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  1. #1
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    Pakistan expert: Religiosity aiding spike in militancy

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Militant attacks are on the rise in Pakistan amid a growing religiosity that has brought greater intolerance, prompting one expert to voice concern the country could be overwhelmed by religious extremism.

    Pakistani authorities are embracing strengthening religious belief among the population to bring the country closer together. But it’s doing just the opposite, creating intolerance and opening up space for a creeping resurgence in militancy, said Mohammad Amir Rana, executive director of the independent Pakistan Institute for Peace Studies.

    “Unfortunately, instead of helping to inculcate better ethics and integrity, this phenomenon is encouraging a tunnel vision” that encourages violence, intolerance and hate, he wrote recently in a local newspaper. “Religiosity has begun to define the Pakistani citizenry.”

    Militant violence in Pakistan has spiked: In the past week alone, four vocational school instructors who advocated for women’s rights were traveling together when they were gunned down in a Pakistan border region. A Twitter death threat against Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai attracted an avalanche of trolls. They heaped abuse on the young champion of girls education, who survived a Pakistani Taliban bullet to the head. A couple of men on a motorcycle opened fire on a police check-post not far from the Afghan border killing a young police constable.

    In recent weeks, at least a dozen military and paramilitary men have been killed in ambushes, attacks and operations against militant hideouts, mostly in the western border regions.

    A military spokesman this week said the rising violence is a response to an aggressive military assault on militant hideouts in regions bordering Afghanistan and the reunification of splintered and deeply violent anti-Pakistan terrorist groups, led by the Tehreek-e-Taliban. The group is driven by a radical religious ideology that espouses violence to enforce its extreme views.

    Gen. Babar Ifitkar said the reunified Pakistani Taliban have found a headquarters in eastern Afghanistan. He also accused hostile neighbor India of financing and outfitting a reunified Taliban, providing them with equipment like night vision goggles, improvised explosive devises and small weapons.

    India and Pakistan routinely trade allegations that the other is using militants to undermine stability and security at home.

    Security analyst and fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, Asfandyar Mir, said the reunification of a splintered militancy is dangerous news for Pakistan.

    “The reunification of various splinters into the (Tehreek-e-Taliban) central organization is a major development, which makes the group very dangerous,” said Mir.

    The TTP claimed responsibility for the 2012 shooting of Yousafzai. Its former spokesman, Ehsanullah Ehsan, who mysteriously escaped Pakistan military custody to flee to the country, tweeted a promise that the Taliban would kill her if she returned home.

    Iftikar, in a briefing of foreign journalists this week, said Pakistani military personnel aided Ehsan’s escape, without elaborating. He said the soldiers involved had been punished and efforts were being made to return Ehsan to custody.

    The government reached out to Twitter to shut down Ehsan’s account after he threatened Yousafzai, although the military and government at first suggested it was a fake account.

    But Rana, the commentator, said the official silence that greeted the threatening tweet encouraged religious intolerance to echo in Pakistani society unchecked.

    “The problem is religiosity has very negative expression in Pakistan,” he said in an interview late Friday. “It hasn’t been utilized to promote the positive, inclusive tolerant religion.”

    Instead, successive Pakistani governments as well as its security establishments have exploited extreme religious ideologies to garner votes, appease political religious groups, or target enemies, he said.

    The 2018 general elections that brought cricket star-turned-politician Imran Khan to power was mired in allegations of support from the powerful military for hard-line religious groups.

    Those groups include the Tehreek-e-Labbaik party, whose single-point agenda is maintaining and propagating the country’s deeply controversial blasphemy law. That law calls for the death penalty for anyone insulting Islam and is most often used to settle disputes. It often targets minorities, mostly Shiite Muslims, who makeup up about 15% of mostly Sunni Pakistan’s 220 million people.

    Mir, the analyst, said the rise in militancy has benefited from state policies that have been either supportive or ambivalent toward militancy as well as from sustained exposure of the region to violence. Most notable are the protracted war in neighboring Afghanistan and the simmering tensions between hostile neighbors India and Pakistan, two countries that possess a nuclear weapons’ arsenal.

    “More than extreme religious thought, the sustained exposure of the region to political violence, the power of militant organizations in the region, state policy which is either supportive or ambivalent towards various forms of militancy ... and the influence of the politics of Afghanistan incubate militancy in the region,” he said.

    Mir and Rana both pointed to the Pakistani government’s failure to draw radical thinkers away from militant organizations, as groups that seemed at least briefly to eschew a violent path have returned to violence and rejoined the TTP.

    Iftikar said the military has stepped up assaults on the reunited Pakistani Taliban, pushing the militants to respond, but only targets they can manage, which are soft targets.

    But Mir said the reunited militants pose a greater threat.

    “With the addition of these powerful units, the TTP has major strength for operations across the former tribal areas, Swat, Baluchistan, and some in Punjab,” he said. “Taken together, they improve TTP’s ability to mount insurgent and mass-casualty attacks.”

    https://apnews.com/article/world-new...19863db3077796

  2. #2
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    Yeah no, this subject has been beaten to death. These academics need to pay their bills and anti-Islam and anti-Pakistan grift has a big market.

  3. #3
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    Still waiting for the Taliban to takeover Pakistan.

    Been hearing it for a decade.

  4. #4
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    its been longer than that. The Afghan Taliban never interfere with Pakistan and whatever it is, desirable or undesirable, is limited to Afghanistan. The Tehreike Taliban of Pakistan were menacing but from what I gather they have been wiped out for a while now.


    Kut khani hai to aa jao idher, khushbo laga ke!

  5. #5
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    I have been saying that for a long time. This country is becoming more and more extreme. The state does not challenge the extremist narrative but also prefers to look the other way. Whenever an Ahmedi, Hindu or Christian is killed in a targeted attack, there is ZERO condemnation from the PM or any of his ministers.

    When a mob lynches to death a person after accusing him of blasphemy, instead of calling out the perpetrators, educating the public about such violence and advocating peace and tolerance, the government simply stays mum.

    Just today, I saw a video of a primary school teacher in Pakistan telling students to slaughter blasphemers. Every young, old and middle-aged person is heard saying, ‘Gustakh ki aik saza, sar tun say juda.’

  6. #6
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    Extreme religiosity leads to extreme violence? Who would have thought that!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by guna View Post
    Extreme religiosity leads to extreme violence? Who would have thought that!
    Extreme religiosity makes you pious. An extreme religious person can show physical resistance against oppression only in defence.

  8. #8
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    i hear the TTP are marching on islamabad in a few days time. IK selected is also the hidden imam of the TTP and will be the new caliph..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by the Great Khan View Post
    i hear the TTP are marching on islamabad in a few days time. IK selected is also the hidden imam of the TTP and will be the new caliph..
    This made my day.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by the Great Khan View Post
    i hear the TTP are marching on islamabad in a few days time. IK selected is also the hidden imam of the TTP and will be the new caliph..
    Maybe he wont be seen for a few weeks in public, and that will be because when he reappears he will have a nice long beard


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