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  1. #1
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    Effect of Coronavirus Pandemic on the Airline/Aviation industry and Air Travel

    Emirates Airline announced on Sunday it will be suspending all passenger flights starting from March 25, in an effort to combat the spread of the deadly coronavirus.

    “Today we made the decision to temporarily suspend all passenger flights by 25 March 2020. SkyCargo operations will continue. This painful but pragmatic move will help Emirates Group preserve business viability and secure jobs worldwide, avoiding cuts,” the airline announced in a statement.

    The UAE has reported 153 cases of coronavirus in the country, and two deaths as a result of the virus.

    “The world has literally gone into quarantine due to the COVID-19 outbreak. This is an unprecedented crisis situation in terms of breadth and scale: geographically, as well as from a health, social, and economic standpoint,” Chairman and CEO of Emirates Group Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum.

    Emirates, which is one of the biggest airlines in the world, can no longer operate passenger services until countries re-open their borders and people feel safe traveling, he added.

    Emirates had previously announced it would be suspending all flights to several virus-hit countries, including all flights to France, Germany, Nigeria, and New York.

    The UAE suspended the entry of GCC nationals into the country starting from Midnight Saturday until the approval of the pre-examination mechanism for the coronavirus, the foreign ministry said on Friday according to state news agency WAM.

    Visas on arrivals, except for diplomatic passport holders, have also been suspended.

    https://english.alarabiya.net/en/New...r-flights.html


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  2. #2
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    Poori dunya mein pehla ke ab mausoof ko khayal aya hai.... Flight suspension should have been the first step when the virus broke out in China.


    In a utopian world were business interests do no surpass people's health, all flights in and out of China would have been halted in early Jan. Let China deal with their own mess and they have shown are capable of doing it as well. Only when China would have been cleared then flights resumed. This would have prevented it spreading to every freaking country in the world.


    Mein inko rolaonga

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syed1 View Post
    Poori dunya mein pehla ke ab mausoof ko khayal aya hai.... Flight suspension should have been the first step when the virus broke out in China.


    In a utopian world were business interests do no surpass people's health, all flights in and out of China would have been halted in early Jan. Let China deal with their own mess and they have shown are capable of doing it as well. Only when China would have been cleared then flights resumed. This would have prevented it spreading to every freaking country in the world.

    Dubai airport is a big money earner.


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  4. #4
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    That's a lot of capacity taken out of the market.


    Have some Sehwag in your life.

  5. #5
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    It sucks from the POV of all those who are employed due to the aviation and aero industry, with the uncertainty you begin to question how businesses will response despite the promised relief from various governments but beyond it all health comes first.


    Ah, so this is what it feels like

  6. #6
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    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Dubai-based Emirates Airline has stepped back from its initial move Sunday to suspend all passenger flights due to the coronavirus crisis after facing pressure from governments.

    Instead, it will temporarily suspend “most” passenger flights by March 25 , with flights still operating to several destinations based on demand and border accessibility.

    “Having receiving requests from governments and customers to support the repatriation of travellers, Emirates will continue to operate passenger and cargo flights to the following countries until further notice, as long as borders remain open, and there is demand: the UK, Switzerland, Hong Kong, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Japan, Singapore, Australia, South Africa, USA, and Canada,” a company statement said Sunday.

    “The situation remains dynamic, and travellers can check flight status on emirates.com.”

    The company added South Korea to that list shortly after issuing the statement.

    The news comes amid mounting national lockdowns, border closures and flight groundings as coronavirus cases climb around the world.

    Emirates Group said Sunday that it will not cut jobs, but will implement a temporary reduction in basic salary for the majority of its employees for three months, ranging from 25% to 50%. Emirates is the world’s largest A380 operator, and top-five largest airline in terms of passenger and freight ton kilometers flown.

    “Pay cuts are across the board except junior level staff. But it is only on basic salaries. Flying pay isn’t affected by the announced cuts,” a representative from the company told CNBC.

    Cost-cutting measures being undertaken by the group beyond the salary cuts include postponing or canceling discretionary spending, freezing all non-essential recruitment and consultancy work, encouraging employees to take paid or unpaid leave, and a 100% basic salary cut for Emirates and airport services provider dnata’s presidents Tim Clark and Gary Chapman.

    The decision for the airline, one of the world’s largest in terms of passenger miles flown, means a significant hit to jet fuel demand in the region. Globally, major airlines are slashing services as demand screeches to a halt while people are urged to stay at home and self-isolate to slow the spread of the virus.

    American Airlines last week announced a 75% cut to its operations, while United plans to cut 90% of international services scheduled for April.

    British Airways is cutting its flight capacity by 75% for April and May, and Turkish Airlines, the world’s largest in terms of passenger destinations, has said that 85% of its passenger planes are not being used. Major airlines in the U.S. have asked the government for more than $50 billion in rescue funds to avoid furloughing thousands of workers.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/22/emir...ource=Facebook


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    That's a lot of capacity taken out of the market.
    Doesn't matter the demand is already way below capacity

  8. #8
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    Abu Dhabi's Etihad to temporarily cut staff wages by up to 50%

    Abu Dhabi's Etihad Airways told staff on Monday it would temporarily cut salaries by up to 50% for a month due to the impact on its business from the coronavirus outbreak, according to an internal email seen by Reuters.

    The state-owned carrier, which will suspend its entire passenger network for two weeks from Wednesday, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    Executives, pilots and engineers will be paid half their basic salaries and cabin crew would be paid 25% less in April, the email said.

    Other employees would also have their salaries cut and staff would not be paid their usual transport and other job-related allowances, it said.


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  9. #9
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    KARACHI: As air travel comes to a standstill with countries locked down to fight the coronavirus pandemic, there are many airlines in the world which are at risk of going bankrupt in the near future.

    Among the worst-hit carriers is the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA).

    According to an article published by bloomberg.com, a spokesman for PIA says that losses and debt of PIA have become too great for the company to handle alone and that options suggested to the government include a debt-to-equity swap and issuance of long-term bond.

    The global airline industry has never had it so bad, not even after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the US.

    Airlines could lose a quarter of a trillion dollars in revenue this year, according to the International Air Transport Association. Most carriers will go bankrupt by the end of May if they can’t find support, Sydney-based CAPA Centre for Aviation said recently.

    Airlines can lose a quarter of a trillion dollars in revenue this year because of coronavirus lockdowns

    Which airlines are most at risk? Like the virus, the crisis is indiscriminate, affecting each one from budget operators to national flag carriers. Aircraft manufacturers and their suppliers also are under immense pressure, with Boeing Co calling for billions of dollars in state support and Airbus SE extending credit lines and canceling its dividend.

    Using the Z-score method developed by Edward Altman in the 1960s to predict bankruptcies, Bloomberg News filtered out listed commercial airlines to identify the ones most at risk of going bust, based on available data. The calculations don’t take into account government bailouts or other funding sources that could help keep operators alive.

    While the list focuses on Asia, mostly due to high debt levels, European carriers aren’t immune, as the collapse of UK regional airline Flybe Group Plc proved. According to Altman, scores of 1.8 or below indicate a risk of bankruptcy and scores over 3 suggest sound footing. Indebted low-cost carrier Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA and Air France-KLM both landed below the threshold, as did American Airlines Group Inc. and SkyWest Inc.

    Governments around the world are in talks with aviation companies about financial support, and those with deep-pocketed backers — such as Delta Air Lines Inc. with billionaire investor Warren Buffett — will have access to other avenues for cash.

    Qatar Airways’ Chief Executive Officer Akbar Al Baker warned that many airlines would go bust, limiting the scope for takeovers.

    “People who were bragging about not taking state aid and being independent are now themselves all over the world asking for state aid,” he said on Thursday on Bloomberg Television.

    The Z-score involves five variables measuring liquidity, solvency, profitability, leverage and recent performance. The model initially had accuracy rates of over 95 per cent in predicting bankruptcies, but that has come down to between 80pc and 90pc based on a year before insolvency, Altman said in a 2018 interview.

    A representative for AirAsia Group Bhd declined to comment, while PNG Air Ltd didn’t respond to a request for comments. The communications director for Kenya Airways Plc, which is now operating only a handful of local flights, couldn’t immediately comment.

    SpiceJet Ltd sees “no possibility at all” of failing, has maintained adequate cash flows and expects a surge in demand as the virus is contained, a spokesman said. Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd, which has furloughed 80pc of its workforce and slashed flights to a bare minimum, said it is taking measures to rapidly reduce its cost base to preserve cash.

    Asiana Airlines Inc said it secured a bridge loan and will receive $1.3 billion from Korea Development Bank and other creditors. It also said financials would improve once HDC Hyundai Development Co and its partners complete their acquisition of Kumho Industrial Co’s stake. Also, the Korean government is discussing the airline industry and taking measures to provide emergency funds to large companies, Yonhap News reported on Thursday.

    The Bogota-based company has offered its 21,000 employees unpaid leave and is negotiating payment terms with suppliers.

    Norwegian Air is trying to secure a government lifeline worth up to $270 million under certain conditions, and this week two Nordic banks were approved to provide a guarantee for the required 10pc for the first tranche. The airline declined to comment further.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1544372/pi...going-bankrupt


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  10. #10
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    Borders shut. Travel banned. Billions under lockdown. The pandemic has delivered an "unprecedented shock" to airlines with huge challenges ahead, the International Air Transport Association says. Demand for airplane travel has plummeted, with two million flights already cancelled, and the IATA estimates the industry will lose $252bn (£202bn) in 2020. Here’s the latest:

    American Airlines is requesting $12bnin support from the US government

    Passenger numbers in Germany’s Frankfurt airport - a major international hub - have dropped 90.7%

    British Airways has suspended all flights to and from London Gatwick’s airport, and routes operating from Heathrow Airport are severely reduced

    In the UK, the companies which manage baggage handling warned that they are close to collapse

    On Monday, budget airline EasyJet grounded its whole fleet

    US Congress last week set aside $50bn for airlines, with half the money offered as loans in exchange for not mandating leave of absence for employees until at least 30 September

    Last week, the British chancellor said airlines should not turn to government first when seeking financial help


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  11. #11
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    Coronavirus: British Airways nears deal to suspend 36,000 staff

    The airline has been in talks with unions over measures it is taking in response to the impact of the outbreak.

    British Airways is nearing agreement with unions on a deal to suspend 36,000 cabin crew, ground staff and engineers due to the coronavirus crisis.

    Sky News understands that up to 80% of these staff would be furloughed but that none would lose their jobs.

    The figure rose to 100% at Gatwick and London City airports where BA has axed services entirely as a result of the outbreak. Trade union Unite was yet to respond to a request for comment.

    GMB, another trade union, said: "GMB and our sister union Unite have fought hard to secure members terms, conditions and job security.
    "We believe the current deal, which is nearing its conclusion, secures this.

    "But there are significant challenges for the aviation industry and whilst this current deal gives security for BA staff now, the government can't take its eye off the ball."

    BA's parent company, International Airlines Group, has previously said its capacity would be down 75% in April and May compared with the same period last year.

    British Airways chief executive Alex Cruz told staff in March jobs would be lost "perhaps for a short period, perhaps longer term" and the company was in discussions with trade unions.

    He warned that it was in a battle for survival amid a crisis "of global proportions like no other we have known", more serious than the financial crisis, SARS or 9/11.

    Rival airline easyJet said on Monday that it had grounded its entire fleet.

    On Wednesday, Sky News revealed that fears over the future of another airline, Virgin Atlantic, had prompted major aviation industry players including Heathrow Airport to call for state intervention in the form of a bailout.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...eport-11967241

  12. #12
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    British Airways cabin crew members fear they may have contracted Covid-19 over the past two weeks after working on long-haul flights.

    Unions representing cabin crew and pilots are demanding greater action to prevent staff becoming infected. BA staff told the BBC that the airline had been slow to take action.

    BA is still running some flights to US destinations including New York. The company will also run many of the government’s repatriation flights for British nationals abroad.

    The airline has insisted that personal protective kit is available for staff and that it has taken steps to reduce contact between customers and crews.


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  13. #13
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    The first PIA flight carrying over 300 British nationals has landed in Manchester with another due at Heathrow soon

    ==

    Meanwhile, as many as 195 Pakistanis stranded in Istanbul (Turkey) arrived at the Islamabad International Airport on a Pakistan International Airlines flight on Friday night.

    An FIA immigration official said the 195 Pakistanis stranded in Turkey were brought to Islamabad on a Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) special flight PK-782, which was operated from Karachi to Toronto on Thursday.

    Soon after their arrival, all the Pakistani passengers were screened by the health authorities at the Islamabad airport. They were later shifted to different hotels for quarantine.

    The government has planned a week-long repatriation flight operation from Saturday to bring back its nationals stranded overseas due to the suspension of international flight operation in the wake of Covid-19 pandemic.
    Last edited by MenInG; 4th April 2020 at 22:04.


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  14. #14
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    Palpa advises members to avoid operating flights

    The Pakistan Airline Pilots’ Association (Palpa) has advises its members to not operate any flights at the moment due to the current situation arising out of the coronavirus outbreak.

    According to a notification, the association stated that safety and other standard operating procedures have been compromised on recent "humanitarian flights".

    "The health and safety of our crew has always been and remains our utmost priority," the notification reads.
    Last edited by MenInG; 5th April 2020 at 16:24.


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  15. #15
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    ISLAMABAD: The Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) on Sunday suspended its operations from Karachi, rejecting reports that its pilots from a flight from Britain had contracted the coronavirus.

    In a statement issued Sunday, the national carrier clarified its views on quarantining its aviation staff in Karachi. "The PIA is strictly abiding by the instructions issued by the Government of Pakistan," its spokesperson Abdullah Khan said.

    "The instructions include measures related to disinfecting the airplane as well as the crew's health and safety," Khan added, noting that the federal government's instructions were being followed at all airports in the country.

    Related: PIA allowed to resume flights to repatriate Pakistanis stranded abroad

    The incident that took place at Karachi airport was "against the instructions issued by the Government of Pakistan on aviation staff", he said, adding that three hours prior to the plane with no passengers was scheduled to arrive from London, all officials had been informed.

    However, the spokesperson stressed that despite instructions, the Sindh health department's officials insisted on forcefully quarantining the pilots. PIA Chief Executive Air Marshal Arshad Malik has expressed serious concerns over the actions contrary to the federal government's instructions, he added.

    The PIA's airplane crew is bringing back Pakistanis who have been stranded abroad, CEO Malik said, according to Khan. "We have ensured all possible safety measures for the aviation staff," he added.

    Also read: Aviation Minister Ghulam Sarwar says PIA suffered Rs4bn loss due to coronavirus

    The spokesperson mentioned that the national carrier was constantly in contact with top officials and that reports about its airplane crew contracting coronavirus were misleading.

    The crew was in isolation in a PIA hotel and were awaiting test results, the spokesperson added. However, the airline's operations from Karachi were to remain suspended until there was a consensus on the government-issued directives, he said.

    PALPA tells pilots not to fly planes
    The Pakistan Airline Pilots' Association (PALPA), an organisation to protect the rights of the national carrier's pilots, has told pilots not to fly planes, putting ongoing flight operations at risk of suspension.

    The PALPA stressed that the lives of pilots and aircrew were at risk if they flew to countries hit by the coronavirus pandemic. The move has put flights for Pakistanis stranded abroad in danger.

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/281090-pia...chi-operations


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  16. #16
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  17. #17
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    This will have a lasting impact on the airline and tourism industry. This pandemic will weigh heavily on people's minds before deciding their next travel destination. I don't think people will travel so freely for vacationing over the fear of catching something like coronavirus. The trust in authorities like WHO is at an all time low.

  18. #18
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    The Future - soon Inshallah.


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  19. #19
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    RAWALPINDI: The PIA management has launched an inquiry into a pilot’s note to the company’s safety head, explaining that the delay of PIA flight PK-782 was caused by shortage of face masks and checking of body temperature of passengers.

    Because of the coronavirus pandemic across the world, the PIA has introduced Special Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for all flights, making it mandatory for all passengers to board planes wearing face masks and after screening of their body temperatures by officials.

    Talking to Dawn, PIA spokesman Abdullah Hafeez said that the management of the airlines had launched an inquiry into the complaint of the pilot of PIA flight PK-782 that returned to Islamabad from Toronto via Istanbul on April 3.

    He said that strict disciplinary and departmental action would be taken if anybody was found guilty in the inquiry. The spokesman said that all PIA flights were being disinfected properly because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

    In his note written to PIA’s safety head Captain Amir Aftab, the captain of PK-782 said: “The departure of the flight PK-782 was delayed by 34 minutes due to awaiting face masks for over 40 per cent of passengers as they boarded the aircraft without wearing face masks and without getting their body temperature check before boarding the plane.”

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1546816/pi...e-masks-gloves


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  20. #20
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    RAWALPINDI: The Pakistan Airline Pilots Association (Palpa), the body representing pilots in the national airline, on Sunday night asked its members “not to operate any flights until further notice”.

    The “urgent advice” was conveyed at a time when suspension of flight operation, which is in force because of the Covid-19 pandemic, is being revisited for bringing back Pakistanis stranded in different countries.

    In a letter to its members, Palpa said that on the recently operated “humanitarian flights” safety had been compromised and Covid-19 related SOPs had been ignored. It said the safety and health of crew members had always been utmost priority, adding that Palpa would in no circumstances compromise on the safety of its members.

    Palpa’s decsion to halt operation came hours after four crew members of a special flight of the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) were put into isolation by Sindh’s health authorities on their arrival at Karachi airport in the morning.

    However, they all tested negative for coronavirus.

    PIA spokesperson Abdullah Hafeez said the test report which came late in the night had cleared all the crew members.

    He said the national flag carrier had operated a special flight from Islamabad to London which came back without passengers and landed at the Jinnah International Airport Karachi on Sunday.

    The four crew members (two crew sets) were sent on board with one operating first leg of the flight and the other operating the second leg. As per SOP instructions, if the crew is not leaving the plane they don’t need to be quarantined. Upon arrival in Karachi, Sindh health ministry officials approached the pilots and insisted on quarantining them despite the fact that it was not needed.

    After a hard discussion between the pilots and the health officials, the former’s samples (swabs) were collected for coronavirus test and they were sent into isolation at a hotel at the airport.

    Mr Hafeez told Dawn that PIA management strictly adhered to the guidelines set by the Pakistan government which included disinfection of the plane for health and safety of its crew members.

    He said the Karachi airport incident with the PIA crew members was against the government’s directives. He said all officials concerned had been informed three hours before the plane returned from London. Yet, he added, the Sindh health officials insisted on quarantining the crew members.

    PIA Chief Executive Officer Air Marshal Arshad Malik expressed reservations over what was termed an unfair treatment with the crew members who he said were national heroes as they were serving to repatriate Pakistanis stranded abroad despite threats of Covid-19.

    The spokesperson said that Air Marshal Malik was in contact with top officials. “Reports of coronavirus in the crew members are misleading,” he said.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1546808/pa...fly-any-flight


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  21. #21
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    LAHORE: Two pilots of the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) that recently flew back from Canada have been confirmed to have contracted the novel coronavirus and shifted to a private in Lahore for treatment, according to Punjab Minister for Health Yasmin Rashid.

    "The coronavirus tests of two PIA pilots and three other members of the crew on a flight that recently flew back from Canada were carried out and the two pilots have tested positive for the virus," Rashid told the media on Monday morning.

    "The two pilots have been shifted to a private hospital in Lahore for treatment where their condition is getting better. The other three crew members have been told to self-isolate themselves in line with international protocols on the virus," Rashid added.


    https://www.geo.tv/latest/281211-two...ahore-hospital


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  22. #22
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    ISLAMABAD: Pakistani aviation authorities on Sunday introduced modified Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for airports at international arrivals for better control of the spread of coronavirus.

    The SOPs shall be applicable on all passengers and flight crew with immediate effect, says a press release issued by Aviation Division on Sunday.

    As per SOPs, upon arrival by international flights, everyone will be screened as per practice. The swab sample shall not, however, be collected at the airport.

    All passengers and flight crew shall be quarantined for 24 hours at a location decided by the authorities. After 24 hours, a swab sample shall be collected for the test at the designated facility. Anyone with a positive test result shall be retained at the quarantine or other relevant location.

    Those with negative test result shall be allowed to leave with strict instructions and guidance for home quarantine.

    Data of all the passengers and flight crew with their mobile numbers will be kept for record and further follow up.

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/281196-pak...ng-at-airports


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  23. #23
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    RAWALPINDI:Three Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flights to Gilgit and Skardu from Islamabad were cancelled on Monday after the Pakistan Airline Pilots Association (Palpa) refused to operate any flight due to coronavirus standard operating procedures (SOP) being ignored and two pilots and a member of cabin crew testing positive for Covid-19.

    In a letter to its members, Palpa said safety was compromised and coronavirus-related SOPs ignored on recently operated humanitarian flights.

    Palpa General Secretary Imran Narejo told Dawn: “Our strike is continuing. No measures have been taken by the management regarding the safety of pilots and other crew members as three pilots and three cabin crew members have been affected by the virus.”

    He said Palpa would not compromise on the safety of its members in any circumstances.

    The association decided to halt flight operations after four crew members of a special PIA flight were placed in isolation by Sindh health authorities upon their arrival in Karachi from Toronto on Sunday.

    PIA flights PK-605 and PK-607 for Gilgit and PK-451 for Skardu were cancelled, but two special flights scheduled to arrive from Birmingham and Uzbekistan carrying more than 250 stranded Pakistanis landed at at IIA on Monday.

    PIA spokesperson Abdullah Hafeez told Dawn that efforts were underway to keep flight operations ongoing without any halts.

    He said negotiations are being held with Palpa to resolve the issue, although the PIA took all safety measures for staff and passengers.

    According to the Aviation Division, after the closure of flight operation Civil Aviation Authority staff disinfected Gilgit airport with chlorinated water.

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1547034/th...-pilots-strike


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  24. #24
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    Millions of aviation jobs at risk due to coronavirus outbreak

    The International Air Transport Association has warned that 25 million jobs across the world were at risk due to the coronavirus virus, urging governments for support amid warnings that carriers were running out of cash.

    It said global air travel saw a 70 percent drop at the beginning of the second quarter, with European flights down 90 percent.


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  25. #25
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    ISLAMABAD: The Pakistan International Airline (PIA) on Wednesday brought back 136 stranded Pakistani nationals from Baghdad through a special flight, ARY News reported.

    PIA’s special flight PK-9814 brought back home the Pakistani nationals stuck in Iraq owing to suspension of international flights to the country amid coronavirus pandemic.

    The special flight reached Islamabad airport on Wednesday morning, where doctors examined and screened the passengers.

    The passengers include disabled persons, women, children and elderly people. All the passengers and crew members have for now been quarantined at a local hotel.

    One passenger has been shifted to the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences PIMS due to high fever.

    It must be noted that the national flag-carrier resumed its flight operation as pilots end strike after successful dialogues between Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) administration and PALPA (Pakistan Airline Pilots’ Association).

    PIA, PALPA agreement

    Talks between secretary aviation and Pakistan Airline Pilots’ Association (PALPA) on Tuesday culminated on a successful note after the latter had refused to operate Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flights due to unsatisfactory disinfection arrangements amid coronavirus pandemic.

    According to details, a meeting was led by Secretary Aviation Hassan Nasir Jamy with PIA and PALPA representatives, where they agreed over to operate flights after following proper standard operating procedures (SOPs) in the wake of COVID-19.

    PIA PALPA agreement coroanvirus

    According to the agreement finalized between the two sides, the crew members and pilots of the PIA planes would be provided with personal protective equipment (PPE).

    https://arynews.tv/en/pia-brings-bac...stranded-iraq/


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  26. #26
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    ISLAMABAD: Pakistan on Thursday extended the suspension of domestic and international flight operations in the country in a bid to contain the coronavirus. The number of coronavirus cases in Pakistan surged to almost 4,500 today.

    "As per decision of the Government of Pakistan, the suspension of International and Domestic Flight Operations as effected earlier has been extended upto Tuesday April 21, 2020 2359 PST," read a notification from the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).

    In its last notification, the CAA had said that diplomatic, special/cargo flights and flights of national carrier to/from Pakistan holding special approval from the competent authority for transporting stranded Passengers" would be exceptions to the ban.

    Most countries around the world have suspended international travel ever since the pandemic started spreading at a feverish pace in Europe, America and Asia last month.

    The CAA had previously announced extending the ban till April 11.

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/282002-pak...-till-april-21


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  27. #27
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    (CNN) — The coronavirus pandemic has grounded most of the world's airplanes for the immediate future.

    But when aviation eventually reboots, pilots will need to be up to speed.

    That doesn't just mean polishing their Ray-Bans and dusting off their navy-blue blazers. It means brushing up on flight-deck skills and ensuring they keep within the boundaries of aviation's stringent safety regulations.

    And that is presenting a looming challenge as pilots remain housebound.

    "Pilots require frequent training and 'recency' to be able to fly," says Brian Strutton of the British Airline Pilots Association, or BALPA, which represents the interests of all UK pilots.

    "Recency" means complying with regulations that stipulate a pilot must have successfully carried out three takeoffs and landings -- one of which using the cockpit's autoland facility -- within the previous 90 days.

    To qualify for flying both at daytime and night-time, commercial pilots also need to perform three night-time take-offs and landings within the 90 days, which are harder because the pilot has less visual cues. This covers the three daytime take-offs and landings as well.

    But there are other annual checks, as well.

    These include the License Proficiency Check, which a pilot would have to do every year to keep their pilot's license valid. Also, the airline that the pilot flies for will have to perform an Operational Proficiency Check every six months.

    "Most of these checks could be conducted in what is known as a 'D level' simulator," says Adam Twidell, an experienced pilot and CEO of

    These are the most realistic and offer the highest definition and lifelike responses -- just like flying the real thing.

    Simulators are also important to help pilots keep their skills sharp. While much can be practiced using computer games such as Microsoft Flight Simulator, there is no substitute when it comes to ratings, training and certifications. Pilots need to access real, full-scale flight simulators.

    But for that to happen, simulators need to be available. In the UK, for example, many facilities offering simulators are closed.

    There is also the issue of the availability of instructors and examiners to conduct checks. A co-pilot also needs to be present.

    "There's going to be a significant backlog of available simulator slots. When airlines do want to get back to normal operations they won't be able to do it instantly," Twidell tells CNN Travel.

    Expense is an issue, too. Simulator time costs around $300 to $400 an hour, and that's without the necessary associated personnel. It's all an enormous undertaking.

    Additionally, there are regular fire and smoke training requirements, where pilots have to go into a smoke-filled aircraft and evacuate it. There are also first aid courses and crew resource management training, which involves assessing how crew members work together as a team.

    Combine the complexity of the different types of training and certifications that flight crew might have to catch up on if the grounding persists for a prolonged period with the fact that the majority of the world's 290,000-plus active pilots are sitting at home, and the scale of the imminent problem becomes all too apparent.

    Pushing the boundaries

    To help alleviate the pressure accumulating from the potential expiration of the pilots' medical certificates and ratings (additional elements of the pilot's license that allows them to fly specific types of aircraft), time extensions are being granted worldwide by regulatory authorities.

    Across Europe, the EU Aviation Safety Agency, or EASA, has extended the deadlines for certain requirements on condition that each airline comes up with a detailed pilot training plan that the agency will assess. If it's a credible plan, an extension could be granted.
    In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration's assistant chief counsel for enforcement, Naomi Tsuda, says that, due to the extraordinary circumstances related to the pandemic, the FAA will not take legal action against pilots in cases of noncompliance with medical certificate duration standards if their certificate expires between March 31 and June 30, 2020.

    "The FAA will reevaluate this decision as circumstances unfold, to determine whether an extension or other action is needed to address this pandemic-related challenge," said Tsuda in an FAA Notice of Enforcement Policy.

    In the UK, the Civil Aviation Authority, in line with EASA guidance (while the UK is still in the EU), has exempted all operators, aircrew, instructors and examiners engaged in commercial air transport from the normal validity periods for licenses, certificates and ratings that expire before October 31, 2020.

    Deferring the expiry of licenses and certificates is certainly helpful. But all of this is incredibly stressful for the airlines' workforces.
    Staffing issues

    The world's longest and largest twin-engine airliner, the Boeing 777-9X, has completed its first test flight from Boeing's wide-body factory near Seattle.

    "Over 40 airlines have grounded their entire fleets, including airlines like EasyJet, and the majority of others have grounded 80-90% -- it's just unheard of. That gives you an idea as to how many pilots are not flying aircraft," says Sam Sprules, managing director at pilot recruitment agency AeroProfessional.

    Sprules tells CNN that a lot of flight crew are either grounded on minimal pay or being asked to take unpaid leave for the next couple of months.

    In some countries, airlines are operating from the furlough or pay subsidy schemes, and in worst case scenarios crew are being terminated.

    "Recruiting of flight crew has pretty much dried up at the moment while airlines are rightly focusing on trying to consolidate their finances just to survive," he says.

    This is a colossal body-blow to an industry that was booming before the Covid-19 crisis took hold. However, Sprules also says that a small minority of aviation businesses are taking an optimistic approach, believing that recovery will be sooner rather than later.
    "What they want to do is keep their recruitment moving to capitalize on the fact that there are a lot of skilled crew in the market right now."

    Face-to-face interviews are now replaced with online tools such as Microsoft Office Teams or Skype. Airlines can build up pools of candidates so that as soon as the sector is back into recovery mode and restrictions start to subside they can jump into action.

    "We are doing that with a few of our clients -- conducting applicant gathering and documentation screening and getting candidates to a point where we can go no further, until things start to move again," says Sprules.

    "You start forgetting things"

    So besides using computer simulators, how can pilots stuck at home keep their cockpit skills honed?
    Karlene Petitt, a US-based Boeing 777 pilot and author of "Normalization of Deviance: A Threat to Aviation Safety," tells CNN that pilots could use this time of grounding for educational improvement.

    She says that in an age where certain aspects of the flight deck are automated, pilots need to know, procedurally, how to set up the flight deck, which buttons to push and which checklists to read.

    "You start forgetting things if you don't use them," she says. "And much of what we, as pilots, do is cognitive based. If you can keep that alive, then you're not going to lose proficiency.

    "It would be nice if the airlines made available online training tools that we had during initial training or during initial type rating, so we could go and maintain proficiency while at home, until we get back into the sky."

    Carriers could also have the ability to track and see which of their pilots are actually utilizing those tools, says Petitt, adding that even a home-made low-tech approach could be beneficial too:

    In the past, when Petitt was "out of the cockpit" for a couple of years in the days before online pilot training was an option, she made flashcards and what she calls a "paper trainer," a sort of wall poster, to practice cockpit procedures at home.

    "We did this years ago. You just physically move and touch the button because the motion of actually touching where you would be touching in the airplane helps to instill it into memory."

    The well-being factor

    US airlines are requesting an aid package from the federal government that could amount to about $50 billion due to the coronavirus, according to industry group Airlines for America.

    Joji Waites, flight safety specialist at BALPA, tells CNN that his organization is ensuring that the few crew that are still flying (on cargo, medical, repatriation, and a few scheduled services) are equipped with protective kits where necessary, and checking that aircraft are properly cleaned.

    "For those that are not flying -- those that are furloughed -- the shift is towards well-being," says Waites.

    Beyond the practicalities of brushing up procedural skills, pilots need to keep their minds in good shape too.

    Flight crew are used to quite a structured way of working and are conditioned to knowing what is coming up in the next month in terms of their flight schedules.

    Tens of thousands of airline jobs are at risk as travel plunges

    Waites says that BALPA has been sharing, with its members, mental health and well-being tips from the MIND Charity and from Public Health England.

    "There are specific resources available," says Waites. "And there is a requirement coming out later this year in August for airlines to have a peer support network program staffed by pilots for pilots for them to raise, confidentially, concerns of well-being and mental health."

    Many airlines already have these in place ahead of when the regulation comes out, pointing pilots towards those facilities within their airlines where they can share concerns, by "having people to talk to about their anxieties and what they are going through."

    "Pilots are not used to sitting around," says Waites. "We're thinking ahead to the time when things hopefully resume and scheduled flights start up."

    https://edition.cnn.com/travel/artic...urs/index.html


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  28. #28
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    ISLAMABAD: A pilot who captained an airplane from Canada to the country has tested positive for coronavirus, the Pakistan Airlines Pilots' Association (PALPA) confirmed on Sunday, lamenting how its advice for precautionary measures went unheeded.

    In its statement earlier today, the PALPA said the pilot had flown an airplane from Canada to Pakistan and had tested positive for the COVID-19 virus after landing in the country.

    The viral disease has so far infected over 5,100 people and killed nearly 90 in Pakistan.

    Police took away the pilot from the hotel in a manner as if he was arrested for some crime, the captains' association said. It added that it had earlier advised taking precautionary measures to prevent such an untoward case from occurring in the first place but its suggestion was unfortunately ignored.

    On April 7, the PIA had confirmed in a statement that six of its workers — including a pilot, two cabin crew members, and an aircraft technician — had contracted the virus but did not say how and when this occurred. A spokesperson had insisted that all pilots and crew members were performing duties in PPE.

    Related: PIA rejects reports of pilots contracting coronavirus, suspends Karachi operations

    The PALPA and the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) have been at loggerheads over pilots' safety as well as failure to adhere to protocol, whereas the national carrier had earlier alleged that the Sindh health department's officials insisted on forcefully quarantining the pilots despite instructions.

    'Humanitarian flights'

    A report in The News had stated that the dispute arose after the PIA flight crew was detained in Karachi, with the PALPA claiming that safety had been compromised and that the COVID-19-related SOPs were ignored during the recent "humanitarian flights".

    PALPA President Captain Chaudhry Salman had also claimed that the Pakistan Civil Aviation Authority (PCAA) failed to ensure preset rules and regulations and that the negligence was a disaster for the airline. He had further alleged that the PIA was also violating its own rules by compelling pilots to perform duties for over 24 hours.

    Insiders had revealed earlier this week that the pilots' association had approached the Prime Minister House — which reportedly told it to consult with the PIA chief operating officer — and Aviation Minister Ghulam Sarwar Khan, who advised the association to talk to the civil aviation secretary.

    Aviation Secretary Hassan Nasir Jamy had later assured representatives of the pilots' body and PIA of full support, as well as readiness towards taking measures to ensure aircrew's safety, after he was apprised of the PALPA's "apprehensions pertaining to the safety measures being taken regarding airline operations in the wake of COVID-19".

    It had been recognised during the meeting that the airlines were responsible to provide appropriate Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) to the cockpit and cabin crew "with immediate effect", that flights would only operate "upon satisfaction of the captain", and that the airlines would "not be held responsible".

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/282460-pal...or-coronavirus


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  29. #29
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    Heathrow Airport, traditionally the busiest in Europe, forecast that passenger demand would plunge by over 90 percent in April, as coronavirus restrictions stop most people from travelling.

    Heathrow said that its passenger numbers were down 52 percent in March compared with the same period last year, with many of those journeys being made by Britons returning home from abroad.

    The airport, which is owned by a group of investors including Spain's Ferrovial, the Qatar Investment Authority and China Investment Corp, said it was now only using one of its two runways, as flights continue for cargo.


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  30. #30
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    The number of passengers passing through London's Heathrow Airport will fall by up to 90% in April as coronavirus restrictions prevent people from travelling, the airport has forecast.

    Usually one of the busiest airports in the world, Heathrow said passenger numbers for March were down 52% compared with the same period last year.

    The airport said it was now only using one of its two runways, as flights continue for cargo.

    Air passenger numbers have plummeted across the world because of the pandemic.

    In the US, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson international airport usually handles up to 2,600 flights a day and 63,000 people work at the airport when flights run at capacity.

    "Right now, we’re down to 1,200 flights and they’re mostly empty,” said the airport’s general manager, John Selden.


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  31. #31
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    Cousin has been stuck in Pakistan for over 4 weeks now with a small child.

    Good ol PIA messing her around saying her flight is confirmed, then mearer the time saying there are no seats.

    Ridiculous customer service.



  32. #32
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  33. #33
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    Airlines getting bailed out in States with a lot of strings attached unlike wall street ones in 2008....

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    Cousin has been stuck in Pakistan for over 4 weeks now with a small child.

    Good ol PIA messing her around saying her flight is confirmed, then mearer the time saying there are no seats.

    Ridiculous customer service.
    Your cousin should have known to not fly to a foreign country considering international guidelines. Easy to blame PIA but people need to take responsibility for their actions. This is coming from someone whose family were also abroad.

  35. #35
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    Thailand has exetended its flight ban to 30 April, local media are reporting. There are some exceptions though, for instance repatriation and other virus related flights, or state and military aircraft.

    It's the third time the flight ban has been pushed further. Whoever arrives on the few flights exempt from the ban will have to serve a 14-day quarantine.

    Thailand has 2,613 confirmed infections and 41 deaths have been linked to Covid-19.


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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Misbah View Post
    Your cousin should have known to not fly to a foreign country considering international guidelines. Easy to blame PIA but people need to take responsibility for their actions. This is coming from someone whose family were also abroad.
    Actually she flew before the outbreak, so you shouldn't make assumptions without knowing the facts.



  37. #37
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    Chinese airlines report $4.8 billion loss in first quarter as virus erodes travel demand

    Chinese airlines reported a total loss of 33.62 billion yuan ($4.8 billion) in the first quarter as the pandemic hit travel demand, the aviation regulator said on Wednesday.


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  38. #38
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    UK to operate chartered flights to repatriate citizens stranded in Pakistan

    The diplomat said that his team has been working with the Pakistani authorities to keep some international flights running.

    The United Kingdom will organize a series of chartered flights to repatriate Brits stranded in Pakistan, amid international flight cancellation due to coronavirus pandemic.

    “I know how stressful Pakistan international flight suspension has been, with so many British nationals unable to get home," said British High Commissioner to Pakistan, Christian Turner in a video message on Wednesday.

    The diplomat said that his team has been working with the Pakistani authorities to keep some international flights running. “PIA was the only airline permitted to operate commercially so the best and quickest way to get stranded Brits home," he said.

    The British High Commissioner said that over 7,758 passengers have been repatriated to the UK from April 4th.

    Turner said that the PIA has informed them that they would no longer operate daily flights to the UK, after which UK's Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab has agreed that they would now organize a series of chartered flights to bring more Britians back home.

    https://www.brecorder.com/2020/04/15...d-in-pakistan/

  39. #39
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    British low-cost airline EasyJet plans to keep the middle seat on its planes empty to allow for social distancing once the Covid-19 lockdown has been lifted.

    The airline grounded its entire fleet at the end of March.

    Chief executive Johan Lundgren said he hoped the seating measure would encourage more people to fly.

    He said bookings for winter flights were ahead of last year, helped by customers who had rebooked tickets after Covid-19 disrupted their travel plans.

    The company has faced criticism from customers who have had trouble getting refunds.


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  40. #40
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    Covid-19 has severely decreased the number of daily flights. But where are all those grounded planes kept during a pandemic?

    Between a third and half of the global population are in some form of lockdown. City centres, malls, high streets and tourist attractions are all quiet – and so too is the sky above our planet. The planes that connect our world, unite families and open our eyes to new horizons are, almost entirely, grounded.

    “In March, we'd typically expect to see between 175,000 and 180,000 total flights per day,” explains Ian Petchenik from flight tracking website FlightRadar24. “At any one time that's generally between 10,000 and 15,000 flights. Those numbers have fallen significantly to just 64,522 flights tracked on 29 March.”

    Most planes that would ordinarily be in the air are currently on the tarmac. And on top of the multitude of economic and logistical problems this poses for airlines, employees and passengers, there’s another issue to consider: where can airlines store these grounded aircraft?

    The answer, say experts, is a mixed picture that depends on where your hubs are, the kind of aircraft you fly and the engineering capacity in place to mothball the aircraft (deactivating and storing it) and get them back up and running when this current crisis is over.




    Planes, from Canada's second largest airline Westjet, sit grounded at Vancouver International Airport on April 09, 2020 in British Columbia, Canada (Credit: Getty Images)

    Hubs and boneyards

    As a rule, airline economics dictate that planes should be used as much as possible. For larger planes used for long-haul flights, this means keeping them flying as close to 24/7 as possible. If you’re an airline flying a big 400-seater Boeing 777, for example, you’ll ideally have it at your home airport for only as long as it takes to get passengers and cargo off and on, refuel, clean, load catering and depart.

    The upshot of that is that there simply isn’t enough space at most global hub airports — the ones where major international airlines connect their regional and intercontinental passengers, like Dubai, New York JFK, London Heathrow and so on — to park all the planes that are notionally based there. Those planes aren’t normally all there at the same time. As a result, aircraft are being parked in a variety of places.

    “Some airlines are using dedicated storage facilities,” Petchenik explains. Southwest and Delta Air Lines, he says, are storing over 50 aircraft each at Victorville, a former US air base in California that now serves as a logistics hub for business, military and freight aviation, and also a ‘desert boneyard’ famous for its lines and lines of mothballed aircraft.

    Delta also has over 80 aircraft stored in each of Marana, Arizona, another boneyard, and Birmingham, Alabama, both in the US, Petchenik says. “United Airlines and American Airlines are each storing aircraft at their hub airports, with over 40 United aircraft stored in Houston (IAH, the city’s main airport). American, in addition to its hub storage, has aircraft parked in Tulsa and Pittsburgh [in the US states of Oklahoma and Pennsylvania, respectively].”

    Larger airlines are clustering similar aircraft together; some need certain maintenance, and having engineers who specialise in those types of planes in the same place makes sense. American Airlines, for example, is using four airports: its Airbus A320, A321 and A330 aircraft, as well as Embraer E-190 regional jets, are parked in Pittsburgh, the airport that used to be a hub for US Airways (which merged with American in 2015) but which has had extra space to offer since.


    American Airlines announced that it is cutting a third of its international flights amid a major travel slowdown due to the COVID-19 outbreak (Credit: Getty Images)

    Tulsa is the temporary home for many of American’s Boeing aircraft: the already-grounded 737 MAX, plus the 757, 777 and 787. But Tulsa is bang in the middle of ‘Tornado Alley’ and indeed, a severe thunderstorm passed through the area in late March. Planes are strengthened against hail hitting them from the front when they’re flying, but less so from above when they’re parked, so any damage will be an expensive proposition.

    Mobile in Alabama — where Airbus has a factory — has American’s A321 and 777 aircraft parked. Roswell, in the US state of New Mexico (best known for a more interplanetary kind of visitor), is now temporary home to Boeing 737, 757, 767 and 777 aircraft. It’s another of the famous aircraft boneyards, where planes are stored long-term before eventually either being reactivated, stripped for parts, recycled or a combination of the three. The airport used to be a major US Air Force base during the Cold War and has had space to spare since the base’s closure.

    Like any airport parking lot, the rates an airline pays to park its planes depend on how convenient the location is. Space at larger and more important airports tends to be more expensive, and is also limited, which is why airlines are flying their planes to out-of-the-way places. Airlines have to make hard decisions about whether it’s better to keep planes closer to hand, making restart easier but costing more in parking fees, or whether to take the cheaper parking space that’s a lot farther away.

    Runway parking

    In Europe, some airlines have grounded their entire fleets, while others are keeping a few key aircraft ready to perform repatriation flights, fly critical medical and other cargo around the world, or as otherwise agreed with their national governments. When it comes to storage, a similar patchwork of solutions is in place.

    Low-cost carrier easyJet, for example, has a dispersed hub structure, so has parked its 344 aircraft across 30 airports in its network. Since it mostly operates short-haul flights between non-hub airports, easyJet’s point-to-point network means that it is used to finding a variety of places around Europe for its aircraft to spend the night.


    Frankfurt Airport, one of Europe’s busiest hub airports, has dedicated one of its four runways to house dozens of grounded aircraft (Credit: Getty Images)

    Since Europe doesn't have the space or ultra-dry desert climates for boneyards, airlines are parking their aircraft at a variety of different airports. “British Airways has nearly 40 aircraft at Bournemouth,” says Petchenik. “Others, like Lufthansa, are parking aircraft on now-unused runways and in unused areas of the airport.”

    “In total, 700 out of 763 Lufthansa Group aircraft are parked,” says Lufthansa spokesperson Neda Jaafari. That number doesn’t just contain Lufthansa’s planes with the signature crane on the tail: it’s the members of its corporate family, which includes Austrian, Brussels Airlines, Eurowings and Swiss.

    At Frankfurt airport, one of Europe’s busiest and most important hub airports, one of the four runways (and the taxiways leading to and from it) is now home to dozens of aircraft. Most of Lufthansa’s planes are parked there, in Munich (Lufthansa’s second primary hub) and Berlin, says Jaafari. “We have planned [to position] most of our aircraft at the hubs to ensure that they can be reactivated on site and returned to operations at any time: for example, at Berlin Schönefeld Airport, where Lufthansa Technik is based.”

    Lufthansa Technik is the German airline’s MRO — maintenance, repair and overhaul — operator. Not all airlines keep this sort of work in-house, with many outsourcing to other airlines or third-party companies, so it will be interesting to see whether this gives some airlines an advantage in keeping their planes ready for the recovery.

    Caring for aircraft

    What you have to do to a parked aircraft depends on how long you expect it to be on the ground, says Jaafari. “For example, there are clear specifications from aircraft manufacturers as to what needs to be done for short-term parking in regards to a few days or even up to months. For an A320 [a short- to medium-haul plane that usually flies routes of between one and five hours, carrying up to 186 passengers], for example, this means covering the engines and sensors, draining liquids (oil, water and kerosene), disconnecting the power supply and batteries.”


    British Airways planes are parked up in a row on March 31, 2020 in Gatwick, England (Credit: Getty Images)

    Depending on the weather conditions more work may then be added in, like protecting aircraft against frost or strong winds. “In case of longer periods of inactivity, additional measures may be necessary, such as masking windows and doors. And if we do not have enough engine covers, the engines can alternatively be protected with foil.”

    Parked aircraft, Jaafari notes, need to be checked regularly, usually once a week, by qualified mechanics to ensure that there is no damage. As a rule, she says, it takes some 60 working hours to mothball an Airbus A320, and should take about the same time to bring one back into service.

    Though the timescale will be slightly different for each aircraft, what that means is that relaunching the global commercial air fleet will have to be a staggered process, rather than an immediate spike back to the way things were — and some planes may not return at all.

    Retiring older aircraft

    Demand is expected to return slowly once the coronavirus crisis starts to diminish. That means, however, that airlines are having to make hard choices about their fleets.

    The Boeing 747, perhaps the most iconic commercial aircraft of all time, has already been retired by many airlines, but both Dutch airline KLM and Australia’s Qantas have brought forward their jumbo jets’ retirement. These older planes were on the way out over the next few years, and keeping the few remaining aircraft in working order when they probably won’t be needed doesn’t make economic sense.

    Virgin Atlantic, too, has retired its Airbus A340-600; this large four-engine passenger plane couldn’t compete on efficiency with newer aircraft with two more efficient jets, and with dropping demand it won’t fly again for the airline.

    Some airlines, too, may bring forward retirements of the Boeing 757, a medium-sized plane that is used for a variety of missions but has a useful niche of flying about 150 passengers around seven hours. This niche serves lower demand flights from the eastern US to western and central Europe, and if the 757 doesn’t return (or doesn’t return in sufficient numbers) these routes may have to wait until the first deliveries of the Airbus A321XLR, the new generation aircraft that is planned to replace the 757 by most airlines.

    With uncertainty about when it will be safe to lift the world’s lockdowns, however, there’s equal uncertainty about how many of those planes will be needed during the recovery phase, and how quickly. Demand is still, in many places, rock-bottom: earlier this month, on 2 April, just 349 people left Hong Kong Airport. Those people could easily fit on one Cathay Pacific plane, with room to spare.




    https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article...anes-right-now


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  41. #41
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    Emirates Airline starts rapid on-site Covid-19 testing for passengers

    Emirates has become the first airline to roll out rapid on-site testing for Covid-19 for passengers. The blood test — which gives results within 10 minutes was first used on a flight from Dubai to Tunisia on Wednesday.

    According to the National Press Radio, the airline now also requires passengers to wear masks during boarding and throughout the flight while in-flight magazines and hand baggage excluding small handbags and briefcases is no longer permitted.


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  42. #42
    Debut
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    Tens of thousands of Pakistanis await repatriation flights

    Tens of thousands of Pakistanis have been stranded abroad, awaiting repatriation flights.

    The government says citizens who wish to do so will soon be brought back from countries such as the United Arab Emirates.

    But the speed in which the government is conducting its coronavirus response has drawn criticism both home and abroad.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...112053354.html

  43. #43
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    A GROUP of people stuck in Pakistan say they are running out of medical supplies and are desperate to return to Lancashire.

    Tassaddaq Hussain, a 31-year-old financial advisor from Burnley, travelled to Pakistan in early March with 20 others to attend the Pakistan Super League cricket final.

    Among those stuck are NHS medical professionals including nurses, an ENT specialist, MRI radiographers, and vulnerable elderly people whose medication is running out.

    Mr Hussain said: “The lockdown in itself is proving mentally and physically challenging. It is difficult to move across town without being put under intense questioning by the Pakistan army.

    “We are having to pay extortionate amounts for daily essentials such as nappies. There is a lack of communication from all parties."

    The lockdown in Pakistan was introduced on March 22 and there have been reports of some police using brutal force to deal with those outside.

    Mr Hussain says he is with elderly people who cannot access the medication they need as it was prescribed by doctors in the UK.

    He said: “It is difficult to move from town to town and we see no end. The airlines nor the governments have helped, and we fear the worst for those who are medically unstable.

    “The mental scars of such a trip will have a lasting effect on each of us. Our priority is to return home and help our people in these testing times, but we require assistance from the authorities.”

    He added: “We are questioned by the police and the army on a daily basis, regarding where our journey is from and to. We are asked for proof of our date of visiting the country as well as being asked for health certificates.”

    The group have contacted Burnley MP Antony Higginbotham, who they say is doing his best to provide regular updates but they are no closer to coming home.

    Mr Higginbotham said: “I was told this morning that Pakistan International Airlines have stopped all flights and do not plan on flying any more. I have spoken to Mr Hussain previously and will do my best to ensure they can get on the flights now arranged by the foreign office.

    “I know costs are a concern and have raised this with the foreign office, who will offer interest free loans to people who need help.”

    Mr Hussain said: “I am told planes are leaving with seats available, whilst the governments are suggesting these flights are full.

    “We are being quoted £900 for a single ticket and we feel the Pakistan government are cashing in on our downfall whilst the UK government are not treating us fairly. We are aware a £75m fund has been established, however these funds are not being used to facilitate ourA GROUP of people stuck in Pakistan say they are running out of medical supplies and are desperate to return to Lancashire.

    Tassaddaq Hussain, a 31-year-old financial advisor from Burnley, travelled to Pakistan in early March with 20 others to attend the Pakistan Super League cricket final.

    Among those stuck are NHS medical professionals including nurses, an ENT specialist, MRI radiographers, and vulnerable elderly people whose medication is running out.

    Mr Hussain said: “The lockdown in itself is proving mentally and physically challenging. It is difficult to move across town without being put under intense questioning by the Pakistan army.

    “We are having to pay extortionate amounts for daily essentials such as nappies. There is a lack of communication from all parties."

    The lockdown in Pakistan was introduced on March 22 and there have been reports of some police using brutal force to deal with those outside.

    Mr Hussain says he is with elderly people who cannot access the medication they need as it was prescribed by doctors in the UK.

    He said: “It is difficult to move from town to town and we see no end. The airlines nor the governments have helped, and we fear the worst for those who are medically unstable.

    “The mental scars of such a trip will have a lasting effect on each of us. Our priority is to return home and help our people in these testing times, but we require assistance from the authorities.”

    He added: “We are questioned by the police and the army on a daily basis, regarding where our journey is from and to. We are asked for proof of our date of visiting the country as well as being asked for health certificates.”

    The group have contacted Burnley MP Antony Higginbotham, who they say is doing his best to provide regular updates but they are no closer to coming home.

    Mr Higginbotham said: “I was told this morning that Pakistan International Airlines have stopped all flights and do not plan on flying any more. I have spoken to Mr Hussain previously and will do my best to ensure they can get on the flights now arranged by the foreign office.

    “I know costs are a concern and have raised this with the foreign office, who will offer interest free loans to people who need help.”

    Mr Hussain said: “I am told planes are leaving with seats available, whilst the governments are suggesting these flights are full.

    “We are being quoted £900 for a single ticket and we feel the Pakistan government are cashing in on our downfall whilst the UK government are not treating us fairly. We are aware a £75m fund has been established, however these funds are not being used to facilitate our

    https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.u...plies-running/


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  44. #44
    Debut
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    London's Heathrow airport normally has about 600 flights landing on an average day, but in lockdown Britain, about 60 arrive daily.

    Other UK airports are receiving a tiny number of flights between them. But the number is still high enough to trouble MPs, who on Friday received a letter from the UK aviation minister explaining why flights were still in the air.

    It is the airlines, who say nearly all of their passengers on their flights into Heathrow are people heading home, which decide which routes to run.

    "No-one is on holiday," says Airlines UK chief executive Tim Alderslade, whose group represents British Airways, Virgin Atlantic and other UK-based carriers.

    That was certainly the picture at a deserted Heathrow Terminal 5 when I visited this week. I watched from a distance as a trickle of mask-sporting passengers appeared after flying in on British Airways from Los Angeles.

    Some people on social media have questioned why flights are still coming in from countries such as the US, Italy and Spain, where Covid-19 is also prevalent.

    Alitalia said the four daily flights it is now operating between Rome and London are "quite empty" flying into Heathrow.

    However, on the return leg to Rome, its aircraft are "almost full" of Italian citizens who want to fly back to Italy. Those people travelling to Italy must fill in a declaration to say that their journey is essential.

    Madrid and Barcelona are, like Heathrow, hub airports. That means many passengers flying in from there will have started their journey elsewhere, such as airports in Latin America.

    And many people flying into Heathrow will transit and fly straight back out again to another destination.

    Many airlines would not disclose exactly how many passengers they have been ferrying into London.

    However, American Airlines said social distancing had been possible "for all passengers", suggesting that its aircraft have a lot of empty seats.

    Passenger numbers have been so low for Dutch carrier KLM that over the past few days, it has had to cancel its only daily flight from Amsterdam Schiphol into Heathrow.

    In normal times, it runs 11 of those flights in a single day.

    Virgin Atlantic revealed that many of its commercial flights which have been running over the past couple of weeks have only, on average, been a quarter full.

    And my understanding is that British Airways is, globally, currently carrying a minuscule fraction of its usual passenger load.

    But if passenger flights are not full of passengers right now, their belly will be full of cargo which, because of demand, now travels at a premium.

    Cargo has become a vital source of income for airlines, which have had their passenger revenue slashed in apocalyptic fashion.

    At the same time, their high fixed costs, such as maintaining, leasing and parking aircraft, remain.

    In specific cases, airlines such as BA and Virgin Atlantic have been using passenger airliners to carry solely cargo, namely medical supplies such as ventilator parts, face masks and protective clothing (PPE).

    Over a 10-day period earlier this month, Virgin Atlantic ran 20 cargo-only flights into Heathrow.

    It ran just 15 commercial passenger flights over the same period.

    When a passenger aircraft is used to carry cargo, most of the seats can be covered with netting, so that supplies can travel in the cabin as well as in the belly of the plane.

    Normally, most of the world's air cargo is transported in the hold of passenger aircraft.

    But with the vast majority of airliners grounded, cargo companies have had to step up their operations in an effort to meet the demand.

    Companies such as FedEx Express, DHL and IAG Cargo (a sister company of BA and Iberia) have been ferrying medical supplies into the UK, namely from China.

    There is "a huge demand" for component parts for projects to manufacture respirators in the UK, according to Trevor Hoyle from FedEx Express.

    He said his company had also moved "a huge amount" of personal protective equipment (PPE) into the UK in recent days.

    The number of cargo-only flights travelling into Heathrow has grown exponentially throughout the crisis.

    And despite most passenger flights being grounded, East Midlands Airport, which boasts the UK's "largest dedicated air cargo operation", has seen a rise in overall flight numbers because of the demand for freight.

    As for getting people home, BA and Virgin Atlantic are also running official repatriation flights for the Foreign Office.

    The UK government says it has brought back 7,300 people on 35 flights since the coronavirus outbreak began in China. However, the vast bulk of people returning have travelled via commercial routes.

    It's estimated that 1.3 million people have arrived back in the UK on commercially operated aircraft over that same period, but thousands of British residents are still stranded abroad.

    One of those to return was Kiran Sandhu, who was flown home this week from India, where she was visiting family. When she left India, Kiran was given a temperature check and had to answer questions about whether she had Covid-19 symptoms.

    But when she landed in the UK, there were no such questions or tests.

    "It was a bit confusing," she says. "You just assume that if one airport is doing it, then other airports would follow through with the same regulation and process."

    Public Health England says checks are not effective, because some people carrying Covid-19 do not have a temperature and some show no symptoms at all.

    This may not remain the case forever. Heathrow's boss says that at some point, tests might have to become the norm in airports around the world, partly so passengers are not confused by inconsistent approaches.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-52319575


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  45. #45
    Debut
    May 2015
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    It is gonna be quite a few years before the aviation and aerospace industry get back to pre-COVID19 days, according to various European and Australian experts.

    And here I am in my 4th year of Aerospace Engineering staring at a VERY rocky start to my career

  46. #46
    Debut
    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    A GROUP of people stuck in Pakistan say they are running out of medical supplies and are desperate to return to Lancashire.

    Tassaddaq Hussain, a 31-year-old financial advisor from Burnley, travelled to Pakistan in early March with 20 others to attend the Pakistan Super League cricket final.

    Among those stuck are NHS medical professionals including nurses, an ENT specialist, MRI radiographers, and vulnerable elderly people whose medication is running out.

    Mr Hussain said: “The lockdown in itself is proving mentally and physically challenging. It is difficult to move across town without being put under intense questioning by the Pakistan army.

    “We are having to pay extortionate amounts for daily essentials such as nappies. There is a lack of communication from all parties."

    The lockdown in Pakistan was introduced on March 22 and there have been reports of some police using brutal force to deal with those outside.

    Mr Hussain says he is with elderly people who cannot access the medication they need as it was prescribed by doctors in the UK.

    He said: “It is difficult to move from town to town and we see no end. The airlines nor the governments have helped, and we fear the worst for those who are medically unstable.

    “The mental scars of such a trip will have a lasting effect on each of us. Our priority is to return home and help our people in these testing times, but we require assistance from the authorities.”

    He added: “We are questioned by the police and the army on a daily basis, regarding where our journey is from and to. We are asked for proof of our date of visiting the country as well as being asked for health certificates.”

    The group have contacted Burnley MP Antony Higginbotham, who they say is doing his best to provide regular updates but they are no closer to coming home.

    Mr Higginbotham said: “I was told this morning that Pakistan International Airlines have stopped all flights and do not plan on flying any more. I have spoken to Mr Hussain previously and will do my best to ensure they can get on the flights now arranged by the foreign office.

    “I know costs are a concern and have raised this with the foreign office, who will offer interest free loans to people who need help.”

    Mr Hussain said: “I am told planes are leaving with seats available, whilst the governments are suggesting these flights are full.

    “We are being quoted £900 for a single ticket and we feel the Pakistan government are cashing in on our downfall whilst the UK government are not treating us fairly. We are aware a £75m fund has been established, however these funds are not being used to facilitate ourA GROUP of people stuck in Pakistan say they are running out of medical supplies and are desperate to return to Lancashire.

    Tassaddaq Hussain, a 31-year-old financial advisor from Burnley, travelled to Pakistan in early March with 20 others to attend the Pakistan Super League cricket final.

    Among those stuck are NHS medical professionals including nurses, an ENT specialist, MRI radiographers, and vulnerable elderly people whose medication is running out.

    Mr Hussain said: “The lockdown in itself is proving mentally and physically challenging. It is difficult to move across town without being put under intense questioning by the Pakistan army.

    “We are having to pay extortionate amounts for daily essentials such as nappies. There is a lack of communication from all parties."

    The lockdown in Pakistan was introduced on March 22 and there have been reports of some police using brutal force to deal with those outside.

    Mr Hussain says he is with elderly people who cannot access the medication they need as it was prescribed by doctors in the UK.

    He said: “It is difficult to move from town to town and we see no end. The airlines nor the governments have helped, and we fear the worst for those who are medically unstable.

    “The mental scars of such a trip will have a lasting effect on each of us. Our priority is to return home and help our people in these testing times, but we require assistance from the authorities.”

    He added: “We are questioned by the police and the army on a daily basis, regarding where our journey is from and to. We are asked for proof of our date of visiting the country as well as being asked for health certificates.”

    The group have contacted Burnley MP Antony Higginbotham, who they say is doing his best to provide regular updates but they are no closer to coming home.

    Mr Higginbotham said: “I was told this morning that Pakistan International Airlines have stopped all flights and do not plan on flying any more. I have spoken to Mr Hussain previously and will do my best to ensure they can get on the flights now arranged by the foreign office.

    “I know costs are a concern and have raised this with the foreign office, who will offer interest free loans to people who need help.”

    Mr Hussain said: “I am told planes are leaving with seats available, whilst the governments are suggesting these flights are full.

    “We are being quoted £900 for a single ticket and we feel the Pakistan government are cashing in on our downfall whilst the UK government are not treating us fairly. We are aware a £75m fund has been established, however these funds are not being used to facilitate our

    https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.u...plies-running/
    I feel Imran Khan's government has done a poor job. IK has been supported and funded for years from overseas Pakistanis esp those from the UK. In return his government couldn't sort out safe flights for them to go aboard. PTI have lost many supporters in the UK because of this.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  47. #47
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    Pakistan starts repatriating UAE-based nationals stranded by coronavirus

    Pakistan has started repatriating some of its citizens from the United Arab Emirates, which had threatened to review labour ties with countries refusing to take back their nationals during the novel coronavirus pandemic, Reuters reported.

    The first Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flight carrying 227 “stranded passengers” from Dubai and other emirates left for Islamabad on Saturday evening, Pakistan's consulate general in Dubai said in a Twitter post.

    It was not clear when other flights would depart. More than 40,000 Pakistanis in the Gulf Arab state have registered with the consulate to return home, two UAE newspapers reported.

    The UAE and other Gulf states have reported increased infections among low-income migrant workers who live in overcrowded quarters. Some have moved to re-house them in shuttered schools or dedicated centres, and are trying to arrange flights to repatriate them.

    ==

    SAPM Yusuf says govt to bring 6,000 Pakistanis back this week

    Special Assistant to the Prime Minister on National Security Dr Moeed Yusuf has said the government plans to bring back 6,000 Pakistanis in the coming week.

    Speaking at a press conference in Islamabad, the SAPM said that the Torkham border had been opened on Saturday and some 1,000 people would be allowed to return to Pakistan daily.

    The SAPM added that the Chaman border would be opened next week.


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  48. #48
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    Jun 2017
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    Virgin Atlantic will collapse without help - Branson

    Virgin Group boss Richard Branson has written an open letter to the company's employees warning Virgin Atlantic will collapse unless it receives government financial support, saying this is the "most challenging time" the company has faced in five decades of business.

    He writes: "It is hard to find the words to convey what a devastating impact this pandemic continues to have on so many communities, businesses and people around the world. From a business perspective, the damage to many is unprecedented and the length of the disruption remains worryingly unknown."

    It has been reported that the carrier is asking for up to £500m ($614M) of public money. Sir Richard writes: "This would be in the form of a commercial loan - it wouldn't be free money and the airline would pay it back."

    He also defends himself from criticism of his request for help from taxpayers, saying: "I’ve seen lots of comments about my net worth – but that is calculated on the value of Virgin businesses around the world before this crisis, not sitting as cash in a bank account ready to withdraw."

    He adds: "Much has been said about Virgin Atlantic employees taking a wage reduction for eight weeks, spread across six and a half months. This was a virtually unanimous decision made by Virgin Atlantic employees and their unions who collectively chose to do this to save as many jobs as possible – it was not forced upon them by management."
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/world-52349779

  49. #49
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    Richard Branson and his virgin Atlantic have been ignored by Australian government and for good. Asking for bailout of 1.4 billion from tax payers money while he maintains his island and 4billion assets, is a travesty. He should liquidate some of that if he is really passionate about his business.. But yeah the bad effects are chinese opportunists waiting to make a quick cheap deal..

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by globalcitizen View Post
    Richard Branson and his virgin Atlantic have been ignored by Australian government and for good. Asking for bailout of 1.4 billion from tax payers money while he maintains his island and 4billion assets, is a travesty. He should liquidate some of that if he is really passionate about his business.. But yeah the bad effects are chinese opportunists waiting to make a quick cheap deal..
    Yeah, its a good airline and I am sympathetic to the staff and all the related contractors at airports that rely on work from the airline but Branson is pushing his luck here.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by globalcitizen View Post
    Richard Branson and his virgin Atlantic have been ignored by Australian government and for good. Asking for bailout of 1.4 billion from tax payers money while he maintains his island and 4billion assets, is a travesty. He should liquidate some of that if he is really passionate about his business.. But yeah the bad effects are chinese opportunists waiting to make a quick cheap deal..
    Not unique to Branson sadly, it's the billionaire mentality: say and do anything to make some more profit. He couldn't care less how it affects the taxpayers or even employees.


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  52. #52
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    Norwegian Air cuts 4,700 staff

    Norwegian Air has said four of its subsidiaries in Sweden and Denmark had filed for bankruptcy, affecting some 4,700 pilots and crew, as a result of the economic impact of the new coronavirus.

    "It is heartbreaking that our Swedish and Danish pilot and cabin crew subsidiaries now are forced to file for bankruptcy, and I'm truly sorry for the consequences this will have for our colleagues," Jacob Schram, chief executive of Norwegian Air, said in a statement.


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  53. #53
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    Coronavirus: Branson offers Caribbean island to secure Virgin bailout

    Sir Richard Branson has pledged his luxury island resort as collateral to help get a UK government bailout of his stricken airline Virgin Atlantic.

    The billionaire Virgin Group boss said in an open letter to staff he was not asking for a handout, but a commercial loan, believed to be £500m.

    The airline's survival was in doubt, and his Necker Island home in the Caribbean could be mortgaged, he said.

    It comes as Virgin Group's airline in Australia faces administration.

    Both airlines have been hit hard by the global coronavirus lockdown, and Sir Richard has appealed to governments in both countries for help.

    However, has been criticised for appealing for taxpayer aid rather than drawing on his huge wealth. Sir Richard's fortune is thought to be well over £4bn. The large US airline Delta owns 49% of Virgin Atlantic.

    Sir Richard said in his letter to staff: "Many airlines around the world need government support and many have already received it." The crisis facing airlines, and the staff they employ, was "unprecedented," he said.

    Despite his wealth, this did not mean he had "cash in a bank account ready to withdraw". And he hit back at criticism that he was a tax exile who did not deserve help, saying he and his wife "did not leave Britain for tax reasons but for our love of the beautiful British Virgin Islands and in particular Necker Island".

    He said Necker would be offered as security for any loans. "As with other Virgin assets, our team will raise as much money against the island as possible to save as many jobs as possible around the group," Sir Richard said.

    Government support

    In his letter to staff, Sir Richard said: "We will do everything we can to keep the airline [Virgin Atlantic] going - but we will need government support to achieve that in the face of the severe uncertainty surrounding travel today and not knowing how long the planes will be grounded for.

    "This would be in the form of a commercial loan - it wouldn't be free money and the airline would pay it back (as EasyJet will do for the £600m loan the government recently gave them)."

    He pointed out that Virgin Atlantic started with one plane 36 years ago, before adding: "Over those years it has created real competition for British Airways, which must remain fierce for the benefit of our wonderful customers and the public at large."

    Sir Richard offered to inject £250m into the Virgin Group last month, with most of that going to the airline.

    Earlier this month, Rolls-Royce, Airbus, Heathrow airport and Manchester Airports Group sent letters to the government highlighting the importance of Virgin Atlantic to the UK's manufacturing supply chain.

    Australia struggles

    Meanwhile, it has been reported that Virgin Australia - in which Sir Richard holds a stake of around 10% - is close to going into administration after being refused help by the Australian government.

    The carrier has been forced to cancel nearly all of its flights during the coronavirus crisis and been unable to restructure its debts.

    The Australian government refused a request from the company for a A$1.4bn (£720m) loan.

    The airline - which employs about 16,000 - is part-owned by Sir Richard along with Etihad, Singapore Airlines and China's HNA.

    "The brilliant Virgin Australia team is fighting to survive and need support to get through this catastrophic global crisis," Sir Richard said.

    "We are hopeful that Virgin Australia can emerge stronger than ever, as a more sustainable, financially viable airline."

    He warned: "If Virgin Australia disappears, Qantas would effectively have a monopoly of the Australian skies. We all know what that would lead to."

    Sir Richard also addressed the fierce criticism he has faced in recent weeks over his tax situation.

    Critics have pointed out he has paid no UK income tax since moving to the tax-free British Virgin Islands 14 years ago.

    Sir Richard is the 312th richest person in the world with an estimated $5.2bn fortune, according to the Bloomberg billionaires index.

    "I've seen lots of comments about my net worth - but that is calculated on the value of Virgin businesses around the world before this crisis, not sitting as cash in a bank account ready to withdraw," he said.

    "Over the years significant profits have never been taken out of the Virgin Group, instead they have been reinvested in building businesses that create value and opportunities."

    Turning to the question of living abroad he said: "Joan and I did not leave Britain for tax reasons but for our love of the beautiful British Virgin Islands (BVI) and in particular Necker Island, which I bought when I was 29 years old, as an uninhabited island on the edges of the BVI.

    "Over time, we built our family home here. The rest of the island is run as a business, which employs 175 people."
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-52354865

  54. #54
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    Virgin Australia has confirmed it has entered voluntary administration - making it Australia's first big corporate casualty of the coronavirus pandemic.

    The country's second-largest carrier cut almost all flights last month following wide-spread travel bans.

    It was already struggling with a long-term A$5bn (£2.55bn; $3.17bn) debt.

    The airline is now seeking new buyers and investors, after failing to get a loan from Australia's government.

    Virgin Australia chief executive Paul Scurrah said: "Our decision today is about securing the future of the Virgin Australia Group and emerging on the other side of the Covid-19 crisis.

    "Australia needs a second airline and we are determined to keep flying."

    Meanwhile, Sir Richard Branson - whose Virgin group is a part-owner of Virgin Australia - has offered a Caribbean island as collateral to help get a UK government bailout of Virgin Atlantic.

    Branson offers Caribbean island to secure bailout
    Shares had been suspended in the firm for the past fortnight as it struggled to find a survival plan.

    Canberra refused a request from the company for a A$1.4bn loan, but in the past month had announced around A$900m in support for all local airlines.

    Virgin Australia has turned just two statutory profits in the past decade.

    It is part-owned by a number of entities including the UAE government, Singapore Airlines, China's HNA, and Sir Richard Branson's Group.

    It employs about 10,000 people directly and another 6,000 through ancillary businesses.

    Consulting firm Deloitte announced it had appointed as administrator on Monday. It will try and restructure the firm's debt, pay off creditors and find a buyer - with private equity groups expected to be interested.

    Consumer groups and local politicians have voiced concerns that unless the airline is resurrected, national flag carrier Qantas will hold a near-monopoly in Australia.

    Air travel is crucial in the vast continent where distances between coastal capital cities make flights the only practical way to travel quickly domestically.

    Virgin Australia had previously held around 31% of domestic flights, while Qantas controlled around 58% of the market.

    The long-term loss of the airline will also be seen as a major blow to Australia's tourism industry - a big GDP driver.

    Before the shutdown, Virgin Australia had flown about 130 aircraft to 41 destinations - mainly domestic routes, but also international services including to New Zealand, Bali, Fiji, Tokyo and Los Angeles.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-52363428


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  55. #55
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    Some airports are "at risk" of closure because of the loss of business during the coronavirus pandemic, experts have warned.

    Nine out of 10 flights have been grounded since the UK went into lockdown.

    Airports said cargo flights were running and shareholders were being supportive as they worked to cut costs.

    Flight tracking website Flightradar24 recorded just 711 departures from the UK's 10 biggest airports last week.

    This compares with 7,865 in the week up to the UK's lockdown.

    Could airports close?

    Independent aviation analyst Martin Evans said there was a "risk" some airports would fold.

    "Regional airports, just before the lockdown, were hit by the administration of Flybe," he said. "So they had already lost a substantial amount of income.

    "Now is the start of the period when they should be getting maximum revenue. If things return to normal by winter, that's the point they are at their quietest.

    "There is a risk that we could see airports close. That could mean an airport company folds but that the buildings and facilities are still there and someone else would take over, but there is a risk at the moment."

    He said airports would still have to cover fixed costs - ranging from management to air traffic control - whether there were flights or not.

    Julian Bray, an aviation expert and broadcaster, said some grounded aircraft may "never return to the skies".

    He said systems would need to be thoroughly serviced before they could fly again.

    Mr Bray added: "We will see some smaller airports go to the wall unless a rescue deal can be arranged."

    He said he expected passenger numbers to be low even when restrictions were lifted as people choose not to travel.

    "Some are getting one or two departures a day, but it is pretty bleak at the moment."

    EasyJet said it expected a pre-tax loss of between £185m and £205m for the six months to 31 March, although this would mark an improvement after a £275m loss in the same period a year earlier.

    It has said it is likely to keep its middle seats empty once flights resume to maintain social distancing triggered by the pandemic.

    Heathrow Airport would normally see an average of 1,400 take-offs and landings per day.

    In the week before the UK went into lockdown 2,432 flights were tracked departing the airport by Flightradar24 while last week there were just 464.

    For some airports, almost all passenger flights have stopped.

    A spokeswoman for Birmingham Airport said traffic was down 90%.

    "Birmingham Airport remains open to support any airlines that need to carry out aircraft maintenance checks, emergency flights and cargo, and we will continue to remain open for any airlines which need to use Birmingham as an arrival or departure point," she said.

    "We are following government advice regarding social distancing to safeguard our employees and customers. "

    She said remaining passenger flights included repatriation services arriving from Pakistan plus some services to Dublin and Amsterdam.

    One of the airport's hangars is being used for a temporary mortuary with space for about 1,500 bodies and the site is also close to the West Midlands' new Nightingale hospital at the NEC.

    A spokesman for Manchester Airports Group, which runs Manchester, Stansted and East Midlands airports, said: "Every airport in the UK has seen an unforeseen, rapid and significant reduction in passenger numbers.

    "MAG has already acted quickly to protect jobs and secure its long term future by cutting costs across the group. MAG faces into this crisis in a strong and prudent financial position, with supportive shareholders."

    He said East Midlands Airport was currently one of the top 10 busiest airports in Europe by flight numbers because of its cargo operation, with volumes "as high as they would be in a normal month" but passenger numbers down "very significantly on normal levels".

    Newcastle Airport has limited its hours of operation and currently has one commercial flight per day, four days a week, operating between Newcastle and Amsterdam as well as one-off military, freight and medical flights.

    "We welcome the measures taken so far by the government to support businesses through this difficult time but hope there will be further help provided," a spokeswoman said.

    At Belfast International, there have been no passenger flights since EasyJet grounded services in March.

    A spokeswoman said the airport remained open and "appropriately staffed".

    "Passenger flights are effectively limited to round-the-clock medical emergency flights," she said.

    "Our extensive lifeline nightly cargo operations continue to provide the vital supplies required by the core health and food chain sectors throughout this most challenging of times."

    Medical flights include passengers who need to go to Great Britain for treatment, not related to coronavirus, while cargo flights go mainly to the East Midlands and Stansted airports and include Royal Mail services.

    Bristol Airport is "assisting with repatriation, medical, military and other essential movements," a spokeswoman said.

    What's the effect on local jobs?

    The Centre for Cities think tank estimates one in five jobs in areas that depend on the aviation industry are vulnerable to the economic impacts of Covid-19.

    The economy of Crawley, near Gatwick airport, is likely to be hardest hit, the report states.

    The town has a large share of employees working in the aviation and aircraft manufacturing industries.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-52323416


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  56. #56
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    The days of cheap air travel will be over if airlines are forced to introduce physical distancing measures on planes because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the industry has warned, reports Julia Kollewe.

    Alexandre de Juniac, the director general of the International Air Transport Association (Iata), said that if governments ordered airlines to adopt physical distancing onboard aircraft, at least a third of seats would remain empty and airlines would have to raise their ticket prices by at least 50% or go bust.

    Either you fly at the same price, selling the ticket at the same average price as before, and you lose enormous amounts of money so it’s impossible to fly for any airline, particularly low cost; or you increase ticket prices by at least 50% and you are able to fly with a minimum profit. So it means that if social distancing is imposed, cheap travel is over.

    Source Guardian


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  57. #57
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    COVID-19 crisis seems to also be the final blow for South African Airways. The airline is collapsing and has laid off all of its 4,700 employees.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...fire-workforce

  58. #58
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    Is there not a furlough type scheme in Australia? Or would Virgin Australia still ha e struggled?
    @Varun

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firebat View Post
    Not unique to Branson sadly, it's the billionaire mentality: say and do anything to make some more profit. He couldn't care less how it affects the taxpayers or even employees.
    He is trying to save the jobs of his 70,000 staff.

    I’ve watched that bloke build his empire up from nothing. He started by selling records out of the crust of a church.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert View Post
    He is trying to save the jobs of his 70,000 staff.

    I’ve watched that bloke build his empire up from nothing. He started by selling records out of the crust of a church.
    True, but there's change petition going around by the do-gooders to get Branson to sell his private assets before being allowed to get bailed out by the govt.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    Virgin Australia has confirmed it has entered voluntary administration - making it Australia's first big corporate casualty of the coronavirus pandemic.



    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-52363428
    It was very much expected. They weren't doing very well and were always expected to fold up if ever the going got tough.

    Always a bad move for a mainline premium carrier to get into the low-cost business.

  62. #62
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    Coronavirus: Delta rules out cash lifeline for struggling Virgin Atlantic


    Sir Richard Branson's co-investor in Virgin Atlantic has ruled out injecting cash into the struggling airline - and indicated he expects it to go into administration.

    Ed Bastian, chief executive of Delta Air Lines, said his focus was currently on protecting his own business as the aviation industry grapples with the worst trading environment in living memory.

    Delta owns 49% of Virgin Atlantic while Sir Richard's Virgin Group owns the other 51%.

    Sir Richard published an open letter to Virgin Atlantic employees on Tuesday in which he warned that, without financial support from the UK government, the 36-year old airline would collapse.

    Some industry followers have speculated that, following its recent successful efforts to raise cash and cut costs, Delta might be able to lend support to the carrier.

    Delta has halved its operating costs during the last 30 days and has been awarded a $5.4bn grant by the US government to cover its wages bill during April, May and June.

    It is also applying for a further $4.6bn in US government loans.

    But Mr Bastian told CNBC today that no money would be finding its way to Virgin Atlantic.

    He said this was partly because under EU rules, by which British carriers must still abide, EU-based carriers must be majority-owned by EU-based owners.

    He told interviewer Phil Lebeau: "We are not in a position to invest any more in Virgin Atlantic, we are already at the ownership cap of 49% and candidly, with our crisis, with the cash we need to protect our own business, that's what our focus is.

    "I trust Virgin will work through its challenges with the government and with Richard."

    Mr Bastian insisted this would not be the end of the Virgin brand in aviation.

    He went on: "If they are required to go through an administration process in the UK, I am confident they [Virgin Atlantic] could re-emerge.

    "There's a need for the Virgin brand in the UK market place and I'm confident once we… get to a point where people will feel safe to travel again, the Virgin brand will be strong once more.

    "But it could take a legal process to get through that."

    His comments come a day after Virgin Australia, which is 10% owned by Sir Richard, went into administration.

    It has been reported that it proposed nine different bail-out packages to the Australian government before doing so.

    The Trump administration last week signed off on an aid package for US carriers that is expected to come to around $50bn, of which around $17.5bn would be in grants, with the rest in loans.

    The UK government said last month that it might provide "bespoke support" to individual carriers in this country and stressed that this would only be as a "last resort" once all other options had been exhausted.

    But the Financial Times reported at the weekend that Virgin Atlantic's proposal for a £500m package of commercial loans and guarantees had "failed to impress" the government.

    It quoted one source as saying the airline had not done enough to show it had explored other options to bolster cash before asking for state aid.

    In his letter to employees, Sir Richard sought to make clear that the airline was not asking for anything its competitors had not.

    He wrote: "We will do everything we can to keep the airline going - but we will need government support to achieve that in the face of the severe uncertainty surrounding travel today and not knowing how long the planes will be grounded for.

    "This would be in the form of a commercial loan - it wouldn't be free money and the airline would pay it back (as easyJet will do for the £600m loan the government recently gave them)."

    Easyjet announced on 6 April that it had raised £600m by selling commercial paper which has been bought by the Bank of England under the Covid Corporate Financing Facility (CCFF) - the scheme launched last month by Rishi Sunak, the Chancellor, to support larger companies during the current crisis.

    Another short-haul carrier, the FTSE 250-listed Wizz Air, announced on Tuesday that it had been told it would be eligible to raise money under the scheme - although it has not yet indicated that it will tap the facility.

    International Airlines Group, the owner of Virgin Atlantic's bitter rival British Airways, is expected by industry analysts to be highly unlikely to seek any government support.

    It announced three weeks ago that it would not be paying its latest dividend, saving it £320m, while it has also been drawing on existing bank facilities and exploring other ways in which it can boost its liquidity position.

    Willie Walsh, IAG's chief executive, said last month it was not for taxpayers to support airlines when the shareholders of those airlines were not prepared to do so.

    Mr Bastian was speaking as Delta reported a net loss of $534m for the first three months of the year.

    That compared with a net profit of $730m during the same period last year.

    Delta, the first of the major US carriers to report financial results for the first quarter of the year, has grounded more than 650 aircraft.

    Mr Bastian said that, as of the end of March, the airline had been burning through $100m on a daily basis.

    But he told CNBC that following cost cutting measures and its efforts to raise capital, including support from the US government, that sum would have halved by the end of June and could even be reached by May.

    The US aviation industry is expected, in total, to report losses of at least $2bn for the quarter.

    Delta completed its £233m acquisition of a 49% shareholding in Virgin Atlantic from Singapore Airlines in June 2013.

    Singapore had paid Sir Richard £600.25m for the stake in December 1999.

    A plan that would have seen Air France-KLM acquire a 31% stake from Sir Richard, which would have seen him cede control of the airline, was abandoned just before Christmas last year.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...antic-11977216

  63. #63
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    Air Mauritius placed into administration

    The current crisis in the aviation industry seems to have suddenly caught up with several airlines. As of today, Mauritian airline Air Mauritius has been placed into administration. The airline’s board came to a decision following “a complete erosion of the company’s revenue base.”
    https://simpleflying.com/air-mauritius-administration/

    There goes another one. They are starting to fall like ninepins. Wonder which one will be next.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by gani999 View Post
    Air Mauritius placed into administration

    The current crisis in the aviation industry seems to have suddenly caught up with several airlines. As of today, Mauritian airline Air Mauritius has been placed into administration. The airline’s board came to a decision following “a complete erosion of the company’s revenue base.”
    https://simpleflying.com/air-mauritius-administration/

    There goes another one. They are starting to fall like ninepins. Wonder which one will be next.
    I was reading an article on Bloomberg few days back and PIA was right at the top of Airlines most at risk of bankruptcy.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gayle_Force View Post
    I was reading an article on Bloomberg few days back and PIA was right at the top of Airlines most at risk of bankruptcy.

    PIA is state run and propped up by the taxpayer. It will never go bankrupt. Same with Air India, Biman Bangladesh, Sri Lankan, the Middle East Big 3 etc.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by gani999 View Post
    PIA is state run and propped up by the taxpayer. It will never go bankrupt. Same with Air India, Biman Bangladesh, Sri Lankan, the Middle East Big 3 etc.
    Air India is already bankrupt and close to a shutdown

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert View Post
    He is trying to save the jobs of his 70,000 staff.

    I’ve watched that bloke build his empire up from nothing. He started by selling records out of the crust of a church.
    Good for him but why does he want my money, when he has $4billion? Instead of asking for a bailout, time to pull out his wealth and save his loved employees job. I'd rather not be paying extra taxes when he can pay it all without little issue. Perhaps you could pay my share?


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by gani999 View Post
    PIA is state run and propped up by the taxpayer. It will never go bankrupt. Same with Air India, Biman Bangladesh, Sri Lankan, the Middle East Big 3 etc.
    Pretty sure most of PIA's debt is to foreign entities. Unfortunately, government can't print foreign currency to pay off debt.

    Also, South African Airline, which is also state owned is on the brink of going under so PIA going under is not out totally of the realm of possibilities.

  69. #69
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    As more countries mull lifting Covid-19 lockdowns, airlines are examining what flying might look like as travel restrictions start to be relaxed. Carriers are haemorrhaging money and it’s very much in their interests to get planes back in the air. Passenger confidence will be one of many hurdles to overcome, however, with many worried about keeping a reasonable distance from their fellow travellers.

    Several airlines are exploring the idea of keeping middle seats empty, to avoid passengers sitting directly beside each other. European short-haul carrier EasyJet was the latest airline to float the idea, with chief executive Johan Lundgren describing it last week as “something that the customers would like to see”. Other airlines that have mooted similar plans include Alaska Airlines and European budget carrier Wizz Air.

    Removing the unloved middle seat option would lead to a hearty hooray from the travelling public. Sit by the window and you get a view, plus a bulkhead to snooze against. In an aisle seat, you can pop to the toilet or stretch whenever you like. The middle seat has no such benefits, unless you’re one of those people who strikes up conversations with their seatmates.

    But would blocking middle seats actually help us maintain proper social distancing and if so, how long could airlines keep doing it? Is it a realistic option beyond the very short term?

    “Right now, we need it, because not doing so would contradict instructions from authorities and common sense. The urgent need to slow infection rates takes precedence overall, even if the solution is not perfect,” explains Daniel Baron, managing director of Tokyo-based LIFT Aero Design, which helps airlines design cabins and customer experience. “Long term, however, it is not economically sustainable. After the dust settles, we will all go back to expecting affordable global mobility again. To enable the fares for that, especially if total capacity has been reduced, airlines will need bums in all seats.”

    In the two-metre theory, four passengers need 26 seats

    Planes are very much not set up for social distancing – entirely the opposite. Billions of dollars have been spent in recent years in particular to fit as many people as possible into smaller spaces. For example, when the big wide-body, twin-aisle, twin-engine Boeing 777 started flying in the 1990s, most of them had nine seats per economy row on long-haul flights. Today, almost all airlines flying the plane – whether long-haul with the likes of Emirates or short-haul within Japan – have 10 seats, meaning narrower seats and narrower aisles.

    After the dust settles, we will all go back to expecting affordable global mobility again – Daniel Baron
    Responsible social distancing in the age of Covid-19 means staying at least 2m (6ft) from other people. But that’s impossible on a modern plane, where seats are around 45cm (17-18 inches) wide, so leaving the middle seat free only keeps you 45cm from your neighbour, side to side. You’d need to be more than four seats apart to keep 2m away. In other words, about as far away as the two window seats in any row of six seats separated by a single aisle. (We’re ignoring, for simplicity’s sake, any travel by passengers or crew up and down the aisle.)

    That’s side to side. Forwards and backwards, airline seats are spaced in rows around 75-80cm (29-32 inches or so) apart. So, if we wanted to keep people at least 2m apart, that would mean leaving two full rows free between each passenger. What that means is seating four passengers every 26 seats, which translates in percentage form to filling just 15% of seats. That’s what airlines call “load factor”.

    Fundamentally, airlines need to operate at least at break-even

    The load factor – in essence, the percentage of seats on a plane occupied by passengers – determines whether flights break even and are worth operating. At a certain load factor, flights become profitable, and the difference between making a loss or not on a route turns on just a few passengers. In 2019, the International Air Transport Association cited an average global load factor of 84%, regionally ranging from 89% in North America to 71% in Africa.


    An almost empty flight from Milan to London in March. Some airlines are moving to keep at least middle seats empty in aircraft that have them (Credit: Getty Images)

    Blocking out middle seats on a Boeing 737 or Airbus A320, which are usually in a 3-3 layout – and even some larger planes like a Boeing 787 or Airbus A350, which tend toward a 3-3-3 configuration – would mean a maximum load factor of 66.7%. That’s simply not enough to allow airlines to operate without making losses.

    Yet Jason Rabinowitz, head of catalogued data at Airline Tariff Publishing Company, an airline-owned company that provides pricing data, points out that current demand makes it a viable stopgap – for the moment. “As long as airline load factors remain low, airlines will be able to continue blocking middle seats without any issues. Flights that are still operating today are doing so with load factors so low that there simply isn't a need to occupy middle seats,” he explains.

    When we do start flying again, don’t be surprised if your seat assignments end up being changed
    Those flights still operating are, by and large, because governments have asked for them in order to move the essential minimum of people and cargo during lockdown periods.

    But the current situation cannot continue forever. Unless government regulation changes, social distancing is mandated and some way to bridge the resulting revenue gap for airlines is found, “as the industry begins to recover and operate flights on a somewhat normal schedule, airlines will eventually have no choice but to unblock middle seats as load factors increase”, Rabinowitz says. “Moving forward, airlines will likely have to be a bit more heavy-handed in evenly spacing passengers on board, moving seat assignments to facilitate as much social distancing as possible.”

    So, when we do start flying again, don’t be surprised if your seat assignments end up being changed.

    Distance is just one of a package of measures

    Not all airlines are advocating the middle seat approach. Ryanair’s Michael O’Leary questions the effectiveness of adding just 45cm of separation, especially if passengers aren’t separated adequately on the ground.

    Airports have installed signs urging social distance, like at Schiphol airport in the Netherlands (Credit: Getty Images)

    LIFT Aero Design’s Daniel Baron points out that there are a number of other measures that airlines can use to try and make travel safer. “Let's not forget that cabin air circulation is on par with operating theatres,” he says. “A combination of pre-flight screening, thorough cabin sanitising, smart seat assignments and masks will likely be the way forward in the short to medium term.”

    Other ideas will come to the fore as well: Delta Air Lines has changed the way it boards aircraft, and is now boarding them strictly from the rear to the front, so passengers sitting at the back don’t have to pass those sitting at the front. The airline is also boarding fewer people at a time to improve physical distancing of passengers.

    Many airlines are also cancelling or reducing inflight food and beverage service to reduce interactions on board: Southwest is serving individual cans of water rather than its usual full drinks round, for example. Some airlines are offering to-go bags in the gate area instead.

    Covid-19 has already changed our world in multiple ways, and will continue to do so as we apply the best of human ingenuity to fighting it. For those of us who need to travel while we do so, and for those of us fortunate enough to travel afterwards, the way we do will be changed too.

    https://www.bbc.com./worklife/articl...t-flying-again


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  70. #70
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    The boss of Ryanair says the budget airline will not resume flights if it has to keep middle seats empty to fight Covid-19, calling the idea "idiotic".

    Michael O'Leary said empty seats didn't ensure safe social distancing and were financially unviable.

    You might remember that easyJet, Emirates and Delta in the US have all said they plan to keep middle seats empty.

    But Mr O'Leary said that if the Irish government imposed it as a rule, it would have to pay for the middle seat "or we won't fly".


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  71. #71
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    US air fares fall further, Europe and Asia bottom out

    US air fares have fallen by nearly 40% and are continuing to decline, according to the Airbus risk-management subsidiary Skytra.

    It says airlines in the North America region have been offering big discounts on the services they are still running.

    Average fares in the US-dominated region are now down 37.8% since 1 January, Skytra says.

    Meanwhile, ticket pricing in Europe and Asia is bottoming out, with 20.7% and 13% year-to-date declines respectively. This is a slight improvement from a week earlier.


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  72. #72
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    The UK government has chartered 14 new flights to bring 3,600 more stranded British travellers back home, the Foreign Office says.

    Once completed, these additional flights will bring the total number of people flown to the UK from India on government charter flights to more than 13,000, according to the department.

    The flights, which leave from next week from Amritsar, Ahmedabad and Delhi, are for British nationals who normally reside in the UK and their direct dependants. Seats are only available for those who are already registered and on a waitlist.

    More than 1.3 million travelling Britons have been helped to return to the UK on commercial flights - but "tens of thousands" are still stranded, officials said on Tuesday.


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  73. #73
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    United flight attendants must wear masks

    All United Airlines flight attendants must wear a face covering or mask on duty starting today - the first such rule by a major US carrier

    In a letter seen by Reuters, the Association of Flight Attendants welcomed the move but also urged the departments of transportation to make it compulsory for passengers to wear masks.

    It also called for personal protection equipment to be made available to flight attendants, which was echoed by the US pilot union.

    "Flight crews are a unique vector for the virus, traveling all over the country. It is vital that our crews be treated as essential workers and have access to personal protection equipment and testing," Jason Goldberg, spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association, was quoted as saying.

    Major US airlines have drastically scaled back flying schedules but continue to operate domestic flights and a handful of international routes.


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  74. #74
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    Coronavirus: Ryanair boss O'Leary accuses Branson of trying to 'fleece the taxpayer' over loan

    Ryanair's boss has accused Sir Richard Branson of trying to "fleece" the British taxpayer as Virgin Atlantic bids for a government loan to stop it collapsing.

    Michael O'Leary criticised rival airlines for seeking COVID-19 state aid beyond help to pay furloughed staff - mechanisms used by Ryanair as it continues to ground most flights.

    Speaking to Sky News, he said Sir Richard Branson had more than enough money to cover Virgin Atlantic's needs beyond wages, after Delta - which owns 49% of Virgin - refused a bailout.

    Sir Richard revealed in a letter to staff this week that he had offered his luxury island home Necker as security against a government loan - believed to be up to £500m - and that he was also seeking help from the Australian government to save Virgin Australia.

    Just hours later, it was confirmed that Virgin Australia had entered voluntary administration.

    Ryanair chief executive Mr O'Leary said: "Now you have Virgin Atlantic owned by Delta and a Caribbean island-based, non-resident billionaire.

    "Frankly if he's worried about Virgin he should write the cheque himself. It's not like he's short of money."

    He also compared Lufthansa to a "crack cocaine junkie" after it requested €10bn (£8.7bn) from the German government.

    Mr O'Leary told Sky's Ian King Live show that he expected his airline to be flying around 40% of its services by late June or early July.

    But he warned any condition that middle aisle seats be left empty to maintain social distancing, a move that will be adopted by rival easyJet, must be paid for by governments.

    He also apologised for delays to refund payments amid frustration over how long it is taking customers to get their money back.

    He urged people to choose flight vouchers because it is an automated system, insisting Ryanair was doing its best but that it could take months for a cash refund to be processed.

    "In a normal month, we process about 10,000 refunds for occasional flight cancellations - things like that," said Mr O'Leary.

    "We're staffed up for that. At the moment, we're working with about a quarter of the normal refund staff because of social distancing and bans on people travelling to work.

    "But we're dealing... just in the month of April with 10 million refunds because all the fights have been cancelled.

    "So, we have 25% of the staff, dealing with about 10,000 times the normal level of refunds."

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...payer-11978098


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  75. #75
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    Nearly 5,000 Brits to be flown home from Pakistan on 9 chartered flights

    The United Kingdom government has announced that it will repatriate nearly 5,000 Britons stranded in Pakistan through nine more chartered flights.

    The new flights are as follows: 

    April 30: Karachi to London, Islamabad to Manchester
    May 1: Lahore to London, Islamabad to Manchester
    May 2: Islamabad to Manchester, Lahore to Manchester
    May 4: Islamabad to London
    May 5: Lahore to Manchester, Islamabad to Manchester


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  76. #76
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    Air France will receive a €7bn (£6.1bn) loan package backed by the French government to avert a cash crisis brought on by the pandemic, the country’s finance minister Bruno Le Maire has announced.

    France will issue €3bn in direct loans and guarantees on another €4bn in bank lending to the carrier, part of airline group Air France-KLM, Le Maire said.

    “Air France’s planes are grounded, so we need to support Air France,” the minister said on TF1 television, adding that the aid would carry conditions requiring the group to “become the most environmentally friendly airline on the planet”.

    The French state is also preparing to back about €5bn in loans to the car manufacturer Renault, Le Maire said.


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  77. #77
    Debut
    Apr 2013
    Venue
    Karachi
    Runs
    42,336
    Mentioned
    2236 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    Abu Dhabi's Etihad airways has said it will extend its suspension of scheduled passenger flights until May 15.

    The airline had previously said it would partially resume passenger flights from May 1.

    Etihad and other UAE airlines have been operating outbound-only flights for foreigners wishing to leave the Gulf Arab state, which has banned the entry of foreigners due to the global coronavirus outbreak.


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  78. #78
    Debut
    Jun 2001
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    76,740
    Mentioned
    1988 Post(s)
    Tagged
    27 Thread(s)
    Low-cost airline Wizz Air will resume flying on routes out of Vienna from the start of next month, its chief executive has told local news agency APA. Its UK arm said it will also restart flights from London Luton Airport.

    The phased return to operations makes the airline among the first in Europe to announce plans to increase flights after coronavirus left many planes grounded.

    The pandemic has hit international flights hard, with the number of departures at UK airports falling by 90% and leaving some at risk of closure.

    Wizz Air chief executive Josef Varadi told an Aviation Week webcast that he hoped to restart operations with about 30% of the airline's normal capacity, increasing to 75% or 80% in the next two to three months.

    But he said that depended on European countries co-ordinating their pandemic measures to a greater extent. Europe is a "complete mess" at the moment, he said.

    The airline said it would introduce "enhanced" health and safety measures, with new distancing measures during boarding, cabin crew wearing masks and gloves, and aircraft disinfected overnight.



  79. #79
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    130,902
    Mentioned
    2545 Post(s)
    Tagged
    21 Thread(s)
    Flight ban extended until May 15th in Pakistan. All domestic/international flights will remain suspended. Only cargo and repatriation flights will be allowed


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  80. #80
    Debut
    Jun 2017
    Venue
    Manchester
    Runs
    3,548
    Mentioned
    87 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gani999 View Post
    Air Mauritius placed into administration

    The current crisis in the aviation industry seems to have suddenly caught up with several airlines. As of today, Mauritian airline Air Mauritius has been placed into administration. The airline’s board came to a decision following “a complete erosion of the company’s revenue base.”
    https://simpleflying.com/air-mauritius-administration/

    There goes another one. They are starting to fall like ninepins. Wonder which one will be next.
    Mauritius had its own airline? Hope it survives the admin, otherwise RIP.


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