suggestion to use of local umpires was made because of travel restrictions around the world in the wake of the pandemic.

    “I think the need of hour was to start cricket. We also felt that because of travel restrictions, there could be quarantine measures. You don’t have too many elite umpires in the panel. So, we felt that for cricket to kickstart, its best to use local umpires,” Kumble said on Star Sports show 'Cricket Connected'.

    “Most countries don’t have the experience, the local umpires don’t have the experience of a Test Match or being part of a Test match. The reason that we started neutral umpiring 20 years ago was because there was the perception of a bias.

    “The recommendation for an extra review for both teams is not to root that out but we felt that there could be potential inexperience being in a Test match situation, which is why the advantage of the additional review would probably benefit both the teams,” he added.

    While the ICC Cricket Committee recommended a ban on the usage of saliva to shine the ball, it didn’t feel sweat would pose a serious health risk.

    https://sportstar.thehindu.com/crick...le31680022.ece


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  61. #61
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    Maybe something artificial can be created to replace saliva. Its 99.5% water and other enzymes, electrolytes etc. I think texture and cricket use wise something might be possible.

  62. #62
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    The owner of ball manufacturer Dukes says bowlers should have “no problem” producing swing in England this summer, despite the imminent ban on using saliva.

    After recommendations from the International Cricket Council’s medical advisory committee it seems certain that a temporary restriction will be placed on players using the traditional method of spitting or licking their fingers to shine up the ball when the sport resumes.

    Australia seamer Mitchell Starc has warned that children may not want to become bowlers if a lack of movement through the air made life for batsmen too easy, but Chris Woakes suggested last week the swing-friendly Dukes used by the England and Wales Cricket Board could be a saving grace for pacemen on these shores.

    Now Dilip Jajodia, owner of the manufacturer, has offered his reassurance.

    “Woakes is absolutely correct, I don’t see swing being a big problem in England,” Jajodia told the PA news agency.

    “You have to have a balance between bat and ball otherwise the game is boring, we know that. But it’s not just the shiny surface or the rough side that causes swing, it’s the integrity of the ball.

    “You don’t have to worry because with a ball constructed like ours you’ve got a good shape, a strong seam that acts as a rudder through the air and, because it is hand-stitched, it stays harder for longer.

    “They are not banning the use of sweat so you run your hand over your forehead and, with the nature of the leather, a rigorous polish should get the grease moving enough to give a good shine.”

    Australian manufacturers Kookaburra have developed a wax applicator in an attempt to offer a short-term boost to bowlers but Jajodia had a simple word of advice for any seamers looking for extra help.

    “These days the kits are polyester but when you want to materials to work for each other they both need to be natural, like the leather of the ball. Think of the great Malcolm Marshall or Angus Fraser, they always had a cotton towel tucked in to their trousers.

    “This summer more than any other that is what people should be using.”

    The sporting shutdown came at a dreadful time for what is essentially a seasonal trade, but Jajodia remains confident that a business which dates back to the 18th century is ready to ride this difficult period.

    “If next year they still aren’t allowing amateur sport then we really would be up the Khyber Pass. There would have to be a subsidy from somewhere otherwise we won’t be around anymore,” he said.

    “But we have a strong balance sheet, no borrowings and with our reputation I’m confident we will not need to resort to any outside assistance.”

    https://uk.sports.yahoo.com/news/no-...080029510.html


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