[VIDEO] Azeem Rafiq gives evidence to MPs at racism hearing


Sohail Speaks Yasir's Blog Fazeer's Focus

User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 80 of 158
  1. #1
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)

    [VIDEO] Azeem Rafiq gives evidence to MPs at racism hearing



    Cricketer Azeem Rafiq has told MPs he felt "isolated, humiliated at times" due to the bombardment of racism he suffered and the "constant uses of the word p***'" during his time at Yorkshire County Cricket Club.

    The 30-year-old whistleblower had said it was "time for truths" as he prepared to give evidence to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) select committee hearing in Westminster - and told the panel on Thursday he hoped to become "a voice for the voiceless".

    Rafiq, who has been involved in the cricket set-up in Yorkshire since the age of 11, talked openly and candidly to MPs, telling them: "Pretty early on at the club I joined a dressing room full of my heroes. Michael Vaughan, Matthew Hoggard, part of the 2005 Ashes team. And it was just the most surreal moment for me.

    "Me and other people from other Asian backgrounds... there were comments such as 'you'll sit over there near the toilets', 'elephant washers'... and there seemed to be an acceptance in the institution. No one really stamped it out."

    Key revelations:
    • Constant uses of the word 'p***'
    • Treated in an 'inhuman' way when unborn son died
    • Word 'Kevin' used to describe people of colour
    • Pinned down and forced to drink wine
    • Institutional racism across all cricket

    He said: "In my first spell I think I was in denial. I looked the other way. Towards the end of my first spell, I knew there was something wrong, but couldn't put my finger on it."

    He added that he felt there was a change at the club when returning for his second spell. He initially felt settled under captain Alex Lees and coach Jason Gillespie.

    Rafiq said the "temperature changed" in 2016. "You had Andrew Gale coming in as coach and Gary Ballance as captain. For the first time I started to see for what it was - I felt isolated, humiliated at times, constant uses of the word 'p***'."

    The former all-rounder and ex-England U-19s and Yorkshire captain had the protection of parliamentary privilege while giving evidence to MPs - meaning he was free to name names without worrying about legal reprisals.

    Ballance admitted using a "racial slur" towards Rafiq in a lengthy statement issued earlier this month, apologising but framing it as part of a long and deep friendship.

    Rafiq told the committee that was not an accurate depiction of their relationship, saying it went downhill from 2013 onwards and had become toxic by 2017.

    "'Kevin' was something Gary used to describe anyone of colour in a very derogatory manner. It was an open secret in the England dressing room," he said.

    "Anyone who came across Gary would know that was a phrase he would use to describe people of colour."

    Follow the Daily podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Spreaker

    Rafiq, who played two spells at Headingley between 2008 and 2018, initially voiced his claims in an interview with Sky News in September 2020, alleging "deep rooted" racism at the club left him close to taking his own life.

    Yorkshire County Cricket Club launched a formal investigation and concluded he was the victim of "racial harassment and bullying" but nobody at the club faced disciplinary action.

    A leaked report suggested that the use of "the P word" towards Rafiq was made in the context of "friendly banter".

    "'P***' is not banter. Racism is not banter," he told MPs, adding the normalisation of that type of language indicated the scale of the problem.

    Rafiq's emotional and shocking testimony continued as he fought back tears and told the committee about the loss of his baby son, describing the club's treatment of him at that time as "inhuman".

    "They weren't really bothered that I was training one day and I got a phone call to say that there was no heartbeat," he said.

    The hearing was briefly suspended as Rafiq became visibly emotional.

    The panel also heard of a time Rafiq, who is a Muslim, was "pinned down" by a cricketer and forced to drink red wine at the age of 15.

    "The player played for Yorkshire and Hampshire. I (then) didn't touch alcohol until about 2012 and around that time I felt I had to do that to fit in. I wasn't perfect, there are things I did which I felt I had to do to achieve my dreams. I deeply regret that but it has nothing to do with racism."

    "All I wanted to do is play cricket and play for England and live my dream and live my family's dream," he said, but he left Yorkshire for the first time in 2014 after he started taking medication for his deteriorating mental health.

    Asked why he returned to YCCC for a second spell, he said he was in a position where putting food on the table was really difficult, "but more importantly I think I was in denial - right up to 2017".

    But it was after the loss of his child he said he realised he couldn't "look the other way".

    He said when he raised the issues with the club, he was dismissed as a "problem" and "troublemaker".

    Rafiq described England and Wales Cricket Board initiatives on diversity as "box-ticking" exercises and "tokenism".

    He said the problem at Yorkshire existed "up and down the country", and criticised the ECB and Professional Cricketers' Association's handling of his situation.

    "On a human point I felt like if someone else had told me they were suicidal and they were ringing you saying 'please help' I'd forget my constitution and help a human," he said.

    He described the PCA as "incredibly inept" and added: "An organisation that should have supported me left me on my own."

    Former England captain Michael Vaughan is named in the independent report into Rafiq's claims, but has strenuously denied allegations he told four Asian team-mates: "(There's) too many of your lot, we need to do something about it."

    Rafiq told the committee: "He probably doesn't remember it because it doesn't mean anything to him."

    Last week England Test captain Joe Root told reporters he had never personally heard any racism at the club, but added the Yorkshire racism scandal has "fractured our game and torn lives apart".

    When asked about Root's comments, Rafiq said he found it "hurtful" that Root said he had never witnessed anything of a racist nature at Yorkshire.

    "Rooty is a good man. He never engaged in racist language," Rafiq said. "I found it hurtful because Rooty was Gary (Ballance)'s housemate and had been involved in a lot of the socialising where I was called a 'P***'.

    "It shows how normal it was that even a good man like him doesn't see it for what it was. It's not going to affect Joe, but it's something I remember every day."

    Rafiq also alleged former England batter Alex Hales was involved.

    He said: "Gary and Alex Hales got really close to each other when they played for England together. I wasn't present in that dressing room, but what I understand (is) that Alex went on to name his dog 'Kevin' because it was black. It's disgusting how much of a joke it was."

    Asked to name other instances of racism he has personally heard about outside of Yorkshire, Rafiq said he had received messages from people who have played at Leicestershire, Middlesex, Nottinghamshire, and Maurice Chambers has spoken out about his time at Essex.

    The club's full report into the Rafiq's allegations has never been published, and its handling of the case and inaction has prompted widespread criticism.

    It has been stripped of its right to host international cricket, there has been a mass exodus of sponsors and growing political pressure from Westminster - with Health Secretary Sajid Javid saying "heads should roll".

    Last week, Rafiq, who was born in Pakistan and moved to England when he was 10, agreed a financial settlement with his old club.

    https://news.sky.com/story/cricketer...ord-p-12469867
    Last edited by MenInG; 16th November 2021 at 18:58.


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  2. #2
    Debut
    Dec 2016
    Runs
    93
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Been watching the full hearing today. Powerful stuff. This man is extremely brave and may spark some of the most important changes in the English cricketing system. His accounts are entirely believable and it’s no surprise people in the club became accustomed to and indifferent to this all the time.


  3. #3
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    English cricket is "institutionally" racist, says former Yorkshire player Azeem Rafiq.

    Rafiq, 30, told a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee that racist language was "constantly" used during his time at Yorkshire.

    In an emotional testimony, he also said the club gave him "inhuman" treatment after his son was still-born in 2017.

    He added the issues he faced at Yorkshire are "without a shadow of a doubt" widespread in domestic cricket.

    Rafiq said he had lost his career to racism, which is a "horrible feeling" but that "hopefully" by speaking out there will be "massive change in five years' time".

    "All I wanted was an acceptance, an apology, an understanding, and let's try and work together to ensure it never happens again," he continued.

    "I was not going to let this go, no matter how much damage it causes me - I was determined to become a voice for the voiceless."

    In wide-ranging testimony, Rafiq also said:

    All he ever wanted to do was realise his "dream" of playing for England
    Racist language, including terms aimed at his and others' Pakistani heritage, was used "constantly" and "never stamped out" during his time at Yorkshire
    The use of such terms was racist and not "banter" as the report had concluded
    It left him feeling "isolated" and "humiliated", with racist comments made by others in front of team-mates and coaching staff but not challenged
    The use of such language was so common it "became the norm" and people at the club "didn't think it was wrong"
    He "didn't realise" and was "in denial" about the scale of the problem during most of his first spell at Yorkshire, up until 2014
    He thought "things had changed" when he returned for his second spell in 2016
    But the atmosphere became "toxic" after Gary Ballance took over as captain later that year, shortly after former batter Andrew Gale replaced Jason Gillespie as head coach
    Aged 15 and a practising Muslim, he was pinned down by a senior player at his local cricket club and red wine was poured into his mouth
    He said he did not drink alcohol again until "around 2012" when he felt he had to "to fit in" at Yorkshire
    He said he "wasn't perfect" and was "not proud" of some of the things he did and said while drinking, but these have "no relation" to the racism he was subjected to
    The report into his allegations was "shoddy at best" and the panel failed to speak to key witnesses
    Scale of racism in cricket is 'scary'

    Rafiq speaks of 'inhuman treatment' during 'difficult pregnancy'
    Rafiq was giving evidence to MPs after a report found he was a victim of "racial harassment and bullying" but the club said they would not discipline anyone.

    Yorkshire's former chairman Roger Hutton subsequently addressed the committee, followed by representatives from the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), including chief executive Tom Harrison.

    Hutton, who offered his "profound apologies" to Rafiq, said Yorkshire's director of cricket Martyn Moxon and former chief executive Mark Arthur "failed to accept the gravity of the situation".

    "They have not wanted to apologise or take the recommendations of the panel going forward," he added.

    When asked by Damian Green MP if he thought cricket was institutionally racist, Rafiq replied: "Yes, I do."

    In response to a question by Julian Knight MP, chair of the DCMS select committee, on whether the issues he faced were "replicated" at other counties, Rafiq said: "It's a problem up and down the country."

    Former Yorkshire academy players Irfan Amjad and Tabassum Bhatti have alleged they received racist abuse while at the club.

    Essex are facing racism allegations and encouraging those that have experienced discrimination to come forward.

    Last week Essex chairman John Faragher resigned following an allegation he used racist language in a 2017 board meeting, which he denies.

    Former Essex players Zoheb Sharif and Maurice Chambers have both alleged they suffered racist abuse at the club.

    Rafiq said the scale of the problem is "scary" and there have been "denials, briefings, cover-ups, smearing".

    He claimed that British Asian representation in professional cricket since 2010 dropped nearly 40% and that England have missed out on "a hell of a lot of talent" because Asian and black cricketers have been subjected to racism.

    Rafiq also called on the ECB "to make tangible change".

    'Inhuman' treatment after son's death
    Rafiq said he was subjected to "inhuman" treatment after the death of his son, because the club were "blinded" to how they should treat him after he raised a complaint about former England player Tim Bresnan in 2017.

    Rafiq said that the day after his son died, Moxon "ripped shreds" off him in a manner he had never seen Moxon address anyone else at the club.

    He said he was part of a group of "six or seven" players who complained about Bresnan, who now plays for Warwickshire, after which he said the club saw him as a "trouble-maker".

    He added he was the only player of colour in that group and was "the only one to get repercussions".

    Rafiq added that head coach Gale's attitude towards the death of Rafiq's son was that Rafiq was "making it more than what it is" and that "hardly anyone" asked after his and his wife's wellbeing.

    At the end of his session, Rafiq said his wife "has struggled and still continues" to and that his two young children "have not had a dad, really, because all I have been worried about is Yorkshire going out to discredit me and how I am going to deal with it".

    He added: "It has been challenging, but I hope today provides some sort of closure and I can treat her for what she deserves".

    Gale is currently suspended as part of an investigation into a tweet he sent in 2010.

    Moxon is currently absent from work because of a "stress-related illness" and Yorkshire said he "will be given the necessary support".

    BBC Sport is approaching Bresnan and Gale for comment.

    Ballance behaviour 'disgusting'
    Yorkshire batter Ballance, who played 23 Tests for England, said earlier this month he "regrets" using racist language towards Rafiq, who he regarded as his "best mate in cricket".

    Rafiq said he became friends with Zimbabwe-born Ballance when he joined Yorkshire from Derbyshire in 2008 because he felt he was an "outsider" as well and that others called Ballance "things that were out of order".

    But he added their relationship "started to deteriorate" around 2013 because of Ballance's "conduct" and that his "behaviour was so disgusting" Rafiq raised it with an agent they shared.

    Rafiq said they remained "amicable" but not close afterwards and that Ballance found the captaincy a "real struggle" in 2017, resulting in a "toxic" dressing room.

    He added that Ballance used the name 'Kevin' as a "derogatory" term to refer to any player of colour and this was an "open secret", including within the England dressing room.

    Rafiq said that England batter Alex Hales named his dog Kevin "because it's black".

    "It's disgusting how much of a joke it was," said Rafiq.

    He added that India batter Cheteshwar Pujara was called 'Steve' by coaches, players and the Yorkshire website after bowler Jack Brooks, who now plays for Somerset, started calling Pujara that because he could not pronounce his first name.

    Pujara said he would prefer his team-mates to call him Cheteshwar.

    BBC Sport is approaching Hales and Brooks for comment.

    Rafiq alleges former England captain and BBC cricket pundit Michael Vaughan said "too many of you lot, we need to do something about it" to him and three other Asian players in 2009 while they were all at Yorkshire.

    England bowler Adil Rashid and former Pakistan bowler Rana Naved-ul-Hasan have corroborated the allegation, which Vaughan "completely and categorically denies".

    "It's important on Michael that we don't make it all about Michael," said Rafiq.

    "It was a long time ago. He might not remember it because it doesn't mean anything to him."

    England Test captain Joe Root said the Yorkshire racism scandal has "fractured our game and torn lives apart" but that he could not recall any instance of racism during his time at the club.

    Rafiq said Root has never used racist language but he found his statement "hurtful" because Root was Ballance's housemate and was on nights out when racist language directed at his Pakistan heritage was used.

    "Joe might not remember it but that shows just how normal it was - even a good man like him can't see it for what it is," he said.

    "The environment and institution is the problem."

    Rafiq said that following an interview on Sky, former England bowler and Yorkshire team-mate Matthew Hoggard called him and said 'I am sorry if some of the comments made you feel how you described it'.

    Rafiq said he thanked Hoggard for his apology and really appreciated it.

    BBC Sport is approaching Hoggard for comment.

    Rafiq first spoke out last year, claiming "institutional racism" at Yorkshire left him close to taking his own life.

    Seven of the 43 allegations were upheld by an independent panel last month and the report found he had been a victim of "racial harassment and bullying" at the club.

    However, Yorkshire said they will not take disciplinary action against any player, employee or executive.

    Hutton and Arthur have subsequently resigned, with Hutton's replacement as chairman, Lord Patel, apologising "unreservedly" to Rafiq.

    Kit supplier Nike, plus several of Yorkshire's sponsors, including Emerald Publishing, Yorkshire Tea, Tetley's beer and leisure club operators David Lloyd, either ended partnerships or said they would not continue deals.

    BBC Sport is approaching Yorkshire for further comment in response to today's evidence.

    https://www.bbc.com/sport/cricket/59304381


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  4. #4
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    This guy who doesn’t even know me, never spent any time with me, was talking about my personal drinking, going out. That was David Lloyd, England coach, commentator. I found it disturbing because Sky are supposedly doing this amazing work on bringing racism to the front, and within a week of me speaking out that got sent to me and I thought ‘there’s some closet racists. I need to do something about it.’”


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  5. #5
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    Azeem Rafiq was close to tears speaking to MPs about his experience of racism he suffered at Yorkshire County Cricket Club.

    Rafiq was giving evidence to the DCMS committee about the Yorkshire racism scandal, having first made allegations of institutional racism against the club over a year. With Yorkshire declining to publish the report in full, only releasing a summary of the findings, Rafiq’s testimony has shed greater light on the situation at the club.

    “I felt isolated, humiliated at times, [there was] constant use of the word ‘p***’

    “On the 2017 pre-season tour, we were in a place and Gary Ballance walks over and he says, ‘Why are you talking to him? You know he’s a p***.’” Rafiq said. “Or, ‘he’s not a sheikh, he’s got no oil.’ And this happened in front of teammates, in front of coaching staff. We were on a bus trip in London to a Surrey game and we went past a couple of men with beards and it was like ‘Oh is that your dad?’ If we’d go past a cornershop, ‘Oh, does your uncle own this?’ And this happened in front of Martyn Moxon, Andrew Gale, club officials, and it never got stamped out.

    “I want to address Gary’s statement, because there was a narrative there that we were best of mates, that we had a really good relationship. When Gary came to the club from Derby, I saw in him what I saw in myself, and that was ‘outsiders’. A lot of the players at the time called Gary a lot of things which were completely out of order, but no one said anything. Mine and Gary’s relationship started to deteriorate around 2013 due to Gary’s conduct. At one point his behaviour around his personal relationships was so disgusting that I raised it with an agent that we shared and said that this needs to be sorted out before it gets quite silly. Even after that we were amicable, we were teammates, but we never shared the same relationship.”

    “Six or seven players made a complaint about Tim Bresnan that year, but I was the only one that got the repercussions of that,” Rafiq said. “I was the only person of colour. I first raised it as bullying in 2017. A month before I was called a leader, a potential captain, a driver on the field, someone who we should potentially build a team around, especially in white-ball cricket. I raised that complaint about Tim Bresnan, and Tim, former England cricketer, also related to the coach, I knew there was potentially going to be real trouble. But I thought with everyone complaining, it would be safe for everyone, but on the flipside the board minutes say I’m a problem, a troublemaker, and an issue that needs to be resolved. I feel that that then blinded them into how they treated me through the pregnancy and the loss of my son. My first day back after losing my son, Martyn Moxon got me in a room and ripped shreds off me. I’ve never seen him speak to anyone like that, from my time at the club and I couldn’t believe it.”

    “It felt like it went away from the institutional [racism] and working with the club, they tried to make it about individuals and that’s unfortunately over the last couple of weeks, some individuals have had a really tough time. But I didn’t present my evidence like that. It was never intended like that. But that’s what the club, the lawyers, and the panel have tried to do.”

    “Once I left the club, Cheteshwar Pujara joined the club, and Jack Brooks, I think, started it where he didn’t feel the need to call him by his first name. There is in an interview with Cheteshwar where he says ‘I’d prefer them not to’. But not only did Jack, the coaches, the media, Yorkshire Post, the Yorkshire website, the Yorkshire Twitter page, high-profile commentators around the world, everyone called him that.”

    “‘Kevin’ was something Gary used to describe everyone of colour, in a very derogatory manner, whether that be publicly, whether that be in the dressing room, whether that be the opposition. This is an open secret within the England dressing room. Anyone that’s come across Gary would know that that’s a phrase that he used to describe people of colour.”

    “Gary and Alex Hales got really close to each other when they played for England together. I wasn’t present in that dressing room, but what I understand [is] that Alex went on to name his dog ‘Kevin’ because it was black. It’s disgusting how much of a joke it was.”

    “I got pinned down at my local cricket club and had red wine poured down my throat, literally down my throat"

    “The player played for Yorkshire and Hampshire. I [then] didn’t touch alcohol until about 2012 and around that time I felt I had to do that to fit in. I wasn’t perfect, there are things I did which I felt I had to do to achieve my dreams. I deeply regret that but it has nothing to do with racism.

    “When I spoke I should have been listened to. The game as a whole has a problem, with listening to the victim. There is no ‘yeah, but’ with racism; there is no ‘two sides’ to racism.

    “This guy who doesn’t even know me, never spent any time with me, was talking about my personal drinking, going out. That was David Lloyd, England coach, commentator. I found it disturbing because Sky are supposedly doing this amazing work on bringing racism to the front, and within a week of me speaking out that got sent to me and I thought ‘there’s some closet racists. I need to do something about it.’”


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  6. Google Ad Manager-
  7. #6
    Debut
    Dec 2012
    Venue
    Indian Ocean
    Runs
    22,683
    Mentioned
    548 Post(s)
    Tagged
    5 Thread(s)
    • Pinned down and forced to drink wine
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.


    Have some Sehwag in your life.

  8. #7
    Debut
    Sep 2012
    Runs
    94,693
    Mentioned
    7530 Post(s)
    Tagged
    40 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.
    That is what happens when the only consistency in your story are your lies and exaggerations.

  9. #8
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.
    Pinned down and forced to drink when he was 15

    Most south Asian kids of Muslim origin do not want to drink due to fear of household and Muslim community backlash

  10. #9
    Debut
    Sep 2012
    Runs
    94,693
    Mentioned
    7530 Post(s)
    Tagged
    40 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    Does match fixing and Ball tampering compare? Are they both cheating?
    They are both acts of cheating, but with completely contrasting intentions.

    When you fix a match, you are cheating your teammates and your actions decrease the probability of your team winning the match.

    When you tamper, you are cheating the opinion and your actions increase the probability of your team winning the match.

    So the difference between the two is cheating to help your team lose and cheating to help your team win.

    Now that we have got your lame analogy out of the way, explain to me why calling the England U-19 coach a w*nker on Twitter is a lesser crime than engaging in casual racism?

    If that was a mistake, why can’t the casual racism be deemed as a mistake? Why should we sympathize and feel sorry for someone like Rafiq who has clearly demonstrated attitude and disciplinary problems?

  11. #10
    Debut
    Jun 2017
    Runs
    1,730
    Mentioned
    115 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    They are both acts of cheating, but with completely contrasting intentions.

    When you fix a match, you are cheating your teammates and your actions decrease the probability of your team winning the match.

    When you tamper, you are cheating the opinion and your actions increase the probability of your team winning the match.

    So the difference between the two is cheating to help your team lose and cheating to help your team win.

    Now that we have got your lame analogy out of the way, explain to me why calling the England U-19 coach a w*nker on Twitter is a lesser crime than engaging in casual racism?

    If that was a mistake, why can’t the casual racism be deemed as a mistake? Why should we sympathize and feel sorry for someone like Rafiq who has clearly demonstrated attitude and disciplinary problems?
    You’re consistently focussing on one niche point and issues with Rafiq’s past to justify the problem - which is institutional racism at Yorkshire cricket and in English cricket as a whole. Argue about that for a change instead of harping on about how Rafiq’s behaviours justifies the racist comments.

  12. #11
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    They are both acts of cheating, but with completely contrasting intentions.

    When you fix a match, you are cheating your teammates and your actions decrease the probability of your team winning the match.

    When you tamper, you are cheating the opinion and your actions increase the probability of your team winning the match.

    So the difference between the two is cheating to help your team lose and cheating to help your team win.

    Now that we have got your lame analogy out of the way, explain to me why calling the England U-19 coach a w*nker on Twitter is a lesser crime than engaging in casual racism?

    If that was a mistake, why can’t the casual racism be deemed as a mistake? Why should we sympathize and feel sorry for someone like Rafiq who has clearly demonstrated attitude and disciplinary problems?
    In matters of racism, you do not decide what is lame and what is appropriate. You’ve been made to look stupid just like M Vaughan was because you conveniently denied Rafiq’s claims as fabrications and attention seeking. Now that it has been proven, and your theories have been dismissed (again), you are now trying to make an apples and oranges comparison.

    A 19 year old kid having a Twitter tantrum (for which he was punished and fined) is not the same as a human being experiencing constant trauma due to racism be it casual and unintentional.

  13. #12
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    This is the same Mamoon who in the past has influenced people to believe Pakistanis are pure cheats and liars, but there should be sympathy towards Warner and Smith because they cheated to gain an advantage for their team.

    The same Mamoon is equating Rafiq’s outburst as a 19 year old on Twitter as the same as all of those south Asians who have experienced institutional racism whilst playing cricket in England.

    As long as I live and participate on this forum, I vow to continue calling out the nonsense this guy spreads for the greater good of humanity. InshaAllah

  14. #13
    Debut
    Sep 2012
    Runs
    94,693
    Mentioned
    7530 Post(s)
    Tagged
    40 Thread(s)
    We already know the following about Rafiq based on the incident in 2010:

    He has no class, no respect and no values. He is always looking to play victim and will try to find excuses and blame others instead of taking ownership of his own performances.

    This shows why his cricket career flopped and he went nowhere in spite of the fact that Yorkshire fast-tracked him and gave him all the chances in the world to become a star.

    He was their youngest captain, he even captained England at junior levels and he got plenty of chances. He failed to deliver because of his own shortcomings and lack of focus and determination.

    As a result, no sympathies for him and he does not deserve to become the Malala and Greta Thunberg of institutional racism in English cricket.

    He has zero credibility. If you are going to have someone lead the war against institutional racism in English cricket, at least choose someone who has led by example with his attitude.

    May I nominate Moeen Ali or Adil Rashid? Moeen is always crying and loves a good moan. He plays victim as much as the next guy, but at least he is led by example in terms of his character and attitude. A thorough gentleman.

    An even better example would Adil Rashid. A man who has never played victim, he has never given long, scripted interviews to the Telegraph and other tabloids about how hard it is to break through the racism system and make your way, simply because he let his performances do the talking.

    Funnily enough, he came through the ranks at Yorkshire and has been England’s premier white ball spinner for years. Why didn’t the racism at Yorkshire hold him back? We are not going to talk about it because it doesn’t suit our agenda and narrative.

  15. #14
    Debut
    May 2019
    Runs
    1,634
    Mentioned
    32 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Seems like a he said she said situation, without much proof coming from azeems end.

    Him not staying consistent with his story is also not helping.

    His story vs Gary story doesnt add up, why would azeem stay at Garys house if he was racist? Makes no sense.

    Him going out drinking and now saying it was to fit in is complete **. Hes just trying to save face among his community.

    At this point seems like hes desperate and is using previous racist qualms known within the system to his advantage.

    Azeem might have some serious claims but as of right now he nothing to back it up. Also he was never a Great talent so him trying to say country cricket ruined his chances at the national level dont add up.

  16. #15
    Debut
    May 2010
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    34,133
    Mentioned
    298 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.
    I have bolded the relevant part. Drinking of your own accord is quite different to being pinned down and being water-boarded - or wine-boarded in this case. You have inadvertently highlighted the difference yourself in the same post, somewhat unwittingly.

    If you need further clarification on your own words, let me know.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  17. #16
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    Following the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee hearing today, the Club makes the following statement:

    Professor The Lord Patel of Bradford OBE said:
    “This is an incredibly difficult day for all associated with Yorkshire County Cricket Club.

    “The emotion of Azeem Rafiq’s compelling testimony at the Select Committee today was plain to see, and his experiences are harrowing and upsetting.

    “Azeem’s courage in speaking up should be praised, and nobody should underestimate how difficult it would have been to relive all of this in public. His wish to bring a ‘voice to the voiceless’ should be an inspiration to provoke real change in the sport.

    “I repeat our apology to Azeem for what he has gone through, it should never have happened and that is something that the Club has to recognise.

    “It is becoming ever clearer since I joined this Club that what happened with the investigation into Azeem’s allegations was fundamentally flawed and unacceptable. The processes and subsequent actions taken by the Club have rightly been criticised.

    “There is no quick fix to the clear problems which have been identified, and the issues are complex, not least the charge of institutional racism which must be addressed head on. Azeem noted that this is not about individuals, but rather the structure and processes of the Club, and we need to tackle this. It is clear that we have good people at Yorkshire County Cricket Club and that gives me hope that we can. I am struck by the concept of ‘White Rose’ values and what that means: I want to say firmly that our values at this Club cannot be in any way rooted in racism, discrimination or abuse of any kind.

    “I agree with Azeem that we are only at the start of a journey, which will take time. At the heart of this is listening, and going through our past – including the Fletcher Report – as well as examining our culture and taking positive steps to build to a better future, such as the progression from grass roots to the professional game. We need to own the issues collectively as a Club, and cannot hide from what has been spotlighted.

    “As well as the set-up of the independent whistleblowing hotline, we are committed to taking further action in response, and will communicate these steps transparently.

    “In his testimony, Azeem said that, despite the treatment he received, ‘Yorkshire is still my club’. I want to make this Cricket Club a source of pride once again, righting the wrongs of the past and making sure that we are an inclusive home for aspiring players of the future.”


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  18. #17
    Debut
    Dec 2005
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    2,296
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    We already know the following about Rafiq based on the incident in 2010:

    He has no class, no respect and no values. He is always looking to play victim and will try to find excuses and blame others instead of taking ownership of his own performances.

    This shows why his cricket career flopped and he went nowhere in spite of the fact that Yorkshire fast-tracked him and gave him all the chances in the world to become a star.

    He was their youngest captain, he even captained England at junior levels and he got plenty of chances. He failed to deliver because of his own shortcomings and lack of focus and determination.

    As a result, no sympathies for him and he does not deserve to become the Malala and Greta Thunberg of institutional racism in English cricket.

    He has zero credibility. If you are going to have someone lead the war against institutional racism in English cricket, at least choose someone who has led by example with his attitude.

    May I nominate Moeen Ali or Adil Rashid? Moeen is always crying and loves a good moan. He plays victim as much as the next guy, but at least he is led by example in terms of his character and attitude. A thorough gentleman.

    An even better example would Adil Rashid. A man who has never played victim, he has never given long, scripted interviews to the Telegraph and other tabloids about how hard it is to break through the racism system and make your way, simply because he let his performances do the talking.

    Funnily enough, he came through the ranks at Yorkshire and has been England’s premier white ball spinner for years. Why didn’t the racism at Yorkshire hold him back? We are not going to talk about it because it doesn’t suit our agenda and narrative.
    Out of interest, why would you make such a rigid judgement about Rafiq being classless and having no values based on one snapshot of his life? I’ve called many people a derogatory word in my life at that age but that’s not the only good and bad I’ve done.

  19. #18
    Debut
    May 2010
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    34,133
    Mentioned
    298 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    We already know the following about Rafiq based on the incident in 2010:

    He has no class, no respect and no values. He is always looking to play victim and will try to find excuses and blame others instead of taking ownership of his own performances.

    This shows why his cricket career flopped and he went nowhere in spite of the fact that Yorkshire fast-tracked him and gave him all the chances in the world to become a star.

    He was their youngest captain, he even captained England at junior levels and he got plenty of chances. He failed to deliver because of his own shortcomings and lack of focus and determination.

    As a result, no sympathies for him and he does not deserve to become the Malala and Greta Thunberg of institutional racism in English cricket.

    He has zero credibility. If you are going to have someone lead the war against institutional racism in English cricket, at least choose someone who has led by example with his attitude.

    May I nominate Moeen Ali or Adil Rashid? Moeen is always crying and loves a good moan. He plays victim as much as the next guy, but at least he is led by example in terms of his character and attitude. A thorough gentleman.

    An even better example would Adil Rashid. A man who has never played victim, he has never given long, scripted interviews to the Telegraph and other tabloids about how hard it is to break through the racism system and make your way, simply because he let his performances do the talking.

    Funnily enough, he came through the ranks at Yorkshire and has been England’s premier white ball spinner for years. Why didn’t the racism at Yorkshire hold him back? We are not going to talk about it because it doesn’t suit our agenda and narrative.
    Whether he was good enough or not isn't really the issue, I haven't followed his career as carefully as you have, so can't really comment on that aspect. It still doesn't excuse racism, at least not in Britain. Those sitting in public judgement at the ECB or Yorkshire can't really say, "Oh he was a bit crap anyway, so what if he got called a P*ki?" It's about our standards as Brits, not yours in the third world.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  20. #19
    Debut
    Feb 2019
    Runs
    6,597
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    These hearings are total drama bazi, Hearings are non-binding for starters, secondly the line of questioning is already divulged. The more probing questions were not even asked.

    Tony Blair faced questioning from a select committee, as have many others.

    It’s a dog and pony show.

  21. #20
    Debut
    Dec 2005
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    2,296
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Can somebody clarify what David Lloyds involvement is in this matter. When did he make comment about Rafiq publicly and what did he say?


  22. #21
    Debut
    Apr 2010
    Venue
    221B Baker Street
    Runs
    14,152
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Goes to show alot of ill-informed people on this forum having no clue as to what was happening and were readily making accusations to demean the process of which Rafiq was part of.
    Last edited by Sherlock; 16th November 2021 at 23:02.

  23. #22
    Debut
    Apr 2010
    Venue
    221B Baker Street
    Runs
    14,152
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.
    You're confusing what happened to him at 15, to what he began doing at a later age to fit in.

  24. #23
    Debut
    Apr 2010
    Venue
    221B Baker Street
    Runs
    14,152
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    I have bolded the relevant part. Drinking of your own accord is quite different to being pinned down and being water-boarded - or wine-boarded in this case. You have inadvertently highlighted the difference yourself in the same post, somewhat unwittingly.

    If you need further clarification on your own words, let me know.
    It's genuinely embarrassing some users still don't do their own research a little.

  25. #24
    Debut
    Apr 2010
    Venue
    221B Baker Street
    Runs
    14,152
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    This is the same Mamoon who in the past has influenced people to believe Pakistanis are pure cheats and liars, but there should be sympathy towards Warner and Smith because they cheated to gain an advantage for their team.

    The same Mamoon is equating Rafiq’s outburst as a 19 year old on Twitter as the same as all of those south Asians who have experienced institutional racism whilst playing cricket in England.

    As long as I live and participate on this forum, I vow to continue calling out the nonsense this guy spreads for the greater good of humanity. InshaAllah
    Nothing's changed over the years and that's such a sad part.

  26. #25
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    English cricket is close to an emergency over its failure to address diversity issues, says ECB chief executive Tom Harrison.

    Harrison was quizzed by the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee on Tuesday shortly after former Yorkshire player Azeem Rafiq's harrowing account of racial slurs at the club which had left him feeling "isolated and humiliated".

    Yorkshire's response to an independent report into Rafiq's allegations attracted widespread criticism and led the ECB to suspend Yorkshire as a host for international games while the club also lost key sponsors.

    Harrison told the panel the handling of the report "speaks to institutional racism."

    "We've been aware of the importance of this agenda - not just racism, but diversity and equity," said Harrison.

    "What we've struggled with is getting our first-class game to wake up.

    "If we're not in an emergency, we're approaching one."

    Harrison commended Rafiq's "bravery" in speaking out about his treatment at Yorkshire.

    "We need to start to look at dressing room culture throughout the country," he said. "There's a huge effort on this from the ECB but it takes time to trickle through."

    Rafiq, who was born in Pakistan but raised in Barnsley and captained England's under-19 side, earlier told panel members he would not want his son "anywhere near cricket" after his own experiences of racism.

    Asked about the perception of English cricket and the damage the allegations of racism caused, Harrison said: "I'd say please understand that we're really sorry for the experiences you may have been through trying to experience cricket in this country.

    "We know we may have let you down. We'll fix it fast. We know the survival of our sport depends on it. We'll transform this game very quickly."

    Former Yorkshire chair Roger Hutton said he had been blocked from removing former chief executive Mark Arthur and director of cricket Martyn Moxon from the board because the Colin Graves Trust vetoed it.

    Rafiq described how Moxon, who is currently signed off sick with a stress-related illness, "got me in a room and literally ripped shreds off me" on his return to the club after the stillbirth of his son.

    Later, he said an official complaint about bullying in 2017 directly led to his subsequent release, for fear that he may continue to raise issues around his treatment.

    Rafiq also revisited longstanding grievances against Arthur, and Hutton said he wanted to remove the pair "as a consequence of the failure to understand the gravity of the situation [regarding Rafiq] and failing to apologise, and particularly for their failings and to move on the recommendations".

    He said it was "wrong" that a major creditor like the Trust should have the power to veto board decisions.

    Hutton welcomed the involvement of the DCMS committee in the situation at Yorkshire, and added: "I do worry what would have happened if it hadn't."

    Hutton said in his view the ECB could and should have led the investigation into Rafiq's allegations, rather than leave it to Yorkshire.

    "In my view the ECB did have the discretion to investigate," he said.

    "Any member of the ECB could have started that complaint, as they have just done with Essex at the moment. I think the investigation would have been far more satisfactory."

    However, Harrison appeared to refute Hutton's suggestion, saying Yorkshire "were very clear they wanted to run this investigation themselves".

    Meena Botros, director of legal and integrity at the ECB, said Yorkshire had only asked the ECB if it would like to put someone on the panel which would assess the investigation team's findings.

    Harrison said: "The reason why Yorkshire were allowed to undergo this investigation is because - up to that point - it was fairly normal practice for first-class counties to run their own regulatory process.

    "We have learned lessons through this process."

    Lord Patel vows to 'right the wrongs of the past'

    Yorkshire chairman Lord Patel praised Rafiq's courage following his testimony at the DCMS Select Committee hearing and vowed to "right the wrongs of the past" to make the club an "an inclusive home for aspiring players of the future".

    In a statement, Lord Patel said it is "an incredibly difficult day for all associated with Yorkshire County Cricket Club" and apologised to Rafiq again for the treatment he had to endure.

    "It is becoming ever clearer since I joined this Club that what happened with the investigation into Azeem's allegations was fundamentally flawed and unacceptable," the statement read. "The processes and subsequent actions taken by the Club have rightly been criticised.

    "There is no quick fix to the clear problems which have been identified, and the issues are complex, not least the charge of institutional racism which must be addressed head on. Azeem noted that this is not about individuals, but rather the structure and processes of the Club, and we need to tackle this.

    "It is clear that we have good people at Yorkshire County Cricket Club and that gives me hope that we can. I am struck by the concept of 'White Rose' values and what that means: I want to say firmly that our values at this Club cannot be in any way rooted in racism, discrimination or abuse of any kind.

    "I agree with Azeem that we are only at the start of a journey, which will take time. At the heart of this is listening, and going through our past - including the Fletcher Report - as well as examining our culture and taking positive steps to build to a better future, such as the progression from grass roots to the professional game. We need to own the issues collectively as a Club, and cannot hide from what has been spotlighted.

    "As well as the set-up of the independent whistleblowing hotline, we are committed to taking further action in response, and will communicate these steps transparently.

    "In his testimony, Azeem said that, despite the treatment he received, 'Yorkshire is still my club'. I want to make this Cricket Club a source of pride once again, righting the wrongs of the past and making sure that we are an inclusive home for aspiring players of the future."

    SKY


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  27. #26
    Debut
    Oct 2021
    Venue
    Nagpur
    Runs
    241
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Poor lad.. He has suffered a lot..
    Lots of pain in his eyes.
    We people from subcontinent should put our differences aside to support Azeem and fight against racism occurring in world of sports.

  28. #27
    Debut
    May 2010
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    34,133
    Mentioned
    298 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sherlock View Post
    It's genuinely embarrassing some users still don't do their own research a little.
    You don't need to do research. Perhaps in some parts of the world they just don't understand that taking abuse from seniors from the majority ethnic group is wrong.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  29. #28
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    The PCA joins with the ECB and further stakeholders in the hope that today’s Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee hearing proves to be a significant step towards ending racism in our game.

    PCA Chief Executive, Rob Lynch, said:

    “The PCA believes that this is a defining moment for cricket. Far greater emphasis has to be placed on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion within the game. This can only be achieved via collaboration between all of the game’s stakeholders. We all have a part to play and we look forward to contributing to Friday’s game-wide meeting, which will address this vital topic.

    “We thank Azeem for shining a light on the harrowing experiences he, and others within professional cricket, have suffered.

    “He has been courageous in coming forward and giving a voice to those who have been discriminated against.

    “The PCA recognises important lessons need to be learnt in the way these matters are handled. The PCA condemns racism in all forms and there are no mitigating factors.

    “We are listening to our Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Working Group which was established in July 2020.

    “Acting upon their feedback, anti-racism education has been ongoing throughout 2021 and is part of our commitment to eradicating racism and discrimination within the professional game.

    “The PCA has also set up a panel of independent barristers who can be contacted, in confidence, by members encountering any issues of racism and discrimination.

    “The PCA welcomes the involvement of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee with its aim of helping the game to confront these issues.

    “The PCA thanks DCMS Chair Julian Knight for the opportunity to write to the committee as a right of reply and we will be submitting a report on the evidence provided at today’s hearing.

    “The PCA encourages every professional player who has suffered from – or witnessed - discrimination to report the matter so the game can listen, learn and act to become a welcoming sport for all.”


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  30. #29
    Debut
    Jul 2010
    Runs
    14,296
    Mentioned
    35 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.
    This is a different incident and occured when he was very young.

    He alleges he was pinned down and had alcohol poured down his throat. If it happened as he said then it must have been a harrowing experience for a youngster to go through.

    Its not difficult to work out who the player is that may have done it to him....and the fact that he went on to have a pretty decent player speaks volumes about how this type of character is tolerated in English dressing rooms.

    Look, i'm no fan of Rafiq and we can poke holes in some of his own actions...but doing this to a 15 year old kid and getting away with it is criminal.

  31. #30
    Debut
    Nov 2005
    Venue
    England
    Runs
    24,628
    Mentioned
    582 Post(s)
    Tagged
    5 Thread(s)
    Instinctively I don't trust Rafiq( I am not sure why, maybe it's my teaching background)but some of his allegations are incredibly serious and heads need to roll unless they are refuted.

  32. #31
    Debut
    Jun 2001
    Runs
    85,799
    Mentioned
    2231 Post(s)
    Tagged
    27 Thread(s)
    Kick up the backside that English cricket needed, especially those snobs who have been running the game for too long.

    Wake up call, but will things change, I'm not so sure.

    This is ingrained deep in English society and it's not just about cricket, it's more than cricket.



  33. #32
    Debut
    Sep 2009
    Runs
    290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Which player has played for yorkshire and Hampshire?

    With the shocking stories coming out of Yorkshire, one has really stuck in my head. A 15 year old youngster being forced alcohol down his throat against his wishes.

    Apparently this was done by a player who has played for yorkshire and Hampshire . . So how many players and which players have played for both counties?

  34. #33
    Debut
    Sep 2009
    Runs
    290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I’m not asking who he is referring to? Simply asking who has played for both counties?

  35. #34
    Debut
    Jul 2010
    Runs
    14,296
    Mentioned
    35 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are a few players.

    Michael Lumb for instance has played for Yorkshire before leaving for Hampshire and ultimately finishing his career at Notts.

  36. #35
    Debut
    Jul 2012
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    7,532
    Mentioned
    84 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    Kick up the backside that English cricket needed, especially those snobs who have been running the game for too long.

    Wake up call, but will things change, I'm not so sure.

    This is ingrained deep in English society and it's not just about cricket, it's more than cricket.
    Reminds me so much of how Jimmy Saville matter was handled by BBC. Bad things were considered norm.

  37. #36
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DeadlyVenom View Post
    There are a few players.

    Michael Lumb for instance has played for Yorkshire before leaving for Hampshire and ultimately finishing his career at Notts.
    It’s someone who has played club cricket in England. Lumb is from Zimbabwe I believe?

  38. #37
    Debut
    Jul 2010
    Runs
    14,296
    Mentioned
    35 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    It’s someone who has played club cricket in England. Lumb is from Zimbabwe I believe?
    Hes a Saffer. Was just giving an example of a player.

    Alex Morris is another. Played for Barnsley CC too.....

  39. #38
    Debut
    Jul 2018
    Runs
    5,404
    Mentioned
    74 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.
    You're mixing two different stories he told during the hearing.

    The wine incident was much earlier in his career when he was a young player.

    He said he started going drinking with teammates on his own accord after 2012 in a bid to 'fit in'.

    Don't see how he said anything inconsistent here.

  40. #39
    Debut
    Mar 2015
    Runs
    8,840
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Azeem Rafiq’s testimony exposes how power works in cricket – and in Britain

    In 2016 Azeem Rafiq returned to Yorkshire, the club and the county where – as we now know – he had encountered racist abuse and ritual humiliation since he was a child. On Tuesday morning in parliament the Conservative MP Damian Green, who was sacked from the government in 2017 for lying about the discovery of pornography on his office computer in 2008, wanted to know why.

    Green was by no means the first person to pose this question. Since Rafiq first went public with his experiences last autumn he has been hounded on social media by members of the public demanding to know why he willingly returned to Yorkshire if the culture was as bad as he claimed, with the implication that it clearly couldn’t have been.

    Indeed, speaking on 5 Live earlier that morning, the BBC’s cricket correspondent Jonathan Agnew had made a similar insinuation. “Rafiq played at Yorkshire, was made their youngest ever captain,” Agnew argued. “Now, if it had been such a very dreadful experience the first time, why did he go back there? Why didn’t he go and play for somebody else?” Addressing the digital, culture, media and sport select committee, Rafiq gave a simple answer. “Derbyshire didn’t have the finances to offer me a contract,” he said. “I was in a position where putting food on the table was difficult. That’s why I went back.”

    A quick thought exercise: how many of the committee questioning Rafiq will ever have been in a position where they were forced to make the invidious choice between returning to a toxic workplace or being unable to feed their family? How many of the Yorkshire management who treated him so shoddily? How often, we think, have the MPs, the great and good of Yorkshire, or Agnew or Michael Vaughan or Tom Harrison had to worry about putting food on the table? In recent weeks Rafiq’s case, and its handling by the institutions that were supposed to protect him, has been the source of a good deal of bafflement and disbelief. The culture and attitudes of the Yorkshire dressing room are described as prehistoric, the men at executive level who stood by and allowed it to flourish derided as dinosaurs resistant to change. We wonder aloud, with incredulity, how this can possibly be allowed to happen in this day and age. “The culture of Yorkshire is stuck in the past,” declared Roger Hutton, the outgoing chairman of Yorkshire. But he was wrong. It’s stuck in the present.

    In many ways it is the present. The treatment of Rafiq was no startling anomaly. It was the very opposite of unforeseeable. It was entirely consistent with the way British society works in 2021 and the way the British establishment has operated for decades. This is a country built on the idea of punching down, of accumulating and retaining personal capital by any means necessary, even if it means trampling on the weakest and the poorest. When Rafiq spoke of his desire to speak on behalf of the “voiceless”, one felt he was articulating a disconnect that stretches well beyond the narrow, grass-stained world of cricket.

    Take, by way of example, the supposedly independent report commissioned by Yorkshire last year. According to Hutton, the original terms of the investigation were altered in April this year to prevent any judgment from being made on whether Yorkshire were institutionally racist. Meanwhile, according to Rafiq, members of the investigation panel were being treated to Test match hospitality at Headingley. Meanwhile the Colin Graves Trust – which has the power to bankrupt Yorkshire virtually overnight – was moving to block Hutton’s attempts to remove Yorkshire’s chief executive, Mark Arthur, and the director of cricket, Martyn Moxon, from their positions. Meanwhile senior figures at Yorkshire were viciously briefing against Rafiq under the cover of anonymity.

    In many ways it is the present. The treatment of Rafiq was no startling anomaly. It was the very opposite of unforeseeable. It was entirely consistent with the way British society works in 2021 and the way the British establishment has operated for decades. This is a country built on the idea of punching down, of accumulating and retaining personal capital by any means necessary, even if it means trampling on the weakest and the poorest. When Rafiq spoke of his desire to speak on behalf of the “voiceless”, one felt he was articulating a disconnect that stretches well beyond the narrow, grass-stained world of cricket.

    Take, by way of example, the supposedly independent report commissioned by Yorkshire last year. According to Hutton, the original terms of the investigation were altered in April this year to prevent any judgment from being made on whether Yorkshire were institutionally racist. Meanwhile, according to Rafiq, members of the investigation panel were being treated to Test match hospitality at Headingley. Meanwhile the Colin Graves Trust – which has the power to bankrupt Yorkshire virtually overnight – was moving to block Hutton’s attempts to remove Yorkshire’s chief executive, Mark Arthur, and the director of cricket, Martyn Moxon, from their positions. Meanwhile senior figures at Yorkshire were viciously briefing against Rafiq under the cover of anonymity.

    And so perhaps the greatest gift Rafiq has given us is to see how power really works in this country. Those with status and influence can simply bend the world to their whim, define truth as they see fit, ignore or trounce anyone who threatens their position. They have capital and goodwill, powerful friends to push their case, safety nets upon safety nets. Rafiq had none of this. He was powerless, penniless and alone. He had no corporate sinecure, no Test caps, no column in the Daily Telegraph, no benefit of the doubt. This is why cricket’s establishment felt empowered to drive him to the brink of suicide rather than reform itself.

    This particular case occurred in cricket but frankly it could have happened anywhere: the police, the civil service, the media, an investment bank. A few heads roll, those in power pledge to go on a listening journey and the world moves on. Green lies in public office and still gets to make our laws. Julian Knight, the committee chairman, gets to criticise the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020 and then pontificate about racism on live television in 2021. Accountability is for the little people.

    It was possible, while watching the likes of Hutton and Harrison squirm under the committee room lights, to see all this as some sort of vindication or victory for Rafiq, a triumph of truth and justice over obfuscation and malfeasance. In reality, of course, any victory here was purely symbolic.

    Rafiq’s cricket career is over. But Gary Ballance still has one, and so do Martyn Moxon and Andrew Gale and Vaughan. Hutton still has his lucrative legal business. Harrison still gets his bonus. The system resets and replenishes. Nature heals.

    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/bl...and-in-britain


    Arsenal all the way!! (and Pakistan, of course!)

  41. #40
    Debut
    Jul 2018
    Runs
    5,404
    Mentioned
    74 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Saw a great deal of Rafiq's testimony.

    The kind of racism he was subjected to is absolutely shocking. And the extent to which racism is engrained within English cricket even more so.

    I hope more rabid racists and disgusting human beings like Gary Ballance are outed. Azeem has shown alot of courage coming forward and detailing the shocking level of racial and mental abuse that he was victim to.
    Last edited by RedwoodOriginal; 17th November 2021 at 07:17.

  42. #41
    Debut
    Feb 2005
    Venue
    Canada
    Runs
    1,482
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    We already know the following about Rafiq based on the incident in 2010:

    He has no class, no respect and no values. He is always looking to play victim and will try to find excuses and blame others instead of taking ownership of his own performances.

    This shows why his cricket career flopped and he went nowhere in spite of the fact that Yorkshire fast-tracked him and gave him all the chances in the world to become a star.

    He was their youngest captain, he even captained England at junior levels and he got plenty of chances. He failed to deliver because of his own shortcomings and lack of focus and determination.

    As a result, no sympathies for him and he does not deserve to become the Malala and Greta Thunberg of institutional racism in English cricket.

    He has zero credibility. If you are going to have someone lead the war against institutional racism in English cricket, at least choose someone who has led by example with his attitude.

    May I nominate Moeen Ali or Adil Rashid? Moeen is always crying and loves a good moan. He plays victim as much as the next guy, but at least he is led by example in terms of his character and attitude. A thorough gentleman.

    An even better example would Adil Rashid. A man who has never played victim, he has never given long, scripted interviews to the Telegraph and other tabloids about how hard it is to break through the racism system and make your way, simply because he let his performances do the talking.

    Funnily enough, he came through the ranks at Yorkshire and has been England’s premier white ball spinner for years. Why didn’t the racism at Yorkshire hold him back? We are not going to talk about it because it doesn’t suit our agenda and narrative.
    Are you just screaming into your each chamber when you ask these questions? Why don’t you fly to the UK and investigate everything yourself to satisfy your racist agenda? You come in here and begin to abuse the victim, call him classless with no values? This actually sounds like you’re describing yourself. Get help.

  43. #42
    Debut
    Jul 2018
    Runs
    5,404
    Mentioned
    74 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Besides the fact that it literally took people 15 minutes to find a picture on Alex Hales's Instagram with his black dog "Kevin" who he has quite literally mentioned in the caption, the shameful racist Ballance even apologized to Rafiq by referring to him as "Rafa" in his official statement, which can be taken as shorthand for "Rafa the Kaffir", the same ethnic slur that Rafiq mentioned in his testimony that Hoggard was known for using.

    These stupid racists can't even cover their tracks.
    Last edited by RedwoodOriginal; 17th November 2021 at 07:44.

  44. #43
    Debut
    Jul 2010
    Runs
    14,296
    Mentioned
    35 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some extracts from the notes - I'm surprised that Azim never know the meaning of Kaffir but I'm more surprised that the English players allowed it to be said. That word is similar to the N word and there was a high profile case in the early 2000's with Stan Collymore,where it was all over the media that it was racist terminology.

    Matthew Hoggard
    Matthew Hoggard: 2008 – 2009
    34. Matthew Hoggard (or “Hoggy”) was part of the England team for the 2005 Ashes series. He and
    Michael Vaughan were the two England players at YCCC at that time. When they came in, everyone
    looked up to them. For us young academy players coming into the club, they were the flag bearers
    for YCCC. All of the young players revered Hoggy, myself included. It was a huge honour for me to
    be playing on the same team with him. I made my first 100 for the club with Hoggy and it was
    probably one of the most fun days I had playing cricket. I genuinely liked Hoggy, but I think he was
    a product of the discriminatory culture he was in and the culture that was allowed to thrive at YCCC.

    35. It was Hoggy who started calling me “Raffa the Kaffir”. At the time, I honestly didn’t understand
    that it was a racist slur. My nickname at the club was “Raffa”, which was a shortening of my surname
    Rafiq, so when he started calling me “Raffa the Kaffir” – I just thought he said it because it rhymed.
    It was only later I realised what “Kaffir” meant, how it was used, and that it was a racist term. It was
    when I was outlining incidents to the YCCC Investigation Team that I had reason to look into this
    further and appreciated for the first time how seriously demeaning the term was and how casually
    and lightly it had been taken throughout my career with these players. The use of this term provides
    important background context to my claims and indicates the extent to which YCCC had enabled a
    discriminatory culture at YCCC to flourish.

    36. The comments from Hoggy towards myself and the other Asian players – Adil, Ajmal and Rana –
    were constant, on a daily basis, and all day, every day. I think he might have thought it was just
    dressing room banter, but we would come in in the morning and he would say things like “you lot
    sit over there” and make us all sit together. He would also call us things like “elephant washers”
    and “****”.


    37. After I made my disclosure to the media (without naming any names and only referring to the terms
    that were used), Hoggy called me to apologise for what he had said to me. I thanked him and I
    respect him for that.

    38. I think Hoggy is a good example of how there was a club culture that led him to emulate the kinds
    of things he had heard said by players before him. Because it was accepted at YCCC and they did

    not put a stop to it, younger players – like Gary Balance, Andrew Gale and others – then just picked
    up what Hoggy said, like “Raffa the Kaffir”, and kept running with it.

  45. #44
    Debut
    Jul 2010
    Runs
    14,296
    Mentioned
    35 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    https://committees.parliament.uk/pub...81586/default/

    Was going to paste more but its probably easier to read using the link. Details of the abuse by particular players are mentioned. Gale and Bresnan seem the worst because they were in positions of authority.
    Last edited by DeadlyVenom; 17th November 2021 at 15:33.

  46. #45
    Debut
    Sep 2016
    Venue
    Jurassic Park.
    Runs
    12,755
    Mentioned
    123 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The press tells us "not every Muslim is a terrorist but most terrorists are Muslims". Not every Englishman is a racist but most racists are white people!. We all know this is very true. Yes nothing has really changed at all. After the black Footballers missed the penalties against Italy they were all attacked my racists on social media but no one says a thing when white players miss pens. Every major sport is institutionally racist I have no doubt about that. These club's like Yorkshire are still very much in to blue blooded English culture living in the 1960's. They think coloured people are still their slaves.
    Last edited by PakLFC; 17th November 2021 at 15:58.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  47. #46
    Debut
    Feb 2005
    Venue
    Cybertron, Guest of Optimus Prime
    Runs
    25,695
    Mentioned
    210 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Varun View Post
    Earlier he stated that he went drinking with colleagues/friends of his own accord.

    It's important that he stays consistent to his original story for his own sake, instead of trying to please every group in the audience at various times.
    They are two separate incidents. He didn't start to drink to fit in until 2012. He regrests that now and clearly he does.

    His story is consistent except for those who are hell bent on trolling and just denigrating anybody who says anything of the sort.

    I would suggest you re read his testimony or re watch. Dont just listen to the *** bits and comments from our resident troll and his multiple accounts.

  48. #47
    Debut
    Feb 2005
    Venue
    Cybertron, Guest of Optimus Prime
    Runs
    25,695
    Mentioned
    210 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by offstump View Post
    Are you just screaming into your each chamber when you ask these questions? Why don’t you fly to the UK and investigate everything yourself to satisfy your racist agenda? You come in here and begin to abuse the victim, call him classless with no values? This actually sounds like you’re describing yourself. Get help.
    Ignore him. His job is to come onto perfectly normal.disxussions and derail them. I would ask as many of you as possible to ignore his posts and put him on mute. Just reply to the more sensible posters and ignore this one and his ilk.

  49. #48
    Debut
    Aug 2010
    Venue
    Sheffield
    Runs
    37,395
    Mentioned
    1278 Post(s)
    Tagged
    12 Thread(s)
    @Mamoon - if you attended a game at your beloved Arsenal - you'd hear much MUCH worse than the W word being bandied around.

    Equating that word to racial abuse is laughable.

    Watching the Select Committee hearing has raised another issue - the clear conflict of interest between the ECB's regulatory function and it's role to promote the game.

    There's a truly comical exchange at one point:

    ECB Lawyer: We have an Independent Regulatory Committee chaired by an independent Chair.

    Damien Green: And who appoints the Chair of the Independent Regulatory Committee ?

    ECB Lawyer: The ECB...

  50. #49
    Debut
    Sep 2012
    Runs
    94,693
    Mentioned
    7530 Post(s)
    Tagged
    40 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by PakLFC View Post
    The press tells us "not every Muslim is a terrorist but most terrorists are Muslims". Not every Englishman is a racist but most racists are white people!. We all know this is very true. Yes nothing has really changed at all. After the black Footballers missed the penalties against Italy they were all attacked my racists on social media but no one says a thing when white players miss pens. Every major sport is institutionally racist I have no doubt about that. These club's like Yorkshire are still very much in to blue blooded English culture living in the 1960's. They think coloured people are still their slaves.
    Again, a myth.

    Whites are not more racists than Asians, it is just that their racism his highlighted more because Asians do not rake responsibility for their failures and play the victim card at first opportunity.

    Racism has nothing to do with color; it has everything to do with being in a position of power.

    The level of discrimination that we witness in Pakistan when it comes to religious minorities is nothing compared to what we witness in the west. Same goes for India, a far more racist country than UK and any predominantly white country.

    Pakistan lost its entire eastern half because of the level of racism directed at Bengalis and how they were discriminated and denied equal opportunities because of their color and physical characteristics. We perceived their culture as inferior.

    No society can be 100% racism free. It is not natural, there will always be such elements. However, the West overall has done a remarkable job in giving opportunities to minorities.

    This is why every Pakistani and Indian jumps at the chance of going abroad and getting a foreign passport.

    The folks who are jumping up and down in this thread would make a million excuses and provide justifications if you ask them to return to Pakistan and live here if the UK is so racist.

    The fact is that the UK gave them opportunities and a platform that Pakistan could not, and that is why they settled there. If things were that bad they wouldn’t be living here, but they love nothing more than their UK passport.

    Quaid-e-Azam liberated these people from the Queen and made them first class citizens in Pakistan but then they decided that this freedom was not good enough and ran to the UK to sing God save the queen to achieve the ultimate Pakistani dream - get a foreign passport and then play the racism card.

  51. #50
    Debut
    May 2010
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    34,133
    Mentioned
    298 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    Again, a myth.

    Whites are not more racists than Asians, it is just that their racism his highlighted more because Asians do not rake responsibility for their failures and play the victim card at first opportunity.

    Racism has nothing to do with color; it has everything to do with being in a position of power.

    The level of discrimination that we witness in Pakistan when it comes to religious minorities is nothing compared to what we witness in the west. Same goes for India, a far more racist country than UK and any predominantly white country.

    Pakistan lost its entire eastern half because of the level of racism directed at Bengalis and how they were discriminated and denied equal opportunities because of their color and physical characteristics. We perceived their culture as inferior.

    No society can be 100% racism free. It is not natural, there will always be such elements. However, the West overall has done a remarkable job in giving opportunities to minorities.

    This is why every Pakistani and Indian jumps at the chance of going abroad and getting a foreign passport.

    The folks who are jumping up and down in this thread would make a million excuses and provide justifications if you ask them to return to Pakistan and live here if the UK is so racist.

    The fact is that the UK gave them opportunities and a platform that Pakistan could not, and that is why they settled there. If things were that bad they wouldn’t be living here, but they love nothing more than their UK passport.

    Quaid-e-Azam liberated these people from the Queen and made them first class citizens in Pakistan but then they decided that this freedom was not good enough and ran to the UK to sing God save the queen to achieve the ultimate Pakistani dream - get a foreign passport and then play the racism card.
    I said this yesterday to one of our Indian posters, but what happens in the third world is not really our concern. We are a developed multicultural nation which has among the best living standards in the globe. This type of whataboutery is irrelevant here, we judge ourselves by our own standards, not what happens in some tin pot country in the east where 80% of the population barely have food or shelter let alone wonder what racism is.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  52. #51
    Debut
    Sep 2012
    Runs
    94,693
    Mentioned
    7530 Post(s)
    Tagged
    40 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Markhor View Post
    @Mamoon - if you attended a game at your beloved Arsenal - you'd hear much MUCH worse than the W word being bandied around.

    Equating that word to racial abuse is laughable.

    Watching the Select Committee hearing has raised another issue - the clear conflict of interest between the ECB's regulatory function and it's role to promote the game.

    There's a truly comical exchange at one point:
    This is is not about the weight of the word but the significance. The fact that Rafiq did what he did in 2010 tells us the following: he has behavioral and disciplinary issues and like pretty much every Asian in the West, he is not prepared to take ownership of his failures and will always be quick to blame someone else.

    So far, he has presented weak and vague evidence be it Vaughan, Lloyd or Ballance. People are being bullied into apologizing for light remarks. Since he is in a position of power, he can accuse any white person of racism and the woke crowd will be all over him like a rash.

    Instead of abusing his coach for dropping him, had Rafiq focused on his performance and worked twice as hard, he could have achieved something in his cricket career and today, he would be known for his on-field performance instead of being the Malala and Greta against racism in English cricket.

  53. #52
    Debut
    Sep 2012
    Runs
    94,693
    Mentioned
    7530 Post(s)
    Tagged
    40 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt. Rishwat View Post
    I said this yesterday to one of our Indian posters, but what happens in the third world is not really our concern. We are a developed multicultural nation which has among the best living standards in the globe. This type of whataboutery is irrelevant here, we judge ourselves by our own standards, not what happens in some tin pot country in the east where 80% of the population barely have food or shelter let alone wonder what racism is.
    British Asians can become “brown angraiz” by speaking in a British accent they are still brown and still second-class citizens.

    As a result, they cannot detach themselves from what happens in their homelands. Hence, a British Pakistani or British Indian complaining about racism in the UK will always be shown the mirror and reminded of where they came from and what is happening in their original countries.

  54. #53
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    British Asians can become “brown angraiz” by speaking in a British accent they are still brown and still second-class citizens.

    As a result, they cannot detach themselves from what happens in their homelands. Hence, a British Pakistani or British Indian complaining about racism in the UK will always be shown the mirror and reminded of where they came from and what is happening in their original countries.
    Misinformation. No British Asian is reminded about where they came from when they complain about racism.

    You have no exposure to the west. Stop pretending you do.

  55. #54
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    British Asians can become “brown angraiz” by speaking in a British accent they are still brown and still second-class citizens.

    As a result, they cannot detach themselves from what happens in their homelands. Hence, a British Pakistani or British Indian complaining about racism in the UK will always be shown the mirror and reminded of where they came from and what is happening in their original countries.
    Misinformation. No British Asian is reminded about where they came from when they complain about racism.

    You have no exposure to the west. Stop pretending you do.

  56. #55
    Debut
    May 2010
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    34,133
    Mentioned
    298 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    British Asians can become “brown angraiz” by speaking in a British accent they are still brown and still second-class citizens.

    As a result, they cannot detach themselves from what happens in their homelands. Hence, a British Pakistani or British Indian complaining about racism in the UK will always be shown the mirror and reminded of where they came from and what is happening in their original countries.
    I am not really interested in your third world views. You don't even represent genuine Pakistani views, you are from a privileged elite, but you are still from a different world to the west thus your views are completely out of touch with what we believe as British people. Brits don't accept that being brown or black makes you a second class citizen, these are beliefs which are more suited to ignorants living in third world countries....hence your contribution.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  57. #56
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Venue
    England
    Runs
    39,934
    Mentioned
    358 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Oh my goodness, Matthew Hoggard. I have always looked up to him as an honest man and as an underappreciated northern workhorse. Turns out that he is a huge racist. What a disappointment.

  58. #57
    Debut
    Sep 2016
    Venue
    Jurassic Park.
    Runs
    12,755
    Mentioned
    123 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    Again, a myth.

    Whites are not more racists than Asians, it is just that their racism his highlighted more because Asians do not rake responsibility for their failures and play the victim card at first opportunity.

    Racism has nothing to do with color; it has everything to do with being in a position of power.

    The level of discrimination that we witness in Pakistan when it comes to religious minorities is nothing compared to what we witness in the west. Same goes for India, a far more racist country than UK and any predominantly white country.

    Pakistan lost its entire eastern half because of the level of racism directed at Bengalis and how they were discriminated and denied equal opportunities because of their color and physical characteristics. We perceived their culture as inferior.

    No society can be 100% racism free. It is not natural, there will always be such elements. However, the West overall has done a remarkable job in giving opportunities to minorities.

    This is why every Pakistani and Indian jumps at the chance of going abroad and getting a foreign passport.

    The folks who are jumping up and down in this thread would make a million excuses and provide justifications if you ask them to return to Pakistan and live here if the UK is so racist.

    The fact is that the UK gave them opportunities and a platform that Pakistan could not, and that is why they settled there. If things were that bad they wouldn’t be living here, but they love nothing more than their UK passport.

    Quaid-e-Azam liberated these people from the Queen and made them first class citizens in Pakistan but then they decided that this freedom was not good enough and ran to the UK to sing God save the queen to achieve the ultimate Pakistani dream - get a foreign passport and then play the racism card.
    No I disagree. Coloured people are racist too but not as much as whites. I am not gonna deny how many times I have heard Pakistani making racist comments towards whites and even Indian's but not at the level that they make physical threats. Racism has everything to do with race, what you on about being in denial about it. It is the belief that my race is historically better then yours. Certain Football clubs sing songs of how the UK was never ruled by foreigners.

    I am talking about white racism towards coloured Cricketers today where as you are on about ancient times. I do not want to derail this thread by starting on the 1971 war so will stay on topic. I don't think white cricketers been abused during the IPL or PSL, this because many coloured people do deep down feel that white's are superior. No one is saying that the west is not a great place to live....it would also help if the many coloured people from the subcontinent attempted to improve their English speaking and understanding skills too. Let me make it clear that most white Cricketers and sporting institutions in the west have racist attitudes.


    PP's own self proclaimed sharpshooter and defender of Islam and Pakistan.

  59. #58
    Debut
    Apr 2010
    Runs
    29,924
    Mentioned
    4757 Post(s)
    Tagged
    23 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    Misinformation. No British Asian is reminded about where they came from when they complain about racism.

    You have no exposure to the west. Stop pretending you do.
    You are wrong, there is so much to learn from individuals who come from communities with such a severe tribal mindset that they are only allowed to marry closely related Pashtuns in the family, there is a lot to learn from these people when it comes to racism in the west and obtain a deeper understanding into the consequences of their experiences, especially the disease which is spread.

  60. #59
    Debut
    May 2010
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    34,133
    Mentioned
    298 Post(s)
    Tagged
    6 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by shaz619 View Post
    You are wrong, there is so much to learn from individuals who come from communities with such a severe tribal mindset that they are only allowed to marry closely related Pashtuns in the family, there is a lot to learn from these people when it comes to racism in the west and obtain a deeper understanding into the consequences of their experiences, especially the disease which is spread.
    You are doing the troll's work for him, he doesn't even identify with that tribal mindset, he's an avowed Indophile. Take it from a forum veteran, there's another more effective path for hitting the target.


    I for one welcome our new In____ overlords - Kent Brockman

  61. #60
    Debut
    Aug 2010
    Venue
    Sheffield
    Runs
    37,395
    Mentioned
    1278 Post(s)
    Tagged
    12 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamoon View Post
    This is is not about the weight of the word but the significance. The fact that Rafiq did what he did in 2010 tells us the following: he has behavioral and disciplinary issues and like pretty much every Asian in the West, he is not prepared to take ownership of his failures and will always be quick to blame someone else.

    So far, he has presented weak and vague evidence be it Vaughan, Lloyd or Ballance. People are being bullied into apologizing for light remarks. Since he is in a position of power, he can accuse any white person of racism and the woke crowd will be all over him like a rash.

    Instead of abusing his coach for dropping him, had Rafiq focused on his performance and worked twice as hard, he could have achieved something in his cricket career and today, he would be known for his on-field performance instead of being the Malala and Greta against racism in English cricket.
    Let's talk specifics instead of recycling these monologues. First:

    Why is a casual racist remark worse than calling the U-19 England coach a w*nker on Twitter?
    UK citizens are legally protected from racist harassment in the workplace. Calling somebody a W (which here is akin to calling somebody an idiot than the literal sense of the term) on Twitter is not a prosecutable offence. Nor is a one time Twitter outburst comparable to years and years of prolonged racial harassment.

    Rafiq deserved disciplining after that Twitter remark. However we've heard disciplinary action was NOT taken against Gary Ballance for a far worse offence - failing a recreational drug test, and that YCCC allowed Ballance to miss drug tests under the guise of mental health.

    Given YCCC's behaviour it's highly doubtful a cricketer of colour would've received similar latitude, and reflects an institutional racism that Roger Hutton himself admitted.

    Second, you attack Rafiq's credibility on the basis of one incident yet won't discuss the credibility of Yorkshire's "independent" investigation and their spineless executives Moxon and Arthur, who refused to answer questions in Parliament ! The company Yorkshire used to investigate Rafiq's allegation is ex-chair Roger Hutton's old law firm. How on earth can that be an independent investigation ?!

    Finally, the problem is while Varun has a reflexively anti-English bias, you have a reflexively pro-English bias borne from your brief experiences living in Southern England. Idyllic places like Southampton are far removed from these ex-industrial Northern towns across Yorkshire where I've lived and worked where sadly, informal segregation and ghettoisation exists.

    This racial polarisation is reflected in local cricket. Having cricketers of colour playing for Yorkshire or England doesn't mean the structural barriers like the lack of investment in ethnic minority communities and almost invisible presence of ethnic minorities in County Boardrooms doesn't exist. Recognising this doesn't mean I'm ungrateful for the opportunities the UK have given me with free healthcare, a fairly liberal society, a good education and a job providing income my Pakistani born parents could never have dreamed of. I still love this country despite it's flaws, and remain a proud Yorkshireman.

    But loving your country means improving it by confronting hard truths, not shying away from them and smearing those who speak up, so everyone receives the same opportunities.

  62. #61
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    British Asian Person: I would like to make a complaint about the racism I suffered by XYZ people.

    British Police: You would like to make a complaint about racism? May I remind you where you have come from?!


    This is how Mamoon would like you to believe it.

  63. #62
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    British Asian Person: I would like to make a complaint about when I suffered racial abuse when I was working for company x.

    British police: according to our records, you called your boss a w*nker 10 years ago. So I guess you are both even now, what is the point of complaining?

    This is Mamoon’s analogy.

  64. #63
    Debut
    Jun 2017
    Runs
    1,730
    Mentioned
    115 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    British Asian Person: I would like to make a complaint about when I suffered racial abuse when I was working for company x.

    British police: according to our records, you called your boss a w*nker 10 years ago. So I guess you are both even now, what is the point of complaining?

    This is Mamoon’s analogy.
    Exactly.

    ‘Had you worked twice as hard instead of calling your boss a Wxxx, we wouldn’t be having this conversation about racism as you would have succeeded in your career’

  65. #64
    Debut
    Feb 2019
    Runs
    6,597
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    British Asian Person: I would like to make a complaint about when I suffered racial abuse when I was working for company x.

    British police: according to our records, you called your boss a w*nker 10 years ago. So I guess you are both even now, what is the point of complaining?

    This is Mamoon’s analogy.
    That’s not the analogy.

    If Azeem when to a tribunal or a proper criminal court of law, then his past actions and character would be exposed and he would face far more tougher questions then the sugar-coated loaded questions he faced at the select committee yesterday.

    When a case is at a criminal court, because racism is a crime, all past history and data related to the case is revealed by law. It would mean having Vaughan, Bumble, Ballance, etc in the dock, including Azeem.

    A barrister would rip apart Azeem’s experience in a matter of a few hours.

  66. #65
    Debut
    Feb 2019
    Runs
    6,597
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If Azeem’s case was heard at a court of law then the following questions would be enough to flummox the charge:

    1. Why did you not report the instances of racism at the time?
    2. Why did you not report coercion at the time?
    3. If you were playing for England today, would you have ever reported racism and coercion at YCCC?
    4. You mentioned your 2017 statistics warranted progression, why given other YCCC players had better statistics?
    5. Why did you wait for over 10 years to report racism and coercion?
    6. There are xyz Asian players with YCCC, County, and ECB central contracts - how does this translate to institutional racism?

    There’s a reason why cases on racism and mysigoniy never hit criminal courts - casual claims are dismantled easily.

    Institutional racism, such as with the case of Stephen Lawrence, cause tsunamis and force change to the system which is why they are heard in a criminal court of law, whereas as causal racism - he said this he said that, simply fall into the compensation & attention seeking category.


    5.

  67. #66
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Technics 1210 View Post
    That’s not the analogy.

    If Azeem when to a tribunal or a proper criminal court of law, then his past actions and character would be exposed and he would face far more tougher questions then the sugar-coated loaded questions he faced at the select committee yesterday.

    When a case is at a criminal court, because racism is a crime, all past history and data related to the case is revealed by law. It would mean having Vaughan, Bumble, Ballance, etc in the dock, including Azeem.

    A barrister would rip apart Azeem’s experience in a matter of a few hours.
    In case you are struggling to comprehend the current proceedings, anyone accused by Azeem has not contested his allegations by suing him for defamation. Nearly everyone named has either admitted their guilt or apologised for past actions. So I don’t understand why you are trying to beat a dead horse when you say ‘if this was a criminal case’. There is no criminal case right now, it’s an open and shut case.

  68. #67
    Debut
    Feb 2019
    Runs
    6,597
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    In case you are struggling to comprehend the current proceedings, anyone accused by Azeem has not contested his allegations by suing him for defamation. Nearly everyone named has either admitted their guilt or apologised for past actions. So I don’t understand why you are trying to beat a dead horse when you say ‘if this was a criminal case’. There is no criminal case right now, it’s an open and shut case.
    You need to read what I posted. The point was in relation to Azeem’s past disciplinary and character assessment. IF Azeem had gone to a criminal court, his past would be revealed, and this plays and sways on judgement. He has smart - don’t delay claim today - lawyers who knew media sensationalism would be an easier route out.

    Racism in the UK is a crime, why didn’t Azeem take the YCCC and ECB to court? In your own time.
    Last edited by MenInG; 17th November 2021 at 19:45.

  69. #68
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Technics 1210 View Post
    You need to read what I posted. The point was in relation to Azeem’s past disciplinary and character assessment. IF Azeem had gone to a criminal court, his past would be revealed, and this plays and sways on judgement. He has smart - don’t delay claim today - lawyers who knew media sensationalism would be an easier route out.

    Racism in the UK is a crime, why didn’t Azeem take the YCCC and ECB to court? In your own time.
    In your own time, why don’t you explain to me why anyone accused by Azeem have not filed for defamation? Rather everyone has apologised or admitted their mistakes?

    Defamation of character is also a crime. If Azeem is at fault for whatever procedure he did apply, he would have to answer for it in a criminal court because of possible defamation
    Last edited by MenInG; 17th November 2021 at 19:45.

  70. #69
    Debut
    Feb 2019
    Runs
    6,597
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    I’m not sure what I said wrong to him as a response. It’s a pretty fair response to his argument.

    The only way this will turn into a criminal case is if those accused by Azeem want to take him to court for defamation. The other way is if the police decide to prosecute those who have admitted to be racist in the report of this tribunal.
    You didn’t answer my question(s). There is no argument.

    Rhetorical question (meaning no need to answer it), racism is a crime, why didn’t Azeem take this case to a criminal court? Some of us know why.

  71. #70
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Technics 1210 View Post
    You didn’t answer my question(s). There is no argument.

    Rhetorical question (meaning no need to answer it), racism is a crime, why didn’t Azeem take this case to a criminal court? Some of us know why.
    OK, but then why didn’t those accused by him not take him to court for defamation of character? That’s my question to you. Let us know why?

  72. #71
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    Azeem Rafiq has had to wait a long time to make himself heard and he’s grown so frustrated it has affected his mental health. He has gone through an absolute nightmare.

    So it was incredibly brave of him to sit there in front of the world on Tuesday and explain so impressively what he has experienced. It was harrowing listening to it.

    There is no doubt there has been a culture in cricket dressing rooms for a very long time where every point of difference is open to mickey-taking.

    But there is a line that must not be crossed and it’s now become clear just how shockingly that line was all too often crossed, and not just at Yorkshire.

    It is prevalent throughout the game. And it has not been picked up because it has become the norm. It’s been a ‘that’s what we do’ attitude and that has been allowed to fester for far too long.

    Those constant little digs and comments take their toll and the victims have just been forced to laugh it off because they have to fit in and conform. But we have not known how people react to those digs when they go back to their room and are alone.

    Rafiq will have been fully vindicated by former chairman Roger Hutton admitting institutionalised racism at Yorkshire. It is why he had to go through the media to get his voice heard in the first place. His club were ignoring him.

    How Yorkshire can finally come up with a report, after delay upon delay, and conclude there was racism and bullying yet not hold anyone responsible is the most shocking aspect of this whole affair. You can imagine Azeem’s reaction when he heard that.

    It doesn’t just send a message to Rafiq but everyone in the system. To all the young kids, coaches and supporters. That systemic racism and bullying are fine. If you do that you will not be held accountable.

    No one came out of Tuesday well. Not Yorkshire. Nor the PCA, who claimed they did not have the budget to support Rafiq.

    And not the ECB either. I’ve heard the words Tom Harrison said on Tuesday for years and years. I’ve heard ‘this is not good enough’ ever since I first picked up a bat.

    I’ve heard that the ECB will be looking into the lack of British Asians in the professional game. That they will investigate the lack of participation in cricket among the British Afro-Caribbean community.

    Honestly, we have heard it all before. I was asking when I was England captain what happened to all the talented young Asian kids I would watch at my dad’s cricket school in Ilford. There was so much talent but they never seemed to make it to the professional game.

    I have watched a lot of age-group and Essex League cricket over the last few years and have seen teams made up of 50 per cent British Asian players. Then it just drops off a cliff as they get older.

    Is it any wonder when you hear Rafiq’s story?

    I look on in dismay at what is happening at my old club. The Essex chairman John Faragher has been forced to resign and two former players, Zoheb Sharif and Maurice Chambers, have come forward to say they were victims of racism while at the club.

    It was disturbing in particular to hear what happened to Chambers. How that sort of behaviour can go on in a cricket dressing room as recently as 10 years ago is beyond me.

    There is a guy I have mentioned before called Arfan Akram who is doing brilliant work for Essex with the South Asian community in east London. I really feel for him today.

    There is so much good going on at that Leyton hub, not only in encouraging different communities to play the game but also educating the coaches to work with them. But if there is a rotten culture at the top all that becomes is a box-ticking exercise.

    There will have been so many British Asian families watching Rafiq’s testimony on Tuesday and nodding their heads because it has happened to them. It is what they have been through.

    Yes it is a complicated topic and there are some British Asians who prefer to play in their own leagues but they have felt like outsiders for all the talk of inclusivity.

    Is this a turning point? Well, I’ve seen a lot of so-called turning points over the years but maybe after on Tuesday there is hope.

    I applaud what Azeem has done and there is no doubt Yorkshire now have a good man at the top in Lord Patel.

    I have met him a couple of times and he looks like a doer to me. If there is a complaint he will investigate it and he won’t put up with any more nonsense.

    Lord Patel has talked about seismic change and as long as the game means it and doesn’t just go in for those box-ticking exercise, like wearing T-shirts and all that sort of stuff, then maybe we can be optimistic for a brighter, more inclusive future.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/sp...sh-Asians.html


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  73. #72
    Debut
    Feb 2019
    Runs
    6,597
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    OK, but then why didn’t those accused by him not take him to court for defamation of character? That’s my question to you. Let us know why?

    Answer my questions first and I promise you I will answer yours.

  74. #73
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Technics 1210 View Post
    Answer my questions first and I promise you I will answer yours.
    Tbh, I do not know why he didn’t file for a criminal case straight away. Maybe because he was worried about the element of ‘my word against yours’ when making accusations. To make a criminal case of racism, I guess Azeem needed a current incident witnessed by others to report to the police, and then take it from there.

    The nature of the case which spans a period of 10-15 years with sporadic incidents that require cultural interpretation may be the reason why he went through the civil channels, such as filing complaints with the ECB and then building upon it with the support he received. It has worked in his favour because the pressure amounted by him has lead to many people admitting their mistakes, others being exposed for their mistakes and some apologising for their role in this. It has lead to suspensions of employment contracts and hosting rights for YCCC. So there is no smoke without fire here, it is a clear case of a fire that is very much visible now.

    What I do think should happen now is the Metropolitan police will be monitoring how this case unfolds and will be pressing charges accordingly.

  75. #74
    Debut
    Mar 2021
    Venue
    The Universe
    Runs
    496
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think what is clear is that if you have an obsession and a passion with tackling all forms of racism then you are coming from a very good place.

    If you have an obsession and passion with playing down racism, attacking those that call it out then there is something seriously wrong with you.

    It is clear from all the threads on this topic, who is in what camp.

    I mean, having doubts about things and questioning things - as many do - is fine. But to be so obsessed and determined to troll on this topic can only mean that there are serious mental and psychological issues at play with the individuals concerned. I hope they are able to get the help they need.

  76. #75
    Debut
    Jul 2018
    Venue
    London, UK
    Runs
    6,838
    Mentioned
    228 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Markhor View Post
    Let's talk specifics instead of recycling these monologues. First:



    UK citizens are legally protected from racist harassment in the workplace. Calling somebody a W (which here is akin to calling somebody an idiot than the literal sense of the term) on Twitter is not a prosecutable offence. Nor is a one time Twitter outburst comparable to years and years of prolonged racial harassment.

    Rafiq deserved disciplining after that Twitter remark. However we've heard disciplinary action was NOT taken against Gary Ballance for a far worse offence - failing a recreational drug test, and that YCCC allowed Ballance to miss drug tests under the guise of mental health.

    Given YCCC's behaviour it's highly doubtful a cricketer of colour would've received similar latitude, and reflects an institutional racism that Roger Hutton himself admitted.

    Second, you attack Rafiq's credibility on the basis of one incident yet won't discuss the credibility of Yorkshire's "independent" investigation and their spineless executives Moxon and Arthur, who refused to answer questions in Parliament ! The company Yorkshire used to investigate Rafiq's allegation is ex-chair Roger Hutton's old law firm. How on earth can that be an independent investigation ?!

    Finally, the problem is while Varun has a reflexively anti-English bias, you have a reflexively pro-English bias borne from your brief experiences living in Southern England. Idyllic places like Southampton are far removed from these ex-industrial Northern towns across Yorkshire where I've lived and worked where sadly, informal segregation and ghettoisation exists.

    This racial polarisation is reflected in local cricket. Having cricketers of colour playing for Yorkshire or England doesn't mean the structural barriers like the lack of investment in ethnic minority communities and almost invisible presence of ethnic minorities in County Boardrooms doesn't exist. Recognising this doesn't mean I'm ungrateful for the opportunities the UK have given me with free healthcare, a fairly liberal society, a good education and a job providing income my Pakistani born parents could never have dreamed of. I still love this country despite it's flaws, and remain a proud Yorkshireman.

    But loving your country means improving it by confronting hard truths, not shying away from them and smearing those who speak up, so everyone receives the same opportunities.
    Excellent response to an overseas individual from a privileged society in Pakistan who could never relate to these issues.

    @Mamoon I bet no one in your life has ever called you a p***. I've lived in a white dominated neighbourhood since birth and have been subject to the racist slur since I was 6 years old.

    You have no idea what we go through and it's exactly why I also speak up for the oppressed minorities in Pakistan but unlike you, I have the decency not to derail this thread because this isn't the place to discuss it. There are plenty of threads on timepass to put your points forward on this matter.

  77. #76
    Debut
    Jan 2006
    Runs
    34,058
    Mentioned
    388 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    A classic case of my word against yours in cricket racism:

    1. Moeen Ali hears an Australian cricketer say ‘Take that Osama’.

    2. Moeen Ali lodges a complaint of racism to the police as this is a criminal offence.

    3. The person in question strongly denies using a racial slur and says Moeen misheard him.

    4. Witnesses confirm they either didn’t hear the person say ‘take that Osama’, or they didn’t really hear anything so they just want to stay out of it.

    5. Due to a lack of evidence, the police have no choice but to close the case.

    This is why you cannot be sure to file criminal charges in such delicate matters. Azeem did the right thing and he will eventually open a door for people to lodge their experiences as victims of racism in club cricket and pro cricket. Everything through this medium will be taken seriously now

  78. #77
    Debut
    Feb 2019
    Runs
    6,597
    Mentioned
    100 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rana View Post
    Tbh, I do not know why he didn’t file for a criminal case straight away. Maybe because he was worried about the element of ‘my word against yours’ when making accusations. To make a criminal case of racism, I guess Azeem needed a current incident witnessed by others to report to the police, and then take it from there.

    The nature of the case which spans a period of 10-15 years with sporadic incidents that require cultural interpretation may be the reason why he went through the civil channels, such as filing complaints with the ECB and then building upon it with the support he received. It has worked in his favour because the pressure amounted by him has lead to many people admitting their mistakes, others being exposed for their mistakes and some apologising for their role in this. It has lead to suspensions of employment contracts and hosting rights for YCCC. So there is no smoke without fire here, it is a clear case of a fire that is very much visible now.

    What I do think should happen now is the Metropolitan police will be monitoring how this case unfolds and will be pressing charges accordingly.
    You nailed it.

    Azeem had no empirical evidence, it was his word against others, his experience and words against others, so he went the media route, took a gamble, which compelled past and present players to ‘apologise’ - aka peer pressure - given the current climate of race relations.

    The nature of the accusations span 10 to 15 years indeed, but here lies the problem, within those 10-15 years, Azeem excelled at the county level, and U19 level. It’s hard to prove institutional racism in court given his success at County level is proof that he was given the opportunity to represent his county as an Asian. He knew this.

    This is why Azeem didn’t go to a criminal court, a) he had no empirical evidence, b) his 10+ year tenure undermines his account of institutional racism at YCCC.

    What Azeem has is a case of casual racism between colleagues. Ballance used racist language, used terms like ‘Kevin’ (which frankly speaking I have never heard of before), and Azeem felt he was discriminated given his relationship with Ballance. Bumble and Vaughan are just scapegoats. Their comments were by no means racist language and that Azeem simply inferred their comments as racist. Had Azeem been born in the UK, I doubt he would have used Vaughan’s comments as an equivocal to racism simply because Azeem would have a better understanding of Yorkshire culture being born and bred.

    Now to answer your question - why didn’t those accused by him not take him to court for defamation of character? Ballance is from Zimbabwe, racism is ingrained in his upbringing and culture. His perception of racism is considered a normality given the race relations in Zimbabwe - in simple terms, social conditioning. In the same way Vaughan’s - you lot - comment is the norm in North `England, but you have to live it from the day you are born to understand the northern culture. There is no mallace, it’s just culture that has overspilled into the definition of racism.

    You cannot blame Ballance for his blaze views on racism in the same way we cannot blame Pakistan/Indians on their views vicer versa veesa.

    This case in my view has exposed the lack of cultural integration management between multinational players. Some times we have to accept that oil and water do not mix.

    I don’t think the police will get involved now. The select committee grants immunity and is non-binding, any case in a criminal court would be refused now due to the media exposure.

  79. #78
    Debut
    Oct 2004
    Runs
    162,625
    Mentioned
    2880 Post(s)
    Tagged
    22 Thread(s)
    Azeem Rafiq says he is "determined" that sharing his experiences of racism at Yorkshire will be the moment "not only sport but society as a whole" moved in a different direction.

    Rafiq, 30, told a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee on Tuesday that English cricket is "institutionally" racist.

    The former Yorkshire player told BBC sports editor Dan Roan he was "incredibly relieved" to have given his emotional and harrowing account of the racist abuse he suffered in two spells at the club.

    "It's really important the game and wider society listens to my experiences and we don't let this moment go and we try to use this as a watershed moment for the future," he said.

    Rafiq, who had two spells at Yorkshire between 2008-14 and 2016-18, said his dad had told him how proud he was of him after giving his testimony to MPs.

    "He said that no amount of runs or wickets could've done what I did and that I should be really proud of myself," he said.

    "I have no doubts that racism cost me my career but I believe in Allah and that everything happens for a reason.

    "What I've been able to do and hopefully what we'll all be able to do moving forward will be more powerful than any runs and wickets or Ashes and World Cups."

    Rafiq added that he had received death threats throughout the process after first speaking out last year, claiming "institutional racism" at Yorkshire left him close to taking his own life.

    "We've had threats throughout, different types, but it comes with the territory," he said.

    "You've got a lot of people in denial and it's sad but hopefully we can get through it."

    He added that someone had recently tried to claim he had a bomb in his local shop.

    "It's something we've lived with all our lives," he said.

    "I'm very determined that this is going to be looked back as the moment that not only sport but society as a whole went in a different direction to the way it had been going."

    Rafiq told the DCMS select committee how racist language was "constantly" used at Yorkshire County Cricket Club and how he received "inhuman" treatment after his son was still-born in 2017.

    He added the issues he faced at Yorkshire are "without a shadow of a doubt" widespread in domestic cricket.

    Rafiq said on Wednesday that he expects the "floodgates" to open and similar cases in county cricket to emerge, and that he had spoken to "a few people" already since his testimony.

    He said while the process had been "horrible" and was still "incredibly raw" he would "be there" for anyone else who comes forward.

    "You've got to be honest and you've got to come forward and get it off your chest - you are going to be heard," he said.

    "Whether anyone else stands by you or not, I'll stand by you.

    "Hopefully people will be believed and heard a lot more and people can take confidence from that."

    Former Essex players Zoheb Sharif and Maurice Chambers have both alleged racism at the club in recent days.

    Sharif told BBC Sport that Rafiq speaking up empowered him to talk about the racist abuse he faced himself.

    England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) chief executive Tom Harrison told the DCMS select committee that the ECB had "struggled" to get the first-class game to "wake up" on racism.

    Rafiq said that Harrison only has "a few months where we need to see some tangible changes" because "everyone's patience is starting to run out".

    "It's very easy to throw the book at Yorkshire," added Rafiq.

    "As we'll find out over the next few days and weeks, it's not just a Yorkshire problem. The buck lies with the ECB."

    Rafiq said both the ECB and the Professional Cricketers' Association (PCA) "let me down" and there needs to be "accountability" at both organisations.

    "The PCA and how they operate needs to be looked at, because it didn't feel like a trade union to me," he added.

    "It feels like the game has got so corporate and lost the human touch."

    In a statement, the ECB said: "Azeem has shown incredible courage in speaking out, and we are appalled by what he has experienced. His evidence was harrowing, and this must be a turning point for our game.

    "We utterly condemn racism or discrimination of any kind and there is no place for it in our game. We are thoroughly investigating these events, will take the necessary action, and must learn lessons as a game."

    Rafiq on denials and apologies

    Rafiq says the focus should be on institutions instead of individuals, though his testimony and witness statement necessarily includes specific allegations against named people.

    He alleges former England captain and BBC cricket pundit Michael Vaughan said "too many of you lot, we need to do something about it" to him and three other Asian players in 2009 while they were all at Yorkshire.

    England bowler Adil Rashid and former Pakistan bowler Rana Naved-ul-Hasan have corroborated the allegation, which Vaughan "completely and categorically denies".

    When asked about Vaughan, Rafiq said: "With people in denial there's got to be a level of accountability there and it's for their employers to send out a message - are they going to give a green light to racism or are they going to stamp it out?

    "I'm disappointed in a lot of people's denials. It may not mean a lot to them - I can live with that.

    "But to try and completely deny it and make out that it's all made up in my head is hurtful."

    He also criticised Yorkshire director of cricket Martyn Moxon, who is absent from work with a "stress-related illness," and former chief executive Mark Arthur, who resigned last week, for not attending Tuesday's hearing.

    "The fact they didn't should show the Yorkshire members and people still standing by their side exactly how they've behaved throughout this period," he said.

    "Standing with them now means you're not just part of the problem, you are the problem."

    However, Rafiq said he will accept those who reach out to apologise.

    Rafiq said on Tuesday that Sky Sports commentator David Lloyd, a former Lancashire captain and England player and later coach, had made disparaging comments about Asian cricketers after Rafiq spoke about his experiences on television.

    Lloyd issued a public apology and Sky are investigating Rafiq's claims.

    "David Lloyd reached out and apologised to me personally," added Rafiq.

    "I said to him that's all I ever wanted and I told him that it hurt me, he was completely out of order and he doesn't even know me.

    "He's deeply sorry about it and I accept his apology."

    https://www.bbc.com/sport/cricket/59319449


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  80. #79
    Debut
    Jan 2021
    Runs
    911
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I only just watched the full video....it is even more harrowing than the text snippets on any news website. It's horrific how he was treated at YCCC, even worse when it's not just racism but inhumane treatment as a result of his stillborn child, of side lining Azeem even after he reported not just racism but elements of bullying. At one stage he mentions that he was one of I think 7 who complained, yet he was the only one singled out and punished...punished for raising bullying in his work place.

    The ECB has been inept as custodian of the game since its inception and must be restructured or eliminated.

  81. #80
    Debut
    Dec 2005
    Venue
    UK
    Runs
    2,296
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Technics 1210 View Post
    You need to read what I posted. The point was in relation to Azeem’s past disciplinary and character assessment. IF Azeem had gone to a criminal court, his past would be revealed, and this plays and sways on judgement. He has smart - don’t delay claim today - lawyers who knew media sensationalism would be an easier route out.

    Racism in the UK is a crime, why didn’t Azeem take the YCCC and ECB to court? In your own time.
    You are completely clueless about the British constitution and the facts of the Azim Rafiq.

    Racism is not necessarily a crime heard in a criminal court where the matter has to be proved beyond reasonable doubt.

    Employment matters, which the Rafiq matter is, is heard in an employment tribunal which is a civil court. In a civil court you don’t prove beyond reasonable doubt but base decision on balance of probability.


    Rafiq case has been settled out of court! There was enough evidence for a claim to be accepted by the courts and settlement claims were made much earlier than last week by Yorkshire CCC who are advised by employment solicitors.

    Now that is cleared then lots focus on the facts….

    Rafiq being good or bad character is irrelevant

    Rafiq taking one week or ten years to report a matter can be considered acceptable if a valid reason is given

    Rafiq being a good or bad player is irrelevant

    Again to repeat myself again my dear friend….


    Rafiq reported racism and no action / not enough action taken and not adequately investigated

    Eventually a top law firm (Squire Patton and Boggs) have been paid by YCCC to write an independent report. One of the findings is that the word p*ki is merely banter! This report would have been approved by the board before being published.

    Much of this report is now public and since then existing players have admitted using the p*ki word or being encouraging or dismissive of racism or failing to report it!

    This my dear boy is a huge, monumental sporting scandal yet you can’t see it! You seem to be obsessed with words such as snowflake and opportunistic when the perpetrators, YCCC, ECB and witnesses have either confirmed or admitted that racism took place.

    Rafiq has been given a payout as the above is a scandal where he is a victim.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •