[VIDEO] Taliban say they want peace, will respect women's rights under Islamic law - Page 2


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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhenSultansBowled View Post
    Women who used to worlk at Kabul Airport have started coming back to their jobs:



    Slowly and steadily!
    Looks a lot like women from Dubai international airport

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahmedzee View Post
    Looks a lot like women from Dubai international airport
    No. Women in Dubai International airport are a lot different. There maybe about 5% of woemn who dress like this and that too their faces aare unveiled.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tubs View Post
    Did I say anything about anyone intervening? I am simply saying that their comment about respecting women's rights under Islamic law was an oxymoron.
    Yes, I already addressed this in an earlier post. To us it seems that way, but they don't have our western mindset so all this talk about archaic religious texts is going right over their heads for the most part.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by OMB View Post
    No. Women in Dubai International airport are a lot different. There maybe about 5% of woemn who dress like this and that too their faces aare unveiled.
    Oh yeah, they at times don't wear Niqaab, you are absolutely correct.
    Though they're on their phones all the time, hence the massive line up at the immigration

  5. #85
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    Yet another rally in favor of IEA by Afghan women.

    This time in Maymana (Faryab province):


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  7. #86
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    ISLAMABAD, Sept 15 (Reuters) - Afghanistan's women's soccer team has left for neighbouring Pakistan, the information minister in Islamabad said on Tuesday, as questions linger over the status of female athletes under Taliban rule.

    "We welcome Afghanistan women football team, they arrived at Torkham Border from Afghanistan," said Fawad Chaudhry, Pakistan's information minister, in a Tweet, adding they were received by a representative of the Pakistan Football Federation.

    Chaudhry gave no details and it was not immediately clear how many players had entered the country and what their plans were.

    The departure is part of a broader exodus of Afghan intellectuals and public figures, especially women, since the Taliban took over the country a month ago.

    When the Islamist group last ruled Afghanistan two decades ago, girls were not allowed to attend school and women were banned from work and education. Women were barred from sports and that is likely to continue in this regime as well.

    A Taliban representative last week told Australian broadcaster SBS that he did not think women would be allowed to play cricket because it was "not necessary" and would be against Islam.

    "Islam and the Islamic Emirate do not allow women to play cricket or play the kind of sports where they get exposed," SBS quoted the deputy head of the Taliban's cultural commission, Ahmadullah Wasiq, as saying.

    Several former and current women football players fled the country following the Taliban takeover, while a former captain of the team urged players still in Afghanistan to burn their sports gear and delete their social media accounts to avoid reprisals. read more

    The sport's governing body FIFA said last month it was working to evacuate those remaining in the country


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  8. #87
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    Heroines' welcome for Afghan female soccer team and their families in Lahore:

    Last edited by Last Monetarist; 19th September 2021 at 01:58.

  9. #88
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    https://www.dawn.com/news/1647044

    Girls were excluded from returning to secondary school in Afghanistan on Saturday, after the country's new Taliban rulers ordered only boys and male teachers back to the classroom.

  10. #89
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    Afghanistan women’s soccer team escapes to Pakistan

    Female players from Afghanistan’s junior national soccer team have crossed the border into Pakistan.

    The girls had spent the past month in hiding amid fears of a crackdown on women’s rights by the Taliban.

    Members of the women’s side flew out of Kabul last month but the youth team were reportedly left stranded as they lacked passports and other documents.

    Thirty-two players and their families won visas after the charity “Football for Peace” lobbied Pakistan.

    An official with Pakistan’s Football Federation said the group, totalling 81 people, would be housed at the federation’s headquarters in the eastern city of Lahore. A further 34 people were to arrive on Thursday he said.

    The players will remain in Pakistan under tight security for 30 days before applying for asylum in third countries, the official said.

    The Independent newspaper recently revealed that the players had written to Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan to ask for permission to urgently enter the country.

    The letter claimed that the girls were at risk of “grave threats” from the Taliban.

    After the fall of Kabul a month ago, players were warned by the national team’s former captain, Khalida Popal, to delete pictures of themselves playing on social media and to burn their kits to protect themselves from potential reprisals from the new regime.

    Last week the deputy head of the Taliban’s cultural commission, Ahmadullah Wasiq, cast doubt over the future of women’s sport in the country when he said it was considered neither appropriate nor necessary in response to a question about the fate of the women’s cricket team.

    “In cricket, they might face a situation where their face and body will not be covered. Islam does not allow women to be seen like this,” Wasiq said.

    “It is the media era, and there will be photos and videos, and then people watch it. Islam and the Islamic Emirate [Afghanistan] do not allow women to play cricket or play the kind of sports where they get exposed.”

    Women were barred from participating in sports during the Taliban’s last spell in power from 1996-2001.

    Their departure is part of a wider exodus of Afghan sports and cultural stars amid fears of a crackdown on women’s rights following the takeover of the country by the Taliban after foreign forces withdrew. (BBC Sport)

    https://www.sundayobserver.lk/2021/0...capes-pakistan

  11. #90
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    About two dozen women activists protested outside Afghanistan's women's ministry on Sunday after it was closed by Taliban officials in power in Kabul and replaced by their Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice.

    Female staff said they had been trying to return to work at the ministry for several weeks since the Taliban takeover last month, only to be told to go home.

    The sign outside the Ministry of Women's Affairs has been replaced by one for the Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice.

    “The Ministry of Women's Affairs must be reactivated,” said Baseera Tawana, one of the protesters outside the building. “The removal of women means the removal of human beings.”


    When Taliban Islamists were in power from 1996-2001, girls were not allowed to attend school and women were banned from work and education.

    During that period, the Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice became known as the group's moral police, enforcing its interpretation of Sharia that includes a strict dress code and public executions and floggings.

    The protest came a day after some girls returned to primary schools with gender-segregated classes, but older girls faced an anxious wait with no clarity over if and when they would be able to resume their studies.

    “You cannot suppress the voice of Afghan women by keeping girls at home and restricting them, as well as by not allowing them to go to school,” said protester Taranum Sayeedi.

    “The women of Afghanistan today are not the women of 26 years ago.”

    The protest lasted for about 10 minutes. After a short verbal confrontation with a man, the women got into cars and left, as Taliban in two cars observed from nearby. Over the past months, Taliban fighters broke up several women’s protests by force.

    Taliban officials have said they will not return to their fundamentalist policies, including the ban on girls receiving an education.

    Kabul municipality to female workers: stay home
    Meanwhile, the interim mayor of Afghanistan’s capital said on Sunday that female employees in the Kabul city government had been told to stay home, with work only allowed for those who could not be replaced by men.

    In his first news conference since being appointed by the Taliban, Mayor Hamdullah Namony said that before the Taliban takeover last month, just under one-third of close to 3,000 city employees were women, and that they had worked in all departments.

    Namony said the female employees had been ordered to stay home, pending a further decision. He said exceptions had been made for women who could not be replaced by men, including some in the design and engineering departments and the attendants of public toilets for women. Namony did not say how many female employees had been forced to stay home.

    “There are some areas that men can’t do it, we have to ask our female staff to fulfil their duties, there is no alternative for it,” he said.

    Across Afghanistan, women in many areas have been told to stay home from jobs, both in the public and private sectors. However, the Taliban have not yet announced a uniform policy. The comments by the Kabul mayor were unusually specific and affected a large female workforce that had been involved in running a sprawling city of more than five million people.

    Elsewhere, about 30 women, many of them young, held a news conference in a basement of a home tucked away in a Kabul neighbourhood. Marzia Ahmadi, a rights activist and government employee now forced to sit at home, said they would demand the Taliban re-open public spaces to women.

    “It’s our right,” she said. “We want to talk to them. We want to tell them that we have the same rights as they have.”

    Most of the participants said they would try to leave the country if they had an opportunity.

    Namony also said the new government had begun removing security barriers in Kabul, a city that has endured frequent bombing and shooting attacks over the years. Such barriers — erected near ministries, embassies and private homes of politicians and warlords — had been commonplace in Kabul for years.

    The mayor said private citizens would be charged for the work of taking down the barriers. While he said most barriers had been removed, reporters touring the city noted that barriers outside most government installations and embassies had been left in place.

    'Our people need help'
    Witnesses, meanwhile, said an explosion targeted a Taliban vehicle in the eastern provincial city of Jalalabad, and hospital officials said five people were killed in the second such deadly blast in as many days in the militant Islamic State (IS) group stronghold.

    The Taliban and IS extremists are enemies and fought each other even before the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan last month.

    Hospital officials in Jalalabad said they received the bodies of five people killed in the explosion. Among the dead were two civilians, including a child, and three others who according to witnesses were in a targeted border police vehicle and were believed to be Taliban.

    The Taliban were not immediately available for comment about possible casualties among their ranks.

    On Saturday, three explosions targeted Taliban vehicles in Jalalabad, killing three people and wounding 20, witnesses said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

    With the Taliban facing major economic and security problems as they attempt to govern, a growing challenge by IS militants would further stretch their resources.

    The Taliban have tried to present themselves as guarantors of security, in hopes that this will win them support from a public still widely suspicious of their intentions. Under the previous government, a rise in crime had been a major concern for ordinary Afghans.

    Perhaps the toughest challenge faced by the new Taliban rulers is the accelerated economic downturn. Even before the Taliban takeover, Afghanistan was plagued by major problems, including large-scale poverty, drought and heavy reliance on foreign aid for the state budget.

    In a sign of growing desperation, street markets have sprung up in Kabul where residents are selling their belongings. Some of the sellers are Afghans hoping to leave the country, while others are forced to offer their meagre belongings in hopes of getting money for the next meal.

    “Our people need help, they need jobs, they need immediate help, they are not selling their household belongings for choice here,” said Kabul resident Zahid Ismail Khan, who was watching the activity in one of the impromptu markets.

    “For a short-term people might try to find a way to live, but they would have no other choice to turn to begging in a longer term,” he said.

    DAWN


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  12. #91
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    "We Will Not Remain Silent": Afghan Woman Business Leader On Taliban Rule

    Taliban have increasingly excluded women from public life since sweeping to power in mid-August.

    An Afghan business leader who employs hundreds of women on her saffron fields has vowed to speak up for the rights of her workers, and "not remain silent" under Taliban rule.
    The hardliners have increasingly excluded women from public life since sweeping to power in mid-August, pushing many female entrepreneurs to flee the country or go into hiding.

    Many fear a return to their brutally oppressive rule from 1996 to 2001 when women were effectively banned from going to school or work, and only allowed to leave the house with a male relative.

    "We will raise our voice so that it reaches their ears," said Shafiqeh Attai, who started her saffron company in the western city of Herat in 2007.

    "No matter what happens we won't just sit at home, because we have worked very hard."

    'We will not remain silent'

    Attai's business, the Pashton Zarghon Saffron Women's Company, produces, processes, packages and exports the world's most expensive spice with an almost exclusively female workforce.

    More than 1,000 women pick the brightly coloured crocuses across the company's 25 hectares (60 acres) of land in the Pashton Zarghon district of Herat Province, which borders Iran.

    Another 55 hectares are independently owned and operate under the collective that Attai set up for women saffron pickers, who are represented by union leaders.

    Employing women allows them to be breadwinners for their families, Attai said, enabling them to send their children to school, and to buy them clothing and other essentials.

    "I worked hard to establish my business," the 40-year-old said. "We don't want to sit quietly and be ignored. Even if they ignore us, we will not remain silent."

    Alternative to opium

    The ousted, Western-backed government encouraged farmers to grow the spice -- used in dishes from biryani to paella -- in a bid to wean them away from Afghanistan's huge and problematic poppy industry.

    Still, the country remains by far the world's biggest producer of opium and heroin, supplying between 80 and 90 percent of global output.

    During their previous stint in power, the Taliban -- who used the sale of opium to fund their insurgency -- destroyed much of the crop ostensibly to eradicate it, though critics said it was to drive up the value of their huge stockpiles.

    The cultivation of poppies has again surged in recent years, as poverty and instability increased. Afghanistan's production area is now roughly four times larger now than in 2002, according to the United Nations.

    'Red gold'

    Herat Province produces the vast majority of Afghanistan's saffron.

    At more than $5,000 per kilogram (2.2 pounds), saffron is the world's most expensive spice, and Attai's company produces between 200 and 500 kilos each year.

    The pistil of the flower has for centuries been used around the world in cooking, perfumes, medicines, tea and even as an aphrodisiac -- and because of its high price has been dubbed "red gold" by those who rely on its cultivation.

    Best grown in the baking hot sun, the bright purple saffron flowers are harvested in October and November by armies of workers, many of them women in their fifties and sixties, who start picking at dawn before the plants wilt later in the day.

    Labourers then prise apart the delicate lilac leaves, vivid red stigmas and pale yellow stamens -- painstaking work that demands concentration and skill.

    'Hard work'

    Attai is concerned not just about the future of her business, but also for women across Afghanistan who are living in limbo, uncertain about jobs, education and representation in government.

    "Now that the government of the Islamic Emirate is here we are very worried that they will block our work," she said.

    "They haven't given girls the permission to go back to school and university, and they haven't given any women posts in the government -- I am worried about what will happen," she added.

    "I'm not just thinking about myself, I'm thinking about all those that this business supports to run their homes," she said, noting that some of her employees are the sole breadwinners in their families.

    "I am worried that 20 years of hard work by these women will go to waste."

    'Cannot be ignored'


    In the 20 years between the US-led ouster of the Taliban in 2001 and the Islamists' return, many women became business leaders, particularly in cities like Herat.

    Long a key commercial hub near Iran and Turkmenistan's borders, the city has in recent months suffered from the flight of many businesswomen.

    Younes Qazizadeh, head of the city's chamber of commerce, told AFP that he hoped the Taliban would make an official announcement to indicate that "women could come back and do business under this government as well".

    For now, the fate of businesses like Attai's hangs on a thread.

    "It is our hope to start women's businesses again in our country," Qazizadeh added.

    Attai said that for now, she is staying in her homeland because she has "some hope" that her business can survive.

    Ahead of the US pullout, a mammoth airlift saw 124,000 people evacuated from Kabul airport.

    "I could have left as well. But I didn't leave because all the hard work and effort that we put in should not be ignored," Attai said.

    "I don't think they will block our work," she added, referring to the Taliban.

    "We are a company which is completely run by women and employs women -- not a single man is brave enough to stop that. A woman who has shovelled her fields day and night cannot be ignored."

    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/tali...n-rule-2555175

  13. #92
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    https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-p...pe-2021-10-04/

    Women in Afghanistan who object to what the Taliban have said and done since returning to power are finding it harder to protest, now that impromptu demonstrations have been banned and previous rallies were broken up by gunfire and beatings.

    Resistance within families and concerns over sharing information over social media that could identify people involved are also acting as deterrents, according to six female protesters Reuters spoke to across the country.

    Sporadic demonstrations by women demanding that the Taliban respect their civil freedoms have been captured on social media, as have the sometimes violent responses, drawing the world's attention to issues of equality and human rights.

    The last time the Taliban ruled in the 1990s, they banned women from work and girls from school, allowed women to leave their homes only when accompanied by a male relative and insisted that women wore all-enveloping burqas.

    Those who broke the rules were sometimes whipped in public by the Islamist militants' "moral police".

    This time the Taliban are promising greater freedom for women, including in education and employment, in accordance with their interpretation of Islamic law.

    Yet older girls are still not back at school, there are no women in senior positions in the new government, the Women's Ministry in Kabul has been shut and the Taliban have said women will only be allowed to work in a small number of jobs.

    Women wanting to express their anger publicly are struggling to do so. Six who took part in demonstrations after the Taliban stormed to power on Aug. 15 said they had not done so since early September.

    "We have a lot of plans to stage more protests, but unfortunately due to security concerns, we are not going out much right now," said Nasima Bakhtiary, a former commerce ministry worker in Kabul.

    "We have seen so much harassment ... regarding our protests ... we have to be careful."

    Earlier this month, the Taliban said protests were not banned, but that those wanting to hold demonstrations needed to seek prior permission and provide details of place, timings and slogans that would be chanted.

    Taliban spokespeople did not respond to requests for comment for this story.

    Based on interviews with organisers, social media posts and advocacy groups, Reuters counted seven significant women-led protests between Aug. 15, when the Taliban came to power, and Sept 8. when they made permission necessary.

    Since Sept. 8, Reuters has counted one, on Sept. 19 outside the women's ministry building in Kabul after it was shut down. The sign outside has been switched to that of the Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice - the moral police.

    Maryam Sadat, a 23-year-old law student and protest organiser in Kabul, said she and a small number of others had tried to stage a demonstration on Sept. 30, but it was dispersed by members of the Taliban.

    Women have also been involved in broader protests, some of which have involved hundreds of people. Several people have been killed, some demonstrators have been beaten and the Taliban have fired warning shots in the air to disperse crowds.

    The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights last month condemned the violence against protesters, including women.

    "As Afghan women and men take to the streets during this time of great uncertainty in their country to press peacefully for their human rights to be respected ... it is crucial that those in power listen to their voices," it said.

    Women like Taranom Seyedi said they were scared to continue to demonstrate.

    The 34-year-old women's rights activist in Kabul who helped organise some of the protests there said she had received letters saying the Taliban had made a list of all the women who protested and would conduct house searches for them.

    She does not know who sent the letters, but has erased protest-related content from her social media accounts as a precaution, and said others had done so too.

    Sadat went further.

    "Since my participation in the protest, I've had to relocate twice ... My family is terrified, and even my neighbours are concerned and urging me not to join."

    Others spoke of pushback from those close to them, including Zulaikha Akrami, a 24-year-old international relations graduate who worked at a foreign non-profit organisation in the northeastern province of Badakhshan.

    "My mother tried to threaten me not to go and said if you go, don't call me mother," said Akrami, referring to a demonstration she attended in Badakhshan on Sept. 8.

    She said she recalled her younger brother telling her: "If they beat you to death, I won't be there to pick up your body off the street."


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