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  1. #1
    Debut
    Apr 2013
    Venue
    Karachi
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    42,167
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    Flu virus with 'pandemic potential' found in China

    A new strain of flu which has the potential to become pandemic has been identified in China by scientists.

    It emerged recently and is carried by pigs, but can infect humans, they say.

    The researchers are concerned that it could mutate further so that it can spread easily from person to person, and trigger a global outbreak.

    They say it has "all the hallmarks" of being highly adapted to infect humans - and needs close monitoring.

    As it's new, people could have little or no immunity to the virus.

    Pandemic threat


    A bad new strain of influenza is among the top disease threats that experts are watching for, even as the world attempts to bring to an end the current coronavirus pandemic.

    The last pandemic flu the world encountered - the swine flu outbreak of 2009 that began in Mexico - was less deadly than initially feared, largely because many older people had some immunity to it, probably because of its similarity to other flu viruses that had circulated years before.

    That virus, called A/H1N1pdm09, is now covered by the annual flu vaccine to make sure people are protected.

    The new flu strain that has been identified in China is similar to 2009 swine flu, but with some new changes.

    So far, it hasn't posed a big threat, but Prof Kin-Chow Chang and colleagues who have been studying it, say it is one to keep an eye on.

    The virus, which the researchers call G4 EA H1N1, can grow and multiply in the cells that line the human airways.

    They found evidence of recent infection starting in people who worked in abattoirs and the swine industry in China.

    Current flu vaccines do not appear to protect against it, although they could be adapted to do so if needed.

    Prof Kin-Chow Chang, who works at Nottingham University in the UK, told the BBC: "Right now we are distracted with coronavirus and rightly so. But we must not lose sight of potentially dangerous new viruses."

    While this new virus is not an immediate problem, he says: "We should not ignore it".

    The scientists write in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that measures to control the virus in pigs and closely monitor working populations should be swiftly implemented.

    Prof James Wood, Head of the Department of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Cambridge, said the work "comes as a salutary reminder" that we are constantly at risk of new emergence of pathogens, and that farmed animals, with which humans have greater contact than with wildlife, may act as the source for important pandemic viruses.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-53218704


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  2. #2
    Debut
    Mar 2016
    Venue
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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    8,093
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    388 Post(s)
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    Wow! We don't need another pandemic.

    They better monitor this virus well.


    Bangladeshi Fan

  3. #3
    Debut
    Dec 2019
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    162
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    6 Post(s)
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    The Chinese are a menace to rest of the World.

  4. #4
    Debut
    Oct 2004
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    A new flu virus found in pigs in China has become more infectious to humans and needs to be watched closely in case it becomes a potential "pandemic virus", a new study has found.

    A team of Chinese researchers looked at influenza viruses found in pigs from 2011 to 2018 and found a "G4" strain of H1N1 with "all the essential hallmarks of a candidate pandemic virus", according to the paper, which was published in the US journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

    Workers on pig farms showed elevated levels of the virus in their blood, the authors said, adding that "close monitoring in human populations, especially the workers in the swine industry, should be urgently implemented.

    "Pigs are intermediate hosts for the generation of pandemic influenza virus. Thus, systematic surveillance of influenza viruses in pigs is a key measure for prewarning the emergence of the next pandemic influenza," the study said.

    The peer-reviewed study was authored by academics at the China Agricultural University, Shandong Agricultural University, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the University of Nottingham.

    'Mixing vessels'
    The study highlights the risks of viruses crossing the species barrier into humans, especially in densely populated areas where millions live in close proximity to farms, breeding facilities, slaughterhouses and wet markets.

    The novel coronavirus that caused the COVID-19 pandemic is believed to have originated in horseshoe bats in southwest China, and could have spread to humans via a seafood market in Wuhan, where the virus was first identified.

    The PNAS study said pigs are considered important "mixing vessels" for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses and called for "systematic surveillance" of the problem.

    China took action against an outbreak of avian H1N1 in 2009, restricting incoming flights from affected countries and putting tens of thousands of people into quarantine.

    The new virus identified in the study is a recombination of the 2009 H1N1 variant and a once prevalent strain found in pigs.

    But while it is capable of infecting humans, there is no imminent risk of a new pandemic, said Carl Bergstrom, a biologist at the University of Washington.

    "There's no evidence that G4 is circulating in humans, despite five years of extensive exposure," he said on Twitter after the paper's publication. "That's the key context to keep in mind."

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...032738586.html


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  5. #5
    Debut
    Oct 2004
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    An apparent outbreak of bubonic plague in China is being "well managed" and is not considered to represent a high risk, a World Health Organization (WHO) official has said.

    Local authorities in the city of Bayannur in the Chinese region of Inner Mongolia issued a warning on Sunday, one day after a hospital reported a case of suspected bubonic plague.

    It followed four reported cases of plague in people there last November, including two of pneumonic plague, a deadlier variant.

    "We are monitoring the outbreaks in China, we are watching that closely and in partnership with the Chinese authorities and Mongolian authorities," WHO spokeswoman Margaret Harris told a United Nations press briefing in Geneva on Tuesday.

    "We are looking at the case numbers in China. It's being well managed."

    "Bubonic plague has been with us and is always with us, for centuries," she said, adding, "At the moment we are not ... considering it high-risk."

    The bubonic plague, known as the Black Death in the Middle Ages, is a highly infectious and often fatal disease that is spread mostly by rodents.

    Although the plague is rare in China and can be treated, at least five people have died from it since 2014, according to China's National Health Commission.

    The UN health agency said it was notified by China on Monday of a case of bubonic plague in Inner Mongolia.

    "Plague is rare, typically found in selected geographical areas across the globe where it is still endemic," the agency said, adding that sporadic cases of plague have been reported in China over the last 10 years.

    "Bubonic plague is the most common form and is transmitted between animals and humans through the bite of infected fleas and direct contact with carcases of infected small animals. It is not easily transmitted between people."

    The man infected in Inner Mongolia was in stable condition at a hospital in Bayannur, the city health commission said in a statement.

    Xinhua News Agency said in neighbouring Mongolia, another suspected case, involving a 15-year-old boy who had a fever after eating a marmot hunted by a dog, was reported on Monday.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/...102948677.html


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  6. #6
    Debut
    Jan 2012
    Venue
    Sialkot
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    Reportedly Kazakhstan is experiencing a Pneumonia Outbreak deadlier than Covid-19.

  7. #7
    Debut
    Jan 2011
    Venue
    Nottignham
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    2,262
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    1 Thread(s)
    and mongolia have reported the bubonic plague : bbc heading for its is just a joke

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-53303457


    TGK 237.1 owner


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