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  1. #1
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    Coronavirus Pandemic hitting ethnic minorities the worst

    The coronavirus epidemic is having a disproportionate impact on UK black, Asian and minority ethnic communities (BAME), data from intensive care units suggests.

    Following similar reports on the effect on black communities in US cities, the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre found that in a sample of 2,000 critically ill patients, 35% were BAME.

    According to the last census, 14% of the population as a whole are people are from ethnic minorities.

    Among the possible explanations are the concentration of BAME people in London - where the outbreak is worst- the impact of poverty; the effect of large, multi-generational households; and the fact that ethnic minority workers are often employed in essential, public-facing jobs.

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  2. #2
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    This is truly sad.

    Some say that C19 is a great leveller but it disporportionately affects the poor, the old and ethnic minorities who make up a great percentage of bus drivers, nurses, carers and small shopkeepers and are therefore more likely to be exposed.

  3. #3
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    Dr Jerome Adams, the US Surgeon General, takes the podium to speak about how there has been a larger impact of coronavirus on minority American communities.

    "It's alarming but it's not surprising that people of colour have a greater burden of chronic health conditions," he says. "African Americans and Native Americans develop high blood pressure at much younger ages.

    "Puerto Ricans have higher rates of asthma and black boys are three times as likely to die of asthma as their white counterparts.

    "As a matter of fact, I have been carrying an inhaler in my pocket for 40 years out of fear of having a fatal asthma attack. I hope by showing you this inhaler it shows little kids across the country that they can grow up to be Surgeon General one day."

    He goes on to say that people of colour are both more likely to be exposed to Covid-19 and have increased complications from it.

    “We tell people to wash their hands, but as studies show, 30 percent of the homes in Navajao Nation don’t have running water,” he says. "It's even more important in communities of colour we adhere to the task force guidelines to slow the spread."


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  4. #4
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    What is the reason for this?


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  5. #5
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    lack of vitamin D so weakened immune system? many bame suffer from this in UK

  6. #6
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    Also obesity rates are pretty bad among older asians.

  7. #7
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    Beijing (AFP) - Africans in southern China's largest city say they have become targets of suspicion and subjected to forced evictions, arbitrary quarantines and mass coronavirus testing as the country steps up its fight against imported infections.

    China says it has largely curbed its COVID-19 outbreak but a recent cluster of cases linked to the Nigerian community in Guangzhou sparked the alleged discrimination by locals and virus prevention officials.

    Local authorities in the industrial centre of 15 million said at least eight people diagnosed with the illness had spent time in the city's Yuexiu district, known as "Little Africa".

    Five were Nigerian nationals who faced widespread anger after reports surfaced that they had broken a mandatory quarantine and been to eight restaurants and other public places instead of staying home.

    As a result, nearly 2,000 people they came into contact with had to be tested for COVID-19 or undergo quarantine, state media said.

    Guangzhou had confirmed 114 imported coronavirus cases as of Thursday -- 16 of which were Africans. The rest were returning Chinese nationals.

    It has led to Africans becoming targets of suspicion, distrust and racism in China.

    Several Africans told AFP they had been forcibly evicted from their homes and turned away by hotels.

    "I've been sleeping under the bridge for four days with no food to eat... I cannot buy food anywhere, no shops or restaurants will serve me," said Tony Mathias, an exchange student from Uganda who was forced from his apartment on Monday.

    "We're like beggars on the street," the 24-year-old said.

    Mathias added that police had given him no information about testing or quarantine but instead told him "to go to another city".

    Police in Guangzhou declined to comment when contacted by AFP.

    A Nigerian businessman said he was evicted from his apartment earlier this week.

    "Everywhere the police see us, they will come and pursue us and tell us to go home. But where can we go?" he said.

    - Growing tensions -

    Other Africans said the community had been subject to mass COVID-19 testing even though many had not left China recently, and placed under arbitrary quarantine at home or in hotels.

    China has banned foreign nationals from entering the country and many travellers are being sent into 14-day quarantines either in their own accommodation or at centralised facilities.

    Thiam, an exchange student from Guinea, said police ordered him to stay home on Tuesday even after he tested negative for COVID-19 and told officers he had not left China in almost four years.

    He believes the measures are specifically and unfairly targeting Africans.

    "All the people I've seen tested are Africans. Chinese are walking around freely but if you're black you can't go out," he said.

    Denny, a Nigerian trader evicted from his flat on Tuesday, said police moved him to a hotel for quarantine after he spent several days sleeping on the streets.

    "Even if we have a negative test result, police don't let us stay (in our accommodation) and they don't give a reason why," he said.

    - 'Crazy fear' -

    The infections in Guangzhou have sparked a torrent of abuse online, with many Chinese internet users posting racist comments and calling for all Africans to be deported.

    Last week a controversial cartoon depicting foreigners as different types of trash to be sorted through went viral on social media.

    "There's just this crazy fear that anybody who's African might have been in contact with somebody who was sick," said David, a Canadian living in Guangzhou who did not want to give his full name.

    China's foreign ministry acknowledged this week that there had been some "misunderstandings" with the African community.

    "I want to emphasise that the Chinese government treats all foreigners in China equally," said spokesman Zhao Lijian on Thursday, urging local officials to "improve their working mechanisms".

    The complaints in Guangzhou contrast with a welcome reception to Chinese efforts in battling the coronavirus across the African continent, where Beijing this week donated medical supplies to 18 countries.

    "When China engages Africa it's the central government that does that, but when it comes to immigration enforcement that happens at the local level," said Eric Olander, managing editor of the China Africa Project.

    "That explains why there's an inconsistency in the more upbeat messaging we hear about Chinese diplomacy on the continent and the increasingly difficult realities that African traders, students and other expatriates face in their day-to-day lives in China."

    https://news.yahoo.com/african-commu...053136117.html


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  8. #8
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    There is concern that a disproportionate number of NHS staff who have died have come from ethnic minority backgrounds, a fact confirmed by the health secretary, Matt Hancock.

    Nineteen NHS workers have died with coronavirus since the outbreak began. The first 10 doctors whose deaths were announced were all from minority backgrounds.

    The British Medical Association has called for an investigation.


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  9. #9
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    UK government urged to investigate coronavirus deaths of BAME doctors

    The head of the British Medical Association has called on the government to urgently investigate if and why black, Asian and minority ethnic people are more vulnerable to Covid-19, after the first 10 doctors in the UK named as having died from the virus were all BAME.

    Those doctors have ancestry in regions including Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Even allowing for the overrepresentation of BAME staff in the NHS – they comprise 44% of medical staff compared with 14% of the population of England and Wales – the fact that they were all from ethnic minorities was “extremely disturbing and worrying”, the BMA chair said.

    “At face value, it seems hard to see how this can be random – to have the first 10 doctors of all being of BAME background,” Dr Chaand Nagpaul said. “Not only that, we also know that in terms of the BAME population, they make up about a third of those in intensive care. There’s a disproportionate percentage of BAME people getting ill.

    “We have heard the virus does not discriminate between individuals but there’s no doubt there appears to be a manifest disproportionate severity of infection in BAME people and doctors. This has to be addressed – the government must act now.”

    As well as the 10 doctors, three out of six nurses named as having died have also been BAME as was a hospital pharmacist and at least one healthcare assistant. The overall death figures in the UK have not been broken down by ethnicity but early research published this week showed that 35% of almost 2,000 patients in intensive care units were non-white.

    Nagpaul said BAME health professionals were understandably concerned about the deaths of their colleagues and what it might mean for them. The BMA chair said it might be too early to get firm answers but that it needed to be investigated.

    Among the factors he speculated could be contributing was whether BAME doctors felt less able to complain about inadequate personal protective equipment (PPE) – a recurring complaint among healthcare workers during the crisis – thereby putting themselves in danger.

    “BAME doctors often feel bullied and harassed at higher levels compared to their white counterparts,” he said. “They are twice as likely not to raise concerns because of fears of recrimination.”

    He said the death of BAME doctors was particularly upsetting because of “the vast majority – I think only one was born here – who have come from overseas and have given their lives to the NHS, to save the lives of others”.

    Among the wider BAME population, he suggested the fact that many were in key worker roles, combined with their living arrangements, could be contributing to their disproportionate presence in intensive care units.

    “You’ve got a high proportion of BAME people not able to stay at home, serving the nation, putting themselves at risk,” he said. “If you add that to overcrowded and multigenerational occupancies, the infections can be brought back home and spread to other members of the family.”

    Nagpaul questioned whether enough was being done in terms of translating information leaflets about Covid-19 and physical distancing for people for whom English is a second language, suggesting mosques and temples could be used by the government to help relay the message. He said difficulties speaking English could lead to problems accessing NHS 111 either online or on the phone.

    Nagpaul also highlighted the higher prevalence of diabetes, heart disease and kidney disease among BAME communities than in the white population, adding: “Previous inequalities will be greater at a time of crisis. This [coronavirus] may be bringing into focus historic inequalities facing BAME communities.”

    He said the best advice for BAME doctors to protect themselves against Covid-19 until more was known about the virus was the same as for any of their colleagues: ensure they are wearing appropriate PPE. He urged them not to risk their life if it was not forthcoming.

    “We need to safeguard our BAME population and the BAME medical officers,” he said “These are workers who are already experiencing significant hardships working for the NHS. They are serving the nation at a time of unprecedented crisis. The government must take steps to address this.”

    The Department of Health and Social Care said it was working hard to protect all communities, adding that translations of the public information leaflet, posted to all 30 million households in the UK, were available on its website.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/...me-doctors-bma

  10. #10
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    Theres a disproportionate number of ethnic minorities working where there is face to face contact required with people ie nhs, grocery stores etc etc

    Also they they have greater underlying health issues among the population, poorer diets and live in extended families which all result in higher percentage getting the illness and dying from it

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by irfan View Post
    lack of vitamin D so weakened immune system? many bame suffer from this in UK
    I have Vitamin D deficiency. Its def a big issue

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaz View Post
    Theres a disproportionate number of ethnic minorities working where there is face to face contact required with people ie nhs, grocery stores etc etc

    Also they they have greater underlying health issues among the population, poorer diets and live in extended families which all result in higher percentage getting the illness and dying from it
    I think this answer the op

  13. #13
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    @Zaz

    Let's just go with the hogwash you typed and why the black community?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    What is the reason for this?
    More exposed to the public generally I would think, especially in the medical profession.


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  15. #15
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    'Disproportionate' impact on ethnic minority patients

    There is "emerging evidence" to suggest coronavirus is having a disproportionate impact on people who are from ethnic minority backgrounds.

    Only 14% of people in England and Wales are from ethnic minority backgrounds, according to the 2011 census.

    However, the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre found that 34% of more than 3,000 critically ill coronavirus patients identified as black, Asian or minority ethnic.

    Dr John Chinegwundoh, 50, works as a consultant respiratory physician in London and recently lost his 93-year-old father to coronavirus.

    He described his father Lawrence as a "special, loving and gentle man who will be deeply missed by the Nigerian community".

    Dr Chinegwundoh said it was important the government tracked data about coronavirus cases by ethnicity so that "lessons could be learnt for the future to support communities".


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  16. #16
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    Coronavirus: Oprah warns black Americans about outbreak

    American broadcaster Oprah Winfrey has warned African Americans to take the coronavirus outbreak seriously, saying the disease is "taking people out".

    The virus was hitting the black community hard, and "people aren't getting the message" about the risk of asymptomatic carriers, she said.

    African Americans make up a disproportionate number of coronavirus deaths and hospitalisations in the US.

    The US is the epicentre of the pandemic with 592,743 cases and 25,239 deaths.

    Government data suggests that 33% of those in the US hospitalised for coronavirus are black - even though African Americans only make up 13% of the US population.

    In Chicago, nearly 70% of those who died from coronavirus were African American - while only 23% of the population was black.

    Winfrey said that initial messages around coronavirus "did not connect to the [US] audience in a way they could hear".

    American broadcaster Oprah Winfrey has warned African Americans to take the coronavirus outbreak seriously, saying the disease is "taking people out".

    The virus was hitting the black community hard, and "people aren't getting the message" about the risk of asymptomatic carriers, she said.

    African Americans make up a disproportionate number of coronavirus deaths and hospitalisations in the US.

    The US is the epicentre of the pandemic with 592,743 cases and 25,239 deaths.

    Government data suggests that 33% of those in the US hospitalised for coronavirus are black - even though African Americans only make up 13% of the US population.

    In Chicago, nearly 70% of those who died from coronavirus were African American - while only 23% of the population was black.

    Winfrey said that initial messages around coronavirus "did not connect to the [US] audience in a way they could hear".

    "When this was happening in Wuhan, we thought it was 'over there'… and then I talked to African Americans in Milwaukee, and folks were saying 'we heard about it in Washington, but Washington is way over there, we didn't think it had anything to do with us'," she told CBS news.

    It was important for "black people to understand pre-existing conditions" like diabetes and asthma put them at greater risk of the virus, she added.

    Winfrey, who suffered from pneumonia last year, said she was also taking additional precautions because of her condition - and because many people could be asymptomatic carriers.

    She added that actor Idris Elba, who she interviewed for her Oprah Talks Covid-19 series, had tested positive for the virus, but shown no symptoms.

    "It's all these people, who perhaps could be carriers," she said.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52288760


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  17. #17
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    I wonder if some members of ethnic minorities aren't taking Covid19 seriously and are paying the consequences.

    Even now I'm seeing people ignoring social distancing guidelines.



  18. #18
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    Professor Chris Whitty was asked about the apparent disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME) groups.

    He said he had asked Public Health England to look at this “in detail” and report back.

    More than a third of patients critically ill in hospital with the virus are from these backgrounds, research suggests.

    But he said it was not yet clear why people from BAME communities were more likely to become ill with the virus and die from it.

    Others have suggested they are more likely to be key workers or in low-paid jobs, which could put them in closer contact with the virus.

    Some groups are also more likely to have underlying health conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, which could be a factor.



  19. #19
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    A government review is to be launched into why people from a black and minority ethnic background appear to be disproportionately affected by COVID-19, Sky News understands.

    It follows calls for the government to investigate the number of deaths of people from the BAME community and those working for the NHS during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Sky News analysis has found that of the 54 front line health and social care workers in England and Wales that have died because of COVID-19, 70% of them were black or from an ethnic minority.

    Our analysis also found that four of the five health trusts in England that have recorded the most deaths so far cover areas with some of the highest combined South Asian and black populations.

    Many of these are in London and the West Midlands which together account for almost half of all deaths in England.

    Despite only accounting for 13% of the population in England and Wales, 44% of all NHS doctors and 24% of nurses are from a BAME background.

    Early research from the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) found that last week 34% of critically ill coronavirus patients in England, Wales and Northern Ireland were from black or minority ethnic backgrounds.

    According to the 2011 census, just 14% of the population is from those backgrounds.

    The research was based on 3,300 patients from intensive care units.

    Nadir Nur, a 48-year-old bus driver from London, is one of the key workers to have died after contracting coronavirus.

    One of his nine children, Yusuf, told Sky News he was a "hardworking, strong" man.

    Nadir Nur, a 48-year-old bus driver from London, is one of the key workers to have died after contracting coronavirus

    "It's incredibly heart-breaking to have my dad taken away at such a young age because he won't ever get to see his grandchildren or ever see any of us getting married," said Yusuf.

    "We won't be able to have any other memories like go on holidays again or gather for Eid. There's a big hole that's been left for any of these things."

    He added: "It's horrible to think that he's buried right now, none of it really does feel real. I couldn't even go to the funeral, or see his face for one last time."

    Yusuf said his father wasn't given any PPE and the family thinks he contracted the virus on his busy route which took people to the hospital.

    "I knew that he was definitely worried about it all and I knew that, despite that, he would still carry on doing his job because it's his job. He was always hardworking and he was strong, and he would never run away and hide from it all."

    Downing Street has confirmed the review will get under way.

    It will be led by the NHS and Public Health England along with other organisations, including the British Medical Association.

    Asked about the Sky News data during the daily Downing Street news conference, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said: "Absolutely we're on the side of anyone. This virus doesn't discriminate but we want to follow analysis of the data that you've described."

    Professor Chris Whitty, England's chief medical officer, added: "It's critical that we find out which groups are most at risk so we can help to protect them. Three things are clear and ethnicity is less clear. The three things that are clear are age, people who've got more than one other disease and male sex is a clear risk factor.

    "Being a member of an ethnic minority group is less clear. I've had discussions with scientists about this in terms of trying to tease this apart today.

    "Also, looking very specifically at healthcare workers with leaders of the NHS. This is something we're very keen to get extremely clear. We've asked PHE to look at this in some detail and then what we really want, if we see any signal at all, we want to then know what next to do about it to minimise risk.

    "This is not yet clear in terms of ethnic minorities."

    In reaction to the government's decision to carry out a review, the council chair of the British Medical Association, Dr Chaand Nagpaul, said: "BAME deaths don't just happen in hospitals, they are prevalent in the community too. It's incredibly important that the government looks at the data and understands why this is happening.

    "In the meantime, they need to put in place specific measures to address this disproportionate number of deaths which is incredibly shocking and sad to see."

    On the other side of the Atlantic, there has also been alarm over the growing number of coronavirus deaths among African-American communities across the US.

    Fresh data suggested that people who are black or hispanic in the US are twice as likely to die from COVID-19.

    There are fears that pre-existing health inequalities are making people from minority communities more likely to lose their lives.

    Aggressive public health campaigns have been launched in cities including Chicago, where black people accounted for 72% of deaths from COVID-19 complications and 52% of positive tests, despite making up only 30% of the population.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...id-19-11974116


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  20. #20
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  21. #21
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    As a clearer picture emerges of COVID-19’s decidedly deadly toll on black Americans, leaders are demanding a reckoning of the systemic policies they say have made many African Americans far more vulnerable to the virus, including inequity in access to health care and economic opportunity.

    A growing chorus of medical professionals, activists and political figures are pressuring the federal government to not just release comprehensive racial demographic data of the country’s coronavirus victims, but also to outline clear strategies to blunt the devastation on African Americans and other communities of color.

    On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released its first breakdown of COVID-19 case data by race, showing that 30% of patients whose race was known were black. The federal data was missing racial information for 75% of all cases, however, and did not include any demographic breakdown of deaths.

    The latest Associated Press analysis of available state and local data shows that nearly one-third of those who have died are African American, with black people representing about 14% of the population in the areas covered in the analysis.

    Roughly half the states, representing less than a fifth of the nation’s COVID-19 deaths, have yet to release demographic data on fatalities. In states that have, about a quarter of the death records are missing racial details.

    Health conditions that exist at higher rates in the black community -- obesity, diabetes and asthma -- make African Americans more susceptible to the virus. They also are more likely to be uninsured, and often report that medical professionals take their ailments less seriously when they seek treatment.

    “It’s America’s unfinished business -- we’re free, but not equal,” civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson told the AP. “There’s a reality check that has been brought by the coronavirus, that exposes the weakness and the opportunity.”

    This week, Jackson’s Rainbow PUSH Coalition and the National Medical Association, a group representing African American physicians and patients, released a joint public health strategy calling for better COVID-19 testing and treatment data. The groups also urged officials to provide better protections for incarcerated populations and to recruit more African Americans to the medical field.

    Jackson also expressed support for a national commission to study the black COVID-19 toll modeled after the Kerner Commission, which studied the root causes of race riots in African American communities in the 1960s and made policy recommendations to prevent future unrest.

    Daniel Dawes, director of Morehouse College’s School of Medicine’s Satcher Health Leadership Institute, said America’s history of segregation and policies led to the racial health disparities that exist today.

    “If we do not take an appreciation for the historical context and the political determinants, then we’re only merely going to nibble around the edges of the problem of inequities,” he said.

    The release of demographic data for the country’s coronavirus victims remains a priority for many civil rights and public health advocates, who say the numbers are needed to address disparities in the national response to the pandemic.

    The AP analysis, based on data through Thursday, found that of the more than 21,500 victims whose demographic data was known and disclosed by officials, more than 6,350 were black, a rate of nearly 30%. African Americans account for 14.2% of the 241 million people who live in the areas covered by the analysis, which encompasses 24 states and the cities of Washington D.C., Houston, Memphis, Pittsburgh and Philadelphia — places where statewide data was unavailable.

    The nation had recorded more than 33,000 deaths as of Thursday.

    In some areas, Native American communities also have been hit hard. In New Mexico, Native Americans account for nearly 37% of the state’s 1,484 cases and about 11% of the state’s population. Of the 112 deaths where race is known in Arizona, 30 were Native Americans.

    After Democratic lawmakers introduced legislation this week to try to compel federal health officials to post daily data breaking down cases and deaths by race, ethnicity and other demographics, the CDC released only caseload data that — similar to the AP’s analysis of deaths —show 30 percent of 111,633 infected patients whose race is known were black. African American patients in the 45-to-64 and 65-to-74 age groups represented an even larger share of the national caseload.

    The lawmakers sent a letter last month to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar urging federal release of the demographic data. And Joe Biden, the former vice president and presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, also called for its release.

    Meanwhile, some black leaders have described the Trump administration’s response to COVID-19 as inadequate, after what they said was a hastily organized call with Vice President Mike Pence and CDC Director Robert Redfield last week.

    According to a recording of the call obtained by the AP, Redfield said the CDC has been collecting demographic data from death certificates but that the comprehensiveness of the data depends on state and local health departments, many of which are overburdened by virus response. No plan was offered to help health officials in hard-hit communities collect the data, leaders who were on the call said.

    Kristen Clarke, president of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, which took part in the call, said African Americans “have every reason to be alarmed at the administration’s anemic response to the disproportionate impact that this crisis is having on communities of color.”

    Mistrust runs deep among residents in many communities.

    St. Louis resident Randy Barnes is grappling not just with the emotional toll of losing his brother to the coronavirus, but also with the feeling that his brother’s case was not taken seriously.

    Barnes said the hospital where his brother sought treatment initially sent him home without testing him and suggested he self-quarantine for 14 days. Five days later, his brother was back in hospital, where he was placed on a ventilator for two weeks. He died April 13. Barnes’ brother and his wife also were caring for an 88-year-old man in the same apartment, who died from the virus around the same time.

    “Those people are not being tested. They’re not being cared for,” Barnes said.

    Eugene Rush lives in one of the areas outside large urban cities that have been hit hard with coronavirus cases. He is a sergeant for the sheriff’s department in Michigan’s Washtenaw County, west of Detroit, where black residents account for 46% of the COVID-19 cases but represent only 12% of the county’s population.

    Rush, whose job includes community engagement, was diagnosed with COVID-19 near the end of March after what he initially thought was just a sinus infection. He had to be hospitalized twice, but is now on the mend at home, along with his 16-year-old son, who also was diagnosed with COVID-19.

    “I had a former lieutenant for the city of Ypsilanti who passed while I was in the hospital and I had some fraternity brothers who caught the virus and were sick at the hospital,” Rush said. “At that point, I said, ‘Well, this is really, really affecting a lot of people’ and they were mostly African American. That’s how I knew that it was really taking a toll a little bit deeper in the African American community than I realized.”

    https://apnews.com/8a3430dd37e7c44290c7621f5af96d6b


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  22. #22
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    Rome, Italy - Volunteers unload stuffed-full plastic bags from the back of a car while two women from the Horn of Africa wait for their groceries behind the fence of "Selam Palace", home to as many as 500 asylum seekers and refugees from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan.

    They have been living behind closed doors since April 6, after two coronavirus cases were found inside their nine-storey squat. The army has closed the road to the main entrance, fenced off the whole area, and is patrolling all ways in or out.

    "We just saw the police coming. Nobody notified us of anything," 40-year-old Eritrean refugee Bereket told Al Jazeera.

    Selam Palace is the largest building in Rome to become a squat for refugees and migrants, who struggle to afford the Italian capital's rental costs. Experts estimate there are another 110 occupied buildings in the Eternal City.

    The president of the local municipality, Monica Lozzi, confirmed to Al Jazeera that all residents had been tested for coronavirus, and 50 were found to have contracted it.

    "They are mostly asymptomatic and have already been transferred to other facilities," she said.

    Two women with their children have been admitted to a local paediatric hospital, but aid organisations are furious about the way authorities have handled the crisis.

    "I've been repeating for years that people cannot live in these conditions. It was crystal clear that this was going to happen," Donatella D'Angelo, a family doctor and president of the charity Citizens of the World, told Al Jazeera.

    Citizens of the World have been providing a weekly health and social counselling service to the refugees, who first occupied the building in 2006.

    'Palace of shame'

    The glass-covered Selam Palace was once an office building belonging to the University of Tor Vergata on the southern outskirts of Rome, surrounded by parking lots and office blocks.

    Many occupants spend their days in the courtyard, since the facility cannot cope with the hundreds of people in it.

    "Overcrowding, a lack of ventilation and of any means to heat and cool these spaces render the environment unhealthy - and a perfect ally in the transmission of COVID-19 [the disease caused by the virus]," Dr D'Angelo said.

    In early 2012, Nils Muiznieks, the then-commissioner for human rights for the Council of Europe, paid a visit here and met its residents. "Places such as Selam Palace should not exist," he wrote afterwards.

    There is one toilet for every 19 people, and a shower for every 33 people, Citizens of the World reported in 2018. Residents have divided the office spaces with plasterboard to construct more rooms, but five or six still share each bedroom.

    At the beginning of March, the aid organisation wrote to local health authorities, the president of the municipality and the regional governor. But its warnings remained unheeded until residents found out about the first infection.

    "And when they finally listened to me, they sent the army," said Dr D'Angelo. "That's outrageous."

    The aid organisation cast doubts over the measures to limit the infection here.

    "Testing with swabs started last week, but then they stopped for Easter," notes social worker Guendalina Curi. "Are we sure that those deemed as negative have not been infected in the meantime?"

    Residents are worried too, since authorities did not evacuate the relatives of some of those who tested positive, and social distancing here is practically impossible.

    'Failure of the system'

    In Italy, the coronavirus pandemic has further exposed the state of emergency refugees and migrants live in every day.

    "Selam Palace represents the blatant failure of our reception system, because people accept to live in these conditions just to have a roof over their head," said Dr D'Angelo.

    Despite some successful examples of residents travelling to other European countries and beginning a new life there, Dr D'Angelo says at least half of the residents have been stuck here since 2006. Most barely speak Italian.

    Bereket works as a porter in a delivery company and is a union activist. But finding accommodation has proved hard for him, too.

    "You have no permanent contract, and you are a foreigner and Black; it's not easy to rent a room," he said.

    Before moving to Selam Palace, he lived in an occupied office block in Via Curtatone, with another 800 Eritrean and Ethiopian refugees.

    Law enforcement emptied the building in August 2017. The images of the Italian police using water cannons to disperse the ensuing protest sparked international indignation.

    Looking to the future, it is discrimination that scares Bereket more than coronavirus.

    "If they say that this is a 'red zone'," he says, "how would people react when we finally get out to go to the supermarket?"

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...232514207.html


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  23. #23
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    Jenrick addresses concerns over ethnic statistics

    Asked about Covid-19 deaths, Robert Jenrick says: "There does appear to be a disproportionate impact on BAME [black, Asian and minority ethnic] communities. For that reason the Chief Medical Officer is working with Public Health England to better understand issues. It's right to do thorough research."

    "I'm acutely aware of the challenge and am working with different groups," he says, so that "the voices of BAME communities are heard."


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  24. #24
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    Muslim-led charities in the UK, long recognised by parliamentary reports as "the fourth emergency service" are even more important now that the first three are so severely overstretched.

    The Muslim community has more than stepped up during the coronavirus crisis. Many of those National Health Service (NHS) staff who have lost their lives to COVID-19 have been of immigrant - often Muslim - background, and mosques took the step of closing their doors well in advance of government advice.

    None of this has prevented far-right figures - as well as some mainstream tabloid journalists - from stigmatising Britain's minorities, especially the Muslim community.

    The usual peddlers of Islamophobia are continuing to push dangerous conspiracy theories. Tommy Robinson, one of the UK's most notorious online provocateurs, has been quick to seize the opportunity do so.

    Robinson recently shared a video of Muslim men allegedly flouting social distancing rules by attending a "secret mosque" in Birmingham - fake news which was quickly dismissed by West Midlands police.

    It is a particularly trying time for Britain's faith communities. Many of them hail from minority backgrounds, and are disproportionately affected by the virus - particularly when it comes to those who need intensive care or lose their lives.

    As places of worship are shut down during the lockdown, some of those mosques, dependent on weekly congregational donations, may not survive the pandemic.

    This is a huge worry for all charities in the Muslim philanthropy space - a sector where well over 100 million pounds ($125 million) is raised every year in the UK during the month of Ramadan alone (which will start next week).

    Without the physical space to hold fundraising events and solicit much-needed donations, some Muslim civil society institutions may find their operations are no longer sustainable after the outbreak.

    In spite of this, and without clarity from Chancellor Rishi Sunak about how much of his 750-million-pound support fund for charities will reach them, Muslim-led charities have stepped up their work in serving the most vulnerable across the country, distributing millions of pounds worth of aid and welfare in response to COVID-19.

    At my charity, Penny Appeal, we have established a hardship fund, distributed food and hygiene packs and set up a bespoke Coronavirus Listening Line, a service which offers support to people who are under particular strain at the moment.

    We are not alone. Islamic Relief has already committed half a million pounds to partner organisations, particularly food banks. The National Zakat Foundation is offering cash grants to those under financial stress, while others are working with members of Parliament, councils and even directly supporting front-line NHS staff in hospitals. The Ummah Welfare Trust is donating a staggering one million pounds worth of personal protective equipment to front-line healthcare workers.

    These contributions are just the tip of the iceberg. So much more is under way, most of which will remain under the radar of any media reporting, since many Muslims are reluctant to advertise what they see as a spiritual, rather than a public, duty.

    All this flies in the face of what the far right in the UK are spouting - sentiments which sadly do not exist in a vacuum.

    The "You Clap For Me Now" viral campaign seeks to highlight the fears of ethnic minority communities in the UK whose contributions to society are being celebrated in this moment of national need but worry that when the dust settles the post-Brexit climate of racism and bigotry - which has more than doubled since 2013 - will return.

    Minorities should not only be welcomed in the UK at a time of need or when they are providing essential services. They should be as much a part of the country's fabric as anyone else. Not least given how Muslim-led charities like ours play such an integral role in how Britain functions during crises.

    Those who racialise British Muslims when they are linked with something negative should not make their faith and ethnicity invisible when they are such a crucial part of a national effort to survive a once-in-a-generation global emergency.

    During World War I, 2.5 million Muslims travelled to Europe to fight for the UK. Similarly, after World War II, as part of the effort to rebuild the country, tens of thousands of Windrush immigrants were welcomed to Britain alongside subjects from across the former colonies in the Indian subcontinent and Africa, just because the country needed them. Generations later, they are still all-too-often treated as alien, and their culture as inferior.

    The war against coronavirus must be different. This time, we must remember all the soldiers - whether they are charity volunteers wearing Team Orange t-shirts or medical doctors donning blue medical scrubs - and we must keep clapping for them when the war is over.

    A time of upheaval creates unprecedented instability and fear, and history shows us how this can drive countries to lurch politically either to the right or to the left.

    After the last world war, the welfare state was established. A welfare state that for years has been shrinking away and is now at breaking point, with the website for applying for Universal Credit (income support in the UK) crashing under the stress of new claimants.

    Luckily for Brits, our welfare is protected not only by the government's welfare system but also by the "fourth emergency service" - British Muslim-led charities. This is a duty mandated by our faith; to serve those in need regardless of who they are or what their background might be.

    In return, we do not ask for special treatment or consideration. All we want is to be treated as equals when the dust settles.

    The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera's editorial stance.

  25. #25
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    The ethnicity of those who have died with coronavirus in English hospitals has been published for the first time.

    The breakdown by NHS England gave the ethnicity of 12,593 of the 13,918 people known to have died before the weekend.

    It states that 18.7% of those who died had Black, Asian and mixed ethnicity (BAME) backgrounds.

    The most recent reliable ethnicity data in England and Wales is a little dated, but according to the 2011 census 14% of people in were from ethnic minority backgrounds.

    Downing Street says it has commissioned an investigation into the issue.



  26. #26
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    The British Asian role in the ongoing Coronavirus Pandemic

    Good to see appreciation from the highest echelons...

    ===

    Prince Charles has thanked British Asians for playing a "vital role" in responding to the coronavirus crisis.

    The Duke of Cornwall, who tested positive for COVID-19 himself in March, paid tribute to the community in a message recorded for the British Asian Trust.

    The Prince of Wales is the royal founding patron of the trust, which supports British Asians and the poorest people in the South Asian region.

    He said: "The current public health crisis is a challenge which confronts us all. In every community and in every part of the world.

    "In the United Kingdom, I know that the British Asian community is playing a vital role in response to this crisis.

    "Whether in the NHS or as key workers in other roles, or through the wonderful work done by volunteers and local initiatives in temples, mosques and gurdwaras to support all members of all communities."

    British Asians make up around 10% of the whole NHS workforce, with many frontline staff having died after testing positive for coronavirus.

    Prince Charles also launched the British Asian Trust's COVID-19 emergency appeal in his video message.

    The fundraiser aims to support those suffering from the virus in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

    Scientists believe the coronavirus crisis in South Asia is set to worsen over the next few weeks.

    Hospital beds have reached capacity in Pakistan and with the country's decision to allow mass prayers during Ramadan, there are fears the death tally could rise drastically.

    Prince Charles said: "I wanted to lend my support to the launch of an emergency appeal to help those who are suffering most across India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

    "To play its part in responding to this pandemic, the British Asian Trust, in partnership with local organisations and government, is ramping up its work to support the daily basic needs of the poorest and the most vulnerable."

    He added: "Across the region an estimated 40 million children are in need. Over 400 million daily workers have seen their livelihoods disappear with no form of income and no savings. They and their families now face a fight for survival."

    Mohammad Nafees Zakaria, the high commissioner for Pakistan to the UK, said in response to the prince's message: "We are very grateful for this message and appeal from His Royal Highness.

    "There are hundreds of thousands of vulnerable people in Pakistan. During this crisis, if they don't die of COVID-19, they'll die of starvation and hunger. These are people that rely on their daily wages."

    He also urged British Asians to donate to the appeal.

    Richard Hawkes, chief executive of the British Asian Trust, told Sky News: "[Prince Charles] has always been really passionate about the region, about South Asia, as he is about the whole of the Commonwealth.

    "Because he had his own experience of coronavirus, it is very personal to him.

    "He is very aware of the tremendous work so many British Asians have been doing in the UK at the forefront of the fight against the virus."

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...virus-11977909


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  27. #27
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    Baroness Doreen Lawrence will lead a review into the impact of coronavirus on black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, the Labour Party says.

    The campaigner and mother of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence has been appointed as Labour's race relations adviser by leader Sir Keir Starmer.

    The review will examine why the virus appears to disproportionately impact those from ethnic minority backgrounds.

    The government has also commissioned an investigation into the issue.

    The Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre found that 34% of more than 4,800 critically-ill patients with Covid-19 identified as black, Asian or minority ethnic.

    This is despite only 14% of people in England and Wales being from ethnic minority backgrounds, according to the 2011 census.

    The virtual launch of Labour's review on Friday is being attended by Baroness Lawrence, Sir Keir and Labour's shadow secretary of state for women and equalities, Marsha de Cordova.

    Other attendees include Muslim Council of Britain's general secretary Harun Khan, Operation Black Vote's director Lord Simon Woolley, Royal College of Nursing deputy president Yvonne Coghill and the Sikh Network's Jas Khatkar.

    'Tragic pattern'

    Sir Keir said it was "extremely concerning" to see the "disproportionate toll" coronavirus was having on black, Asian and minority ethnic communities.

    "We cannot afford to treat this as an issue to investigate once the crisis is over. We must address it now."

    Baroness Lawrence, a Labour peer, said: "The coronavirus pandemic has brought society together, but it has also exposed the gulf in living standards that still blights our communities.

    "Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities have long been disadvantaged by the social and economic injustice which still exists in our country.

    "There is a clear and tragic pattern emerging of the pandemic's impact on those communities which must be better understood."

    Read more on :
    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-52405243


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  28. #28
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    The deputy chief medical officer says that data on any link between coronavirus deaths and ethnicity may be difficult to draw until there is "very, very clear data" but that the issue is under "very active consideration".

    Dr Harries says there will be a very detailed review into any potential link - and that the review will consider not just ethnicity but also any link with medical conditions that may be prevelent within some ethinic minority groups.

    "It is really important that we engage with those communtiies so that we understand," she says, adding as an example: "We need to understand how they are represented in the very sad deaths of health workers."

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    I wonder if some members of ethnic minorities aren't taking Covid19 seriously and are paying the consequences.

    Even now I'm seeing people ignoring social distancing guidelines.
    Well said. The hard to swallow truth.

    I can't say anything about others but many Desi uncles are not taking the whole situation seriously enough.

    (Many boomers of my family )

  30. #30
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    There may be a correlation between Covid and blood type. Are BME of a particular blood type?..

  31. #31
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    Far-right movements are exploiting the coronavirus crisis to push their anti-minority agendas and win new support.

    A report by the Zinc Network, a communications agency that tracks disinformation and propaganda, suggests there has been a clear pivot among far-right groups in the UK, EU and US to “utilise the pandemic to bring new relevancy, attention and support for their key grievances”.

    “The evidence we’ve uncovered shows that far-right groups in the UK are using Covid-19 to promote a British form of fascism,” said Louis Brooke, executive director of research and strategy at Zinc Network.

    “Their tactics are sophisticated, and their activity is becoming more difficult to monitor, partly due to the use of private messaging apps to share disinformation and propaganda. We’re seeing the dissemination of material claiming that immigrants spread coronavirus, and that authoritarian regimes outperform western liberal democracies in tackling the health crisis.”

    Zinc Network said British far-right groups such as Britain First and the Knights Templar International, as well as the BNP’s former leader, Nick Griffin, have used the crisis to promote themselves as supporters of the community during the lockdown. Griffin has posted images of himself on social media distributing food parcels.

    Zinc Network, which in the past has attracted scrutiny for its work promoting the Home Office’s anti-radicalisation strategy, Prevent, studied social media posts, photos, videos, journals, official records and media reports to produce the analysis.

    It said one key narrative being pushed by the far right is that the spread of coronavirus is the consequence of illegal immigration. Allied to this is the claim that nations with tightly-controlled borders are better prepared to deal with the pandemic. Another is the premise that modern liberal states are on the verge of collapse, and that their fall can be accelerated through armed action or by a major crisis.

    The promotion of survivalist material by far-right groups is also becoming a trend. Zinc says neo-Nazi publisher Arktos has been publishing updated and expanded editions of far-right survivalist texts.

    A favoured tactic among far-right groups is to put fake documents into circulation, designed to look like real medical or government communications. According to Zinc’s monitoring, far-right Telegram channels have been instrumental in circulating a fake scan of a positive Covid-19 test for the former vice-president and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

    The same channels have also been distributing government pandemic response documents with a view to helping would-be attackers plan their actions.

    Some far-right organisations are using the crisis to impersonate other groups, Zinc claims. Fake Extinction Rebellion flyers have been found in several cities in the UK proclaiming “Corona is the cure – humans are the disease”.

    Most of the leaflets condemn immigration, with some calling for the public to “learn about the JQ” – the “Jewish question”. Others promote conspiracy theories or deny the Russian novichok attack in Salisbury.

    Brooke said: “These extremist groups are using the coronavirus as an opportunity to further their ideological objectives by spreading fear and division and exacerbating social tensions.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...-boost-support
    Last edited by MenInG; 25th April 2020 at 21:25.


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  32. #32
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    BIRMINGHAM, England (AP) — The holy month of Ramadan is underway, and the Central Jamia Mosque Ghamkol Sharif in Birmingham should be full of worshippers. But this year, the main arrivals are the dead.

    While the mosque in the central England city has been closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic, its parking lot has been transformed into a temporary morgue with room for 150 bodies.

    The volunteer-run mortuary, with its white tents, industrial refrigerators and neat stacks of coffins, is evidence of the toll the virus is taking on Britain’s Muslim and ethnic-minority communities. The two most diverse regions of the U.K. — London and the Midlands area centered in Birmingham — have seen the largest number of deaths in the outbreak.

    Mohammed Zahid, a mosque trustee who helped set up the mortuary with a firm of Muslim funeral directors, said the mosque in Birmingham’s predominantly South Asian Small Heath district normally holds one or two funerals a week.

    In the last few weeks, “we were doing five to six a day,” he said.

    “You can see how the families were grieving,” said 44-year-old Zahid, who wears a mask, coveralls and gloves as he moves among the coffins.

    Local government social-distancing rules allow only six people to attend each burial.

    “Especially when they can’t get their own cousins and brothers and sisters around them — it’s made it really hard for the people who’ve lost their loved ones,” said Zahid, who has lost two aunts to COVID-19. “What do you say to a family who’s got five sons or daughters, and some of them have to stay home?”

    It’s a similar story at the nearby Green Lane Mosque, where coffins lie stacked up inside the prayer hall. Usually the mosque holds about 25 funerals a year. For the past three weeks it has seen five a day.

    “Everybody’s worrying about whether it will be their family members next, their loved ones,” said Saleem Ahmed, the mosque’s head of welfare and services.

    Britain has recorded more than 20,700 hospital deaths of people with coronavirus. Thousands more are likely to have died in nursing homes.

    The virus has hit people of all ages and backgrounds, including Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who spent three nights in intensive care. But evidence suggests that ethnic-minority Britons are feeling a disproportionate impact.

    Statistics show that 16% of those who died in Britain with the coronavirus up to April 17 were from black, Asian or minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds. About 14% of the U.K. population comes from those backgrounds.

    ADVERTISEMENT

    Even more starkly, data from Intensive Care National Audit and Research shows that a third of people in intensive care with COVID-19 in the U.K. are non-white. And many of the over 100 health care workers who have died in the outbreak were from BAME backgrounds.

    The government has asked public health officials to investigate the virus’ heavy impact on minorities.

    A similar trend has been seen in countries including the United States, where an Associated Press analysis found that about 42% of Americans who have died from COVID-19 were black, while African Americans account for roughly 21% of the population in the areas analyzed.

    In France, the poor and largely immigrant neighborhoods on the fringes of Paris have seen some of the highest increases in mortality since the outbreak began.

    Kamlesh Khunti, a professor of primary care, diabetes and vascular medicine at the University of Leicester, said complex factors may be involved. While black Americans often have worse access to medical care than white Americans, “ in the U.K. we have a free health care service, so we can’t put it down to just inequalities in care,” he said.

    Khunti said ethnic-minority Britons are more likely to live in large, multi-generational families and cramped housing. Many hold jobs with a high risk of infection: doctors, nurses, taxi drivers and transit workers.

    Black and South Asian people, in Britain and elsewhere, also have higher rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension, conditions that have been be linked to more severe COVID-19 symptoms.

    Others argue that racism is a factor. Gurch Randhawa, professor of diversity in public health at the University of Bedfordshire, said extensive research shows that minority nurses and health care assistants “often receive poorer treatment than their colleagues.”

    “In the context of the present crisis, this means they may have worse access to (personal protective equipment), more trying shift patterns and greater exposure to COVID-19 patients,” he said.

    In Birmingham’s Muslim community, everyone seems to know someone who has died. Haly Bano lost her uncle, a taxi driver who likely caught the virus from a customer.

    “It is really hard for mum, because she can’t go to pay respects to the family or anything,” she said. “So we just called on the phone and FaceTimed and that’s all we could do.”

    Picking up meat for a Ramadan meal in the predominantly South Asian Sparkbrook neighborhood, Bano said she was shocked at the number of people thronging the supermarkets and butcher shops. Some wore masks but few were following government instructions to remain two meters (over 6 feet) apart.

    “People are not listening,” she said. “It is really scary and dangerous.”

    At the Ghamkol Sharif mosque, Zahid is thankful that the temporary morgue hasn’t reached its capacity. It was set up amid fears that without sufficient refrigerated storage, bodies would have to be cremated, counter to Muslim custom. But everyone who has been brought here has had a proper burial.

    “We just make sure they get their final rites,” Zahid said.

    Scientists say Britain has likely passed the peak of its outbreak. The number of people hospitalized is declining, and the increase in the number of deaths has slowed, even though hundreds with COVID-19 are still dying each day.

    Zahid said in the past week the number of bodies arriving at the mosque has ebbed but the anxiety has not.

    “There is fear in people about the corona, there’s no doubt about that,” Zahid said.

    “Whatever comes, comes from God,” he added. “We just have to carry on doing what we’re doing.”

    https://apnews.com/cadd8b877dc9cea28c09709f0a97f963


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  33. #33
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    Immigrants whose visas were cancelled after they committed crimes have found an unlikely ally in 2020: the coronavirus.

    A number of recent cases reveal that members of Australia's Administrative Appeals Tribunal, which reviews government decisions, are asking parties to address how the global COVID-19 pandemic plays into the question of whether a person's cancelled visa should be reinstated.

    In several cases, the government has admitted that travel restrictions mean deportations are unlikely to happen in the near future. That means those without a visa will face longer spells in immigration detention — a factor that has weighed in favour of people getting their visas back.

    Russell Medcalf, a 35-year-old New Zealand citizen, had his cancelled visa reinstated on April 9, with the tribunal finding that the effects of the coronavirus weighed in his favour.

    Medcalf, who has lived in Australia since he was 17, had his visa cancelled in April 2018 because of criminal offences that meant he failed the "character test" in the Migration Act. They included driving offences, assault and a drug trafficking conviction that landed him a three-year jail sentence.

    He applied for his visa to be reinstated, but a bureaucrat rejected his application in February. He appealed to the tribunal, where, at his hearing held over videoconference in late March, members asked for information on the impact of COVID-19.

    Medcalf told the tribunal he was “very scared and worried” about being "stuck in detention indefinitely", because if COVID-19 came to detention it would “spread like wildfire”. The government had conceded that it was unlikely he would be deported in the immediately foreseeable future.

    Detainees across Australia's immigration detention network have spoken out about their anxiety that the virus could easily spread in centres and hotels, brought in by guards or other staff from the outside world.

    The government has so far rejected calls from doctors and advocates to release detainees to reduce the public health risk. Instead, it is taking extreme precautions, such as locking a man in a tiny cell for three days after he asked for Panadol because he was sore following three days of a heavy workout.

    Medcalf also said he was worried about his prospects of finding work and housing in New Zealand. "With the COVID virus going on at the moment there'd be no jobs going," he said. He added that he does not know anyone there.

    Medcalf was also worried that his Australian son would not be able to visit him in New Zealand if borders were closed.

    Senior tribunal member Dr Michelle Evans-Bonner found that the pandemic meant Medcalf would likely be detained for longer than he otherwise would have been.

    It would also add to his difficulties in re-establishing himself in New Zealand, she found. “The economic uncertainty of the pandemic may impact on [Medcalf’s] ability to find employment and on [his] ability to access support services to assist him to resettle in New Zealand and to find housing, although the extent of this impact is uncertain,” the tribunal wrote.

    The extra time he would spend in detention and the difficulties he would face back in New Zealand because of the pandemic weighed in favour of his visa being reinstated, the tribunal found. It was also found it would be in his son's strong interest to have his father present during his formative years.

    The coronavirus was taken into account as early as Feb. 25, when a 29-year-old Chinese citizen argued that he risked dying from the virus if deported to China. In late February, the virus was sweeping through China and infections in Italy, Iran and South Korea were increasing.

    The man, who was known as FRVT in the tribunal, had his visa cancelled after he committed serious drug offences.

    He told the tribunal the coronavirus outbreak in China was one reason his visa should be reinstated, on top of his unwell mother living in Australia, his relationship with his partner’s son in Australia, and the risk that he would face the death penalty in China because of his drug offending.

    Tribunal member Tigiilagi Eteuati agreed that the risk of coronavirus infection was higher in China than in Australia, but that the number of infections was relatively small and that the man came from a province far away from the epicentre in Wuhan.

    The tribunal was relatively optimistic about the progress of the virus, speculating that travel restrictions would last "a matter of months, not years", and pointing to the "drastic steps" the Chinese government had taken to reduce the spread of the virus, quarantine patients, develop testing kits and produce a vaccine.

    Nevertheless, the tribunal found it was not reasonably practicable for the man to be deported to China because of Australia's travel restrictions, which would mean "prolonged" but not "indefinite" detention.

    That prolonged detention, the risk that he could contract the virus in China, and the negative impact on the Chinese economy weighed in his favour, the tribunal said.

    Similar issues have come up in at least two other cases.

    In one, brought by an Indonesian man with Australian children, the tribunal accepted that he could face a prolonged period in detention due to COVID-19 travel restrictions, and said that was one factor weighing against cancelling the visa. His visa was reinstated.

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/hannahryan/...f=bftwbuzzfeed


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  34. #34
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    NHS England has recommended health trusts assess Black, Asian and ethnic minority (BAME) workers as "at potentially greater risk" from coronavirus.

    The official guidance says UK and international data indicates "people from BAME backgrounds are also being disproportionately affected by Covid19".


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  35. #35
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    UK: Black Africans dying at much higher rate than white Britons

    Coronavirus patients from Black African backgrounds are dying in United Kingdom hospitals at more than three times the rate of white British people, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS).

    Its report on Friday comes amid growing evidence that ethnic minority patients and front-line workers are far more likely to suffer serious consequences from the epidemic in terms of health.


    "After stripping out the role of age and geography, Bangladeshi hospital fatalities are twice those of the white British group, Pakistani deaths are 2.9 times as high and black African deaths 3.7 times as high," the IFS said.

    "The Indian, black Caribbean and 'other white' ethnic groups also have excess fatalities, with the white Irish group the only one to have fewer fatalities than white British."

    The data was alarming because, as the IFS noted: "While many minority groups live disproportionately in areas such as London and Birmingham, which have more COVID-19 deaths, most minorities are also younger on average than the population as a whole, which should make them less vulnerable."

    But minorities' exposure to infection and health risks, including mortality, and their increased likelihood of loss of income, made them more vulnerable.

    About 75 percent of medical and care workers who have so far died of coronavirus have been from minority backgrounds.

    In April, the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre (ICNARC) said a third of critically ill COVID-19 patients in the UK were from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) backgrounds.

    Last month, after calls for an inquiry grew, the right-wing Conservative-led government announced a formal review into why COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, appears to disproportionately affect BME communities in the UK.

    Later, the main opposition Labour Party announced its own review.

    "The unequal effects of the COVID-19 crisis on different ethnic groups are likely to be the result of a complex set of economic, social and health-related factors," said the IFS.

    "Understanding the role of each of these will require a better understanding of the virus itself, more data than are currently available, and additional research."

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...124912789.html


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  36. #36
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    BAME Covid-19 deaths probe should include social factors - Powis

    Next up, Ahmed Versi from Muslim News asks about the inquiry into whether people from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds are at greater risk of becoming seriously ill with Covid-19.

    He says the talk might be about medical conditions, but asks are structural issues like racism at play?

    In response, Michael Gove says it's known that inequality can "contribute" to public health outcomes.

    "It may be that we need to take a step back and look more broadly at some of the inequalities that exist within our society," he says, but adds he doesn't want to "prejudge" the question.

    Stephen Powis says: "It's really important that Public Health England and colleagues who are working on this go in with an open mind and look at all the possible causes.

    "Biological causes may be one part but it's important that it's looked at in the round."


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  37. #37
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    There's a question from a member of the public to the briefing about support for people from ethnic minorities, after some studies have suggested they have been more affected by the virus.

    Matt Hancock says the number of deaths in this group has been "disproportionately high," particularly among NHS workers.

    Professor Jonathan Van Tam says the matter is being taken "incredibly seriously," pledging: "we will get to the bottom of this".

    But it is a "complicated picture", he argues, as the effect of other factors such as age, deprivation and underlying conditions on the data will need to be understood.


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  38. #38
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    Black men and women are nearly twice as likely to die with Covid-19 as their white counterparts, according to new analysis from the Office for National Statistics.

    The analysis combines data on Covid-19 deaths with information on ethnicity from the 2011 Census.

    It takes account of age, where people live and some measures of deprivation, disadvantage and health. After adjusting for all these factors, black men and women were 90% more likely to die with Covid-19 than white people.

    Men and women from Indian, Bangladeshi and Pakistani communities were also at higher risk than white people, though not by as much with the data showing their increased risk was between 30- 80%.

    But an analysis based on the census data cannot fully explain the reasons for the higher risk because it does not take into account people’s current health, if they are in more crowded living conditions, are exposed to the virus through front-line roles - or other differences between communities that can increase risk.
    Last edited by MenInG; 7th May 2020 at 20:20.

  39. #39
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    Black people in the United Kingdom are more than four times as likely to die from coronavirus than white people, the UK's statistics office said on Thursday.

    Those of Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnicity also have a significantly higher chance of dying from COVID-19 than white people, even when adjusting for deprivation, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said.

    COVID-19 mortality is partly a result of socio-economic disadvantage and other circumstances, but a remaining part of the difference has not yet been explained," ONS said.

    Using models that adjusted for a range of socioeconomic factors, the statistics office said it was clear that there were significant differences in the risk of dying of COVID-19 among different ethnic groups.

    "The risk of death involving the coronavirus (COVID-19) among some ethnic groups is significantly higher than that of those of white ethnicity," ONS said.

    "People of Bangladeshi and Pakistani, Indian, and Mixed ethnicities also had statistically significant raised risk of death involving COVID-19 compared with those of white ethnicity."

    Scientists studying the novel coronavirus caution that there were vast holes in their knowledge and cite striking differences in the death rates based on age, sex and ethnicity.

    Genetics, they say, might hold many clues that could help eventually reveal a path to medicines or a vaccine that could treat the disease.

    Without adjusting for a variety of factors including deprivation, education and health, the ONS found that Black males were 4.2 times more likely to die from a COVID-19-related cause and Black females were 4.3 times more likely than white ethnicity males and females.

    The adjusted model showed that Black males and females were 1.9 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than the white ethnic group.

    Males of Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnicity are 1.8 times more likely to die, according to the adjusted model. Individuals from the Chinese and mixed ethnic group have similar risks to those with white ethnicity, the ONS said.

    Data from the United States showed African Americans were more likely to die from COVID-19, highlighting long-standing disparities in health and inequalities in access to medical care.

    In the UK, the government last month heeded calls to launch an inquiry into why ethnic minorities appear to be more vulnerable to the novel coronavirus.

    Later, the main opposition Labour Party announced its own review.

    Most doctors who have died on the UK's front lines have been from non-white communities.

    On Friday, the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) said coronavirus patients from Black African backgrounds were dying in UK hospitals at more than three times the rate of white British people.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...092551289.html


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  40. #40
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    UN calls for end to 'tsunami of hate' around virus

    UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres has called for an "all-out effort" to end rising racism linked to the coronavirus pandemic.

    "The pandemic continues to unleash a tsunami of hate and xenophobia, scapegoating and scaremongering," Guterres said on Friday.

    "Anti-foreigner sentiment has surged online and in the streets. Anti-Semitic conspiracy theories have spread and Covid-19-related anti-Muslim attacks have occurred."

    Additionally, "journalists, whistleblowers, health professionals, aid workers and human rights defenders are being targeted simply for doing their jobs," he said.

    He appealed for "an all-out effort to end hate speech globally," and called on "the media, especially social media companies, to do much more to flag and... remove racist, misogynist and other harmful content."


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  41. #41
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    How the pandemic has stirred hate

    Earlier we reported that UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres had called for an all-out effort “to end hate speech globally”. He said the coronavirus pandemic had unleashed a “tsunami of hate and xenophobia".

    "Anti-foreigner sentiment has surged online and in the streets," he said. "Anti-Semitic conspiracy theories have spread and Covid-19-related anti-Muslim attacks have occurred."

    Guterres did not give any specific examples, but here some of the incidents that have been reported:

    India has seen a rise in Islamophobia after an event linked to a Muslim missionary movement - the Tablighi Jamaat - spawned clusters of Covid-19 cases across the country

    A student from Singapore has said he was beaten up by a group of men in the UK who told him: "I don't want your coronavirus in my country"

    The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has said he had been subjected to racist attacks from Taiwan, which its president denied

    Africans in the Chinese city of Guangzhou have complained of discrimination, saying they have been forced from their accommodation and treated unfairly by authorities

    China accused US President Donald Trump of “stigmatising” the country after he referred to Covid-19 as the “Wuhan virus”

    A report by researchers in Israel said the coronavirus crisis was stoking anti-Semitism around the world


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  42. #42
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    Government 'very concerned' about impact of virus on minorities

    The panel is asked about what practical steps the government has undertaken to protect south Asian workers and their families, with evidence suggesting they are disproportionately impacted by the virus.

    In response Shapps says the government is "very concerned" about deaths amongst minority groups and has asked Public Health England to carry out a rapid study to find out why this is happening - with results dues at the end of May.

    Van-Tam says the government is determined to get to the bottom of the issue "with real clarity" but he does not want to offer "quick fixes" as the issue is complex with a number of possible factors contributing.

    He adds that the issue is "urgent" and the government is taking it "incredibly seriously".


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  43. #43
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    Jun 2001
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    A government medical adviser says he cannot easily tell who is more at risk of dying with COVID-19 - a 50-year-old slender black man who runs half-marathons, or a 32-year-old white man who is extremely overweight, has diabetes, asthma and does not exercise.

    Deputy Chief Medical Officer Professor Jonathan Van-Tam was speaking about the "complicated" situation surrounding the vulnerability of people from black and minority ethnic communities.

    It follows an Office for National Statistics (ONS) report earlier this week that said black people are up to four times more likely to die with coronavirus than white people.

    And a separate study found that being male, older in age, having uncontrolled diabetes and severe asthma are key factors related to COVID-19deaths, according to researchers at the University of Oxford and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

    New analysis published on Thursday showed black women are more likely to die by a factor of 4.3 and black men by 4.2 compared with Caucasian people, after adjusting for age.

    Other ethnic minorities have a heightened risk, too.

    Speaking at the government's daily coronavirusnews briefing, Prof Van-Tam said he takes the ONS report on the issue "very seriously indeed".

    He added: "There is an enormous determination across the medical advisory function for the government to get to the bottom of this, and get to the bottom of it with real clarity.

    "And that's why I don't want to come on here today, and offer you, kind of, silly quick fixes. This is a complex mixture of risk by age, risk by gender, risk by comorbidities, other illnesses.

    "There is an obesity signal beginning to emerge as well, and on top of that, and I'm absolutely clear, there is a signal around black and minority ethnic groups.

    "No one I think is trying to brush that under the carpet or say it's not there, but it is complicated."

    He continued: "I can't stand in front of you and say I could easily make an on-the-hoof judgement about who is more at risk.

    "Somebody from the black and minority ethnic community who is svelte, age 50, a regular half-marathon runner, eats well, does everything right, versus somebody who is from a white ethnic group who is 32, extremely overweight, does not exercise, has diabetes, has asthma, etc."

    Prof Van-Tam added it was a "silly example" but he hoped it gives people an understanding that "pitching the risk for individuals is quite a difficult and technically involved thing to do and that's why I don't to make any quick jumps and quick quips of answers to you".

    "We are taking this incredibly seriously, we are determined to get to the bottom of it in a proper and scientific way."

    Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said the government is "very concerned" about deaths amongst minority communities, adding it is "absolutely determined" to get a proper understanding of the issue.

    The government is carrying out a review, by Public Health England, into the higher death rates.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...e-men-11985804



  44. #44
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    Nine out of 10 people arrested for coronavirus-related offenses in New York City have been black or Hispanic, police department data released Tuesday shows, according to the Associated Press.

    Of 125 arrested between March 16 and Sunday, 83 were black, 30 were Hispanic, 9 were white and 3 were Asian.

    The New York Police Department says the pandemic-related arrests fall into broad categories such as hate crimes, domestic violence and resisting arrest. They include fights that broke out over cutting supermarket lines and a bank robbery suspect who gave a note to a teller saying: “This is a bank robbery, I have Covid.”

    These are not social distancing arrests, the department said in a statement. Many were responses to calls for service where there was a clear victim and police took necessary action.

    Data released Friday showed that of the 374 summonses issued through May 5 for violating social distancing orders, 52% were given to black people and 30% to Hispanic people.


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  45. #45
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    Women, migrants, minorities to suffer most in Latin America as coronavirus rages: U.N. agency

    The coronavirus pandemic will make a bad economic situation worse for women, indigenous people, migrants and people of African descent in Latin America, a region already plagued by deep-rooted inequality, a United Nations agency said in a report issued on Tuesday.

    Unequal access to potable water, sanitation, healthcare and housing could also mean higher rates of infection and death among these higher-risk populations, the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) said in the report.

    Women are in a “particularly vulnerable situation,” the report said, because their work is more often informal, with few guarantees, leaving them more exposed to the risk of unemployment.

    Domestic workers in Latin America, who account for 11.4% of employed women in the region, will be especially hard hit by the virus and economic downturn, with limited access to an already tenuous social safety net in many countries.

    Many domestic workers are migrants, or of indigenous or African descent, compounding the discrimination, the agency said.

    Women are also most likely to be saddled with the responsibilities that come with quarantine and the closure of schools, increasing stress at home and the potential for domestic violence.

    “The burden of unpaid domestic work assumed by women, adolescents and girls, as well as cases of violence against them, are significantly increased,” the agency warned.

    Although the UN report focused partly on women, data from around the world has shown that men are dying at a higher rate than women from COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

    Latin America has more than 369,000 confirmed cases of the new coronavirus and more than 20,000 deaths from COVID-19, according to a Reuters count based on official data.

    The region’s economies are set to contract by a record 5.3% in 2020, unleashing the worst social and economic crisis in decades, the agency said in a prior report in April.

    The crisis is expected to exacerbate festering social and labor discrimination suffered by the indigenous and African-American populations, who already face greater wage gaps compared to other groups, ECLAC said.

    “Likewise, discrimination and racism hinder the effective access of indigenous and Afro-descendant people to health services,” the report said.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...-idUSKBN22O2RQ

  46. #46
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    Omid Djalili, Whoopi Goldberg and Sanjeev Bhaskar have joined forces to appeal for black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) participants to take part in Covid-19 research to help establish why people from BAME populations are at greater risk from coronavirus.

    People from all minority ethnic groups are at greater risk of getting severe illness with Covid-19 compared with the white population in the UK – with recent studies saying they are twice as likely to die from the virus as white people. The actor-comedians Djalili and Bhaskar, and the Oscar-winning Goldberg, urged BAME people to join coronavirus research studies in a bid to help find the reasons behind the link.

    Speaking on a video released to support recruitment for the research – which will be conducted by the Centre for BME Health, supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) – Djalili said: “As you know we are in the middle of a devastating pandemic and it seems people from these populaces are affected disproportionality and we want to find out why, now.

    “There are a lot of tests and trials going on but very few people from these communities are putting themselves forward for research. We need to get on with this to help people not just here, but globally, so if you know anyone from these backgrounds, relatives or friends, please pass on this message. The sooner we do it the more lives we can save. Now. Thank you.”


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  47. #47
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    Coronavirus deadliest in New York City's black and Latino neighborhoods, data shows

    Some New York City neighborhoods have seen death rates from the novel coronavirus nearly 15 times higher than others, according to data released by New York City’s health department on Monday, showing the disproportionate toll taken on poor communities.

    The data shows for the first time a breakdown on the number of deaths in each of the city’s more than 60 ZIP codes. The highest death rate was seen on the edge of Brooklyn in a neighborhood dominated by a large subsidized-housing development called Starrett City.

    Civic leaders had been pushing for the more granular data, which they said would show stark racial and economic disparities after New York City became the heart of one of the worst coronavirus outbreaks in the world in March and April.

    In the wealthy, mostly white enclave of Gramercy Park in Manhattan, the rate is 31 deaths per 100,000 residents, the data shows. A long subway ride away in Far Rockaway in the borough of Queens, which is more than 40% black and 25% Latino or Hispanic, the death rate is nearly 15 times higher: 444 deaths per 100,000 residents.

    “It’s really heartbreaking and it should tug at the moral conscience of the city,” Mark Levine, chairman of the City Council’s health committee, said in an interview. “We knew we had dramatic inequality. This, in graphic form, shows it’s even greater than maybe many of us feared.”

    Poor black and Latino New Yorkers are much more likely to do low-paid, essential jobs that cannot be done remotely, putting them at higher risk of exposure, Levine said. They are also more likely than rich, white New Yorkers to live in smaller, more crowded apartments.

    Due to inequalities in access to healthcare, they are also more likely to have underlying health conditions, such as diabetes or hypertension, Levine said.

    The city had been releasing a daily update of cases of COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, by ZIP code, but only gave a breakdown of deaths for each of the city’s five boroughs.

    The coronavirus has killed at least 20,800 people in the city so far, according to health department data.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...-idUSKBN22U32A

  48. #48
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    The Professional Footballers’ Association has asked the Premier League to conduct extra research into the possible effect of Covid-19 on black, Asian and minority ethnic players. The request was made as clubs were due to go back to training from Tuesday before a possible restart of the season next month.

    A substantial number of BAME players are believed to have expressed strong concerns to the players’ union over a return. The Watford captain, Troy Deeney, has said he will not be joining club training because of health concerns.

    Data from the UK Office for National Statistics suggests that black people are more than four times as likely to die from coronavirus as white people, and that a greater risk of death existed even after removing factors such as deprivation or existing health conditions.

    The Premier League’s medical adviser, Mark Gillett, said that the league would be monitoring the risk to BAME players, dependent on more data emerging.

    “We will do everything we can to mitigate against [the risk] … as more information becomes available,” he said. “But the risk in young fit athletes is still very small and I think that is an important factor.”

    Deeney said he had raised questions at a recent meeting involving the league and captains and had not been satisfied it was safe to train.

    “We’re due back in this week; I’ve said I’m not going,” he told Eddie Hearn and Tony Bellew on their Talk the Talk YouTube show. “Within the meeting I asked very simple questions. For Black, Asian and mixed ethnicities they are four times more likely to get the illness and twice as likely to have long lasting illness. Is there any additional screening? Heart stuff, to see if anyone has a problem?

    “I feel that should be addressed. I can’t get a haircut until mid-July but I can go and get in a box with 19 people and jump for a header? I don’t know how that works. No one could answer the questions – not because they didn’t want to, because they didn’t have the information. I just said: ‘If you don’t know the information, why would I put myself at risk?’”

    The striker said it is also a major consideration that his five-month-old son has breathing difficulties. “I don’t want to come home and put him in more danger,” he said.

    https://www.theguardian.com/football...n-bame-players


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  49. #49
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    Asked by Geo News about protecting front-line workers, including those staffing the transport network, Shapps says he has written to transport operators to ensure they are aware of the correct equipment and procedures required for the next phase of the coronavirus response.

    Shapps confirms 53 transport workers have died with coronavirus since the outbreak began.

    "It's a great concern," he adds. He also says there will be a review into the effect of the virus on people from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds.

    "It is heartbreaking to see how this virus developed and many of the people, as you mention, on the front line are from BAME backgrounds," he says, adding he wants to ensure all the right lessons are learned after the epidemic has passed.


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  50. #50
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    Watford captain Troy Deeney says people told him they wished his baby son would contract coronavirus after he chose not to return to training.

    Deeney did not want to put his child, who has had breathing difficulties, "in more danger" and raised concerns over the increased risk to black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) players.

    He is due to resume training next week.

    "I saw some comments in regards to my son, people saying: 'I hope your son gets corona'," Deeney, 31, said.

    He told CNN Sport: "That's the hard part for me. If you respond to that, people then go: 'Ah, we've got him' and they keep doing it.

    "In a time where it's all about mental health and everyone says 'speak up, speak out, please speak', Danny Rose spoke out and I spoke out and we just get absolutely hammered and battered for it.

    "So people see that and go 'woah' and it's not just us that gets it, the missus gets direct messages and you'll be walking down the street and people will be like: 'Oh, I'm at work, you go back to work'."

    On Wednesday, Premier League clubs unanimously voted to resume contact training but Watford are not expected to resume group training until next week.

    Deeney has spoken with England's deputy chief medical officer, Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, and is expected to return to club training next week.

    "He's been doing very, very good research and there is a lot of goodwill on his part to tell me, ultimately, that I'm going to be looked after as best as they can and, ultimately, there is going to be some form of risk for all of us going back to work," Deeney said.

    "Lockdown and the social distancing measures coming down mean people will still always have risk."


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  51. #51
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    The death of a British railway worker was not linked to an attack in which she was spat at by a man claiming to have coronavirus, police have said.

    Belly Mujinga, 47, who died with Covid-19 last month, was working at Victoria station in London when she was assaulted.

    British Transport Police (BTP) concluded the attack did not lead to her death, following "extensive inquiries".

    On Thursday, the force also said no further action would be taken against a 57-year-old man who was interviewed by officers.


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  52. #52
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    People from black and Asian ethnic groups are up to twice as likely to die with COVID-19 than those from a white British background, according to a Public Health England report.

    Health Secretary Matt Hancock said coming from a non-white background was a "major risk factor" for the virus.

    People of Bangladeshi ethnicity had around twice the risk of death, said the report.

    Those of Chinese, Indian, Pakistani, Other Asian, Caribbean and Other Black ethnicity had between 10 and 50% higher risk of death.

    The analysis of death risk accounts for the effect of sex, age, deprivation and region.

    However, it does not include the effects of underlying health conditions or obesity.

    "Other evidence has shown that when these are included, the difference in risk of death among hospitalised patients is greatly reduced," said the PHE report.

    When it comes to being diagnosed, the highest rate per 100,000 population was in black ethnic groups (486 in females and 649 in males) and the lowest in white ethnic groups (220 in females and 224 in males).


    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...gland-11999167


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  53. #53
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    John Newton, testing coordinator for England, urges people not to jump to conclusions about today's report into Covid-19 risks.

    The report does say that coronavirus outcomes are worse for people from black, Asian and minority ethnic people, says Prof Newton, but more work is needed to find out why.

    "It is not necessarily because of their ethnicity, it may be related to their occupation or other reasons why they might be at higher levels of exposure," he tells the Downing Street press conference.

    He says recommendations will follow in due course, in answer to a question from ITV's Emma Morgan, who points out that recommendations had been promised today.


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  54. #54
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    Hancock promises 'action' on BAME impact

    Vic Motune, of The Voice newspaper, says his readers are concerned about the apparent indifference to the black community in Public Health England's report on relative risks, as it does not include any recommendations.

    He also asks how the government will follow the lead of local authorities in protecting people from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities.

    Matt Hancock says "we need to do more work" to find out how much of the disproportionate number of deaths of BAME people is down to issues like their occupation, housing or other issues.

    Conservative MP Kemi Badenoch will be leading the next phase of the research, he says,

    But he promises action "as soon as we can", adding that there is no need to wait for another report.


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  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    Hancock promises 'action' on BAME impact

    Vic Motune, of The Voice newspaper, says his readers are concerned about the apparent indifference to the black community in Public Health England's report on relative risks, as it does not include any recommendations.

    He also asks how the government will follow the lead of local authorities in protecting people from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities.

    Matt Hancock says "we need to do more work" to find out how much of the disproportionate number of deaths of BAME people is down to issues like their occupation, housing or other issues.

    Conservative MP Kemi Badenoch will be leading the next phase of the research, he says,

    But he promises action "as soon as we can", adding that there is no need to wait for another report.
    And in the middle of a pandemic that is killing bame people disproportionately in higher numbers, black people are demonstrating about events that happened in America. Did I miss something

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    John Newton, testing coordinator for England, urges people not to jump to conclusions about today's report into Covid-19 risks.

    The report does say that coronavirus outcomes are worse for people from black, Asian and minority ethnic people, says Prof Newton, but more work is needed to find out why.

    "It is not necessarily because of their ethnicity, it may be related to their occupation or other reasons why they might be at higher levels of exposure," he tells the Downing Street press conference.

    He says recommendations will follow in due course, in answer to a question from ITV's Emma Morgan, who points out that recommendations had been promised today.
    I can tell you from personal experience that many of the BAME communities are not following any advice. I walked past taxi drivers and they were literally standing on top of each other with not even basic social distancing, with that sort of attitude, how can people complain. And the worst of it is that we have had many deaths of the elderly from the virus in our community. After the deaths of one person, I witnessed with my own eyes a full purri at the grave side of the dead with no social distancing and the guy died from corona.

  57. #57
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    Zohra Khaku is on the frontline of the fight against coronavirus.

    But rather than working on a ward, or delivering food, she and her staff are on the end of a phone line. She runs the Muslim Youth Helpline, which offers counselling for young Muslims in the UK.

    She's one of many people in this country dealing with the overwhelming effect the virus has had on Black and Asian communities. In a report released on Tuesday, Public Health England (PHE) acknowledged the disproportionate effect the pandemic has had on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (Bame) people, including making us more likely to become critically ill, and to die.

    Black people are almost four times more likely to die of Covid-19, according to the Office of National Statistics, while Asians are up to twice as likely to die.

    Over the past few months, outreach workers like Zohra have been helping those affected by Covid-19 in our communities. The effects have been brutal - not just physical, but psychological, societal and financial. And they hint at why our communities were so vulnerable to the pandemic in the first place.

    Zohra says they've had a more than 300% increase in calls, web chats and emails from distressed teens and young adults since the virus arrived in the UK - including a spike on Eid weekend.

    The virus, she tells me, has led to many young people becoming isolated - including those who'd never had mental health issues before - while others are struggling with bereavement and grief, after suddenly losing parents and other loved ones.

    "We've been going for 19 years, but we've never been as busy as this," she says. The helpline has had calls from young Muslims with mental health conditions, for whom Friday prayers was their only lifeline to the outside world, providing them with a vital support system and connection to their community.

    "People's support systems were taken away," she says. "Because we've had Ramadan in lockdown, and people not able to go to Friday prayers, people who had depression or were isolated or lonely before all of this happened - whose only thing they would do with other human beings was once a week on a Friday - they suddenly don't have that any more either."

    Remembering coronavirus victims

    These are the names of, and tributes to, 205 of the people who have died in the UK due to coronavirus

    Jenelyn Carter, 41 from Swansea. She had a "heart of gold" and "would go the extra mile for anyone".
    Donna Campbell, 54 from Cardiff. "She was often found singing and dancing, entertaining patients and staff, making everyone smile."
    Caroline Saunby, 48 from New Marske, Yorkshire. "Friend to hundreds, and the most genuine and generous person in the world."
    Christopher Vallely, 79 from Belfast. "He had such a zest for life."
    Eddie Large, 79 from Portishead. "We will miss him terribly. We are so proud of everything he has achieved in his career."
    Janice Graham, 58 from Glasgow. "My mum was there for me, no matter what. I will miss everything about her."
    Isobel Vallely, 77 from Belfast. "So young at heart" with "so much life still to live".
    Steven Pearson, 51 from Cramlington, Northumberland. "Words cannot describe how proud we all are of him - a natural carer."
    Simon Guest, from Furness, Cumbria. "Simon was special - a true gentleman and a great role model to all."
    Manjeet Singh Riyat, 52 from Derby. "Renowned for his warm personality, diligence and compassion. A valued member of the [Royal Derby Hospital] team for over 35 years."
    Pat Midgley, 82 from Sheffield. "The most generous woman you could ever wish to meet, loved by so many."
    Wally Hames, 75 from Yardley, Worcestershire. "The most amazing man."
    Sara Trollope, 51 from Hillingdon, west London. "Sara had that unbeatable combination of kindness, selflessness and total determination to get things right for patients."
    Michael Gerard, 73 from Leicester. "He's one of a kind and will be greatly missed."
    Kenneth Law Sumner, 96 from Newcastle. "He was a true gentlemen who never stopped loving his family."
    Andy Wyness, 53 from Wishaw, Lanarkshire. "Andy always did everything he could to assist others, and was a true gentleman."
    Thomas Harvey, 57 from London. "A caring, supportive and selfless man who always put others before himself."
    Elbert Rico, from Oxford. "He would walk around the hospital with a smile on his face - very rarely would he call in sick."
    Craig Wakeham, 59 from Cerne Abbas, Dorset. "His legacy lives on in our patients, whom he cared for diligently, and in the good name he built for our surgery."
    Robert Savory, 63 from Gloucestershire. "He made everyone he met feel loved, valued, respected and warm."
    Load more tributes



    Jenelyn Carter
    41, Swansea
    Healthcare assistant
    She had a "heart of gold" and "would go the extra mile for anyone".

    Here are only some of those who have died. To see all of them would take more than 88 hours.

    One call that sticks in her mind was from a 17-year-old girl whose parents had both been taken to hospital with Covid-19.

    "Because her parents were in hospital she was looking after a 19-year-old sibling who was self-isolating, and a younger sibling who was severely disabled," Zohra says.

    "Issue one was, 'I don't have any money left, please can you point me in the direction of a food bank because I need to be making food for my siblings.' The second thing was that she was doing her A-levels and applying for university, and this was at a time when we weren't sure what was happening with grades. She said that if one teacher in particular ends up giving her a predicted grade instead of her doing an exam, then she doesn't think she's going to get into the university she wants, because she doesn't think her teacher believes in her and is a little bit racist. So she's worried about her future.

    "And the third thing was, the doctor from the ward that her mum's in called her just before she called us, and said, 'we don't think your mum's going to make it'. This girl said to us, 'the next phone call I'm expecting is to say that she's died. How do I make sure she has a Muslim burial? I'm only 17, I don't know how to do that.'

    "That's just one case, and yet it's so complex. She was on nobody's radar, and if she hadn't reached out for help she'd still be in that situation on her own."

    Why are more Bame people dying?
    The outbreak's impact on ethnic minorities' mental health has been devastating. The Muslim Youth Helpline, Zohra says, has seen a worrying increase in calls from people saying they're considering suicide.

    "We usually get one call about suicide every two weeks, but we get them every night now," Zohra says. "We had one day last week where half of our enquiries were about suicide, and there have been about three or four every night this week."

    For information and support on mental health and suicide, access the BBC Action Line
    The PHE report reveals that people living in the most deprived areas of the country are twice as likely as those living in the least deprived areas to be diagnosed with and to die of Covid-19. People of Black, Asian and mixed ethnicities are all significantly more likely to live in the most deprived 10% of neighbourhoods, according to government statistics.

    Overcrowded households are linked to this deprivation, too. Overcrowding is significantly more prevalent in lower-income households than in wealthier ones - according to one study, it affects 7% of the poorest fifth of households, as opposed to 0.5% of those in the richest fifth.

    This poses additional challenges for Ursala Khan, who provides counselling specifically to Bame youths through her work at The What Centre in Dudley. Since the coronavirus outbreak began, privacy has become a huge issue, she says. Many of the teens she works with live with large families in small spaces, meaning they don't have enough privacy to talk on the phone or video-call about mental health.

    Image copyrightURSALA KHAN
    Image caption
    Ursala Khan: "I see a lot of young people concerned about returning to school"
    "Although we do offer alternatives like online counselling or phone counselling, there are still concerns for people trying to access those," Ursala says. "If someone lives in an over-crowded house, it's quite difficult for them to know if they'll have the privacy to speak to us about their mental health."

    According to the English Housing Survey, carried out between 2014 and 2017, 30% of Bangladeshi households, 16% of Pakistani households and 12% of Black households experienced overcrowding. This was compared with just 2% of white British households.

    South Asian families in the UK are also more likely than white families to live in multi-generational households, with up to three generations of the same family living together. This means that school-age children may be living with their grandparents - something outreach workers have said most iterations of the government's guidance haven't taken into account.

    Because of this, many of the teens The What Centre works with are scared of going back to school.

    "I see a lot of young people concerned about returning to school or college, especially if they live with elderly family members or family members who have pre-existing health conditions," Ursala says.

    Some people have been told to go into work when they haven't felt comfortable, too. Zohra gives the example of a young man who called the helpline after losing his job, after refusing to go into an office he deemed unsafe.

    "We had a few cases of people saying 'I'm not sure if it's safe to go to work, but my employer's making me', and even before the lockdown we had calls about things like PPE," she says.

    "Early on in the outbreak, there was one guy who said he got fired for refusing to go in… but he wrote in a few weeks later and told us: 'You know what, I have no job, but at least I'm alive - and I believe that if I'd continued going into work I wouldn't be'."

    The high risk of 'essential' work
    The risk is partly because of the kind of work that many Black and Asian people in the UK do. South Asians are significantly more likely to work in the NHS, for example. In England nearly 21% of NHS staff are from ethnic minority backgrounds, but they only make up about 14% of the general population.

    At the same time, Black and Asian people are also more likely to be in insecure work - such as gig economy jobs, bogus self-employment and zero-hours contracts - than white people with the same qualifications. Many of these jobs, such as delivery drivers, taxi drivers and supermarket work, are now considered "essential".

    Research from the Trade Union Congress (TUC) last year found that ethnic minority workers are a third more likely to be in insecure work. A report released last month by Carnegie UK Trust, UCL and Operation Black Vote also found that Bame millennials in particular were 47% more likely to be on notoriously unstable "zero-hours" contracts.

    Because of this, Black and Asian people are disproportionately more likely to have been "key workers" in front-line jobs during this pandemic - whether that's caring for patients on a Covid ward, or delivering takeaways. Rajesh Jayaseelan, for example, was an Uber driver in London who died of coronavirus in April. Days before he died, he was evicted from his home and forced to sleep in his car because his landlord had deemed him high-risk, on account of his job.

    Remembering 100 NHS and healthcare workers
    Healthcare workers have also highlighted racism and workplace discrimination as major issues during the pandemic.

    Last month, Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust's head of equality Carol Cooper told the Nursing Times that Black and Asian nurses felt they were being "targeted" for work on Covid wards - more so than their white colleagues.

    "They feel that there is a bias," she told the publication. "The same bias that existed before, they are feeling is now influencing their being appointed - and they are terrified. Everybody is terrified."

    In another survey last month, carried out by ITV News, about 50% of doctors and healthcare staff who responded explicitly blamed "systemic discrimination" at work for the disproportionate number of deaths among Bame NHS staff. One in five healthcare workers said they had personally experienced racism - in response, NHS England said protecting staff was its "top priority" and that it had asked trusts to risk-assess Bame workers.

    So for now it's impossible to pin down whether the higher death rate among Bame people is down to sociology or biology, Michael Hamilton from Ubele, a social enterprise working with Britain's African diaspora, tells me.

    According to PHE, this is "complex" - but in essence, it's both. Socio-economic inequality means we're more likely to catch the virus, while our biology means we're more likely to die.

    Ubele has set up a fund to help people hold memorial services for their loved ones after the crisis. It is also leading the call for a full independent, non-governmental inquiry into the deaths of Black and ethnic minority people of coronavirus.

    So what, in Michael's opinion, is causing us to die at higher rates than our white British counterparts? "Clearly there are multiple reasons, and I think I am personally, genuinely in a place to say at this point that I don't know," Michael says - adding that jumping to conclusions without all of the information is "the worst thing we can do".

    "I think people are going to find different answers depending on their own speciality," he says. "We might find that there is some biology. The socio-economic stuff, that's my bread and butter, so I can recite that. But I want to keep looking, because I genuinely don't know - but I believe that we do have to know."

    How systemic inequality affects our health
    Dr Enam Haque is a GP in Manchester, but he also works with two Bame outreach groups - one that aims to educate patients, and another that works with Bame healthcare workers. He says he and his Bame colleagues have been "terrified" of the virus.

    "It's quite scary as a GP from a Bangladeshi background myself, when I've seen Bame colleagues dying disproportionately," he tells me. The virus is very close to home for him - his uncle, Dr Moyeen Uddin, was a cardiologist in the city of Sylhet in Bangladesh, and was the first doctor in his country to die of Covid-19.

    It's affecting his patients, too: "Many of our patients are staying away and not contacting us with health issues. My fear is that a lot of chronic conditions, lots of worrying conditions are not being diagnosed because people are scared - particularly, I've observed, from the ethnic minority population - that any kind of access to healthcare will make them exposed to Covid-19."

    What about pre-existing conditions?
    Scientists have been looking into whether certain pre-existing medical conditions could be playing a part.

    Black and South Asian people are significantly more likely than white people to have Type 2 diabetes and hypertension (that is, high blood pressure), two conditions known to be high-risk.

    The PHE report reveals that the proportion of both Black and Asian people who've died of Covid-19 with diabetes was higher than white patients. As well as these two conditions, a recent study from Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge has found a link between lower levels of vitamin D and higher Covid-19 mortality rates in 20 European countries. Vitamin D deficiency is particularly common among Black and Asian people in the UK and other countries with limited sunshine.

    I ask Dr Haque what, in his opinion, could be the reason we're so much more likely to become critically ill, or even die. He tells me that although there are medical reasons for people from Bame backgrounds to be more vulnerable, biology doesn't explain everything.

    "It's a fact that people from Bame backgrounds, particularly from South Asia, are more likely to have diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure, all of which make them more at-risk," he says. "But the bigger issue, in my opinion, are the social determinants of health."

    By this, he means the economic and social conditions that make some people more vulnerable to health conditions - in this case, to becoming critically ill from a deadly virus - than others.

    "There's something that has disadvantaged our population and has put us at risk," Dr Haque continues. "It's the inequality in society - there's so much more deprivation, people in our communities earn lower wages, and we have more people working in frontline jobs as well.

    "As well as healthcare workers we have a lot of bus drivers, taxi drivers… they may not have access to PPE in these jobs either, so they're putting themselves at risk while serving the community. That's a major factor right there."

    The problem, Michael Hamilton from Ubele says, is the people we're relying on the most in this pandemic are the ones who are the most exposed - and yet, by virtue of being considered "low-skilled", they are rendered invisible.

    "I think one of the things we have to do - the biggest lesson I think we have to take from this - is to look at what we value, and who we value, and how we show them value," Michael says.

    "It's our ability to not value certain types of people that has allowed this to happen."



    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52894225


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  58. #58
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    The husband of a railway worker has spoken out on the two-month anniversary of her death from coronavirus after she was spat on by a man claiming to have the virus.

    Belly Mujinga, 47, who died with Covid-19 on 5 April, was working at Victoria station when she was assaulted. Police concluded the incident was not linked to her death.

    In a statement Lusamba Mujinga said his wife's employers, Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR), didn’t do enough to protect her.

    Mr Mujinga said: "We want justice for Belly.

    "We want to know why she was sent out to work unprotected on the station concourse that day. We want to know why she was working when she had a respiratory condition.

    "We want justice for Belly’s colleagues who still don’t have full [personal protective equipment].

    "Today, it’s two months since Belly died in hospital from coronavirus. Two months since I lost my wife and our daughter lost her mother.

    "We ask you to take a moment today to think about Belly, and about all the transport workers who have died from this terrible virus and all those putting their lives on the line to keep our country moving."

    More than a million people have signed a petition launched in support of Mrs Mujinga, calling for all frontline workers within Transport for London to be provided with personal protective equipment.

    The petition also calls for GTR to provide an explanation as to why she was still working in direct contact with general public when she had a respiratory underlying health condition.

    ==

    The Crown Prosecution Service has been asked to review evidence into her coronavirus-related death in "recognition of wider public interest", although the case is not being reopened, the police said.

    The man alleged to have spat at Mujinga, 47, who died with Covid-19 on 5 April, claimed to have coronavirus.

    But, following "extensive inquiries", British Transport Police (BTP) concluded last month the attack did not lead to her death.

    The force also said no further action would be taken against a 57-year-old man interviewed by officers.

    The BBC understands that the man, who was the main suspect, had a negative antibody test in the time after the incident.

    In a new statement on Friday, BTP said it had invited the CPS to conduct an independent review of the available evidence, and whether there were any further lines of inquiry.


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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    What is the reason for this?
    Biolgically speaking the only answer is DNA. Which makes me even more convinced that C19 is a biological weapon targeting ethnic minorities.

    Bascially biological warfare ; or ethnic cleansing - which ever way you look at it.

  60. #60
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    Concerns about censorship have been raised after third-party submissions were left out of the government-commissioned report on the disproportionate effects of Covid-19 on black, Asian and minority ethnic people

    Public Health England said it had engaged with more than 1,000 people during its inquiry. But the report, which has been criticised for failing to investigate the reasons for the disparities or make recommendations on how to address them, did not mention the consultations.

    Anger has been compounded by a report in the Health Service Journal claiming that before publication the government removed a section detailing responses from third parties, many of whom highlighted structural racism.

    The Muslim Council of Britain (MCB), which called in its written submission for “specific measures … to tackle the culture of discrimination and racism [within the NHS]”, said it had contacted PHE to ask why its evidence was not included.

    Its secretary general, Harun Khan, said: “To choose to not discuss the overwhelming role structural racism and inequality has on mortality rates and to disregard the evidence compiled by community organisations, whilst simultaneously providing no recommendations or an action plan, despite this being the central purpose of the review, is entirely unacceptable. It beggars belief that a review asking why BAME communities are more at risk fails to give even a single answer.

    “The MCB is seeking further clarification from PHE as to why the report removed the submission from the MCB and others. It is imperative that the full uncensored report is published with actionable policies and recommendations as suggested by community stakeholders, and a full Covid race equality strategy is introduced.”

    The report, which was published on Tuesday, found that BAME groups were up to twice as likely as white Britons to die if they contract Covid-19. But numerous studies had already established disproportionate mortality among BAME people, leaving many furious as to why PHE did not examine the reasons for the disparities or propose solutions.

    Dr Zubaida Haque, the interim director of the Runnymede Trust, who attended a Zoom consultation relating to the review, said: “It’s extraordinary, there’s nothing about that in the document at all. What was the point of carrying out that consultation exercise? It’s a partial review, in terms of the fact that it doesn’t have any written recommendations or plan of action, and it’s a partial review because it clearly hasn’t taken onboard any of the concerns of voluntary and grassroots organisations. In that sense it’s very difficult to have confidence and trust in the review.”

    In a webinar on 22 May, Prof Kevin Fenton, the PHE regional director for London, who led the review, said the public health body had “engaged more than 1,000 – almost coming up now to 1,500 individuals who have participated in briefings, lectures, discussions, listening sessions on this issue”. The “extensive exercise” included steps being taken already because “we shouldn’t be waiting to act when we know what to do”, he said.

    The British Medical Association’s written evidence included the need to take account of socioeconomic factors. Its council chair, Dr Chaand Nagpaul, said: “It is further incredibly concerning, if true, to hear claims that parts of the review have not been published. We first pushed for this review two months’ ago and a number of concerns we have consistently raised are not reflected in the paper. While this review was being compiled, BAME workers were dying and will continue to do so unless the government engages in actions not words.”

    Neither PHE nor the Department for Health and Social Care responded to the Guardian’s question as to whether a section of the report had been removed before its publication.

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics...ovid-19-deaths


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  61. #61
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    Do ministers care about ethnic minorities?

    The last question is from Ahmed Versi, editor of the Muslim News.

    He asks about a PHE report earlier this week which found that people from ethnic minorities were disproportionately more likely to catch Covid-19 and die from the disease than the population in general.

    He suggests Hancock's colleague, Michael Gove, had promised the report would look at whether structural issues and discrimination had played a part in the higher death rates but it had failed to address this.

    His newspaper's readers believed this showed the government did not care about BAME communities' welfare.

    Hancock says the suggestion "pains" him because the government is determined to "get to the bottom" to why certain ethnic groups are more pre-disposed to become infected.

    He says the high proportion of BAME people working in the NHS and public transport is "likely" to have been a major factor, and the introduction of face masks will make a difference.

    But he concedes there are other factors and the government, when taking forward the findings of the report, will consider issues such as economic deprivation and poor housing.


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  62. #62
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    Labour's shadow health secretary has accused the government of "covering up vital recommendations" that could help protect black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people from COVID-19.

    Jonathan Ashworth's criticisms come after Whitehall sources told Sky News the recommendations from a Public Health England (PHE) review were "held back" by the government, adding "ministers have had this element of the report".

    On Tuesday, the government issued the data element of the long awaited review, led by PHE national director for health and wellbeing Professor Kevin Fenton, following suggestions from sources it was set to be delayed because of the Black Lives Matter movement.

    Data collected by PHE was published - but a "qualitative assessment", including the recommendations for the government, was not.

    The published review found people from BAME groups were up to twice as likely to die with COVID-19 than those from a white British background, but there were no recommendations on actions that could be taken to protect BAME lives.

    Sources say the second half of the report contains work which looks at "social inequality" and "structural racism" within the UK and has information from 4,000 stakeholders and organisations.

    Mr Ashworth told Sky News: "We know BAME people are more likely to die from COVID and more likely to fall seriously ill with COVID. This report needs to be published in full.

    "Covering up vital recommendations is completely unacceptable. Action must be taken to protect those disproportionately at risk from this horrific virus."

    PHE did not deny that a "qualitative assessment" with recommendations for the government was issued as part of the findings.

    It said: "Professor Fenton led PHE's work on COVID-19 and BAME communities, engaging with a significant number of individuals and organisations within the BAME community over the past couple of months, to hear their views, concerns and ideas about the impact of the virus on their communities."

    However, a Department of Health and Social Care spokesman denied that only part of the report had been published.

    "On Tuesday PHE published the rapid data review. The report was published in full," they said.

    "The valuable insight that Professor Fenton and PHE colleagues gathered will inform the important work that equalities minister Kemi Badenoch will now take forward."

    The equalities minister admitted in the Commons on Thursday there were "gaps" in the report.

    "The report is welcomed, but it hasn't gone far enough and we will take it where it needs to get to," Ms Badenoch said.

    Responding to questions from MPs, she added: "There was more I was hoping to see from this review."

    But, she said PHE could not collect data for morbidities, occupation and underlying health conditions so could not make recommendations.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...id-19-12001444


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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Technics 1210 View Post
    Biolgically speaking the only answer is DNA. Which makes me even more convinced that C19 is a biological weapon targeting ethnic minorities.

    Bascially biological warfare ; or ethnic cleansing - which ever way you look at it.
    Something isnt right My father who is of asian ethnicity and was 78 went in hospital with underlying health conditions 4 weeks back in england

    He was covid free when he went in and was put in a single isolated ward with no access to other patients and any visitors including his family The only access he had was to doctors and nurses

    Suddenly the other day overnight we were told he was dying and less than 10 hours later he had died

    Whilst mourning his death at the hospital we were told that they are waiting on covid results from a test done on him last night

    A couple of hours later we were told he had covid and that was one of the reasons why he died

    I am very angry and upset This isnt the first case ive heard in our town of something like this happening in hospital

    Is this a systematic attempt to get rid of the elderly in the bame community? Lots of unanswered qs

  64. #64
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    Coronavirus pandemic exposes South Africa's 'brutal inequality'

    The coronavirus is hitting South Africa's mainly Black townships harder than areas that were once the exclusive preserve of white people, according to new data that highlights the lasting effect of apartheid-era housing policies.

    More than 25 years after the end of white minority rule, South Africa remains one of the most unequal countries in the world, according to the World Bank, with urban areas starkly divided along racial lines.

    Townships in the Western Cape province, South Africa's coronavirus hotspots, are suffering particularly high rates of infection, government tracking shows.

    Nearly 12 percent of all infections in the Western Cape are in Khayelitsha, the largest township in Cape Town, even though it has just 6 percent of the province's population.

    By contrast, Stellenbosch, known for its Winelands and a university town, has just 1 percent of Western Cape's cases and makes up about 4 percent of its population.

    Other hotspots include Mitchells Plain township, which has 9 percent of infections.

    "We are seeing townships become virus hotspots because we haven't dismantled the apartheid city," said Edward Molopi, a researcher with housing and human rights charity the Socio-Economic Research Institute in Johannesburg.

    South Africans have taken to the streets in recent weeks to protest against police brutality in townships in an echo of the Black Lives Matter protests in the United States.

    Human rights defenders have said security forces were deployed to enforce lockdowns mainly in poor Black areas like high-density townships, where higher population numbers and overcrowding made it impossible to properly isolate.

    "COVID-19 has exposed the brutal inequality in South Africa," said Chris Nissen, a commissioner from the South African Human Rights Commission, an independent watchdog.

    "People say all lives should matter, but what about people in townships? Don't their lives matter too?" said Nissen in a phone interview.

    South Africa has more than 58,500 confirmed coronavirus cases, and 1,284 deaths, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally.

    he government is expecting an escalation of cases ahead of a predicted August/September peak and rising community infection rates in townships.

    But it is struggling with shortages of test kits, healthcare staff and hospital beds.

    The city of Cape Town has partnered with the Department of Water and Sanitation to distribute 41 million litres (10.8 million gallons) of water into informal settlements to aid handwashing to stem the virus spread.

    "We remain committed to doing all we can to find solutions to challenges in serving our vulnerable residents," said Alderman Limberg, a member of the city's Mayoral Committee for Water and Waste in a press release.

    Molopi said the virus had exposed how little had changed in South African cities since apartheid ended.

    "During apartheid, Black people had to live in sub-standard, crowded, unsanitary conditions, far from economic opportunity," Molopi told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

    "Not much has changed."

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...161408571.html

  65. #65
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    Report on virus impact on ethnic minorities leaked

    The BBC has obtained a copy of a leaked draft report into the impact of coronavirus on ethnic minority communities in the UK.

    It includes recommendations on how best to protect protect black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people from Covid-19.

    It follows the publication of a Public Health England review, which confirmed the risk of death is higher for ethnic minorities.

    However, the report was widely criticised by MPs for not including any recommendations on how to protect these communities.

    A senior academic told the BBC last week that a second report on safeguarding did exist.

    We'll bring you more as we have it.


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  66. #66
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    An official review has found "racism, discrimination and social inequalities" have contributed to the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on people from black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, Sky News has learned.

    The revelation forms part of a report by Public Health England (PHE) that still hasn't been published in full by the government, in a section newly obtained by Sky News.

    The document, written by Professor Kevin Fenton from Public Health England, includes recommendations to protect BAME people from COVID-19.

    Restrictions continue to be eased as the UK gets further past the peak in coronavirus infections

    It was put together after engagement with 4,000 stakeholders expressing the BAME community's "deep dismay, anger, loss and fear" during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    In the executive summary of this review, obtained by Sky News, it says: "It is clear from discussions with stakeholders the pandemic exposed and exacerbated long-standing inequalities affecting BAME communities in the UK."

    The review also highlighted how many BAME people are in key worker roles, meaning they "may be more exposed to COVID-19, and therefore are more likely to be diagnosed".

    The review also states: "Stakeholders pointed to racism and discrimination experienced by communities and more specifically BAME key workers as a root cause to exposure risk and disease progression."

    During the engagement with stakeholders, PHE also found that there were major worries around the second phase of COVID-19 and the impact this could have on the BAME community.

    The engagement sessions highlighted the BAME community's deep concern that, if lessons are not learnt from the initial phase of this epidemic, future waves of the disease could again have severe and disproportionate impacts.

    This element of the review was "held back" by the government because of "current global tensions" such as the Black Lives Matter movement, Sky News can reveal.

    Whitehall sources told Sky News releasing this element would be in "too close proximity" to the protests.

    But this was almost two weeks ago when the data analysis of PHE's review was rapidly published by the government.

    Responding to this leaked document, shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth said: "The impact of COVID-19 on people from BAME communities is serious, and as the data shows for many it can be fatal.

    "This should demand urgent action from ministers. Instead we have had misleading statements and a lack of transparency.

    "We shouldn't have to rely on leaks. This report should be published in full ASAP and action taken. Labour have been raising concerns for weeks and calling for greater use of targeted testing and protection for staff on frontline for example."

    The executive summary is split into five elements, including long-standing inequalities exacerbated by COVID-19, increased risk of exposure, increased risk of complications and death and racism, discrimination, stigma, fear and trust.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...shows-12005950


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  67. #67
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    Its an extremely tough time for our asian elders

    Has anybody else had any bad experience when it has come to elders in hospital or with covid during this period?

  68. #68
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    What does the UK's BAME report tell us?

    Public Health England has finally published its latest report into the impact of coronavirus on black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities.

    At the start of the month, it unveiled a review which found that BAME groups had a higher risk of deaths.

    The latest report, leaked at the weekend but now formally published, has tried to unpick some of the reasons for this.

    It pointed out its original report did not take into account occupation, which could have an impact on whether an individual is exposed to the virus, or pre-existing health conditions, which increase the risk of serious complications.

    But it also points out that there is evidence that “historic racism” and poorer experiences of healthcare may mean individuals in BAME groups are less likely to seek care when needed. It says the way coronavirus has been handled has left BAME groups angry, fearful and deeply dismayed.

    While it was unable to come to firm conclusions on the cause of the higher risk, it did say that ethnicity, racism and structural disadvantage must be taken more into account going forward.

    In particular, it wants to see better data collection, including ethnicity being reported on death certificates, culturally sensitive public health campaigns and risk assessments in the workplace.



    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  69. #69
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    South Asian people are the most likely to die from coronavirus after being admitted to hospital in Great Britain, major analysis shows.

    It is the only ethnic group to have a raised risk of death in hospital and is partly due to high levels of diabetes.

    The study is hugely significant as it assessed data from four-in-10 of all hospital patients with Covid-19.

    The researchers said policies such as protecting people at work and who gets a vaccine may now need to change.

    Twenty-seven institutions across the UK, including universities and public health bodies, as well as 260 hospitals, were involved in the study.

    It tells us only what happens once somebody is admitted to hospital, not whether they were more likely to catch the virus.

    It looked at nearly 35,000 Covid-19 patients in 260 hospitals across England, Scotland and Wales up until the middle of May.

    "South Asians are definitely more likely to die from Covid-19 in hospital, but we don't see a strong effect in the black group," Prof Ewen Harrison, from the University of Edinburgh, told the BBC.

    People from South Asian backgrounds were 20% more likely to die than white people. Other minority ethnic groups did not have a higher death rate.

    The study, the largest of its type in the world, shows:

    The study also reveals profound differences in who is needing hospital care based on ethnicity.

    "The South Asian population in hospital looks completely different to the white population," Prof Harrison said.

    He added: "They're 12 years younger on average, that's a massive difference, and they tend not to have dementia, obesity or lung disease, but very high levels of diabetes."

    Around 40% of South Asian patients had either type 1 or type 2 diabetes compared with 25% of white groups.

    Diabetes has a dual effect of increasing the risk of infection and damaging the body's organs, which may affect the ability to survive a coronavirus infection.

    Why are more people from BAME backgrounds dying from coronavirus?

    This is thought to be a major factor in increasing the death rate in people of South Asian ethnicity, but the full picture has not yet been uncovered.

    Other explanations could include poverty or subtle genetic differences that increase the risk of serious infection, the researchers say.

    The findings have been made public online ahead of being formally published in a medical journal.

    However, the results were passed onto the UK government's scientific advisory group - Sage - more than a month ago.

    The report says ethnicity may now need to be considered alongside age and other health issues when deciding who gets a vaccine if one becomes available. The same issue crops up in deciding who should be shielding and whether some people need extra protection in the workplace.

    "It does have far-reaching implications that are difficult to grapple with," Prof Harrison told the BBC.

    "Should there be a different policy for a frontline South Asian nurse to a white nurse - that's what's really tricky."

    The study showed all ethnic minorities were more likely to need intensive care than people from white backgrounds.

    This may be partly due to the disease becoming more severe. However, another factor is white people were older and sicker so ventilation in intensive care may not be an option.

    The differences, however, were not about access to healthcare.

    The report showed that all ethnicities arrived in hospital in roughly the same stage of Covid-19 suggesting there is no delay in getting help between ethnicities.

    Earlier work by Public Health England showed people of Bangladeshi heritage were dying at twice the rate of white people, while other black, Asian and minority ethnic groups had between 10% and 50% higher risk of death. Although that did not account for other factors such as occupation, health problems and obesity.

    Vitamin D and heart disease?

    Meanwhile, work by Queen Mary University of London has suggested heart disease and vitamin D levels do not explain the increased risk of coronavirus in black, Asian and minority ethnic people.

    Both had been suggested as potential explanations for the greater risk in some groups.

    The researchers used data from the UK Biobank study. It is following people throughout their lives, including during the pandemic, and has detailed personal and medical information on people taking part.

    It did not look at deaths, rather who was testing positive for the virus in hospital.

    Their study, published in the Journal of Public Health, showed weight, poverty and crowded homes all contributed to a higher chance of having the virus.

    Researchers Dr Zahra Raisi-Estabragh and Prof Steffen Petersen told the BBC: "Although some of the factors we studied appeared important, none of them adequately explained the ethnicity differences."

    Even after taking them into account, people from ethnic minorities were still 59% more likely to test positive than those from white backgrounds and the reason remains unknown.

    Dr Raisi-Estabragh and Prof Petersen added: "This is a really important question and one that we need to address urgently.

    "There are a wide range of possible explanations including sociological, economic, occupational and other biological factors such as different genetic susceptibilities that need to be considered."

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-53097676
    Last edited by MenInG; 19th June 2020 at 16:24.


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  70. #70
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    Jewish people at higher risk in UK

    Robert Cuffe

    BBC head of statistics

    Jewish men are twice as likely to die with Covid-19 and Jewish women 20% more likely to die with Covid-19 than Christian men and women, according to analysis from the Office for National Statistics.

    The analysis is based on deaths that occurred between 2 March and 15 May for which coronavirus was mentioned on the death certificate and that could be linked to religion from the 2011 census.

    The risks for Sikhs, people who did not state a religion and people of no religion was slightly lower than for Christians.

    The ONS analysis adjusted for region, socio-economic status and ethnicity.

    The risk of dying was no different for Muslims compared to Christians after adjusting for these factors.

    ==

    Death rate twice as high for disabled people in UK

    The death rate from coronavirus is twice as high for people with disabilities, according to analysis by the Office for National Statistics.

    This group saw 200 deaths per 100,000 men and 140 deaths per 100,000 women.

    Among people who were not disabled, there were 70 deaths with Covid-19 per 100,000 men and 36 deaths per 100,000 women.

    The analysis is based on deaths between 2 March and 15 May for which coronavirus was mentioned on the death certificate.

    The 2011 census defines as disabled people who say that their daily activities are “limited a lot” by a health problem or disability.


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  71. #71
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    Men from black ethnic backgrounds are twice as likely to die with COVID-19 than white males, according to new figures.

    For the first time the data took into account where people live, population density, deprivation and whether people come from crowded multi-generational households.

    Men of Bangladeshi, Pakistani and Indian ethnic backgrounds also had a significantly higher risk of death involving coronavirus (1.5 and 1.6 times respectively) than white males, the ONS found.

    Some of those from BAME backgrounds who have died with coronavirus in the UK
    For females in Bangladeshi or Pakistani, Indian, Chinese and mixed ethnic groups, the risk of death was equivalent to white females.

    Nick Stripe of the ONS said: "Analysis continues to show that people from a black ethnic background are at a greater risk of death involving COVID-19 than all other ethnic groups.

    "The ONS will continue to research this unexplained increased risk of death, examining the impact of other health conditions."

    This comes days after a report by Public Health England (PHE) found the disproportionate impact of coronavirus the BAME community was due - in part - to racism and social and economic inequalities.

    When taking into account religion, the figures found Muslim males have the highest rates of death involving COVID-19 among all groups, with a risk of dying that is 2.5 times higher than males who have no religion.

    The age-adjusted mortality rate for Muslim males in England and Wales during the first few months of the coronavirus outbreak was 198.9 deaths per 100,000 people, and for females 98.2 deaths per 100,000.

    By contrast, those identifying with "no religion" - based on responses in the 2011 Census - had the lowest rate of death, with 80.7 deaths per 100,000 males and 47.9 deaths per 100,000 females.

    Those who identified as Jewish at the time of the 2011 Census showed an increased risk of a death involving COVID-19 compared with the Christian population.

    Jewish males had a mortality rate of 187.9 deaths per 100,000, which was roughly twice the risk of Christian males (92.6 deaths per 100,000).

    For Jewish females, the rate was 94.3 deaths per 100,000, compared with 54.6 deaths per 100,000 for Christian females.

    The rate for Hindu males was found to be 154.8 deaths per 100,000 people, while for Sikh males it was 128.6.

    For Hindu females the rate was 93.3, and for Sikh females it was 69.3.

    Religion is not recorded on somebody's death certificate, so the ONS used information from the 2011 Census to determine religious group and other demographic factors.

    The latest data from ONS is but also isn't shocking. It further confirms the issue we have known for over two months now, that people from a black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds are at a much greater risk of catching and dying with COVID-19. There have been a number of reports and data collections which have all come to this conclusion, even a government commissioned review which was carried out by Public Health England.

    This analysis from ONS, which compares deaths to the 2011 census, takes into account a number of factors which gives us a clearer picture. The data has adjusted for deprivation, multi-generational households (for the first time) and where people live and how busy it is and that shows that still this community which has been hurting ever since the start of the outbreak are at greater risk.

    The adjustments give us some idea of the factors behind why this could be the case. BAME people do tend to live in more deprived and heavily populated areas, like London and Birmingham, both cities which have seen high COVID death rates.

    Many live in overcrowded and multi-generational households, an issue we raised from the beginning, but a cultural issue which has clearly had a detrimental effect during the pandemic. Almost 30% of Bangladeshi households are overcrowded.

    And importantly, BAME people have been at work during this crisis whether it's as, taxi drivers, or security guards or in the healthcare setting - they have been vulnerable to catching the disease and research shows once they do they're at increased chance of ending up in intensive care and dying.

    The data doesn't tell us anything particularly new. It's an addition to the dire situation BAME people have been in during this pandemic But what it does do is add pressure on the government to take some action and implement policy to protect this community in light of a second wave.

    https://news.sky.com/story/coronavir...gures-12010222


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  72. #72
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    People from black and minority ethnic groups in Leicester have said they are alarmed by a "surge" of coronavirus cases in "the most deprived area of the city".

    Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced an "outbreak" in the city at Thursday's Downing Street briefing.

    About 25% of the city's 2,494 confirmed Covid-19 cases were reported in the past two weeks, many in east Leicester.

    One man who was hospitalised for two months with Covid-19 wants shops closed to stop the virus spreading.

    About 28% of Leicester's population is of Indian heritage, and a further 21% are from black or Asian backgrounds.

    It comes as analysis has found South Asian people are the most likely to die from Covid-19 after being admitted to hospital.


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  73. #73
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  74. #74
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    NHS England is asking doctors and midwives to provide more checks and support to black, Asian and ethnic-minority (BAME) pregnant women because of their greater risk from coronavirus.

    Research shows just over half of the pregnant women admitted to hospital with Covid-19 are from a BAME background, even though they account for only a quarter of the births in England and Wales.

    Black mums-to-be are eight times more likely to be admitted to hospital with Covid-19 than white pregnant women, while pregnant Asian women are four times as likely to end up in hospital.

    England's most senior midwife, Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent, has written to all maternity units in the country calling on them to:

    ensure staff have a lower threshold to assess and admit pregnant women from a BAME background
    provide tailored support and advice to pregnant BAME women, including discussing the role of vitamin D supplements

    "Even before this pandemic, women from black, Asian or ethnic-minority backgrounds had poorer pregnancy outcomes, and Covid-19 has sharpened this inequality further," said Gill Walton, chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives (RCM).

    Pregnant women are no more likely to catch coronavirus than anyone else. The majority who do get it will experience only mild or moderate cold/flu-like symptoms.


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  75. #75
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    I think people need to take some responsibility too. Every time I've been to an Asian supermarket recently I've been shocked at how blasé people have been towards social distancing and I was often the only one wearing a face mask and gloves.

    Often people view themselves as young and immune from COVID-19 but they can still pass it on to elderly relatives even if they themselves are asymptomatic.

    I've even seen people posting pictures having picnics in huge groups in public areas right in the middle of the lockdown.

    Can't blame the government when people are ignoring their advice and doing whatever they want.

  76. #76
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    The pandemic tracker highlighting US racial inequalities

    Back in April, US-based Johns Hopkins University launched its Coronavirus Resource Centre to track the spread of Covid-19 around the world.

    It's now being used by millions of people worldwide, including us here at the BBC, and has become an authoritative and vital tool for understanding the pandemic.

    Users can see data on a world map and browse by country. There is also a specialised map of the US which provides data on individual counties - including virus data but also information on demographics, hospital beds and percentages of the population with medical insurance.

    In an interview with the Washington Post, its founders say the numbers are detailed but gathering accurate information is difficult because of different reporting practices within US states, and among other countries around the world.

    “Numbers in some ways instil this sense of comfort. But then on the other hand, they can be wrong,” said Lauren Gardner, the associate professor at Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, who helped to launch the tracker. “And they can be wrong for lots of different reasons.”

    The US breakdown has also illustrated what anecdotal reports have also suggested - that minority communities are being hit the hardest. In Washington DC, for example, African-Americans make up 46% of the capital's population but 74% of all virus-related deaths.

    “We’ve known for generations that populations that are poor and living in highly dense areas have these co-morbidities that are presenting for risk for Covid-19,” said Ms Gardner. “But the reality of the situation is we don’t do anything about it. If you are born black in this country, it’s harder for you to get a job, harder for you to keep a job and also harder for you to stay alive.”


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  77. #77
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    US government releases sought-after racial data

    According to newly released data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Latino and African-Americans are three times more likely to become infected with the coronavirus than white Americans.

    The data, which tracks 640,000 infections detected in nearly 1,000 US counties, was released to the New York Times after they filed a freedom-of-information request to the US government for access to the racial statistics.

    Black and Latino Americans are also twice as likely to die from the virus.

    There are currently 2.8m people infected with Covid-19 in the US, according to Johns Hopkins University.


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