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  1. #1
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    Myanmar coup: Aung San Suu Kyi detained as military seizes control

    Oh dear, what a shame, how sad.



  2. #2
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    Put in her place.

    ==

    Myanmar's military has taken control of the country after detaining de-facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other politicians in the early hours.

    Military TV said a state of emergency had been declared for one year and power transferred.

    The coup comes after tensions rose between the civilian government and the military following a disputed election.

    Myanmar, also known as Burma, was ruled by the military until democratic reforms began in 2011.

    The military said on Monday it was handing power to commander-in-chief Min Aung Hlaing because of "election fraud". Soldiers are on the streets of the capital, Nay Pyi Taw, and the main city, Yangon.

    In November's election, Ms Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) won enough seats to form a government.

    The United States has condemned the coup, saying Washington "opposes any attempt to alter the outcome of recent elections or impede Myanmar's democratic transition".

    US Secretary of State Antony Blinken called for the release of all government officials and civil society leaders and said the US "stands with the people of Burma in their aspirations for democracy, freedom, peace, and development. The military must reverse these actions immediately."

    In Australia, Foreign Affairs Minister Marise Payne said "we call on the military to respect the rule of law, to resolve disputes through lawful mechanisms and to release immediately all civilian leaders and other who have been detained unlawfully."

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-55882489


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  3. #3
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    Nothing changes for rohingyas, may even get worse, as military is in power. Just that this will give some schadenfreude as she was the most visible face of burma.

  4. #4
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    Lets hope the military are better then her and consider the Muslim's as humans.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PakLFC View Post
    Lets hope the military are better then her and consider the Muslim's as humans.

    It’s the military who have been involved in the genocide of the Rohingya people in the first place. And she defended them because of the power sharing arrangements she had with them. No one expected any better from the military but they did from her.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    It’s the military who have been involved in the genocide of the Rohingya people in the first place. And she defended them because of the power sharing arrangements she had with them. No one expected any better from the military but they did from her.
    Perhaps she was the one forcing the military to commit genocide.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  7. #7
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    Good! Let them quarrel amongst each other now after the genocide of Muslims.

  8. #8
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    Now military will try to infuse further liberal values by further killing rohingyas

  9. #9
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    Who cares? No one outside of Myanmar is going to have much sympathy for this monster.

    For decades she masqueraded as some sort of beacon for democracy, decency and human rights until the whole facade was exposed.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    It’s the military who have been involved in the genocide of the Rohingya people in the first place. And she defended them because of the power sharing arrangements she had with them. No one expected any better from the military but they did from her.
    The woman is a fake, evil and guilty of allowing genocide. Hopefuly the west wont come out with the same human rights, champion of democracy this time.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  11. #11
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    So the deal with the devil didnt work out for her?

    Shes back full circle but now with her reputation on the international stage in tatters

    Just what she deserves


    If pakistan cricket is to move forward they need to stop going back

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKhanWC View Post
    The woman is a fake, evil and guilty of allowing genocide. Hopefuly the west wont come out with the same human rights, champion of democracy this time.
    Her Nobel peace prize should have been revoked.


    Ki Mohammad (saw) sey wafa tu ney tou hum terey hain
    Yeh jahaan cheez kya hai Loh-o-Qalam tere hain

  13. #13
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    Good for her. Deserves everything she gets.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by IAJ View Post
    Her Nobel peace prize should have been revoked.
    Its a joke of an award , only some peoples opinion , nothing more. After the likes of Kissinger and Obama it seems those filled with hate get this.

    I see the usual western leaders like Boris are speaking out agaisnt this yet again but were mute when genocide was taking place under her watch.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

  15. #15
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    Video of the coup happening .... in the background.


  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark_Horse View Post
    Now military will try to infuse further liberal values by further killing rohingyas
    What has the Burmese junta got to do with “liberal values”? You do know that nationalist Buddhist extremists are helping to drive the persecution against the Rohingyas right?
    Last edited by Gabbar Singh; 2nd February 2021 at 03:55.

  17. #17
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    Myanmar coup: US threatens sanctions over Aung San Suu Kyi detention

    US President Joe Biden has threatened to reinstate sanctions in Myanmar after the country's military seized power.

    Myanmar's army detained Aung San Suu Kyi and other elected leaders, accusing Ms Suu Kyi's party of fraud over its recent landslide election win.

    In a statement, Mr Biden said "force should never seek to overrule the will of the people or attempt to erase the outcome of a credible election".

    The United Nations and the UK have also condemned the coup.

    The US had removed sanctions over the past decade as Myanmar progressed to democracy. Mr Biden said this would be urgently reviewed, adding: "The United States will stand up for democracy wherever it is under attack."

    UN Secretary-General António Guterres called the army's move a "serious blow to democratic reforms", as the security council prepared for an emergency meeting. The UN demanded the release of what it said were at least 45 people who had been detained.

    In the UK, Prime Minister Boris Johnson condemned the coup and Aung San Suu Kyi's "unlawful imprisonment".

    European Union leaders have issued similar condemnations.

    China, which has previously opposed international intervention in Myanmar, urged all sides in the country to "resolve differences". Some regional powers, including Cambodia, Thailand and the Philippines, have said it is an "internal matter".
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-55722226.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  18. #18
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    Wonder what caused the fallout between her and the military.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GenericBrand View Post
    Wonder what caused the fallout between her and the military.
    Military didn't agree with election result apparently.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  20. #20
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    chickens coming home to roost..


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by the Great Khan View Post
    chickens coming home to roost..
    You are way too polite bro!


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  22. #22
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    Dhaka, Bangladesh – Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh have condemned the military coup in Myanmar but say they do not “feel sorry” for de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s removal from power.

    Speaking to Al Jazeera at the sprawling Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar district, Rohingya community leader Mohammad Yunus Arman said the Myanmar military had killed their families in Rakhine state while Aung San Suu Kyi was in power.

    “She remained silent about it. She didn’t even utter the word ‘Rohingya’. Once we used to pray for her success and used to treat her like our queen. But after 2017, we realised her real character,” he said.

    On Monday, Myanmar’s powerful military seized power in a coup against the democratically elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi, who was detained along with other political leaders. The army in the Buddhist-majority South Asian nation also declared a state of emergency for one year.

    “We don’t feel sorry that she [Suu Kyi] is overthrown from power now,” said Arman.

    Cox’s Bazar in southern Bangladesh is home to more than one million mostly Muslim Rohingya living in cramped, makeshift camps – the world’s largest refugee settlement – after they fled a 2017 military crackdown in Myanmar’s Rakhine state which the United Nations said was carried out with a “genocidal intent”.
    Myanmar said it was committed to the repatriation of the Rohingya as per a bilateral agreement, with Bangladesh expecting the process to start later this year.

    Last month, Dhaka started relocating some of the refugees to Bhasan Char, an isolated island in the Bay of Bengal. So far, nearly 7,000 Rohingya have been sent to the flood-prone island.

    Meanwhile, the coup in Myanmar following a landslide win by Aung San Suu Kyi’s governing National League for Democracy party in November 2020 has raised questions over the Rohingya repatriation.

    “For the past four years, we have been talking about our safe return to our homeland in Myanmar, but no progress has been made on that front,” Arman told Al Jazeera.

    Sayed Ullah, another Rohingya community leader at Thaingkhali camp, told Al Jazeera they are not concerned about the military takeover in their homeland.

    “We have long been living under the military regime. The civilian government of Aung Sun Suu Kyi did nothing for us. They didn’t protest the genocide which on our community,” he said.

    Ullah, however, feared a military takeover means “a more uncertain repatriation process”.
    “Now that the military is in power, we feel our repatriation process is further stalled. There is no way the army would let us get back to our homeland,” he said.

    Disquiet in Bangladesh
    The coup has disquieted Bangladesh, which fears the new military government might not keep up its end of the agreement to repatriate more the Rohingya.

    The neighbours had been at odds in the past few years over the repeatedly stalled repatriation process, prompting Dhaka to send some refugees to Bhasan Char.

    Speaking to Al Jazeera on Tuesday, Bangladesh’s Foreign Minister AK Abdul Momen said a regime change in Myanmar “doesn’t necessarily impede the repatriation process”.

    “We have to wait and see,” he said, adding that Bangladesh is concerned about the coup in Myanmar.

    “We always believe in upholding the democratic process. A military coup can’t be the solution,” he said.

    In a statement issued on Monday in response to the coup, Bangladesh’s foreign ministry said: “As an immediate and friendly neighbour, we would like to see peace and stability in Myanmar.”

    “We have been persistent in developing mutually beneficial relations with Myanmar and have been working with Myanmar for the voluntary, safe and sustained repatriation of the Rohingyas sheltered in Bangladesh,” it said.

    Removed the ‘facade of democracy’
    International relations experts say the coup in Myanmar has removed the “facade of democracy” in the country, and that the probability of repatriating the Rohingya has further diminished.

    “You can’t have a real democracy when 25 percent seats are automatically allocated to the military, which also controls four of the major ministries. So despite elections, the military never really gave up power,” Azeem Ibrahim, author of the book, The Rohingyas: Inside Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide, told Al Jazeera.

    Ibrahim said the government, which denied millions of its own citizens the right to vote “was never a proper democracy”.

    He said he fears the Myanmar military will now “do as it pleases” and urged the international community to “draw red lines in with severe penalties if the military attempts to increase its targeting of minority groups”.

    “This is also Joe Biden’s first foreign policy test,” he added, referring to the newly-installed president of the United States.

    Ali Riaz, professor at Illinois State University in the US, told Al Jazeera the democratisation process that started in 2011 in Myanmar resulted in “a hybrid regime – a regime which has both democratic and authoritarian traits”.

    In that year, Myanmar started a transition to civilian government after five decades of military rule.

    “It was a non-inclusive and repressive system. Suu Kyi’s government was beholden to the military all along with very little scope to manoeuvre on policy issues. However, it was one step away from military autocracy. The coup has put back the clock. What we are witnessing is the regression from hybrid regime to military authoritarianism,” he said.

    Riaz said he saw no difference between the military and the civilian government in Myanmar as far as the question of Rohingya repatriation was concerned.

    “Suu Kyi government was representing the position of the military. The policy of ethnic cleaning was designed and began to be implemented by the military well before Suu Kyi government came to power,” he said.

    “Suu Kyi government’s connivance accelerated it further. There is no reason to think the military has any intention to change the course unless there are enough international pressures.”

    AL Jazeera - Abdul Aziz from Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh contributed to this report


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  23. #23
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    I don't know why people are making such a big deal about this. Or directing their anger towards Suu Kyi.

    She essentially had no power and was a puppet. She accepted everything the military said and even then she was ousted.

    The main architects of the Rohingya genocide are the Tatmadaw i.e. the Myanmar military. From the outset it has been them and they are likely going to become even more brutal with their tactics. They have been the real power in Myanmar for decades and in that sense only the facde of democracy has been removed. Everything else is the same.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    I don't know why people are making such a big deal about this. Or directing their anger towards Suu Kyi.
    Spot on .. the military junta is even more culpable than Aung San Suu Kyi for the Rohingya crisis. Such brain dead posters on this thread


    John 3:16

  25. #25
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    Awww. A Western puppet in detention, go cry a river.

    The West were all up for military coups, Pinochet as an example. West even sent him the finest bottle of Whiskey!

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/amp.t...ch-malt-whisky

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomaskutty View Post
    Spot on .. the military junta is even more culpable than Aung San Suu Kyi for the Rohingya crisis. Such brain dead posters on this thread
    Its not the fact that anyone holds her responsible for the crises Its the fact she never spoke up and did a deal to keep quiet to keep hold of the limited power she had

    People around the world wouldve respected her more if she did the right thing To sit quietly whilst wrong is being committed make her just as culpable as those committing it


    If pakistan cricket is to move forward they need to stop going back

  27. #27
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    She can go to hell

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaz View Post
    Its not the fact that anyone holds her responsible for the crises Its the fact she never spoke up and did a deal to keep quiet to keep hold of the limited power she had

    People around the world wouldve respected her more if she did the right thing To sit quietly whilst wrong is being committed make her just as culpable as those committing it
    She spend years trying to win back power. Do you think she was just going to throw it all away by speaking against against her own military? It was different when she was not in power. Try seeing it from her lens. She was just another opportunistic politician trying to be SC. But she isn't nearly as guilty as the Tatmadaw. Not even close
    Last edited by RedwoodOriginal; 3rd February 2021 at 14:36.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    She spend years trying to win back power. Do you think she was just going to throw it all away by speaking against against her own military? It was different when she was not in power. Try seeing it from her lens. She was just another opportunistic politician trying to be SC. But she isn't nearly as guilty as the Tatmadaw. Not even close
    One way of looking at it. She fought for democracy, and made some compromise on human rights for the thing she cared about the most - democracy. Talking about human rights would have won her respect globally but would have alienated her from her countrymen. She made her choice.

  30. #30
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    It’s not as if she’s the only leader who denied genocide for political reasons. Such people speak of human rights only when it suits their narrative.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    She spend years trying to win back power. Do you think she was just going to throw it all away by speaking against against her own military? It was different when she was not in power. Try seeing it from her lens. She was just another opportunistic politician trying to be SC. But she isn't nearly as guilty as the Tatmadaw. Not even close
    well then thats what separates true leaders and humanitarians from selfish power hungry bigots.
    She deserves everything she gets.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by CricketCartoons View Post
    One way of looking at it. She fought for democracy, and made some compromise on human rights for the thing she cared about the most - democracy. Talking about human rights would have won her respect globally but would have alienated her from her countrymen. She made her choice.
    Tbf she isn't the only leader from the region made compromise on human rights after coming to power

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornbill View Post
    Tbf she isn't the only leader from the region made compromise on human rights after coming to power
    If the founding fathers in our region had worried about human rights first, they wouldn't have got freedom for their nations. Human rights could only mean anything after the nation becomes a sovereign republic.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomaskutty View Post
    Spot on .. the military junta is even more culpable than Aung San Suu Kyi for the Rohingya crisis. Such brain dead posters on this thread
    At least with the military junta you know what you are dealing with. What made the Rohingya genocide more despicable was that it was given the face of humanity and progress thanks to Aung Sang's approval.

    Talk about being brain dead.


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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by CricketCartoons View Post
    One way of looking at it. She fought for democracy, and made some compromise on human rights for the thing she cared about the most - democracy. Talking about human rights would have won her respect globally but would have alienated her from her countrymen. She made her choice.
    You're deeply mistaken if you think any of these political elites from Myanmar to Bangladesh to India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan care about 'democracy'. It's all about power for them. Leaders of India and Sri Lanka have not found the necessary structure and environment within their countries to simply seize power, but if they could, they would have. Same applies to Benazir, Suu Kyi et all. Waving the banner of democracy is simply a way of getting attention from the West. Benazir used to do the same thing.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by the Great Khan View Post
    well then thats what separates true leaders and humanitarians from selfish power hungry bigots.
    She deserves everything she gets.
    I don't know if she's a bigot. But she was no less of an opportunistic power hungry politician than Benazir or Sheikh Hasina. Difference is she never had a chance. The Myanmar military holds all the cards, it always has. Now, simply the facade of democracy has been removed.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    At least with the military junta you know what you are dealing with. What made the Rohingya genocide more despicable was that it was given the face of humanity and progress thanks to Aung Sang's approval.

    Talk about being brain dead.
    This is a truly strange interpretation. I feel like you are failing to grasp the fact that the its the Myanmar military that is and has been carrying out the genocide from the very start. So to defend them is very poor on your part. Regardless of what you may think of Suu Kyi, all she really did was defend her military diplomatically. It was condemnable but she simply cannot be compared to the people actively carrying out the genocide.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    This is a truly strange interpretation. I feel like you are failing to grasp the fact that the its the Myanmar military that is and has been carrying out the genocide from the very start. So to defend them is very poor on your part. Regardless of what you may think of Suu Kyi, all she really did was defend her military diplomatically. It was condemnable but she simply cannot be compared to the people actively carrying out the genocide.
    I think you have misread my post. I did not defend the Myanamar military, my position is that by giving it a democratic face, that too a leader who has won the Nobel Prize, in fact what Soo Kyi was doing was giving their actions legitimacy.


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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    I think you have misread my post. I did not defend the Myanamar military, my position is that by giving it a democratic face, that too a leader who has won the Nobel Prize, in fact what Soo Kyi was doing was giving their actions legitimacy.
    Interesting point.


    Suu Kyi got played.

  40. #40
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    she was only made hero by the west by giving too much publicity otherwise she was same and also their military was too powerful for her any way


    لاا اله الا الله استغفر الله سبحان الله وبحمده سبحان الله العظييم

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by observer1 View Post
    Interesting point.


    Suu Kyi got played.
    Or she was complicit.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    It’s not as if she’s the only leader who denied genocide for political reasons. Such people speak of human rights only when it suits their narrative.
    Awww bless. It's ok for her to deny genocide cos others have done so too. When are Indians going to grow out of this 'they did so too' mentality? Or does it suit your narrative?

    In either case, taking your view, she deserves to be the fuel of hell fire, just like other leaders who ignored genocide and on the payroll of the West. Silly muppet fights for freedom and right but she ignores the plight of Muslims in her country. Guess it suits her narrative.
    Last edited by Technics 1210; 3rd February 2021 at 20:02.

  43. #43
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    Myanmar police file charges against Aung San Suu Kyi after coup

    (Reuters) -Myanmar police have filed charges against ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi for illegally importing communications equipment and she will be detained until Feb. 15 for investigations, according to a police document.

    The move followed a military coup on Monday and the detention of Nobel Peace laureate Suu Kyi and other civilian politicians. The takeover cut short Myanmar’s long transition to democracy and drew condemnation from the United States and other Western countries.

    A police request to a court detailing the accusations against Suu Kyi, 75, said six walkie-talkie radios had been found in a search of her home in the capital Naypyidaw. The radios were imported illegally and used without permission, it said.

    The document reviewed on Wednesday requested Suu Kyi’s detention “in order to question witnesses, request evidence and seek legal counsel after questioning the defendant”.

    A separate document showed police filed charges against ousted President Win Myint for violating protocols to stop the spread of coronavirus during campaigning for an election last November.

    Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) won the election in a landslide but the military claimed it was marred by fraud and justified its seizure of power on those grounds.

    Reuters was not immediately able to reach the police, the government or the court for comment.

    The chair of the ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) Parliamentarians for Human Rights, Charles Santiago, said the new charges were ludicrous.

    “This is an absurd move by the junta to try to legitimize their illegal power grab,” he said in a statement.

    The electoral commission had said the vote was fair.

    Suu Kyi spent about 15 years under house arrest between 1989 and 2010 as she led the country’s democracy movement, and she remains hugely popular at home despite damage to her international reputation over the plight of Muslim Rohingya refugees in 2017.

    The NLD made no immediate comment. A party official said on Tuesday he had learned she was under house arrest in the capital, Naypyidaw, and was in good health.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-m...-idUSKBN2A22NW


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Technics 1210 View Post
    Awww bless. It's ok for her to deny genocide cos others have done so too. When are Indians going to grow out of this 'they did so too' mentality? Or does it suit your narrative?

    In either case, taking your view, she deserves to be the fuel of hell fire, just like other leaders who ignored genocide and on the payroll of the West. Silly muppet fights for freedom and right but she ignores the plight of Muslims in her country. Guess it suits her narrative.
    Calm down dear. Who said it’s okay for her to deny genocide? Her actions were reprehensible and whilst she’ll never be punished directly for them at least being locked up again by the military is a small consolation for those she wronged.

    How does pointing out that she’s not alone when it comes to genocide denial translate to “it’s okay for her to do it”?

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabbar Singh View Post
    Calm down dear. Who said it’s okay for her to deny genocide? Her actions were reprehensible and whilst she’ll never be punished directly for them at least being locked up again by the military is a small consolation for those she wronged.

    How does pointing out that she’s not alone when it comes to genocide denial translate to “it’s okay for her to do it”?
    The fact you are attempting to justifying her denial of genocide - because other have done it - along with your sympathetic OP.

  46. #46
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    As its been proven Democracy was just a facade for her to gain power

    She isnt no human rights champion She was just another power hungry politician and did everything she could including using the west who helped create this false image of her .

    She made her bed, now the chickens have come home to roost She deserves everything she gets
    Last edited by Zaz; 4th February 2021 at 01:21.


    If pakistan cricket is to move forward they need to stop going back

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    I think you have misread my post. I did not defend the Myanamar military, my position is that by giving it a democratic face, that too a leader who has won the Nobel Prize, in fact what Soo Kyi was doing was giving their actions legitimacy.
    Nobody in the world believed Myanmar was a democracy. Their military literally had 25% seats in the parliament under the 2011 Constitution. And her perception in the West had eroded years ago. She was hailed as an icon when she was in exile trying to ascend to power.

    Well obviously she was. She wanted to stay in power. Something she had fought decades to achieve. But that is still nothing compared to the actual carrying out of the genocide.

  48. #48
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    Myanmar's military rulers have shut down the country's internet as thousands of people joined the largest rally yet against Monday's coup.

    A near-total internet blackout is in effect with connectivity falling to 16% of ordinary levels, said the monitoring group NetBlocks Internet Observatory.

    In the main city, Yangon, crowds chanted "Military dictator, fail, fail; Democracy, win, win".

    Police with riot shields have blocked the main roads into the city centre.

    The internet shutdown happened hours after the military had blocked access to Twitter and Instagram to stop people mobilising for protests. Facebook had been banned a day earlier.

    Many users had evaded the restrictions on social media by using virtual private networks (VPNs) but the more general blackout severely disrupted that.

    What Myanmar's coup means for Aung San Suu Kyi
    How the military disrupted Myanmar's internet
    Myanmar coup: What is happening and why?
    Civil society organisations urged internet providers and mobile networks to challenge the blackout order, Reuters news agency reports. Human rights group Amnesty International called the shutdown "heinous and reckless".

    The military has not commented. It temporarily blocked access to the internet following the coup on 1 February.

    Protester: 'We have to end it now'
    On Saturday, protesters including factory workers and students called for the release of those detained by the army, including elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

    They marched through the streets of Yangon as city buses sounded their horns in support. Bystanders flashed the three-finger Hunger Games salute, which has become a symbol of defiance against authoritarianism in the region.

    Demonstrators gave police roses and bottles of drinking water, calling on them to support the people not the new regime.

    "We're here to fight for our next generation, to free them from a military dictatorship," one woman at the rally told Agence France-Presse. "We have to end it now."

    Riot police block a road in Yangon
    IMAGE COPYRIGHTEPA
    image captionPolice in riot gear have blocked roads in Yangon
    Myanmar - also known as Burma - has remained mostly calm in the aftermath of the coup, although some demonstrations have been held in different parts of the country.

    The military authorities are hunkered down in the capital, Nay Pyi Daw, and have so far avoided direct engagement with the protesters.

    The BBC's Nyein Chan in Yangon says the Burmese know very well the violent crackdowns that the military is capable of. The country was ruled by an oppressive military government from 1962 to 2011.

    But now that people have had time to digest what is happening, they are finding different ways to get their voices heard, our correspondent says.

    Australian academic detained
    Ms Suu Kyi is under house arrest, according to her lawyer. Police documents show she is accused of illegally importing and using communications equipment - walkie-talkies - at her home in the capital.

    Meanwhile, an Australian academic, who was an economic adviser to Ms Suu Kyi, was detained in Yangon. Sean Turnell told the BBC he had been confined to his hotel and did not know what he might be charged with.


    media caption"We wish them to fall": Teachers in the city of Yangon have joined protests against Monday's military coup
    The coup took place as a new session of parliament was set to open, following November's landslide election win by Ms Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) party.

    Many Burmese watched the events unfold in real time on Facebook, which is the country's primary source of information and news. But three days later, internet providers were ordered to block the platform for stability reasons.

    Following the ban, thousands of users were active on Twitter and Instagram using hashtags to express their opposition to the takeover. By 22:00 local time (15:30 GMT) on Friday access to those platforms had also been denied.

    Fitness coach films video as Myanmar coup unfolds
    How Facebook became Myanmar's 'digital tea shop'
    Where else have we seen the three-finger salute?
    There was no official word from the coup leaders but AFP reported it had seen an unverified ministry document that said the two social media sites were being used to "cause misunderstanding among the public".

    A spokeswoman for Twitter said the ban undermined "the public conversation and the rights of people to make their voices heard". Facebook, which owns Instagram, called on the authorities to "restore connectivity".

    Myanmar at a glance
    Myanmar is a country of 54 million people in South East Asia which shares borders with Bangladesh, India, China, Thailand and Laos.

    It was ruled by an oppressive military government from 1962 to 2011, either directly or indirectly, leading to international condemnation and sanctions.

    Aung San Suu Kyi spent years campaigning for democratic reforms. A gradual liberalisation began in 2010, though the military still retained considerable influence.

    A government led by Ms Suu Kyi came to power after free elections in 2015. But a deadly military crackdown two years later on Rohingya Muslims sent hundreds of thousands fleeing to Bangladesh.

    It triggered a rift between Ms Suu Kyi and her previous supporters in the international community after she refused to condemn the crackdown or describe it as ethnic cleansing.

    But she has remained hugely popular at home, shown in her party's landslide win in the November election.


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  49. #49
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    Anyone know how sleepy Joe Biden will response? More sanctions? Sending amreekan democratic troops?

    Good riddance. She should be made an example of. A slow an ignominous end.

  50. #50
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    Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Yangon to denounce this week’s coup and demand the release of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in the first such demonstration since the generals seized power.

    “Military dictator, fail, fail; Democracy, win, win,” protesters chanted, calling for the military to free Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and other leaders of her National League for Democracy (NLD) party who have been detained since the coup on Monday.

    “Against military dictatorship” read the banner at the front of the march. Many protesters dressed in the NLD’s colour, red, and some carried red flags.

    Images and videos posted on social media on Saturday showed police blocking a major intersection of Insein Road and Hledan junction in Yangon, as protesters attempt to march forward. Demonstrators peacefully chanted as their raised their hands in a three-finger salute.

    Drivers of private cars and public buses were also seen honking their horns as the standoff continued.

    Myanmar’s military government has tried to silence dissent by temporarily blocking Facebook and extended the social media crackdown to Twitter and Instagram on Saturday in the face of the growing protest movement.

    Authorities ordered internet providers to deny access to Twitter and Instagram “until further notice”, said Norwegian mobile phone company, Telenor Asa.

    Demand for VPNs has soared in Myanmar, allowing some people to evade the ban, but users reported more general disruption to mobile data services, which most people in the country of 54 million rely on for news and communications.

    “We lost freedom, justice and urgently need democracy,” wrote one Twitter user. “Please hear the voice of Myanmar.”

    In a statement on Saturday, Amnesty International denounced the blackout as “heinous and reckless”.

    “To shut down the internet amid a volatile coup, a humanitarian crisis and a health pandemic is a heinous and reckless decision,” Ming Yu Hah, a senior Amnesty official in Asia said.

    “The military must re-establish all telecommunications immediately and stop putting people’s rights in danger.”

    Condemnation
    Senior General Min Aung Hlaing, commander-in-chief of Myanmar’s armed forces, seized power alleging fraud in a November 8 election that the NLD won by a landslide. The electoral commission dismissed the army’s accusations.

    The military government announced a one-year state of emergency and has promised to hand over power after new elections, without giving a timeframe.

    The takeover drew international condemnation with a United Nations Security Council (UNSC) call for the release of all detainees and targeted sanctions under consideration by Washington.

    Aung San Suu Kyi, 75, has not been seen in public since the coup. She spent some 15 years under house arrest during a struggle against previous military governments before the troubled democratic transition began in 2011.

    The lawyer for Suu Kyi and overthrown President Win Myint said they were being held in their homes and he was unable to meet them because they were still being questioned. Suu Kyi faces charges of importing six walkie-talkies illegally while Win Myint is accused of flouting coronavirus restrictions.

    “Of course, we want unconditional release as they have not broken the law,” said Khin Maung Zaw, the veteran lawyer who is representing both of them.

    Sean Turnell, an Australian economic adviser to Aung San Suu Kyi, said in a message to the Reuters news agency on Saturday he was being detained.

    “I guess you will soon hear of it, but I am being detained,” he told Reuters before his line was cut off.

    “Being charged with something, but not sure what. I am fine and strong, and not guilty of anything,” he said, with a smile emoji.

    Reuters has been unable to reach Turnell since then.

    First sign of street unrest
    Saturday’s protest is the first sign of street unrest in a country with a history of bloody crackdowns on protesters. There were also anti-coup protests in Melbourne, Australia, and the Taiwanese capital Taipei on Saturday.

    A civil disobedience movement has been building in Myanmar all week, with doctors and teachers among those refusing to work, and every night people bang pots and pans in a show of anger.

    In addition to about 150 arrests in the wake of the coup reported by human rights groups, local media said about 30 more people have been arrested over the noise protests.

    International pressure
    The United States is considering targeted sanctions on individuals and entities controlled by Myanmar’s military.

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken pressed top Chinese diplomat Yang Jiechi in a phone call on Friday to condemn the coup, the State Department said.

    China, which has close links to Myanmar’s military, joined the consensus on the UNSC statement but has not condemned the army takeover and has said countries should act in the interests of the stability of its neighbour Myanmar.

    UN Myanmar envoy Christine Schraner Burgener strongly condemned the coup in a call with Myanmar’s deputy military chief, Soe Win, and called for the immediate release of all those detained, a UN spokesman said.

    The generals have few overseas interests that would be vulnerable to international sanctions, but the military’s extensive business investments could suffer if foreign partners leave – as Japanese beverage company Kirin Holdings said it would on Friday.

    Telenor, another company attracted to invest, said it was legally obliged to follow the order to block some social media, but “highlighted the directive’s contradiction with international human rights law”.

    US-based pressure group Human Rights Watch called for the lifting of internet restrictions, the release of detainees and an end to threats against journalists.

    “A news and information blackout by the coup leaders can’t hide their politically motivated arrests and other abuses,” said Asia Director Brad Adams.


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  51. #51
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    Myanmar's military ruler has promised to hold an election and hand power to the winner.

    Senior General Min Aung Hlaing was addressing the country on television, as nationwide protests against a coup by troops last week intensified.

    The military seized power last Monday, detaining democratically-elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her government, claiming there had been "huge discrepancies" in last November's election.

    General Hlaing did not say when the new election would be held or give any further details about it.

    He made no mention of Ms Suu Kyi but said he had formed a government of "suitable ministers" and that they would create job opportunities and reopen factories, as well as prioritising prevention of the COVID-19 virus.

    The junta would form a "true and disciplined democracy", he said, trying to distance the situation from previous eras of brutal military rule.

    Foreign policy would remain the same and countries would be encouraged to invest in Myanmar, he added.

    Siobhan Robbins, Sky's South East Asia Correspondent, said the general was "trying to calm people who we've seen on the streets in their tens of thousands".

    "I'm not sure this will stop people going out on the streets but what it might do is give them a little bit of heart that we might not see such a brutal crackdown - but there's no guarantee of that."

    Protests continued in the cities of Myanmar on Monday, with video from the capital, Naypyidaw, showing water cannon bursts fired at a group of protesters for about five minutes.

    Ms Suu Kyi's government was the first led by civilians in decades, though its power was limited by a military-drafted constitution - a constitution General Hlaing insisted was still respected and followed by the military.

    General Hlaing said again that irregularities in the election had been ignored and that the election commission had used COVID-19 as an excuse for restricting fair campaigning.

    https://news.sky.com/story/myanmars-...ction-12212492



  52. #52
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    Bangladesh should offer refugee status to Aung San, maybe she could live with the Rohingya.

  53. #53
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    Police in Myanmar have fired rubber bullets during a demonstration in the capital Nay Pyi Taw, as thousands defied a ban on protests.

    Water cannons and tear gas have also been used against protesters, who are standing against a coup that removed the elected government last week.

    BBC Burmese has been told at least two protesters have been seriously injured.

    The fourth day of consecutive protests is under way, despite new restrictions being introduced on Monday.

    Both a ban on large public gatherings and night-time curfews have been instigated in some cities, with military leader Min Aung Hlaing warning that no-one is above the law.

    Protesters in Myanmar have been demanding the release of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi, along with senior leaders of her National League for Democracy Party (NLD).

    She was arrested when the military seized power. The army has declared a year-long state of emergency and claimed, without evidence, that an earlier election was fraudulent.

    Source BBC


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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    This is a truly strange interpretation. I feel like you are failing to grasp the fact that the its the Myanmar military that is and has been carrying out the genocide from the very start. So to defend them is very poor on your part. Regardless of what you may think of Suu Kyi, all she really did was defend her military diplomatically. It was condemnable but she simply cannot be compared to the people actively carrying out the genocide.
    That's weird logic, comparable to kargill
    There has been unrest in Burma and she no longer commands authority and has thus been impeached
    I have zero sympathy for her and the real victims hold her responsible for the horrible aggression and persecution they have suffered due to their ethnicity and faith


    "If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles"

  55. #55
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    It seems like Aung San Suu Kyi could do with a country giving her refugee status.


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  56. #56
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    Myanmar coup: 'Evidence' live bullets used against protesters, says UN envoy

    Myanmar's security forces have been using live ammunition against anti-coup protesters in breach of international law, the UN human rights envoy says.

    Speaking at an emergency meeting in Geneva, Thomas Andrews condemned the leaders of the coup and said there were "growing reports and photographic evidence" of wrongdoing.

    He called for economic sanctions and a ban on weapons exports to the country.

    Protests continued on Friday in defiance of a plea from the army chief.

    Gen Min Aung Hlaing called for "unity" to prevent "disintegration" as the country marks the Union Day holiday. Demonstrators are demanding the release of detained elected leaders, including Aung San Suu Kyi.

    During Friday's emergency meeting, Mr Andrews - the United Nations human rights investigator for Myanmar - said while investigators have been denied access to Myanmar, there was growing evidence that live ammunition had been used against protesters.

    Mr Andrews said the people of Myanmar had invested their hope in the UN, and needed more than a statement on paper. He called on the UN - through the security council - to consider economic sanctions against Myanmar, a ban on arms exports, and a travel ban on military leaders.

    Earlier this week, 19-year-old Mya Thwe Thwe Khaing was shot in the head and seriously injured when police tried to disperse protesters using water cannon, rubber bullets and live rounds.

    She remains on a ventilator in hospital in a critical condition. The wound was consistent with one from live ammunition, rights groups said.

    The UN calls for sanctions came as protests continued on Union Day, with reports of rubber bullets fired by police in Mawlamine.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56037305


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  57. #57
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    The top United Nations human rights body has called on Myanmar to release Aung San Suu Kyi and other officials and to refrain from using violence on people protesting against the military coup.

    The 47-member Geneva forum adopted a resolution brought by Britain and the European Union (EU) unanimously without a vote, although Russia and China said afterwards that they “disassociated” themselves from the consensus.

    Myanmar’s envoy said before the vote that the resolution was “not acceptable”.

    The resolution was adopted after the UN human rights investigator for Myanmar urged the UN Security Council to consider imposing punitive sanctions, arms embargoes and travel bans in response to the coup. The United States, which imposed its own sanctions on Thursday, urged other UN member states to follow suit, in its first remarks to the Human Rights Council since returning to the forum this week.

    Special rapporteur Thomas Andrews said there were “growing reports and photographic evidence” that Myanmar security forces had used live ammunition against protesters since seizing power almost two weeks ago.

    “Security Council resolutions dealing with similar situations have mandated sanctions, arms embargoes, and travel bans, and calling for judicial action at the International Criminal Court or ad hoc tribunals,” he told the council.

    “All of these options should be on the table.”

    The 47-member forum was meeting at the request of the UK and the European Union. US Charge d’Affaires Mark Cassayre said: “We ask all Council members to join the United States and others to … join us in promoting accountability for those responsible for the coup, including through targeted sanctions.”

    But China and Russia – which have close ties to Myanmar’s military – said they opposed holding the session at all. “What happened in Myanmar is essentially Myanmar’s internal affairs,” said Chen Xu, China’s ambassador.

    Russian ambassador Gennady Gatilov said human rights issues should be addressed through “open dialogue and cooperation”.

    “Today’s special session is clearly not conducive to that. Attempts to whip up hype around the situation in Myanmar need to cease,” he said.

    ‘Draconian orders’

    Supporters of Aung San Suu Kyi clashed with police on Friday as hundreds of thousands joined pro-democracy demonstrations across Myanmar in defiance of the military’s call to halt mass gatherings.

    The UN’s deputy rights chief Nada al-Nashif decried the detention of the country’s elected civilian leaders, including Aung San Suu Kyi and President Win Myint, and of more than 350 others, including officials, activists, journalists, monks and students.

    UN officials and diplomats alike voiced alarm at the assault on democracy in the country and violence against protesters.

    “The world is watching,” al-Nashif said. “Let us be clear: the indiscriminate use of lethal or less-than-lethal weapons against peaceful protesters is unacceptable.”

    In addition, she lamented, “draconian orders have been issued this week to prevent peaceful assembly and free expression”.

    Min Aung Hlaing, the head of Myanmar’s army, known as Tatmadaw, has justified his coup by alleging widespread voter fraud during November’s election.

    Myanmar ambassador to the UN in Geneva Myint Thu said Myanmar would continue to cooperate with the United Nations and uphold international human rights treaties, adding: “We do not want to stall the nascent democratic transition in the country.”

    The United States, which only re-engaged with the council this week after former president Donald Trump withdrew in 2018, also harshly condemned the coup.

    US diplomat Mark Cassayre said all those “unjustly detained” should be released, and called for “accountability for those responsible for the coup, including through targeted sanctions”.

    US President Joe Biden announced this week that his administration was cutting off the military’s access to $1bn in funds, with sanctions targeting Min Aung Hlaing and other top generals.

    Al-Nashif also voiced concern over sanctions imposed following the coup.

    “Any sanctions under consideration should be carefully targeted against specific individuals who are credibly alleged to have violated the people’s rights,” she said.

    “Leaders of this coup are an appropriate focus of such actions,” she said, adding that “it is of critical importance that no harm should be inflicted on the most vulnerable people in the country”.


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  58. #58
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    Myanmar coup: Fear and defiance at night-time arrests

    People in Myanmar are reacting with defiance as authorities use night-time raids to arrest opponents of the military coup.

    Video footage showed people banging pots and pans to warn their neighbours of approaching security forces.

    Mass protests have taken place since the military seized control of the South East Asian country on 1 February.

    The army announced on Saturday that arrest warrants had been issued for seven prominent opposition campaigners.

    They are wanted under the rarely used charge of "disturbing tranquillity". One of them, Min Ko Naing, was one of the student leaders involved in the failed 1988 uprising against the then-military dictator. He has appeared in a social media video denouncing the use of night-time raids to make arrests.

    The United Nations human rights office said on Friday that more than 350 people had been arrested since the coup.

    The country's elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is under house arrest.

    The military on Saturday also suspended laws requiring court orders for detaining people longer than 24 hours and for searching private property.

    BBC Burmese journalist Nyein Chan Aye said people in Myanmar were feeling "extremely insecure, anxious and uncertain about what will happen next".

    "Sleepless nights are becoming common here in Myanmar. Security forces are raiding people's residences in many places across the country and trying to arrest those who are against the military junta. People are protecting each other, staying up late at night," he said.

    In the country's biggest city, Yangon, footage showed people chanting and alerting neighbours as security vehicles approached. In a video shared with Reuters news agency, crowds could be seen surrounding and marching alongside police vehicles.

    The videographer told the news agency the crowd had at least once made the police turn back from driving in the direction of West Yangon Hospital.

    Other footage showed people gathering in Yangon to demand the release of a teacher who had reportedly been detained, and banging pots and pans when they thought police units were conducting raids to arrest people.

    As people took to the streets for the eighth consecutive day on Saturday, protesters chanted: "Stop arresting people at night-time."

    Internet memes captioned "Our nights aren't safe anymore" have been circulating on social media.

    Phil Robertson, the deputy director of Human Rights Watch's Asia division, told the BBC there were "more and more night-time raids" taking place in Myanmar, in which people were dragged from their homes in the middle of the night.

    "We have neighbourhoods now who are trying to organise. They're using pot banging when it looks like the police or military are coming into the area. It really has become a situation where the crackdown is now going after anybody that the military identifies as leaders of these protests," he said.

    Myanmar group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners has also voiced concern about overnight arrests.

    "Family members are left with no knowledge of the charges, location, or condition of their loved ones. These are not isolated incidents, and night-time raids are targeting dissenting voices," it said in a statement.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56054978.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  59. #59
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    I have no sympathy whatsoever.


    I hereby present to thee, inventor of thy round table, arise - Sir Cumference

  60. #60
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    Myanmar coup: Troops on the streets as internet cut off

    Armoured vehicles have appeared on the streets of several cities in Myanmar amid signs the military is preparing a crackdown on opposition to the coup it carried out on 1 February.

    The internet was almost entirely shut down from 18:30 GMT (01:00 local time).

    In the northern state of Kachin, the security forces fired shots at a protest - the ninth day of anti-coup demonstrations across the country.

    A UN official accused the military of "declaring war" on the people.

    Tom Andrews, the UN special rapporteur on Myanmar (also known as Burma), said the generals were showing "signs of desperation" and would be held accountable.

    Western embassies urged the military to show restraint.

    A statement signed by the EU, the US and the UK said: "We call on security forces to refrain from violence against demonstrators, who are protesting the overthrow of their legitimate government."

    The coup in Myanmar removed the civilian government led by Aung San Suu Kyi. Her party won a resounding victory at the election in November, but the military said the vote was fraudulent.

    Ms Suu Kyi is now under house arrest. Hundreds of activists and opposition leaders have also been detained.

    What are the signs of a crackdown?
    Across the country, hundreds of thousands of protesters rallied against the military for the ninth day in a row.

    In the city of Myitkyina, in Kachin state, shooting could be heard as security forces clashed with anti-coup demonstrators. It was not clear whether rubber bullets or live rounds were being fired.

    Five journalists were among those arrested.

    In Yangon, armoured vehicles were seen on the streets for the first time since the coup. Monks and engineers led a rally there, while motorcyclists drove through the streets of the capital, Nay Pyi Taw.

    Telecoms operators in Myanmar said they had been told to shut off internet services from 01:00 to 09:00 local time, Sunday into Monday (18:30 to 02:30 GMT).

    Internet traffic was at 14% of normal levels after the order came into force, according to NetBlock, a monitoring group.

    A doctor at a hospital in Nay Pyi Taw told the BBC the security forces were carrying out night-time raids on homes.

    "I'm still worrying because they make a curfew statement just not to go outside between 20:00 and 04:00, but this makes a time for the police and soldiers to arrest people like us," said the doctor, who cannot be named for safety reasons.

    "The previous day they stole into the house, cut down the fence, entered and arrested people unlawfully. That's why I'm also worrying, yeah."

    An office of the US embassy in Yangon warned US nationals to stay indoors during curfew hours.

    On Saturday, the military said arrest warrants had been issued for seven prominent opposition campaigners and warned the public not to harbour opposition activists fleeing arrest.

    Video footage showed people reacting with defiance, banging pots and pans to warn their neighbours of night-time raids by the security forces.

    The military on Saturday also suspended laws requiring court orders for detaining people longer than 24 hours and for searching private property.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56062955.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  61. #61
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    Myanmar coup: Troops on the streets as fears of crackdown mount

    Small groups of protesters have begun to gather in Myanmar, despite the armoured vehicles which have appeared on the streets of several cities.

    The military's heightened presence is the latest sign of a potential crackdown on opposition to the coup it carried out on 1 February.

    Hundreds of thousands of people have taken part in protests over the last 10 days, demanding democracy be restored.

    They also want their elected leaders released from detention.

    But on Monday, it was reported civilian leader Aung San Su Kyi would be detained for a further two days, according to her lawyer, Khin Maung Zaw,

    She was rounded up with other members of the government in the early hours of 1 February, but her detention was due to end today, news agency Reuters said.

    Her party was elected in a resounding victory last November, but the military has alleged voter fraud without providing proof.

    The news came hours after the internet was restored. Telecoms operator said they had been told to shut off services from 01:00 to 09:00 local time, Sunday into Monday (18:30 to 02:30 GMT).

    Internet traffic was at 14% of normal levels after the order came into force, according to NetBlock, a monitoring group.


    What are the signs of a crackdown?

    Across the country on Sunday, hundreds of thousands of protesters rallied against the military for the ninth day in a row.

    In the city of Myitkyina, in Kachin state, shooting could be heard as security forces clashed with anti-coup demonstrators. It was not clear whether rubber bullets or live rounds were being fired.

    Five journalists were among those arrested.

    In Yangon, armoured vehicles were seen on the streets for the first time since the coup. Monks and engineers led a rally there, while motorcyclists drove through the streets of the capital, Nay Pyi Taw.

    A doctor at a hospital in Nay Pyi Taw told the BBC the security forces were carrying out night-time raids on homes.

    "I'm still worrying because they make a curfew statement just not to go outside between 20:00 and 04:00, but this makes a time for the police and soldiers to arrest people like us," said the doctor, who cannot be named for safety reasons.

    "The previous day they stole into the house, cut down the fence, entered and arrested people unlawfully. That's why I'm also worrying."

    An office of the US embassy in Yangon warned US nationals to stay indoors during curfew hours.



    On Saturday, the military said arrest warrants had been issued for seven prominent opposition campaigners and warned the public not to harbour opposition activists fleeing arrest.

    Video footage showed people reacting with defiance, banging pots and pans to warn their neighbours of night-time raids by the security forces.

    The military on Saturday also suspended laws requiring court orders for detaining people longer than 24 hours and for searching private property.

    What is the rest of the world saying?

    A UN official accused the military of "declaring war" on the people.

    Tom Andrews, the UN special rapporteur on Myanmar (also known as Burma), said the generals were showing "signs of desperation" and would be held accountable.



    Western embassies urged the military to show restraint.

    A statement signed by the EU, the US and the UK said: "We call on security forces to refrain from violence against demonstrators, who are protesting the overthrow of their legitimate government."
    Link: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56062955


    If there is a better batsman than Sachin then he hasn't arrived yet: Viv Richards

  62. #62
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    Access to the internet appears to have been blocked for a second night running by Myanmar's new military rulers.

    UK-based monitor NetBlocks reported a "near-total internet shutdown" from 01:00 local time (18:30 GMT) on Tuesday.

    It is the fourth shutdown since the 1 February coup as the junta tries to stifle dissent, much of it online.

    Earlier, the military authorities announced stiff penalties for those opposing the coup leaders.

    Signs that another outage was imminent came after an internet service provider told BBC Burmese that online access was being blocked.

    The latest shutdown follows a pattern aimed at disrupting continuing opposition to the coup, which overthrew elected leaders including longtime democracy campaigner, Aung San Suu Kyi, who is still in custody.

    Access to Facebook, a rallying point for a campaign of civil disobedience, was restricted soon after the coup. Use of Twitter and Instagram was also disrupted.

    Major telecoms provider Telenor has said it will no longer be updating a list on its website of internet disruption. It told AFP news agency that the situation was "confused and unclear" and said that employee safety was a "top priority".
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56074429.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  63. #63
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    Myanmar coup: Aung San Suu Kyi faces new charge amid protests

    Myanmar's detained opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, has been handed a second criminal charge on the day she appeared in court via video link.

    Ms Suu Kyi, who was earlier charged with possessing illegal walkie-talkies, is now also alleged to have violated the country's Natural Disaster Law.

    It is not clear what the new charge, issued on Tuesday, relates to.

    Myanmar's military earlier repeated its promise to hold fresh elections and relinquish power as protests continue.

    Anti-coup demonstrators are demanding the release of their elected leaders, including Ms Suu Kyi, following the military coup on 1 February.

    Ms Suu Kyi made a brief virtual appearance at a court in the capital Nay Pyi Taw on Tuesday. She reportedly answered questions about legal arrangements and representation.

    Her next court appearance is scheduled to take place on 1 March.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56074429


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  64. #64
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    Protesters out again in Myanmar, police use water cannon in capital

    (Reuters) - Protesters demonstrated across Myanmar again on Thursday to denounce the Feb. 1 military coup and arrest of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi, and police forcefully dispersed crowds, using water cannon in the capital and catapults in a northern town.

    The daily protests and strikes that have paralysed many government offices show no sign of easing even though the junta has promised a new election and appealed for civil servants to return to work, threatening action if they do not.

    “I don’t want to wake up in a dictatorship. We don’t want to live the rest of our lives in fear,” said Ko Soe Min, who was out in the main city of Yangon where tens of thousands took to the streets a day after some of the biggest protests yet.

    Big crowds returned to Yangon’s central Sule Pagoda while many young people also massed at another favourite protest site, at an intersection near the main university campus, spilling into the streets as police tried to move them on.

    The marches have been more peaceful than the bloodily suppressed demonstrations seen during an earlier half century of army rule, but they and the civil disobedience movement have had a crippling effect on much official business.

    Many motorists in Yangon drove at a snail’s pace in a show of opposition to the coup, a day after many pretended to be broken down to block police and army vehicles.

    In the second-biggest city, Mandalay, protesters rallied to demand the release of two officials arrested in the coup. Police fired water cannon in the capital, Naypyitaw, to scatter a crowd approaching police lines.

    The northern town of Myitkyina was tense after police and soldiers used catapults to break up a protest, a resident said. Pictures on social media showed soldiers and rows of police trucks.

    “They’re not acting in line with the constitution nor rule of law. They are acting like terrorists,” said activist Sut Seng Htoi. Police were not available for comment.

    In the old capital of Bagan, people with banners and flags marched in colourful processions against a backdrop of ancient temples. Some protesters stopped at a temple to put a curse on dictators, a witness said.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-m...-idUSKBN2AI03Q


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  65. #65
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    Myanmar coup: At least two killed as police disperse protesters

    At least two people have been killed in protests in Myanmar against a military coup, the worst violence yet in more than two weeks of demonstrations.

    Police used live ammunition to disperse demonstrators in Mandalay, reports from the ground said. At least 20 people were injured.

    Hundreds had gathered for the rally at a shipyard in Myanmar's second largest city.

    The coup saw the overthrow of Aung San Suu Kyi's elected government.

    Protesters are demanding that she be released, along with other members of her National League for Democracy (NLD) party. She is under house arrest, accused of possessing illegal walkie-talkies and violating the country's Natural Disaster Law.

    The military allege the NLD's landslide election win last year was fraudulent but have not provided proof.

    Clashes broke out in Mandalay when police confronted protesters and striking shipyard workers.

    Reports say some protesters flung projectiles at police, who responded with live fire and tear gas.

    Images show protesters holding up what appear to be bullet cartridges.

    Relatives of one of those killed told Reuters news agency he was a carpenter, aged 36, who was shot in the chest. The other fatality - reports say a boy under 18 - was shot in the head.

    The EU said it strongly condemned the violence and the US embassy in Myanmar said it was "deeply troubled".

    UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab tweeted: "The shooting of peaceful protesters in Myanmar is beyond the pale.

    "We will consider further action, with our international partners, against those crushing democracy and choking dissent."

    Singapore, a big investor in Myanmar, warned of "serious adverse consequences for Myanmar and the region" if the situation continued to escalate.

    On Friday a young woman became the first confirmed death from the protests.

    Mya Thwe Thwe Khaing was shot in the head on 9 February at a rally in the capital Nay Pyi Taw. Rights groups said her injuries were consistent with the use of live ammunition. Police denied using lethal force.

    The military authorities say a policeman has been killed since the protests began after the 1 February coup.

    Further demonstrations took place on Saturday in several cities, including Yangon, where residents banged pots and a candle-light vigil was held outside the US embassy. The security forces mostly left the protesters alone.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56137025.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  66. #66
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    Analysis: Can Asia help Myanmar find a way out of coup crisis?

    The arrival of the Myanmar junta-appointed foreign minister, Wunna Maung Lwin, in Bangkok on Wednesday for an unannounced meeting with his Thai and Indonesian counterparts marked the start of a of a daunting diplomatic undertaking for South East Asia.

    No details were released of what was discussed. This first official contact with a senior member of the junta was so delicate that, when asked about it, Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha was unwilling to confirm that it had even happened.

    In fact for every country with an interest in what happens in Myanmar, the crisis presents an unusually thorny challenge.

    The responses of the world's military and economic superpowers have inevitably drawn most attention; the sanctions imposed by the Biden administration in the United States, and those being prepared by the European Union.

    There was a predictably bland statement from China, merely urging all parties to settle their differences peacefully.

    But China did back a watered-down UN Security Council statement, which, while it failed to condemn the coup, did call for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and a return to democratic norms, showing that China was not happy about the coup.

    But both the US and China have limited options over how they deal with the Myanmar crisis.

    The influence of the US is much diminished in this region, far lower than the last time it imposed wide-ranging economic sanctions in the 1990s.

    Yet even those sanctions, which helped cripple the Burmese economy, had little influence on the decisions made by the then-ruling junta.

    The more limited, targeted sanctions imposed now are intended to hit only those directly involved in the coup and the military's businesses, but will likewise do little to change minds in Nay Pyi Taw.

    The crisis has come very early in the Biden administration just as it was beginning to formulate a new approach to the Asia-Pacific region, one which is supposed to emphasise democratic values and also working in co-operation with regional partners like the 10-member Association of South East Asian Nations (Asean).

    But, like China, Asean will not sign up to an approach based on sanctions and condemnation of the junta.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56192105.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  67. #67
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    Myanmar coup: UN ambassador fired after anti-army speech

    Myanmar's military rulers say they have fired the country's ambassador to the United Nations, a day after he called for help to remove the army from power.

    In an emotional speech, Kyaw Moe Tun said no-one should co-operate with the military until it handed back power to the democratically elected government.

    Security forces intensified a crackdown on anti-coup protesters on Saturday.

    Local media say dozens were arrested, and that a woman was shot in the city of Monwya. Her condition is not clear.

    The country has been rocked by protests since top government leaders, including Aung San Suu Kyi, were overthrown and detained after the army took power on 1 February.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56222987.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  68. #68
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    Myanmar coup: Deadliest day of protests as police open fire

    Police have fired on protesters in Myanmar killing at least 18, the UN human rights office says, on the deadliest day of anti-coup rallies.

    Deaths were reported in several cities including Yangon, Dawei and Mandalay as police used live rounds and tear gas.

    Security forces began the violent crackdown on Saturday, after weeks of largely peaceful protests against the 1 February military takeover.

    Government leaders, including Aung San Suu Kyi, were overthrown and detained.

    Police have fired on protesters in Myanmar killing at least 18, the UN human rights office says, on the deadliest day of anti-coup rallies.

    Deaths were reported in several cities including Yangon, Dawei and Mandalay as police used live rounds and tear gas.

    Security forces began the violent crackdown on Saturday, after weeks of largely peaceful protests against the 1 February military takeover.

    Government leaders, including Aung San Suu Kyi, were overthrown and detained.

    Social media footage from Sunday showed protesters running away as police charged at them, makeshift roadblocks being erected, and several people being led away covered in blood.

    The police operation was expanded on Sunday as coup leaders sought to quash a civil disobedience campaign that has shown no sign of ending.

    US National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan said the Biden administration was preparing "additional actions" against those responsible for the violent crackdown.

    "We will continue co-ordinating closely with allies and partners in the Indo-Pacific region and around the world to hold those responsible for violence to account," he said in a statement on Sunday.

    The US has already imposed sanctions on Myanmar's military leaders since the army seized power.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56228357.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  69. #69
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    At least 10 people have been killed in Myanmar after fresh clashes between the security forces and demonstrators.

    There are reports of further deaths in cities around the country but these have not been confirmed.

    The security forces used live rounds on large crowds in Mandalay and Monywa, and at least two of the victims are believed be teenage children.

    Mass protests have been taking place across Myanmar since the military seized control on 1 February.

    The coup saw elected government leaders, including Aung San Suu Kyi, overthrown and detained. Protesters are calling for their release and an end to military rule.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56265962


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  70. #70
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    Myanmar protests

    Situation is getting worse. Security forces have opened fire on protesters.

    Myanmar sees deadliest day as 38 protesters killed

    At least 38 people were killed in Myanmar on Wednesday, the UN confirmed, marking the worst day of violence since protests against military rule began.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56265962

  71. #71
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    It's getting worse by every hour.

  72. #72
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    Myanmar coup: 'Everything will be OK' teenage protester mourned

    Crowds gathered in Mandalay on Thursday for the funeral of a 19-year-old woman who was shot dead during Myanmar's anti-coup protests a day earlier.

    Kyal Sin, known as Angel, was wearing a T-shirt with the phrase "Everything will be OK" when she died.

    Tributes have flooded in on social media, with many calling her a hero.

    Since the 1 February coup, Myanmar has been gripped by mass protests demanding an end to military rule and the release of detained elected leaders.

    More than 54 people have been killed by security forces in the protests so far, according to the UN Human Rights Office, although other reports put the figure much higher. Wednesday was the bloodiest day since the coup, with 38 protesters killed in cities and towns across the country.

    UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet called on security forces to "halt their vicious crackdown on peaceful protesters".

    Dozens of countries have now condemned the violence in Myanmar, though this has been largely ignored by the coup leaders.

    And Myanmar's ambassador to the UN, who the military said they had fired after he pleaded for help to restore democracy, called for "the strongest international actions" against the military.

    "You see these last 3-4 days how many of our innocent and young lives have been taken away," Kyaw Moe Tun told the BBC World Service's Newshour programme in his first interview since he was replaced. "What we want for the people of Myanmar is protection."

    Meanwhile his deputy Tin Maung Naing, who the military appointed in his place, said he had resigned and that Kyaw Moe Tun was still ambassador.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56277165.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  73. #73
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    Hunger Games salute used to protest against Asia’s military regimes

    As thousands of protesters in Myanmar continue to demonstrate against the military coup, one hand gesture has emerged as the movement's defining symbol - the three-fingered salute.

    Originally seen in the Hollywood film series and books The Hunger Games, the salute has been adopted widely in Thailand as well in activists' protests against their military government.

    But what does the gesture really mean, and what does its journey from the big screen to real life tell us about the power of protest symbols?
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-asia-56289575.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  74. #74
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    Myanmar coup: India asked to return police officers who crossed border

    Myanmar has asked neighbouring India to return several police officers who crossed the border seeking refuge after refusing to carry out orders.

    Indian officials said the officers and their families had crossed the border in recent days.

    In a letter, Myanmar authorities asked for their return "in order to uphold friendly relations".

    Myanmar has been gripped by mass protests and strikes following a military coup last month.

    Security forces have taken a hard line against the demonstrations and at least 55 deaths have been reported.

    On Saturday protesters continued to defy the military, gathering across the country. In the largest city, Yangon, police used tear gas, rubber bullets and stun grenades to disperse crowds, reports said.

    There were no reports of fresh casualties.

    Deputy Commissioner Maria CT Zuali, a senior official in Champhai district in the Indian state of Mizoram, told Reuters news agency that she had received a letter from her counterpart in Myanmar's Falam district requesting the return of the police officers.

    The letter said that Myanmar had information about eight police officers who had crossed into India.

    "In order to uphold friendly relations between the two neighbour countries, you are kindly requested to detain eight Myanmar police personnel who had arrived to Indian territories and hand-over to Myanmar," the letter read.

    Ms Zuali said she was awaiting instructions from India's home affairs ministry in Delhi.

    According to Reuters, about 30 people including the officers and their family members have crossed the border into India seeking refuge in recent days.

    On Saturday, scores of other Myanmar nationals were waiting at the border hoping to flee the turmoil, AFP news agency reported, citing Indian officials.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56309338.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  75. #75
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    Myanmar coup: Party official dies in custody after security raids

    An official from Aung San Suu Kyi's party has died in custody in Myanmar after being arrested during raids by security forces in Yangon.

    On Sunday the body of U Khin Maung Latt was released to his family, who were reportedly told that he had died after fainting.

    Photos show a bloodstained cloth around the 58-year-old's head.

    Activists say he was beaten while being detained by police and soldiers, and subjected to a harsh interrogation.

    Protests continue against last month's coup despite a bloody crackdown.

    The UN says more than 50 people have been killed since the military detained Ms Suu Kyi, Myanmar's democratically elected leader, on 1 February.

    The authorities have exhumed the body of one victim, 19-year-old Kyal Sin, and said she had not been killed by police as she had been shot from behind.

    Photos from the protests show she had her head turned away from the police.

    In another development, the military rulers asked neighbouring India to return several police officers who had crossed the border seeking refuge after refusing to carry out orders.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56312147.


    Bangladeshi Fan || [B]

  76. #76
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    Three protesters killed in Myanmar, hundreds surrounded by security forces in Yangon

    (Reuters) - Three people were killed in Myanmar on Monday at demonstrations against last month’s military coup, and hundreds of protesters in the main city Yangon pleaded for help after they were cornered by security forces after dark.

    In a sign of the growing Western outrage at Myanmar’s military, the European Union is preparing to target businesses linked to the army, according to diplomats and internal documents seen by Reuters.

    The junta has come under increasing foreign criticism for its attempts to crush protests and re-establish control over the country, where more than 50 people have been killed since the Feb. 1 coup that ousted elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

    Two protesters died of gunshot wounds to the head in the northern town of Myitkyina, witnesses said. They were hit by gunfire from buildings as police used teargas and stun grenades against protesters, but it was unclear who fired the shots.

    “How inhumane to kill unarmed civilians,” said a 20-year-old man who helped to move the bodies. “We must have our right to protest peacefully.” Three people were wounded.

    At least one person was killed and two wounded at a protest in the town of Phyar Pon in the Irrawaddy Delta, a political activist and local media said.

    Military and police spokesmen did not respond to calls asking for comment on the latest incidents.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-m...-idUSKBN2B005P


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  77. #77
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    Myanmar coup: UN calls for release of 'trapped' protesters

    The UN has appealed to the military in Myanmar for the safe release of hundreds of protesters believed to be trapped inside an apartment block.

    Security forces are thought to have cornered the group of about 200 people in a district of Yangon since Monday.

    The UN Human Rights Office said the group had been protesting peacefully and should be allowed to leave.

    Mass protests have been seen across Myanmar since the military seized power on 1 February.

    More than 54 people have been killed by security forces in demonstrations so far.

    According to the UN, the group were blocked from leaving a four-street area in the Sanchaung area of the city on Monday.

    Police have been raiding houses in the area looking for people who are from outside the district. Residents and a local news service claimed on Facebook that at least 20 people have been arrested in the raids.

    Explosions have been heard from the area, believed to be the sound of stun grenades used by the military.

    UN chief Antonio Guterres was calling for "maximum restraint" and the "safe release of all without violence or arrests", his spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

    "Many of those trapped are women who were peacefully marching in commemoration of International Women's Day," he said.

    The British Embassy also called for the protesters to be freed.

    In Yangon, huge numbers of people gathered on the streets, defying a curfew, in an attempt to distract security forces. They were heard chanting "Free the students in Sanchaung".

    Security forces fired guns and used stun grenades in an attempt to disperse them, Reuters news agency reports.

    It's thought that three people died in demonstrations across the country on Monday. Protesters have been taking to the streets for the past month calling for an end to military rule and the release of the country's elected government leaders - including Aung San Suu Kyi - who were overthrown and detained in the coup.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56329220.


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  78. #78
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    (CNN)Bloodshed continues in Myanmar after another violent day Thursday saw at least 12 people killed by the ruling junta, according to a watchdog group, prompting a top UN official to say the crackdown on peaceful protests is "likely meeting the legal threshold for crimes against humanity."

    In the small, central town of Myaing, police shot into a crowd of unarmed people, killing at least eight, according to advocacy group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP). Images posted on social media showed the town's roads streaked with blood and bodies laying crumpled and lifeless in the street.

    In one unverified graphic image, a body can be seen with the head blown apart and brain remnants spilled onto the road.

    The shootings in tiny Myaing are further evidence the military junta, which seized power in a coup on February 1, is attempting to crush peaceful opposition to its enforced rule in every corner of Myanmar, not just the big towns and cities.

    In the biggest city, Yangon, Thursday, protester Chit Min Thu was killed in North Dagon area, according to Reuters. His wife, Aye Myat Thu, told the news agency he had insisted on joining the protests despite her appeals for him to stay home for the sake of their son.

    "He said it's worth dying for," she said. "He is worried about people not joining the protest. If so, democracy will not return to the country."

    Anti-coup protesters retreat from the front lines after riot policemen fire sound-bombs and rubber bullets in Yangon, Myanmar, on March 11.

    Anti-coup protesters retreat from the front lines after riot policemen fire sound-bombs and rubber bullets in Yangon, Myanmar, on March 11.

    At least 80 people have been killed since the military invalidated the results of the country's democratic election, the United Nations human rights office said, and hundreds more injured. At least four of the deaths in recent days were individuals arrested and detained by the junta, including two officials with the ousted National League for Democracy (NLD) party. All four died in custody, according to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

    More than 2,000 people have been arbitrarily detained since the coup, according to AAPP, many of them kept out of contact from family and friends, their condition or whereabouts unknown.
    CNN cannot independently verify the arrest numbers or death toll from AAPP.

    Myanmar's state run daily newspaper published a notice on Wednesday reinforcing the military's narrative that it is using minimum force against protesters.

    On Thursday, the UN special rapporteur for human rights in Myanmar, Tom Andrews, said in a statement to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva that a "growing body of reporting" indicates the junta's security forces are committing "acts of murder, imprisonment, persecution and other crimes as part of a coordinated campaign, directed against a civilian population, in a widespread and systematic manner, with the knowledge of the junta's leadership."

    The "brutal response," he said, is "thereby likely meeting the legal threshold for crimes against humanity."

    He called on UN member states to stop the flow of revenue and weapons to the junta, saying multilateral sanctions "should be imposed" on senior leaders, military-owned and controlled enterprises and the state energy firm, Myanmar Oil and Gas Enterprise.

    His statement came after rights group Amnesty International released a report saying the military were embarking on a "killing spree" in Myanmar, using increasingly lethal tactics and weapons normally seen on the battlefield against peaceful protesters and bystanders.

    Gen. Min Aung Hlaing, the country's military leader, makes a televised statement on February 11. He announced that more than 23,000 prisoners were set to be granted amnesty and released that day. It was unclear what offenses the prisoners were convicted of.

    By verifying more than 50 videos from the ongoing crackdown, Amnesty's Crisis Evidence Lab confirmed security forces appear to be implementing planned, systematic strategies, including the ramped-up use of lethal force, indiscriminate spraying of live ammunition in urban areas, and that many of the killings documented amount to extrajudicial executions.

    "These Myanmar military tactics are far from new, but their killing sprees have never before been livestreamed for the world to see," said Joanne Mariner, director of crisis response at Amnesty International. "These are not the actions of overwhelmed, individual officers making poor decisions. These are unrepentant commanders already implicated in crimes against humanity, deploying their troops and murderous methods in the open.
    Fleeing to India

    There is evidence the violence is forcing people to flee the country. Between 200 and 300 people have crossed the border from Myanmar into India's northeastern state of Mizoram, fleeing the unrest, Mizoram's chief minister told CNN.

    That number includes police, civil servants, their family members, and other civilian and the number of people fleeing increases daily, according Chief Minister PU Zoramthanga.

    "We (the Mizoram government) are not sending them back as a humanitarian point of view. When somebody enters the land, the country's border, for fear of their lives we cannot simply send them back. They are not criminals. It is a political issue," he said.

    Zormanthanga added that people are given food and shelter, and many have family in Mizoram. He said it is up to the Indian central government on how to deal with people crossing the border.
    Suu Kyi accused of bribery

    Ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi was accused of bribery and corruption by the military Thursday, adding to four charges already against her that could result in a years-long prison sentence.

    Military spokesperson Brig. Gen. Zaw Min Tun said in a news conference that Suu Kyi accepted illegal payments worth $600,000, as well as gold, while in government, according to Reuters.

    The spokesperson added that the information had been verified following a complaint from a former Yangon regional minister, and an anti-corruption committee was investigating.
    Suu Kyi's lawyer, Khin Maung Zaw told CNN "the allegations are a complete fabrication."

    "I have been in politics in Myanmar for nearly 40 years, and in all these years I have not witnessed such shameless allegations" he said. "We are in a country where the people have seen lots of corruption in the past and many misbehaviors, but Aung San Suu Kyi is not in that sphere of corruption."

    He added that while he has had "many disagreements" with Suu Kyi, "when it comes corruption, bribery, greed -- this is not her, she is not that kind of woman."


    CNN


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  79. #79
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    Myanmar protests: Civilian leader in hiding vows to continue 'revolution'

    The leader of a group of Myanmar politicians ousted by a military coup has vowed to press on with a "revolution" against the authorities.

    In his first public address, Mahn Win Khaing Than said "this is the darkest moment of the nation and the moment that the dawn is close".

    From hiding, he leads a group of legislators who have refused to accept last month's coup.

    As many as 12 protesters are reported to have been killed on Saturday.

    Myanmar (also known as Burma) has been gripped by street protests since the military seized control on 1 February and detained Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of the National League for Democracy (NLD) party.

    The NLD won a landslide victory in last year's election, but the military said the poll was fraudulent.

    NLD MPs who managed to escape arrest formed a new group, the Committee for Representing Pyidaungsu Hluttaw (CRPH), with Mahn Win Khaing Than appointed acting head. The CRPH is seeking international recognition as Myanmar's rightful government.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56390137.


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  80. #80
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    Myanmar protests: Demonstrators killed in bloody Yangon crackdown

    Activists say 38 protesters have been killed in one of the bloodiest days yet in Myanmar since the military toppled the government.

    Security forces opened fire in an area of Myanmar's largest city, Yangon, with protesters using sticks and knives.

    The military declared martial law in the area after Chinese businesses were attacked. Protesters believe China is giving support to the Burmese military.

    Myanmar has been gripped by protests since the military coup on 1 February.

    Military rulers have detained Aung San Suu Kyi, the country's civilian leader and head of the National League for Democracy (NLD) party.

    The NLD won a landslide in last year's election but the military alleged there had been widespread fraud.

    Some of the ousted MPs have refused to accept last month's coup and have gone into hiding.

    In his first public address, their leader Mahn Win Khaing Than urged protesters to defend themselves against the military crackdown during what he called a "revolution".

    "This is the darkest moment of the nation and the moment that the dawn is close," he said, adding: "The uprising must win."

    At least 21 people were reportedly killed in Yangon on Sunday. Further deaths and injuries were reported elsewhere in the country. The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP) monitoring group said the day's death toll was at least 38.

    Medical workers said the number of people killed in the Yangon area of Hlaing Tharyar was likely to rise, with dozens suffering gunshot wounds.

    What happened in Hlaing Tharyar?

    The junta has declared martial law in Hlaing Tharyar and neighbouring Shwepyitha after China said Chinese factories in the area had been targeted and demanded protection.

    Beijing said people armed with iron bars, axes and petrol had set alight and damaged 10 Chinese facilities - mostly clothing production or storage factories - in Yangon. A Chinese hotel was also attacked.

    On its Facebook page the Chinese embassy said some "factories were looted and destroyed and many Chinese staff were injured and trapped".

    The embassy urged Myanmar to "take further effective measures to stop all acts of violence, punish the perpetrators in accordance with the law and ensure the safety of life and property of Chinese companies and personnel in Myanmar".

    The military-owned Myawaddy Media reported that firefighters had been hindered in their response to the blazes by people blocking their routes.

    Gunshots were heard throughout the day and military trucks were seen in the streets.

    Demonstrators barricaded themselves in with sandbags, car tyres and barbed wire when security forces opened fire. Using makeshift shields, some were seen inching forwards to retrieve the injured.

    One officer posted on social media that police were planning to use heavy weaponry.

    "I will not have mercy on Hlaing Tharyar and they will fight back seriously too because there are all kinds of characters there," the officer said in the subsequently deleted TikTok post.

    "Three died in front of me while I was giving treatment. I'm sending another two to hospital. That's all I can say at this moment," one medic told AFP.

    Several other deaths at the hands of the military were reported in other parts of Myanmar, including a young man shot dead by security forces in the northern jade-producing city of Hpakant, and a man and a woman killed in Bago to the north of Yangon.

    Meanwhile, state TV said one police officer had been killed. Three more were injured by protesters throwing rocks and using catapults in the Bago region, MRTV said.

    In total, more than 120 protesters have reportedly been killed during the crackdown, according to the AAPP monitoring group.

    Later in the evening, hundreds of people sat with lit candles raised at the main junction on Hledan road in central Yangon.
    Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56395085.


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