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  1. #1
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    Coronavirus in Sweden: It has no Lockdown yet, can it last?

    There is one beauty in this pandemic: Not all countries have chosen the same strategy.

    In the Coronavirus Fight in Scandinavia, Sweden Stands Apart

    The country has drawn global attention with an unorthodox approach while its neighbors have imposed extensive restrictions.

    STOCKHOLM — When the coronavirus swept into the Scandinavian countries, Norway and Denmark scrambled to place extensive restrictions on their borders to stem the outbreak. Sweden, their neighbor, took a decidedly different path.

    While Denmark and Norway closed their borders, restaurants and ski slopes and told all students to stay home this month, Sweden shut only its high schools and colleges, kept its preschools, grade schools, pubs, restaurants and borders open — and put no limits on the slopes.

    In fact, Sweden has stayed open for business while other nations beyond Scandinavia have attacked the outbreak with various measures ambitious in their scope and reach. Sweden’s approach has raised questions about whether it’s gambling with a disease, Covid-19, that has no cure or vaccine, or if its tactic will be seen as a savvy strategy to fight a scourge that has laid waste to millions of jobs and prompted global lockdowns unprecedented in peacetime.

    By Saturday, Norway, population 5.3 million, had more than 3,770 coronavirus cases and 19 deaths; Denmark, population 5.6 million, reported 2,200 cases and 52 deaths; Sweden, with 10.12 million people, recorded more than 3,060 cases and 105 deaths.

    A recent headline in the Danish newspaper Politiken, encapsulates the question ricocheting around Europe, “Doesn’t Sweden take the corona crisis seriously?”

    There is no evidence that Swedes are underplaying the enormity of the disease rampaging across the globe. The country’s leader and health officials have stressed hand washing, social distancing and protecting people over the age of 70 by limiting contact with them.

    But peer into any cafe in the capital, Stockholm, and groups of two or more people can be seen casually dining and enjoying cappuccinos. Playgrounds are full of running, screaming children. Restaurants, gyms, malls and ski slopes have thinned out but are still in use.

    The state epidemiologist, Anders Tegnell, said in an interview that Sweden’s strategy is based on science and boiled down to this: “We are trying to slow the spread enough so that we can deal with the patients coming in.”

    Sweden’s approach appeals to the public’s self-restraint and sense of responsibility, Mr. Tegnell said. “That’s the way we work in Sweden. Our whole system for communicable disease control is based on voluntary action. The immunization system is completely voluntary and there is 98 percent coverage,” he explained.

    “You give them the option to do what is best in their lives,” he added. “That works very well, according to our experience.”

    Sweden’s method flies in the face of most other nations’ stricter strategies. India is attempting a lockdown that affects 1.3 billion people. Germany has banned crowds of two or more people, except for families. In France, residents are asked to fill in a form stating the purpose of each errand when they leave their homes; each trip requires a new form. Britain has deployed police officers to remind residents to stay home.

    Still, while Sweden may appear to be an outlier in Scandinavia and in much of the wider world, it is too soon to say whether its approach will yield the same results as other countries’. And the Swedish authorities could still take stronger action as coronavirus hospitalizations rise.

    In explaining Sweden’s current strategy, experts point to other underlying factors: The country has high levels of trust, according to the historian Lars Tragardh, and a strict law in the Constitution prohibits the government from meddling in the affairs of the administrative authorities, such as the public health agency.

    “Therefore, you don’t need to micromanage or control behavior at a detailed level through prohibitions or threat of sanctions or fines or imprisonment,” Mr. Tragardh said in a phone interview. “That is how Sweden stands apart, even from Denmark and Norway.”

    The government has deferred to the agency’s recommendations to fight the virus, which has infected more than 600,000 people and killed more than 27,000 worldwide by Saturday. If the health agency were to say that closing borders and shutting down all of society was the best way to go, the government would most likely listen.

    Mr. Tragardh said Swedes’ level of trust was manifested in other ways: Not only do citizens have confidence in public institutions and governmental agencies and vice versa, but high social trust exists among citizens, as well.

    That is evident in the country’s approach to the virus. Norway did not completely shut its 1,000-mile land border with Sweden, but most people returning from abroad must enter a two-week quarantine (Reindeer herders and daily commuters are exempt.) Finland closed the borders of its most populous region — which has 1.7 million people and includes the capital, Helsinki — for three weeks to fight the outbreak there.

    Norway limited groups outdoors to no more than five people, and those indoors must keep a distance of more than six feet (except relatives). Denmark closed its borders, sent public workers home with pay and encouraged all other employees to work from home. It shut nightclubs, bars, restaurants, cafes and shopping centers, and banned gatherings of more than 10 people outdoors.

    Sweden initially banned gatherings of 500.

    Early in the outbreak, some event organizers suggested they would try to get around the crowd limit by allowing precisely 499 ticket holders into their venues. (That stopped when cases of Covid-19 were confirmed among staff members.)

    Mr. Tegnell, the state epidemiologist, said that is why bans don’t work: “People find ways around the rules.”

    He also said he did not believe Sweden was a maverick and did not understand its neighbors’ strategy. “Closing borders at this stage of the pandemic, when almost all countries have cases, to me does not really make sense,” he said. “This is not a disease that is going to go away in the short term or long term. We are not in the containment phase. We are in the mitigation phase.”

    He also said that closing schools had not been ruled out.

    The Netherlands, which reported more than 9,700 cases of the virus and 639 deaths by Saturday, is taking a similar approach to Sweden’s. On March 16, Prime Minister Mark Rutte said his country of 17.1 million was opting for a “controlled spread” among groups at the least risk of getting seriously ill. He argued that it was too late to shut down the country “completely.”

    A majority of Swedes, 52 percent, support the measures to contain the virus, according to a survey conducted by the newspaper Svenska Dagbladet and published on Tuesday. But 14 percent said that too little consideration was being given to public health in order to benefit the economy.

    There is growing concern as Swedes prepare to travel to their country houses and to the ski slopes for Easter, even though the public health agency has asked citizens to reconsider such trips. (Norway announced a “cabin ban” to prevent residents from going to their country homes.)

    Even Prime Minister Mette Fredriksen of Denmark issued a warning about its neighbor on Monday: “Don’t go on a ski vacation in Sweden!”

    Last week, a cluster of Covid-19 cases was traced to an après-ski party at a Swedish alpine center, Are, prompting officials to close an aerial tram and gondola and shut bars and nightclubs. Hundreds of Covid-19 cases in Scandinavia have stemmed from vacationers returning from ski trips in Italy — which has the most cases in Europe — and in Austria.

    Now, there is a petition on social media to close the ski slopes.

    Some Swedes have suggested that their country is deviating from most other nations’ response to hasten herd immunity, risking lives unnecessarily.

    The public health agency denies this.

    In the meantime, the infection curve in Sweden has started to rise sharply, and on Friday the government tightened the limit on crowds to no more than 50 people.

    Some residents like Elisabeth Hatlem, a hotelier, are of two minds about the Swedish approach. She is grateful that she can keep her business open. But she and her partner do not like sending their six children to school amid the pandemic.

    “For us, a total lockdown is a disaster,” she said. “But I am worried Sweden will explode at some point. I feel like I’m living in a huge experiment, and I was never asked if I wanted to sign up.”

    Christina Anderson reported from Stockholm, and Henrik Pryser Libell from Oslo.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/28/w...ronavirus.html

    I personally like Sweden's approach since that would have a lesser impact on my daily life. Perhpas the rest of the world's population is just not mature enough.

    Let's see how things develop in Sweden and if they can keep this up.

  2. #2
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    Sweden Has No Coronavirus Lockdown, But Can It Last?

    Over the past week international press has taken a particular interest in Sweden and its relatively relaxed approach to the coronavirus outbreak. The Guardian even quoted one expert as saying Sweden is playing “russian roulette” with its population. Among European nations Sweden is one of very few without serious restrictions on movement in place. Schools are open for children under 16, restaurants are up and running and people are free to leave their houses. There isn’t even any official requirement to maintain a defined physical distance from others when outdoors (a few days ago the government gave out instructions for people to keep a distance from each other, but did not specify how much.)

    Swedes have a high level of trust in the government, and tend to follow its instructions. As a result, although things are quieter than normal in Stockholm and many are working from home, this looks nothing like the deserted city streets we’re seeing images of from just about every other corner of the globe right now. Playgrounds are full of kids, parents gather and chat, and the highways heading out of town are busy with cars. There are no queues at grocery stores and the shelves are mostly well-stocked. As with many parts of the world the toilet paper sections tend to look sparse, and other staples like rice, flour and pasta are running lower than usual. It’s impossible to find hand sanitizer. But walking into a Swedish grocery store today you would barely notice a difference from pre-coronavirus times.

    Knowing what’s going on in the rest of the world, it’s a strange thing to witness. Particularly surprising has been the sight of people in the higher-risk age groups, including many elderly people, out shopping in grocery stores and taking walks with friends. The government has said anyone over 70 should try to stay home as much as possible, so either these people aren’t worried or they aren’t paying attention. In true Swedish style no one is out enforcing any of the coronavirus guidelines, and measures to limit the spread of coronavirus are very much left to the individual’s sense of responsibility. For the most part that approach tends to work well in Sweden, where the social contract is strong.

    The crux of the argument put forth by Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s Chief Epidemiologist, and other leaders is essentially that nobody really knows what approach works best for a virus like this, and that the difference in outcomes between draconian lockdowns and a more relaxed approach may not be all that different in the end. As long as Swedish hospitals aren’t overrun, they say, there’s no reason to panic. They seem to be accepting that the virus will make its way through a certain portion of the population. “Flattening the curve” is important, yes, but taking more extreme measures to slow down its spread is not worth the pain and complications it would cause, at least for the moment. That is partly based on simulations run by the government (link in Swedish) that predict a lower number of hospitalizations per 100,000 people compared to other models that have been drawn up.

    But as the curve of new infections and deaths in Sweden gets steeper (the total dead rose 12% from Friday to Saturday, bringing the latest figure to 373), and more and more from outside Sweden question the country’s approach, it’s beginning to feel less sustainable. And it seems that as Sweden’s infection and death rates begin to exceed that of neighbors Denmark and Norway, both of which have stricter lockdowns in place, that especially could cause leadership to consider more comprehensive restrictions. Yesterday Prime Minister Stefan Lofven warned that Sweden may see “thousands” of deaths from COVID-19.

    But as the curve of new infections and deaths in Sweden gets steeper (the total dead rose 12% from Friday to Saturday, bringing the latest figure to 373), and more and more from outside Sweden question the country’s approach, it’s beginning to feel less sustainable. And it seems that as Sweden’s infection and death rates begin to exceed that of neighbors Denmark and Norway, both of which have stricter lockdowns in place, that especially could cause leadership to consider more comprehensive restrictions. Yesterday Prime Minister Stefan Lofven warned that Sweden may see “thousands” of deaths from COVID-19.

    Health Minister Lena Hallengren has been quoted as saying "no, it's not business as usual in Sweden." That was in response to confusion and even exasperation on the part of people outside, who can’t see why Sweden would go a different way than most countries given the evidence we have so far about how the coronavirus spreads. It’s very tempting to think that Swedish leadership are just level-headed and pragmatic, and that the information they have really does indicate we can go on living in a kind of relaxed-but-cautious version of normal life as this pandemic progresses. But the feeling now, among a growing number of Swedes, is that change is on its way.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/gabriel...t-can-it-last/

  3. #3
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    Sweden disputes accusations of lack of coronavirus action

    Sweden has got broad media attention for its soft approach to the new coronavirus outbreak, but it strongly rejects the idea that life is carrying on uninterrupted as the country passes 6,000 confirmed cases.

    A cradle-to-grave welfare state with strong social protection, Sweden has in recent weeks been accused by some, both internationally and domestically, of risking the lives of its citizens by not taking more stringent measures to curb the spread of COVID-19.

    "No, it's not business as usual in Sweden," Health Minister Lena Hallengren told international media outlets this week.

    Sweden has not ordered a lockdown, instead issuing recommendations and calling on citizens to "each take responsibility" and follow the guidelines.

    Hallengren, who together with Deputy Prime Minister Isabella Lovin and Foreign Minister Ann Linde held a special briefing for international media, stressed that the Nordic country had introduced a string of measures and was ready to do more if needed.

    People over the age of 70 and in risk groups have been strongly encouraged to avoid contact with other people, and higher education institutions have been advised to conduct classes remotely.

    Economic measures have been adopted to make sick leave less costly, and people have been repeatedly asked to work from home and self-isolate at the slightest symptom of the new coronavirus.

    Among the stricter measures are bans on gatherings of more than 50 people and on visits to nursing homes.

    The ministers stressed the recommendations were having a noticeable effect. They estimated that about 70 percent fewer people were moving about the city centre, and one-third of Stockholmers were now working from home.

    But in stark contrast to much of Europe and its Nordic neighbours, restaurants and primary schools remain open. And even though the streets of Stockholm - the epicentre of Sweden's outbreak - are less bustling than usual, it's far from a ghost town.

    'Russian roulette'

    "Everyone is responsible for their own well-being, for their neighbours and their own local community. This applies in a normal situation, and it applies in a crisis situation," Linde said, stressing that public trust was a key element of Sweden's strategy.

    So far the approach seems to resonate with voters. A poll published earlier this week by analyst firm Novus showed that faith in the government was significantly up in March, with 44 percent of respondents saying they had a lot or a great amount of trust in Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, up from 26 percent in February.

    However, not all are fans of the Swedish approach. Marcus Carlsson, a mathematician at **** University, went so far as to accuse Sweden of playing "Russian roulette with the Swedish population," in a video posted to YouTube and cited by The Guardian among others.

    And a study published last week in the medical journal The Lancet, titled "COVID-19: Learning from Experience," said that the "initial slow response in countries such as the UK, the USA, and Sweden now looks increasingly poorly judged."

    As of Friday, Sweden had reported 6,078 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus, with 333 deaths.

    On Wednesday, state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell at the country's Public Health Agency said that while Sweden had observed a relatively flat curve for several weeks, it was now seeing "a fairly steep curve".

    Healthcare services have reported shortages in equipment, but they have so far not been overrun like in Italy and Spain.

    However, Stockholm plans to open its first field hospital this weekend amid a sharp rise in cases in the capital.

    Public broadcaster Swedish Radio also reported on Thursday that a third of the country's municipalities had confirmed or suspected cases of the new coronavirus in elderly care facilities.

    Trust being questioned

    Speaking to AFP, Foreign Minister Ann Linde conceded that she did receive a lot of questions from foreign counterparts about Sweden's response, but said this was in part because of disinformation.

    Linde said her government had "the same goal as every other government," the main difference being that most of Sweden's measures were not legally binding.

    According to Linde, this can partly be explained by Sweden's tradition of ministries taking their cue from expert authorities, and that citizens typically have high a level of trust in politicians and authorities. "But politicians and authorities also trust people to take responsibility," she said.

    However, as cases have increased, that trust in authorities is being questioned.

    Last week, a group of 14 scientists wrote an op-ed in newspaper Dagens Nyheter asking the Public Health Agency for more transparency, questioning why Sweden had stayed its course when others, like the UK, followed the rest of Europe with tougher measures.

    "Different countries have different conditions, but we struggle to see why the Swedish context is so different from the British," they wrote.

    https://www.thelocal.se/20200404/swe...navirus-action

    On a side note: the name of the Swedish University is a vulgar word in Urdu and got censored.

  4. #4
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    We need to observe the situation in Norway and Denmark to really get a perspective of how well or bad Sweden's approach is working out. The other two are neighboring country with much stricter measures.


    Country / Global rank / Total cases / New cases / Total deaths / Serious,critical

    Sweden / 19 / 6'830 / +387 / 401 / 541

    Norway / 20/ 5'687 / +137 / 71 / 89

    Denmark / 26/ 4'369 / +292 / 179 / 142

    So far there isn't such a significant difference between the three.

    I don't know when Norway announced their lockdown but Denmark announced their early March and very early when they saw sudden increase in Coronavirus with cases around 500.

  5. #5
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    Sweden has an interesting policy of not allowing politics to intefere with expert medical advice.

    If 95% of people will live, get rid of the lockdowns and let people decide if they want to leave their house now.

    Being in a virtual open prison isnt living at all.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  6. #6
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    Eventually most governments will have to open up, They will have to forcefully isolate the most vulnerable, until a vaccine is found, as long as 50% carriers are not showing symptoms, you can't exterminate the virus.

  7. #7
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    This is the best way to go about it.

  8. #8
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    Interesting strategy from Sweden. Let's see how it pans out.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Musakhel View Post
    Eventually most governments will have to open up, They will have to forcefully isolate the most vulnerable, until a vaccine is found, as long as 50% carriers are not showing symptoms, you can't exterminate the virus.
    True. Let's look at China as it's the first country to open. I hope it goes well and it's containable on wide scales.

  10. #10
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    Sweden always do things her own way whereas Norway mostly follow what other countries do and then take some actions.


    Ki Mohammad (saw) sey wafa tu ney tou hum terey hain
    Yeh jahaan cheez kya hai Loh-o-Qalam tere hain

  11. #11
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    From what I have read sweden government hasn't done a full lock down. But many people started working from home and stopped going out etc from around mid Feb. So in reality they just didn't need to do a forced lock down as people did it themselves.


    "Too often we... enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought"-JFK

  12. #12
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    Also Sweden benefits from low population density. It is not a top hub for immigration. People already have in-built social distancing as part of their culture and also this problem started last winter so I am assuming there wasn’t a tourist season with huge influx of tourists. Plenty of things work in Sweden’s favor. You can’t use it as a template for U.K.,US and China leave alone the subcontinent

  13. #13
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    Right now
    Sweden has 11445 confirmed cases with 1033 death
    Denmark has 6496 confirmed cases with 299 deaths
    Norway has 6623 confirmed cases with 139 deaths.
    Look like Sweden policy may have backfired on them

  14. #14
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    Sweden death rate is also high around 10% of total cases

  15. #15
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    Death count is very high compared to other countries. Does Sweden opted for lockdown?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Itachi View Post
    Death count is very high compared to other countries. Does Sweden opted for lockdown?
    No, this is why this thread was made, they issued guideline about social distancing and trusted people to follow it, I think they were going for herd immunity but herd immunity always come with a price if there is no Vaccination

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Itachi View Post
    Death count is very high compared to other countries. Does Sweden opted for lockdown?
    Denmark and Norway went for a lockdown, while their neighbors Sweden appealed on the population to follow social distancing guidelines without enforcing them. Public places like restaurants, bars and schools remained open.

  18. #18
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    Sweden's coronavirus strategy sparks fierce debate as deaths pass 1,000

    Swedish health authorities hit back after a group of experts attacked the authorities' approach to the coronavirus crisis, as the country's death toll rose past 1,000.

    Sweden's Public Health Agency said it had recorded a total of 11,445 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 1,033 deaths.

    And it warned that because not all deaths had yet been reported over the four-day Easter weekend, the true number might be higher.

    "Deceased per day is probably the figure we can trust the least today, because there is normally a lot of trailing when it comes to weekends," state epidemiologist Anders Tegnell told journalists.

    Sweden has not imposed the extraordinary lockdown orders implemented elsewhere in Europe to stem the spread of the virus, instead calling for citizens to take responsibility to follow social distancing guidelines.

    The government has banned gatherings of more than 50 people and barred visits to nursing homes.

    But the Nordic country's softer approach has still drawn criticism abroad and the been the subject of fierce debate at home.

    A group of 22 doctors, virologists and researchers criticised the Public Health Agency in an op-ed published by Dagens Nyheter newspaper on Tuesday.

    They accused it of having failed to draw up a proper strategy, pointing out that the mortality rate in Sweden was now way above that of its Nordic neighbours.

    "One would like to imagine that Sweden, too, has had a forward-looking strategy, especially since our country has always had a different way of facing the spread of the infection than the rest of the world," they wrote, while stressing a number of more aggressive measures taken in Finland.

    However, the op-ed in turn drew criticism for relying on figures that showed only how many deaths were reported in the period April 7th-9th. Those figures include deaths on previous days. As a result of trailing statistics, reported deaths per day are usually lower on weekends and higher on weekdays.

    "The cited figures in and of themselves are in our view less important than the principle of the development of the pandemic which we are trying to highlight," wrote the researchers in a clarification later on Tuesday.

    During the Public Health Agency's daily news conference, Sweden's Anders Tegnell rejected the criticism from the experts, disputing the figures they had advanced.

    Tegnell has previously stated that Finland appears to be in a different phase of the epidemic, which partly explains the lower mortality.

    Finland, which has about half the population of Sweden, had as of Tuesday reported 64 deaths, and has closed down restaurants and schools.

    On Tuesday, their public health chief recommended people wear masks in public to counter the spread of the virus by asymptomatic carriers.

    Sweden's Foreign Minister Ann Linde has already pushed back at criticism from US President Donald Trump, who last week said the country was not doing enough to combat the virus.

    But Sweden has highlighted the spread of the coronavirus in elderly care homes in Stockholm as a failure, which is believed to have contributed to the Swedish capital's high death toll compared to the rest of the country. The country's immigrant population has also been hit hard, with Stockholm previously highlighting the overrepresentation of vulnerable suburbs Spånga-Tensta and Rinkeby-Kista in the infection statistics.

    What should you be doing to help reduce the rate of infection?

    In Sweden, the official advice requires everyone to:
    Stay at home if you have any cold- or flu-like symptoms, even if they are mild and you would normally continue life as normal. Stay at home until you have been fully symptom-free for at least two days.

    Practise good hygiene, by regularly and thoroughly washing your hands with soap and water, using hand sanitiser when that's not possible, and covering any coughs and sneezes with your elbow.

    Keep distance from all other people when in public places. That includes shops, parks, museums, and on the street, for example. The World Health Organisation recommends keeping at least a 1.5-2 metre distance.

    Avoid large gatherings, including parties, weddings, and other activities.

    Work from home if you can. Employers have been asked to ensure this happens where possible.

    Avoid all non-essential travel, both within and outside Sweden. That includes visits to family, planned holidays, and any other trips that can be avoided.

    If you have to travel, avoid busy times such as rush hour if you can. This reduces the number of people on public transport and makes it easier for people to keep their distance.

    If you are over 70 or belong to a high-risk group, you should stay at home and reduce all social contacts. Avoid going to the shops (get groceries delivered or try to find someone who can help you), but you can go outside if you keep distance from other people. Read more about the help available to those in risk groups here.

    By following these precautions, we can all help to protect those who are most at risk and to reduce the rate of infection, which in turn reduces the burden on Sweden's healthcare sector.


    http://www.thelocal.se/20200414/swed...-pass-1000/amp

  19. #19
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    No city in Sweden is as densely populated as a New York or Shanghai. Comparing it to other parts of the world is irrelevant.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sshakir411 View Post
    No city in Sweden is as densely populated as a New York or Shanghai. Comparing it to other parts of the world is irrelevant.
    Comparing it to its neighbors with other strategies like Denmark and Norway makes sense. These three countries are also culturally very close to each other.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sshakir411 View Post
    No city in Sweden is as densely populated as a New York or Shanghai. Comparing it to other parts of the world is irrelevant.
    The Healthcare and childcare systems have always been lauded in sweden


    "If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles"

  22. #22
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    The Graphs speak a clear language!


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    Sweden will see more deaths now, but most of its population will develop some form of herd immunity.

    Second wave deaths may be higher in countries who have locked down now.

    And if I am not mistaken, most places in Sweden would be less busier than normal, because many people would themselves avoid public places, leading to an automatic social distancing?

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    They are paying the price now for some poor decisions. Number of deaths steadily increasing.



  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    They are paying the price now for some poor decisions. Number of deaths steadily increasing.
    Why poor decisions. There are several serious side effects from these lockdowns. Only after this whole drama is over it will be clear who had the best strategy.

    Just looking at graphs, curves, lines etc doesnt give you the full picture.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by pakistani pride View Post
    Why poor decisions. There are several serious side effects from these lockdowns. Only after this whole drama is over it will be clear who had the best strategy.

    Just looking at graphs, curves, lines etc doesnt give you the full picture.
    I've not heard one expert say lockdowns are a wrong decision. Have you, if so show me the quotes.



  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    I've not heard one expert say lockdowns are a wrong decision. Have you, if so show me the quotes.
    It depends on who you call "experts" in this scenario. According to Sweden, they are making decisions based on the advice of their scientific community.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    I've not heard one expert say lockdowns are a wrong decision. Have you, if so show me the quotes.
    As others have said already though, Sweden has low population, and most practice social distancing to some extent anyway. I can't say whether they took a right decision here, but seems each country has different factors which they have to take into account. What works for Sweden would never work in New York for example.


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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    I've not heard one expert say lockdowns are a wrong decision. Have you, if so show me the quotes.
    You can not lockdown forever. Lockdowns only give you time to prepare for the spread. We will live with corona for many years in my opinion. The countries that have locked down will reopen, then what? Unless you ban any flights into the country or place everyone in quarantine who lands, chorona will spread. The only solution is vaccine, we are globally in a big mess.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azzurri View Post
    It depends on who you call "experts" in this scenario. According to Sweden, they are making decisions based on the advice of their scientific community.
    But their scientist and doctors are not happy with the decision

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azzurri View Post
    It depends on who you call "experts" in this scenario. According to Sweden, they are making decisions based on the advice of their scientific community.
    So why have second-thoughts on their original.plan if it was that perfect.



  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Misbah View Post
    You can not lockdown forever. Lockdowns only give you time to prepare for the spread. We will live with corona for many years in my opinion. The countries that have locked down will reopen, then what? Unless you ban any flights into the country or place everyone in quarantine who lands, chorona will spread. The only solution is vaccine, we are globally in a big mess.
    Nobody has said lockdown forever.



  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    So why have second-thoughts on their original.plan if it was that perfect.
    I am in favor of lockdown, but I don't see as permanent solution, no plan is perfect apart for herd immunity if no vaccination is found, but I have said many times herd immunity will come with a price, it is catch 22 situation.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    I've not heard one expert say lockdowns are a wrong decision. Have you, if so show me the quotes.
    https://off-guardian.org/2020/03/24/...navirus-panic/

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    Nobody has said lockdown forever.
    So you do realise that there will be corona outbreaks after the lockdown is lifted?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Misbah View Post
    So you do realise that there will be corona outbreaks after the lockdown is lifted?
    Bhai a country should at least try before surrendering to nature, you don't know anything positive may come in 5 or 6 months.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Misbah View Post
    So you do realise that there will be corona outbreaks after the lockdown is lifted?
    Yes we all know that, what's your point?



  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by pakistani pride View Post
    A handful out of thousands around the globe.



  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by pakistani pride View Post
    the article doesn't make any sense. Let's say SARS COV 2 is nothing new and it was going on for years. Only recently, it was detected and hence, the preventions were taken. The death count attributed to SARS COV 2, let's assume it is same as the number that of death count in influenza like diseases in other years.

    How is it a bad thing that, since so many people were dying in influenza like illness before hand, now at least have the chance to get treatment?

    Why more knowledge is worse than less knowledge?

  40. #40
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    The head of the Swedish public health agency, Johan Carlson has defended Sweden’s approach to the Covid-19 pandemic.

    There is no formal lockdown in Sweden, with schools, restaurants and shopping malls still open - an approach that has placed the country under intense scrutiny.

    However, at a news conference, Carlson insisted his country was taking the virus seriously, with a mixture of social distancing recommendations and laws including a ban on gatherings of more than 50 people.

    He also raised concerns about the impact of stricter lockdowns on mental and physical health as well as domestic violence levels - saying he couldn’t see any rationale for people sitting indoors listening to radio announcements asking them not to go out.

    The scientist said Sweden’s strategy was designed for the longer term - even until 2022 if necessary - but he hoped any restrictions could be eased before the start of the summer holidays, which usually begin in late June.


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  41. #41
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    The thing with experts in govt and academia is that they tend to have jobs for life and pensions. They can stay at home for a year or 2 and still get paid.
    They can not really comprehend what its like to not have a job or have a small business shut down.

    So its easy for many of them to call for permanent lockdowns until a vaccine is found

  42. #42
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    I live in Sweden and almost everyone here wants the govt to go in lockdown. The number of cases has been rising faster than that of Norway and Denmark...

    Streets and public spots aren’t as filled as before, but people are still going outside despite the risks.

  43. #43
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    Swedish capital has past virus peak, say officials

    The spread of the novel coronavirus may have reached its peak in the region of Swedish capital Stockholm last week and could now start to decline, AFP quoted health officials as saying on Tuesday.

    The Public Health Agency concluded in a report using statistical models that 86,000 of roughly two million residents in the wider Stockholm area had the virus on April 15.

    According to the official tally, Sweden has recorded 15,322 cases nationwide since the outbreak began, including 6,200 infections in the Stockholm area.

    The researchers used modelling based on reported cases and a study of randomly selected Stockholm residents.


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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongHorn View Post
    The thing with experts in govt and academia is that they tend to have jobs for life and pensions. They can stay at home for a year or 2 and still get paid.
    They can not really comprehend what its like to not have a job or have a small business shut down.

    So its easy for many of them to call for permanent lockdowns until a vaccine is found
    That's the unfortunate reality. People sitting in their mansions call for long term lockdowns with their jobs secured and nothing to worry about. The middle class is the one that suffers and protests.

    If Sweden has reached its peak, then their model is probably successful because they will be the ones who went through the crisis without destroying their economy or letting the unemployment go through the roof.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamM97 View Post
    I live in Sweden and almost everyone here wants the govt to go in lockdown. The number of cases has been rising faster than that of Norway and Denmark...

    Streets and public spots aren’t as filled as before, but people are still going outside despite the risks.
    The best time to compare Sweden with Denmark/Norway is after 6 months or a year. Would death rates still be higher for Sweden?

    Sweden front loaded its deaths, others will have them spread out over a longer period of time

  46. #46
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    Anders Tegnell, Sweden's chief state epidemiologist, believes his country's decision not to impose strict lockdown measures has "worked in some aspects because our health system has been able to cope".

    Sweden's approach has been controversial. It has seen more infections and deaths than its Nordic neighbours, with 2,021 deaths and 16,755 cases.

    But Dr Tegnell has told the BBC that at least half the deaths have been in nursing homes and "it's a bit unclear to us if a lockdown would have stopped this from happening or not". He also argued that the decision not to impose strict restrictions meant that there was an immunity level of up to 20% in the capital, Stockholm, "so we hope this will make it easier for us in the long run".


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  47. #47
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    Sweden reported 812 new confirmed cases of coronavirus, the highest number of new cases yet reported, bringing the total number of infections so far in the country to 17,567.

    On Friday, the country also reported 131 new deaths from Covid-19, taking the total death toll in the country to 2,152, according to data published by its public health authority.

    So far, 1,256 patients have had cases serious enough for them to be treated in intensive care.


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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    Sweden reported 812 new confirmed cases of coronavirus, the highest number of new cases yet reported, bringing the total number of infections so far in the country to 17,567.

    On Friday, the country also reported 131 new deaths from Covid-19, taking the total death toll in the country to 2,152, according to data published by its public health authority.

    So far, 1,256 patients have had cases serious enough for them to be treated in intensive care.
    some really idiotic people leading some countries during such a tough time. Playing with the lives of innocent people just to boost their politics and economy.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRSN View Post
    some really idiotic people leading some countries during such a tough time. Playing with the lives of innocent people just to boost their politics and economy.
    You need more info on the numbers. What is the average age for example what % already had health issues etc.

    In Netherlands for example 95% of the people who died with symptons of covid 19 already had serious health issues and were 65 years or older.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by pakistani pride View Post
    You need more info on the numbers. What is the average age for example what % already had health issues etc.

    In Netherlands for example 95% of the people who died with symptons of covid 19 already had serious health issues and were 65 years or older.
    Also how many in Italy, Spain and UK have died as a result of the lockdown. Lockdown causes stress which causes weak immune system. Also note many in Europe have had the flu jab, which means you are more likely to get the virus regardless of a lockdown.


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  51. #51
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    Sweden passes 20,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus

    The total number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in Sweden rose past the 20,000 mark on Wednesday, after the Nordic country reported another 681 infections.

    The latest update from Sweden’s Public Health Agency showed there were now 20,302 cases of coronavirus in the country, which has held back from the kinds of strict lockdowns seen elsewhere in the world.

    Another 107 deaths were reported, bringing the Swedish Covid-19 death toll to 2,462, while 1,005 patients have so far recovered


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  52. #52
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    WHO lauds lockdown-ignoring Sweden as a ‘model’ for countries going forward

    The World Health Organization lauded Sweden as a “model” for battling the coronavirus as countries lift lockdowns — after the nation controversially refused restrictions.

    Dr. Mike Ryan, the WHO’s top emergencies expert, said Wednesday there are “lessons to be learned” from the Scandinavian nation, which has largely relied on citizens to self-regulate.

    “I think there’s a perception out that Sweden has not put in control measures and just has allowed the disease to spread,” Ryan told reporters. “Nothing can be further from the truth.”

    Ryan noted that instead of lockdowns, the country has “put in place a very strong public policy around social distancing, around caring and protecting people in long-term care facilities.”

    “What it has done differently is it has very much relied on its relationship with its citizenry and the ability and willingness of its citizens to implement self-distancing and self-regulate,” Ryan said. “In that sense, they have implemented public policy through that partnership with the population.”

    He said the country also ramped up testing and had adequate capacity in hospitals to handle any outbreaks.

    “I think if we are to reach a new normal, Sweden represents a model if we wish to get back to a society in which we don’t have lockdowns,” Ryan said.

    The country, which has a population of 10.3 million, has seen more than 20,300 cases and 2,462 deaths as of Thursday afternoon — far higher than its Nordic neighbors, which implemented stricter containment measures, the latest data shows.

    By contrast, Denmark has recorded 9,206 cases and 443 deaths among its 5.8 million residents, while Norway has seen 7,680 cases and 207 deaths among 5.4 million, according to the latest figures from Johns Hopkins University. Finland confirmed just 4,906 cases and 206 deaths out of a population of 5.5 million.

    Sweden’s approach has been criticized by 2,300 academics who penned a letter last month calling for the government to reconsider its loose restrictions, Agence France-Press reported.

    “We must establish control over the situation, we cannot head into a situation where we get complete chaos. No one has tried this route, so why should we test it first in Sweden, without informed consent?” said Cecilia Soderberg-Naucler, a professor at the Karolinska Institute.

    https://nypost.com/2020/04/29/who-la...irus-lockdown/

  53. #53
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    Sweden has now recorded around three times as many deaths as its Nordic neighbours combined.

    The country’s Public Health Agency says a key reason is how rapidly coronavirus has spread in care homes.

    In Stockholm, the epicentre of the virus, 212 out of a total of 400 elderly care homes have now reported cases of Covid-19, the agency said on Monday.

    It also reported that it had carried out an online survey of managers at care homes in Stockholm and Sörmland, south of the capital in mid-April. It suggested it had been difficult to maintain safe distances between staff and residents.

    Per Follin, a Stockholm region infectious disease doctor, said “a lot more has been done and very very quickly” since the survey, including changes to cleaning routines and how staff and residents interact.

    A nationwide ban on visiting care homes came into force on 1 April.

    A total of 2,769 people are known to have died with the coronavirus in Sweden. Sweden has focused on voluntary social distancing, in contrast to Denmark, Norway and Finland, which introduced stricter measures.

  54. #54
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    Many more deaths compared to Denmark, Norway and Finland but I think after 12 months, Sweden will be lower because their population is now herd immune.


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  55. #55
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    Sweden’s formula cannot be replicated in other countries simply because their population is way smaller & they can bet on getting herd immunity quickly. Also they think they have the medical facilities which will not be overwhelmed by the surge in covid cases. But for any country with a large population this will not be a viable population as it will be months if not years for attaining herd immunity & also that will cause undeniable strain on availability of medical resources. And perhaps with multiple countries racing in developing a vaccine, the vaccine will arrive before herd immunity is achieved.

    Also there is no proof so far that you cannot get Covid again after exposed to the virus once. So any country betting on herd immunity seems counterintuitive at this stage.

  56. #56
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    The top Swedish health official, Anders Tegnell, has faced criticism for avoiding the lockdowns implemented by neighbouring countries - the death toll in Sweden has now passed 3,000



  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by dildilpak View Post
    Sweden’s formula cannot be replicated in other countries simply because their population is way smaller & they can bet on getting herd immunity quickly. Also they think they have the medical facilities which will not be overwhelmed by the surge in covid cases. But for any country with a large population this will not be a viable population as it will be months if not years for attaining herd immunity & also that will cause undeniable strain on availability of medical resources. And perhaps with multiple countries racing in developing a vaccine, the vaccine will arrive before herd immunity is achieved.

    Also there is no proof so far that you cannot get Covid again after exposed to the virus once. So any country betting on herd immunity seems counterintuitive at this stage.
    Belarus laughed at the lockdown, nothing at all. Football, bars and life continues but their death rate is low, how do you explain this?

    Also you think after the lockdown those coming out with ruined immune systems wont get infected? The second wave will happen, I guarantee you this.


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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    Belarus laughed at the lockdown, nothing at all. Football, bars and life continues but their death rate is low, how do you explain this?

    Also you think after the lockdown those coming out with ruined immune systems wont get infected? The second wave will happen, I guarantee you this.

    The average person who has stayed home for months, is likely to come out of it :

    somewhat pale (lack of exercise and vitamin D,
    stressed (because of the constant fear around us),
    overweight (unless they had self control)
    and with a low immune system because they kept themselves sterile without normal exposure to bacteria/viruses

    They will likely get sick with something else, and then you wil hear the calls of why the lockdowns should not be removed

    Unless you lock yourself up till there is a vaccine or for the next few years, you will get sick with other stuff if not Coronavirus, once you venture out....

    Which is why many European states are opening up as well as American states....

    There will be a spike, its all about controlling

    The initial idea of flattening the curve was to ensure everyone doesn't get sick at once, it was not to have lockdowns for years ...

  59. #59
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    Sweden apologises for failing to protect older people

    “We failed to protect our elderly. That’s really serious, and a failure for society as a whole.” Sweden’s government has apologised for not protecting older people, with 90% of the country’s Covid-19 deaths occurring in the over-70s.


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  60. #60
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    Sweden has reported 348 new cases of coronavirus, as the country begins to see a downward trend in new infections despite having eschewed the kinds of strict lockdowns seen elsewhere in Europe.

    The latest figures from Sweden’s public health authority pushed the total number of cases in the country to 26,670. So far 3,256 people have died after testing positive for Covid-19, with 31 new deaths reported on Monday.

    Earlier on Monday the head of Sweden’s civil contingencies agency admitted authorities could have acted “a little faster” to contain the spread of coronavirus among vulnerable people.

    In a radio interview, Dan Eliasson said that “when major crises occur, you will always look at it afterward. So comes the question, did we react fast enough?”

    Last month the health minister, Lena Hallengren, told Swedish television that “we failed to protect our elderly. That’s really serious and a failure for society as a whole. We have to learn from this.”

    In recent weeks Swedish media have reported cases of large death tolls at retirement homes where staff were continuing to work despite a lack of protective gear or despite exhibiting symptoms.

    Some retirement homes have faced shortages of staff because employees have refused to work or have been encouraged to stay home with mild symptoms.


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  61. #61
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    Sweden responds to Covid-19 with 10,000 more care workers

    Sweden’s public health authority reported 147 more deaths from Covid-19 on Wednesday, as the government announced it would hire up to 10,000 more nursing assistants and care workers to address shortcomings in elderly care exposed by the pandemic.

    About half of the 3,460 coronavirus-related deaths reported in Sweden have been among nursing home residents, and another quarter among those receiving care at home. The country’s approach to the outbreak has been controversial, after the government eschewed a wide-ranging lockdown of society in favour of keeping the economy open.

    So far the country’s public health authority has reported 27,909 confirmed cases, more than a third of which have been in the capital Stockholm, which has also accounted for about half of deaths. (A good )

    The boost in staff is the result of a deal between the government, Sweden’s largest labour union Kommunal, and the country’s municipalities which are tasked with managing elderly care, according to AFP.

    “The virus outbreak has shown that elderly care is vulnerable, and that has structural explanations,” the health minister, Lena Hallengren, told reporters.

    The failure to protect vulnerable nursing home residents has been widely debated in the Nordic country. Some critics have blamed staff working conditions, with reports that many had to work without protective gear.

    In March, Kommunal said that 40% of staff at nursing homes in Stockholm – the centre of the Swedish epidemic – were unskilled workers employed on short-term contracts, with hourly wages and no job security, while 23% were temps.

    These were people who often could not afford not to go to work even if they were sick, they argued.


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  62. #62
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    Sweden has reported 69 more deaths from Covid-19, bringing the total death toll in the country, which has chosen not to implement a wide ranging lockdown, to 3,529.

    In its latest public health update, Sweden’s public health authority said that it 673 more people had tested positive for the coronavirus, bringing its total number of infections to 28,582.

    International observers are keeping a keen eye on Sweden, after it declined to shut down portions of its economy to try to contain the spread of coronavirus. Data analysis by Swedish newspaper SVT Nyheter appears to show that the country has had a similar epidemic curve to others that instituted strict lockdowns, although its death toll and infection rates have been far higher than neighbours in Scandinavia which closed down their economies quickly.


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  63. #63
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    'No lockdown' Sweden defends policy

    Sweden controversially opted to avoid a lockdown – a decision defended by Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, who says “there is no one-size-fits-all” in this crisis.

    He said some media had misreported Sweden’s policy and insisted that “life is not carrying on as normal”. “Many are staying at home,” he told a news conference.

    Social distancing is voluntary, but surveys suggest that most Swedes are doing it. The prime minister said the government’s public health recommendations were to be obeyed - “this is not friendly advice”.

    He also said the government had failed to do enough to protect the elderly. The vast majority of Sweden’s 3,529 deaths so far have been among the over-70s, the BBC's Maddy Savage reports.

    Sweden, with 10 million inhabitants, has not closed its borders, but has advised against travelling abroad.


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  64. #64
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    Almost half of Swedish Covid-19 deaths linked to care homes

    In Sweden almost half of all those whose deaths are linked to Covid-19 were residents of care homes, according to figures given to the BBC by the Swedish public health agency.

    Separate figures released by state-funded data agency Statistics Sweden show that a total of 10,458 people died in April, making it Sweden's deadliest month since 1993, when there was an outbreak of seasonal flu and 11,057 died.

    Prior to that, the highest death toll in a month was in 1918, at the peak of the Spanish flu pandemic.

    In another development, Gothenburg’s iconic blue and white tram services are being suspended this afternoon after union officials raised concerns about the health and safety of drivers during the pandemic. Kommunal, the union which represents tram workers, has told Swedish media that not all drivers’ cabins have been sealed off from passengers and that drivers are being forced to work on busy routes.


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  65. #65
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    Sweden tops Europe Covid-19 deaths per capita over last 7 days

    Sweden, which has opted for a more open strategy in combating the virus than other European countries, has the highest number of deaths in Europe per capita from the coronavirus over the last seven days, Reuters reported.

    Sweden has kept most schools, restaurants and businesses open during the pandemic.

    While deaths are on the decline, Sweden had 6.25 deaths per million inhabitants per day in a rolling seven day average between May 12 and May 19, according to ourworldindata.org.

    That was the highest in Europe and just above the United Kingdom, which had 5.75 deaths per million.


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  66. #66
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    Eighty-eight more people have been recorded as dying from Covid-19 in Sweden, bringing the country’s total death toll to 3,831.

    The latest update from Sweden’s health authority also showed that 724 more people had tested positive for the coronavirus that causes the disease.

    Sweden has not followed the rest of the world in imposing strict restrictive measures and business closures to contain the spread of the virus.


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  67. #67
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abdullah719 View Post

    So much for those saying what a great job was being done in Sweden.



  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    So much for those saying what a great job was being done in Sweden.
    Time to name and shame

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMMY69 View Post
    Time to name and shame
    Not really, the real analysis of the policies be when lockdown opens in countries and there is a potential second wave. We can not lockdown forever and corona is not going any where.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Misbah View Post
    Not really, the real analysis of the policies be when lockdown opens in countries and there is a potential second wave. We can not lockdown forever and corona is not going any where.
    Ok so we wait for the second wave..

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Misbah View Post
    Not really, the real analysis of the policies be when lockdown opens in countries and there is a potential second wave. We can not lockdown forever and corona is not going any where.
    Most workplaces aren't returning before PPE / isolated cubicles installed in offices probably next year as many working remotely. Public transport will take a bit and the aeropress will override a trip to the cafe. Unless people cannot keep away from restaurants, shopping ans pubs, it shouldn't be able to take hold easily. Had lockdown been implemented in late January or early February, UK could've easily matched Germany.

  73. #73
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    Sweden reported 54 more deaths from Covid-19 on Friday, taking the total death toll in the country to 3,925.

    According to the latest figures from Sweden’s public health agency, 637 more people have tested positive for the coronavirus that causes the disease. In total, Sweden has now recorded 32,809 confirmed cases, with 4,971 recoveries.

    As regular readers of the blog will now, we have been following the situation in Sweden with some interest, after its government chose not to implement the kinds of compulsory lockdown measures imposed elsewhere in the world.

    The Guardian’s comment section has published an op-ed by Tae Hoon Kim, a South Korean geopolitical and economic analyst based in Stockholm, on why he believes that, despite it having a much higher death rate than its neighbours, Sweden is unlikely to make a u-turn on its strategy. Kim writes:

    Sweden has received considerable media scrutiny in recent days. According to figures published on Tuesday, it now has the highest coronavirus-per-capita death rate in the world, with an average of 6.08 deaths per million inhabitants a day on a rolling seven-day average between 13 and 20 May. As of 22 May, Sweden has had 32,172 confirmed cases and 3,871 deaths. These figures are lower than those of Italy or the UK. But they are higher than those of Portugal and Greece, two countries with a similar size of population to Sweden. The figures are also much higher than Sweden’s Nordic neighbours, with Denmark at 11,182 cases and 561 deaths, Norway at 8,309 and 235, and Finland at 6,537 and 306 ...

    But despite the high number of deaths, about 70% of Swedes support their government’s approach. In fact, there has not been much public debate or organised opposition to the strategy. The deaths have indeed shocked many Swedes, especially the disproportionately high number of deaths among those over 70 in care homes and those from working-class, immigrant backgrounds. The debates, however, seem to be taking a more socioeconomic angle. In other words, the reasons for these deaths are being blamed on structural, economic, and social deficiencies – but not on the strategy itself.


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  74. #74
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    COVID-19 deaths in Sweden top 4,000

    The death toll from the outbreak of the novel coronavirus in Sweden has topped 4,000, statistics published by the Public Health Agency showed.

    The data published on the agency's website showed that deaths from COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, had risen to 4,029 from 3,998 a day earlier while the number of confirmed cases amounted to 33,843 up from 33,459.

    Sweden has taken a soft-touch approach to fighting the virus, leaving most schools, shops and restaurants open and relying on voluntary measures focused on social distancing and good hygiene.


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  75. #75
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    Norway and Denmark say they will open up tourism between their two countries from 15 June, but will maintain restrictions for Swedes.
    Sweden, unlike its Nordic neighbours, did not impose a lockdown and more than 4,000 people have died from Covid-19 there - far more than elsewhere in Scandinavia.

    Sweden's 10 million population is also bigger than that of Denmark (5.8 million) or Norway (5.4 million).

    Denmark's Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen argued that Denmark and Sweden were in different places concerning the coronavirus pandemic.

    And at a joint video news conference with her, Norwegian PM Erna Solberg said: "We can't open too suddenly, that would jeopardise everything we've accomplished."

    Denmark is also allowing tourists from Germany and Iceland to visit, though they cannot stay in Copenhagen, which has the most coronavirus cases.

    Danes can travel to those two countries too, without having to go into quarantine on their return.


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  76. #76
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    No COVID-19 deaths reported in Sweden in 24 hours, but weekend figures typically delayed

    STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Sweden has not reported any coronavirus deaths in the last 24 hours, for the first time since March 13, the health authority said on Sunday, but there is typically a delay in reporting figures at weekends.

    Sweden’s open approach to the virus, mostly based on voluntary social distancing and basic hygiene, has been criticized by some as a dangerous experiment, but also once touted as a future model by the World Health Organization.

    Last week, Sweden had the highest number of COVID-19 deaths in Europe per capita over a seven-day-period, data showed.

    There have been previous weekends where the death toll has increased by as little as two, only for a steeper rise to return in the following days when the reporting catches up, the health authority spokesman said.

    The pandemic has killed 4,395 people in Sweden.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...KBN2370GQ?il=0


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  77. #77
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    Sweden has recorded a further 775 confirmed cases of coronavirus, and 65 more deaths from Covid-19, according to the latest figures from its public health authority.

    As of Tuesday, the total number of confirmed cases of cases in the country stood at 38,589, of whom 4,468 have died.

    The latest figures came as the numbers of tests carried out reached a new high, but fell well short of the 100,000 a week promised by officials. Almost 36,500 coronavirus tests were analysed in Sweden last week, the public health agency said.


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  78. #78
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    We could have done better,' says Sweden's chief epidemiologist
    Sweden should have done more to combat the coronavirus and prevent a much higher national Covid-19 death rate than in neighbouring countries, the man behind the Public Health Agency’s pandemic strategy said today.

    Nearly 4,500 Swedes have died in the outbreak, a higher mortality rate than in Denmark, Norway and Finland, and criticism has been growing over the government’s decision not to impose lockdown measures as strictly as elsewhere in Europe.

    Anders Tegnell, the chief epidemiologist at the Public Health Agency, said that in hindsight Sweden should have done more.

    “If we were to run into the same disease, knowing exactly what we know about it today, I think we would end up doing something in between what Sweden did and what the rest of the world has done,” Tegnell told Swedish radio. “Yes, I think we could have done better in what we did in Sweden, clearly.”

    While most of Europe, including Norway, Denmark and Finland, closed schools, shops and businesses, bringing much of society to a halt, Sweden has relied more on voluntary measures, social distancing and common-sense hygiene advice to stem the outbreak.

    It shut care homes to visitors in late March, but around half of the deaths in the country have been among elderly people living in care facilities. Tegnell said it was hard to know which measures taken elsewhere might have been the most effective in Sweden.

    “Maybe we will find this out now that people have started removing measures, one at a time,” he said. “And then maybe we will get some kind of information on what, in addition to what we did, we could do without adopting a total lockdown.”

    Earlier this week, Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said the government would launch an enquiry into the handling of the pandemic.


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  79. #79
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    Scientist Behind Sweden’s No-Lockdown Policy Says It Wasn’t Strict Enough:

    The epidemiologist behind Sweden’s controversial decision to forgo a mandatory coronavirus lockdown says “knowing what we know today,” the country would have taken a more restrictive approach



  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    Scientist Behind Sweden’s No-Lockdown Policy Says It Wasn’t Strict Enough:

    The epidemiologist behind Sweden’s controversial decision to forgo a mandatory coronavirus lockdown says “knowing what we know today,” the country would have taken a more restrictive approach
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ct-Sweden.html


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