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  1. #401
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    Quote Originally Posted by OMB View Post
    Why India is on the brink of an unprecedented power crisis

    More than half of the country's 135 coal-fired power plants are running on fumes - as coal stocks run critically low.

    In a country where 70% of the electricity is generated using coal, this is a major cause for concern as it threatens to derail India's post-pandemic economic recovery.

    Why is this happening?
    This crisis has been in the making for months.

    As India's economy picked up after a deadly second wave of Covid-19, demand for power rose sharply.

    Power consumption in the last two months alone jumped by almost 17%, compared to the same period in 2019.

    At the same time global coal prices increased by 40% and India's imports fell to a two-year low.

    The country is the world's second largest importer of coal despite being home to the fourth largest coal reserves in the world.

    Power plants that usually rely on imports are now heavily dependent on Indian coal, adding further pressure to already stretched domestic supplies.

    What is the likely impact?
    Experts say importing more coal to make up for domestic shortages is not an option at present.

    "We have seen shortages in the past, but what's unprecedented this time is coal is really expensive now," said Dr Aurodeep Nandi, India Economist and Vice President at Nomura.

    "If I am [as a company] importing expensive coal, I will raise my prices, right? Businesses at the end of the day pass on these costs to consumers, so there is an inflationary impact - both direct and indirect that could potentially come from this," he added.

    If the crisis continues, a surge in the cost of electricity will be felt by consumers. Retail inflation is already high as everything from oil to food has become more expensive.

    Vivek Jain, Director at India Ratings Research described the situation as "precarious".

    In recent years, India's production has lagged as the country tried to reduce its dependence on coal to meet climate targets.

    India's Power Minister RK Singh, in an interview with The Indian Express newspaper, said the situation is "touch and go" and that the country should brace itself for the next five to six months.

    A senior government official, on the condition of anonymity, confirmed to the BBC that the situation is worrying.

    If this persists, Asia's third largest economy will struggle to get back on track, warns Ms Zohra Chatterji, the former Chief of Coal India Limited - a state-run enterprise responsible for 80% of the country's coal supply.

    "Electricity powers everything, so the entire manufacturing sector- cement, steel, construction - everything gets impacted once there is a coal shortage."

    She calls the current situation a "wake-up call for India" and says the time has come to reduce its over-dependence on coal and more aggressively pursue a renewable energy strategy.

    What can the government do?
    The question of how India can achieve a balance between meeting demand for electricity from its almost 1.4bn people and the desire to cut its reliance on heavily polluting coal burning power plants has been a major challenge for the government in recent years.

    The vast scale of the problem makes a short-term solution unlikely, according to Dr Nandi.

    "It's just the sheer scale of things. A huge chunk of our energy comes from thermal [coal]. I don't think we've reached that stage yet where we have an effective substitute for thermal. So yes, it's a wake-up call, but I don't think the centrality of coal in our energy needs is set to be to be replaced anytime soon, he said.

    Experts advocate a mix of coal and clean sources of energy as a possible long-term solution.

    "It's not completely possible to transition and it's never a good strategy to transition 100% to renewables without a backup. You only transition if you have that backup available because then you're exposing a lot of manufacturing to many risks associated with the environment", Mr Jain said.

    Long term investment in multiple power sources aside, former bureaucrats like Ms Chatterji say a crisis like the current one can be averted- with better planning.

    She feels there is need for closer coordination between Coal India Limited - the largest supplier of coal in the country and other stakeholders.

    From ensuring smooth last-mile delivery to demanding more accountability from power companies in India, Ms Chatterji adds, "power producers must stockpile coal reserves, they must have a certain quantity at all times.

    But in the past we have seen that has not happened, because maintaining such an inventory comes at a financial cost."

    What could happen next?

    It is unclear how long the current situation will last, but Dr Nandi is cautiously optimistic.

    He says "with the monsoon on its way out and winter approaching, the demand for power usually falls.

    So, the mismatch between demand and supply may iron out to some extent".

    Vivek Jain adds, "This is a global phenomenon, one not specifically restricted to India. If gas prices dip today, there could be a switch back to gas. It's a dynamic situation".

    For now, the Indian government has said it is working with state-run enterprises to ramp up production and mining to reduce the gap between supply and demand.

    The government is also hoping to source coal from so-called "captive" mines. Captive mines are operations that produce coal or minerals solely for the company that owns them and under normal conditions are not allowed to sell what they produce to other businesses.

    The overwhelming verdict from experts is that short-term fixes may help to get India through the current energy crunch but the country needs to work towards long-term alternatives to ensure its growing domestic power needs are met.

    As India works to climb out of one of the worst recessions among the world's major economies the country will aim to avoid any further hurdles.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-58824804.amp
    Good. Time to build more solar fans like Bhalla and stop wasting money importing dirty fuels.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhadla_Solar_Park
    Last edited by Napa; 7th October 2021 at 17:16.

  2. #402
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    What is the Below Poverty Limit in India? 100 Rs a day?

  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeetlodil View Post
    What is the Below Poverty Limit in India? 100 Rs a day?
    yes. as per UN, there were about 360m BPL people in India in 2021 which is about 28% and this is due to the pandemic induced job losses.

    Indian Data of 2011 says it was 21% (link below) and since then India had a world record of lifting people out of poverty so no one knows real number as no recent survey has been done. I would guess about 14% to be poor as UN mentioned that poverty in India was doubled during the Pandemic.


    https://data.gov.in/resources/number...ased-tendulkar
    Last edited by OMB; 8th October 2021 at 19:01.

  4. #404
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    Blackout Warning For Delhi If Coal Supply Not Restored In 2 Days

    Over half of India's 135 coal-fired power plants, which in total supply around 70 per cent of the country's electricity, have fuel stocks of less than three days

    There could be a blackout in the national capital in the next two days if coal supplies to power plants do not improve, a Delhi minister said today. Delhi joins a long queue of states including Tamil Nadu and Odisha that have raised concerns over long power cuts due to shortage of coal in power plants.
    Over half of India's 135 coal-fired power plants, which in total supply around 70 per cent of the country's electricity, have fuel stocks of less than three days, data from the central grid operator showed, news agency Reuters had reported earlier this week.

    "If coal supply doesn't improve, there will be a blackout in Delhi in two days," the national capital's Power Minister Satyendra Jain said today. "The coal-fired power plants that supply electricity to Delhi have to keep a minimum coal stock of one month, but now it has come down to one day," Mr Jain said.

    "Our request to the centre is that railway wagons should be arranged and coal should be transported to the plants soonest. All the plants are already running in only 55 per cent capacity," the minister in Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal's Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government said.

    Mr Jain alleged the coal crisis appears to be "man-made, just as the crisis of medical oxygen supply during the COVID-19 second wave."

    "There is politics going on. If you create a crisis, it will seem that some great work has been done by solving it," the Delhi minister said.

    Delhi has a 1,300 megawatt (MW) gas-fired power plant in Bawana on the city's outskirts. "All three companies in Delhi are distributors and not power producers. We depend on the centre's plants. If the supply does not come, then after two days there will be a blackout in the whole of Delhi," Mr Jain said.

    A Reuters analysis of daily load despatch data from the central grid regulator showed India's power supply deficit in the first seven days of October amounted to 11.2 per cent of the country's total shortages throughout the year.

    The data is publicly available but the analysis provides a first concrete indication of the extent of the problem. Energy supplies are under strain globally as prices surge and demand and supply chains are strained by the recovery of consumption following lockdowns to contain the pandemic.

    Mr Kejriwal today tweeted he has written to Prime Minister Narendra Modi for his intervention in making adequate arrangements of coal and gas to power plants supplying electricity to the city. "Delhi could face a power crisis. I am personally keeping a close watch over the situation. We are trying our best to avoid it. In the meanwhile, I wrote a letter to Hon'ble PM seeking his personal intervention," Mr Kejriwal tweeted.

    https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/blac...nister-2569709

  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by OMB View Post
    Blackout Warning For Delhi If Coal Supply Not Restored In 2 Days

    Over half of India's 135 coal-fired power plants, which in total supply around 70 per cent of the country's electricity, have fuel stocks of less than three days

    There could be a blackout in the national capital in the next two days if coal supplies to power plants do not improve, a Delhi minister said today. Delhi joins a long queue of states including Tamil Nadu and Odisha that have raised concerns over long power cuts due to shortage of coal in power plants.
    Over half of India's 135 coal-fired power plants, which in total supply around 70 per cent of the country's electricity, have fuel stocks of less than three days, data from the central grid operator showed, news agency Reuters had reported earlier this week.

    "If coal supply doesn't improve, there will be a blackout in Delhi in two days," the national capital's Power Minister Satyendra Jain said today. "The coal-fired power plants that supply electricity to Delhi have to keep a minimum coal stock of one month, but now it has come down to one day," Mr Jain said.

    "Our request to the centre is that railway wagons should be arranged and coal should be transported to the plants soonest. All the plants are already running in only 55 per cent capacity," the minister in Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal's Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government said.

    Mr Jain alleged the coal crisis appears to be "man-made, just as the crisis of medical oxygen supply during the COVID-19 second wave."

    "There is politics going on. If you create a crisis, it will seem that some great work has been done by solving it," the Delhi minister said.

    Delhi has a 1,300 megawatt (MW) gas-fired power plant in Bawana on the city's outskirts. "All three companies in Delhi are distributors and not power producers. We depend on the centre's plants. If the supply does not come, then after two days there will be a blackout in the whole of Delhi," Mr Jain said.

    A Reuters analysis of daily load despatch data from the central grid regulator showed India's power supply deficit in the first seven days of October amounted to 11.2 per cent of the country's total shortages throughout the year.

    The data is publicly available but the analysis provides a first concrete indication of the extent of the problem. Energy supplies are under strain globally as prices surge and demand and supply chains are strained by the recovery of consumption following lockdowns to contain the pandemic.

    Mr Kejriwal today tweeted he has written to Prime Minister Narendra Modi for his intervention in making adequate arrangements of coal and gas to power plants supplying electricity to the city. "Delhi could face a power crisis. I am personally keeping a close watch over the situation. We are trying our best to avoid it. In the meanwhile, I wrote a letter to Hon'ble PM seeking his personal intervention," Mr Kejriwal tweeted.

    https://www.ndtv.com/india-news/blac...nister-2569709
    A very big worry , unlike old days now people in Delhi are just not used to power cuts. It might prompt a mad rush for inverters/ generators again. Day temperature in Delhi is still close to 40C.


    Aaj ka kaam kal karo, Kal ka kaam parson. Aisi bhi jaldi kya hai, Jab jeena hai barson.

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  7. #406
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeetu View Post
    A very big worry , unlike old days now people in Delhi are just not used to power cuts. It might prompt a mad rush for inverters/ generators again. Day temperature in Delhi is still close to 40C.
    The time of the day when it is the hottest is also the time when solar produces most energy. India already has 2 of the 3 largest solar power plants, time to build a 100 more.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...power_stations

    100 plants the size of Bhadla will cost about $150 billion, and India has about $640 billion forex reserves. Modi needs to get this done ASAP.

  8. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by Napa View Post
    The time of the day when it is the hottest is also the time when solar produces most energy. India already has 2 of the 3 largest solar power plants, time to build a 100 more.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...power_stations

    100 plants the size of Bhadla will cost about $150 billion, and India has about $640 billion forex reserves. Modi needs to get this done ASAP.
    I agree India has lots of Solar energy potential. Ongoing BJP-Kejriwal fued will make situation worse i reckon.

    The only plus side of a night blackout for me would to gaze decent amount stars. Something i haven't seen much of in Delhi in last 30 years.


    Aaj ka kaam kal karo, Kal ka kaam parson. Aisi bhi jaldi kya hai, Jab jeena hai barson.

  9. #408
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeetu View Post
    I agree India has lots of Solar energy potential. Ongoing BJP-Kejriwal fued will make situation worse i reckon.

    The only plus side of a night blackout for me would to gaze decent amount stars. Something i haven't seen much of in Delhi in last 30 years.
    Delhi has too much pollution for those night stars to be visible. (Unless air quality has increased significantly in past few years)

  10. #409
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    Quote Originally Posted by Napa View Post

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...power_stations

    100 plants the size of Bhadla will cost about $150 billion, and India has about $640 billion forex reserves. Modi needs to get this done ASAP.
    Thereís probably a catch and not that simple which is why itís not being done.

    100 times Bhadla size would require 1.4 million acreage of contiguous land. Thatís going to be hard to find in a densely populated country like India

  11. #410
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmad-GERMANFC View Post
    There’s probably a catch and not that simple which is why it’s not being done.

    100 times Bhadla size would require 1.4 million acreage of contiguous land. That’s going to be hard to find in a densely populated country like India
    Bhadla occupies 14,000 acres. 100 Bhadlas would be 1.4 million acres. India's land area is 823 million acres. Rajasthan itself has about 85 million acres, most of it not fit for farming.

    It doesn't have to be contiguous. It is better to diversify the solar plants to get better coverage through the day.

  12. #411
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmad-GERMANFC View Post
    Delhi has too much pollution for those night stars to be visible. (Unless air quality has increased significantly in past few years)
    More than air pollution , its the light pollution that is making stars invisible to us.


    Aaj ka kaam kal karo, Kal ka kaam parson. Aisi bhi jaldi kya hai, Jab jeena hai barson.

  13. #412
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    Quote Originally Posted by Napa View Post
    Bhadla occupies 14,000 acres. 100 Bhadlas would be 1.4 million acres. India's land area is 823 million acres. Rajasthan itself has about 85 million acres, most of it not fit for farming.

    It doesn't have to be contiguous. It is better to diversify the solar plants to get better coverage through the day.
    Solar power requires a lot of land area, as you have rightfully pointed out.

    The way out is nuclear. India should invest heavily in nuclear power generation. Time to stop burning coal.

  14. #413
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    Quote Originally Posted by gani999 View Post
    Solar power requires a lot of land area, as you have rightfully pointed out.

    The way out is nuclear. India should invest heavily in nuclear power generation. Time to stop burning coal.
    Nuclear, especially Thorium for India.

    Lot of land that canít be cultivated is available for Solar. But nuclear and wind provide energy 24 hours unlike Solar.

  15. #414
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    'Fillionaire': Rahul Gandhi’s takes a jibe at govt over sky-high petrol prices

    The Wayanad MP shared an image on Twitter where he described a ‘fillionaire’ as a person who is able to afford a full tank of fuel for their vehicles amid the rising costs of petrol and diesel.

    Congress leader Rahul Gandhi on Thursday ‘coined’ a ‘new’ word ‘fillionaire’ in a bid to criticise the PM Modi-led government over the rise in fuel prices. The Wayanad MP shared an image on Twitter where he described a ‘fillionaire’ as a person who is able to afford a full tank of fuel for their vehicles amid the rising costs of petrol and diesel.

    “GOI is playing a cruel joke on our public,” Rahul Gandhi tweeted using the hashtag TaxExtortion.

    This word, however, was earlier used by Congress leader Shashi Tharoor in February when fuel prices soared.

    Rahul Gandhi earlier this week on two occasions criticised the Union government for not addressing the fuel price hikes. He cited news reports and claimed that the PM Modi-led government’s high taxes on petrol and diesel have increased the burden on the common man.

    Petrol and diesel prices on Thursday rose by 35 paise per litre each, according to a report by PTI. The increase took rates of petrol and diesel to record highs across the country. The price of petrol rose to ₹106.54 in the national capital Delhi while Mumbai saw petrol prices reach a record ₹112.44 per litre. Diesel prices rose to ₹103.26 a litre in Mumbai while Delhi saw diesel prices reach ₹95.27.

    Petrol prices have already crossed ₹100-litre mark or more in all major cities of the nation. Rajasthan’s Ganganagar recorded the costliest petrol price with ₹118.59 a litre and diesel is being charged at ₹109.41 per litre. Thursday’s rise in petrol prices is the 18th increase in petrol price and 21st time that diesel rates spiked after ending a three-week-long hiatus in rate revision in the last week of September, according to a report by news agency PTI.

    https://www.hindustantimes.com/india...821057842.html

  16. #415
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    Somehow thanks to IT our foreign reserves keep rising, can anyone point to what BJP has done to facilitate Foreign reserves?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JaDed View Post
    Somehow thanks to IT our foreign reserves keep rising, can anyone point to what BJP has done to facilitate Foreign reserves?
    When a nation makes economic progress, one can always credit the private sector instead of the government. Growth of the auto, pharma, IT etc. all can be credited to the private sector.

    So does any government deserve any credit for any economic growth? I would say that the government creates and maintains the conditions (infrastructure, security etc.) for the private sector to be successful.

  18. #417
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    Quote Originally Posted by Napa View Post
    When a nation makes economic progress, one can always credit the private sector instead of the government. Growth of the auto, pharma, IT etc. all can be credited to the private sector.

    So does any government deserve any credit for any economic growth? I would say that the government creates and maintains the conditions (infrastructure, security etc.) for the private sector to be successful.
    Understood so you are crediting N rao Manmohan Singh 1991-1996 and Upa1 and 2.

    Didnít BJp oppose these systems in 1991?

  19. #418
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaDed View Post
    Understood so you are crediting N rao Manmohan Singh 1991-1996 and Upa1 and 2.

    Didnít BJp oppose these systems in 1991?
    Sure MMS and especially N Rao deserve credit. BJP was doing what opposition parties do

  20. #419
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaDed View Post
    Understood so you are crediting N rao Manmohan Singh 1991-1996 and Upa1 and 2.

    Didnít BJp oppose these systems in 1991?
    PVNR 1991 to 1996 do deserve credit.

    But what did UPA 1 and 2 do? Except corruption.

  21. #420
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricketjoshila View Post
    PVNR 1991 to 1996 do deserve credit.

    But what did UPA 1 and 2 do? Except corruption.
    UPA 1 and 2 had okay growth rates except for the financial crisis year of 2008.

    Name:  Screen Shot 2021-10-23 at 2.35.34 AM.jpg
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    https://data.worldbank.org/indicator...=IN&start=2004


  22. #421
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    Quote Originally Posted by Napa View Post
    UPA 1 and 2 had okay growth rates except for the financial crisis year of 2008.

    Name:  Screen Shot 2021-10-23 at 2.35.34 AM.jpg
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    https://data.worldbank.org/indicator...=IN&start=2004
    UPA 2 was an economic disaster.

    Between 2008-2013, India was averaging 10%+ in inflation. India's best economic phase was between 2003-2007, high growth with low inflation. Vajpayee also deserves a lot of credit for his privatisation initiatives.

    Modi's biggest economic success was keeping inflation under control. Modi dropped the ball on the economy around 2018-19, and now the pandemic seems to have come as a blessing in disguise for India as we are now seeing some major reforms from the government (Air India privatisation, Retrospective Tax reform etc.)

    If the labour and farm reforms, which are currently in limbo, are implemented it bodes well for the Indian economy for the coming decade.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dead Ball View Post
    UPA 2 was an economic disaster.

    Between 2008-2013, India was averaging 10%+ in inflation. India's best economic phase was between 2003-2007, high growth with low inflation. Vajpayee also deserves a lot of credit for his privatisation initiatives.

    Modi's biggest economic success was keeping inflation under control. Modi dropped the ball on the economy around 2018-19, and now the pandemic seems to have come as a blessing in disguise for India as we are now seeing some major reforms from the government (Air India privatisation, Retrospective Tax reform etc.)

    If the labour and farm reforms, which are currently in limbo, are implemented it bodes well for the Indian economy for the coming decade.
    That is true. Modi has been much more decisive in introducing much needed changes to the legal infrastructure.

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