(Videos) Wasim Akram reveals he was addicted to cocaine after his playing career ended


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View Poll Results: Will Wasim Akram's admission of a previous drug addiction damage his legacy?

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  • No, people will still respect him for his services as a cricketer

    24 66.67%
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  1. #1
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    (Videos) Wasim Akram reveals he was addicted to cocaine after his playing career ended

    Former Pakistan captain Wasim Akram has revealed he was addicted to cocaine after his playing career ended but quit following the death of his first wife.

    The legendary fast bowler, 56, took more than 900 international wickets before retiring in 2003.

    In a new autobiography, Wasim, 56, said he began using cocaine while working as a television pundit around the world.

    "The culture of fame in south Asia is all consuming, seductive and corrupting," he told the Times.

    "You can go to 10 parties a night, and some do. And it took its toll on me."

    His first wife Huma died suddenly in 2009 from a rare fungal infection.

    "Huma's last selfless, unconscious act was curing me of my drug problem," said Wasim.

    "That way of life was over, and I have never looked back."

    After making his international debut in 1984, left-arm quick Wasim played 104 Tests and 356 one-day internationals for Pakistan, winning the 1992 World Cup.

    He led Pakistan in 25 Tests and 109 ODIs between 1993 and 2000 and is widely regarded as one of the best bowlers of all time.

    Wasim said he "developed a dependence on cocaine" while he was travelling away from Huma and their two sons, who were living in Manchester.

    He added: "It started innocuously enough when I was offered a line at a party in England; my use grew steadily more serious, to the point that I felt I needed it to function.

    "Huma, I know, was often lonely in this time, she would talk of her desire to move to Karachi, to be nearer her parents and siblings. I was reluctant.

    "Why? Partly because I liked going to Karachi on my own, pretending it was work when it was actually about partying, often for days at a time."

    He sought help after his late wife discovered his drug use, but said he had a bad experience in a rehab facility in Lahore and fell back into the habit during the 2009 Champions Trophy, where he worked as a pundit.

    He said the drugs were "a substitute for the adrenaline rush of competition, which I sorely missed" but Huma's death shortly after that tournament spurred him to quit.

    He has since remarried and has a young daughter with his second wife.

    Wasim also addressed allegations of match-fixing during his career, again denying any involvement in corruption,

    In 2000, Pakistan players Saleem Malik and Ata-ur-Rehman were banned for match-fixing.

    A report into the scandal by Justice Malik Qayyum found Wasim not guilty of match-fixing but did recommend that he be fined and not allowed to captain Pakistan because he refused to cooperate and "cannot be said to be above suspicion".

    The report said "there has been some evidence to cast doubt on his integrity" but Wasim said he did not read it until he wrote his book.

    "I knew I was innocent," he added.

    "Everything was he said, she said, I heard from someone else, Wasim sent a message through someone else. I mean it doesn't even sound right.

    "It's embarrassing because my kids have grown up and they ask questions."

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/63439764

  2. #2
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    Overall I think he kept it hidden reasonably well.

    Glad to see he is recovered and healthy. Seems in decent shape for an ex coke head diabetic.
    Last edited by MenInG; 29th October 2022 at 21:06.

  3. #3
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    Very brave disclosure given the stigma around substance misuse in the South Asian/Islamic community.

    Cocaine is a hell of a drug.

    Hopefully more people come forward about their substance problems in our part of the world and get help for it.

  4. #4
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    wow, didnt expect that, well done to him on recovering, would never have taken him for a coke head tbh. always seemed to be fairly in control of his image in public. I'm guessing being limited to doing it away from his family meant he had some break from it.

    but why even address the match-fixing issues if ur not gonna be honest. just leave it out.

  5. #5
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    Well damn, it takes a big man to talk openly about this, espacially from Asian culture.

  6. #6
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    Cocaine is a very serious and expensive addiction. One small pouch would cost Rs 25-30 k in 2017, now it must be Rs 50-60k. I know a few people in Pakistan who have sold their cars, plots, houses to finance their addiction. Always avoid at all costs, don't fall for the classic it's only one puff, one line, that's how it starts and then you get addicted.

  7. #7
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    If Wasim Akram can come out and discuss his problem it will only help other youngsters come out and seek help.

    Isnít there a drug problem in Pakistan and Afghanistan despite them being hardcore Islamic countries?

    I would say a brave move.
    Last edited by James; 30th October 2022 at 01:35.

  8. #8
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    It is good to know that he was able to overcome his drug addiction. That can be extremely hard.

  9. #9
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    A lot of skeletons in his closet. Wasim is probably telling he was not a good person or a good husband as he could have been.

  10. #10
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    Times article:

    ==

    The phone line from Australia to Karachi is not the greatest, but there is no mistaking the voice of possibly the most skilful left-arm fast bowler cricket has ever seen. Wasim Akram’s tone is seemingly always sunny, smiling almost, belying what has been a turbulent life on and off the field, and the message he is imparting.

    He has written a new autobiography, Sultan: A Memoir, containing parts shocking in their frankness. “I’m a bit anxious about the book,” he says, “but I think once it is out, I’ll be kind of over it. I’m anxious because at my age, I’m 56 and I’ve been diabetic for 25 years, it is just stress, you know . . . it was tough to revisit all the things. I’ve done it for my two boys, who are 25 and 21, and my seven-year-old daughter, just to put my side of the story.”

    A man with more than 900 international wickets to his name and a World Cup winner from 1992, Wasim is still one of the biggest brands in Pakistan with sponsors and advertisers, but concedes: “I don’t know what happens after this book.”

    He knows that many will be interested in what he has to say about allegations of ball-tampering and match-fixing, but those topics he found relatively easy to talk about. On those issues, he says, “I have nothing to hide.” It was addressing his addiction to cocaine in his post-playing days that was hard. With his late wife Huma at home in Manchester or Lahore with their young sons, he was travelling a lot, appearing on talk shows, doing commercials and reality TV.

    “I liked to indulge myself; I liked to party,” he writes. “The culture of fame in south Asia is all consuming, seductive and corrupting. You can go to ten parties a night, and some do. And it took its toll on me. My devices turned into vices.

    “Worst of all, I developed a dependence on cocaine. It started innocuously enough when I was offered a line at a party in England; my use grew steadily more serious, to the point that I felt I needed it to function.

    “It made me volatile. It made me deceptive. Huma, I know, was often lonely in this time . . . she would talk of her desire to move to Karachi, to be nearer her parents and siblings. I was reluctant. Why? Partly because I liked going to Karachi on my own, pretending it was work when it was actually about partying, often for days at a time.

    “Huma eventually found me out, discovering a packet of cocaine in my wallet . . . ‘You need help.’ I agreed. It was getting out of hand. I couldn’t control it. One line would become two, two would become four; four would become a gram, a gram would become two. I could not sleep. I could not eat. I grew inattentive to my diabetes, which caused me headaches and mood swings. Like a lot of addicts, part of me welcomed discovery: the secrecy had been exhausting.”

    Wasim agreed to go into rehab in Lahore, but the experience proved traumatic. “Movies conjure up an image of rehab as a caring, nurturing environment. This facility was brutal: a bare building with five cells, a meeting room and a kitchen. The doctor was a complete con man, who worked primarily on manipulating families rather than treating patients, on separating relatives from money rather than users from drugs.

    “The treatment was essentially sedation, with fistfuls of tablets to take in the morning and evening, coupled with lectures and prayer. I felt lethargic. I gained weight. For an hour a day I wandered round our little exercise yard like a zombie . . . I screamed at my wife. ‘I’ve got to get out of here.’ ”

    He stuck it out for another seven weeks. He reflects now: “It was horrible. That scarred me for a bit . . . when people keep you against your will that pisses you off.”

    The worst thing was it didn’t work. He lapsed into old habits. “Try as I might, part of me was still smouldering inside about the indignity of what I’d been put through. My pride was hurt, and the lure of my lifestyle remained. I briefly contemplated divorce. I settled for heading to the 2009 ICC Champions Trophy where, out from under Huma’s daily scrutiny, I started using again.”

    Huma’s tragic death shortly after this from a rare fungal infection called mucormycosis, which doctors in Pakistan failed to recognise, changed everything.

    “Huma’s last selfless, unconscious act was curing me of my drug problem. That way of life was over, and I have never looked back.” He has since remarried, to Shaniera Thompson.

    Wasim acknowledges that his admission will shock and disappoint. He can only attempt to explain what happened by linking it to his retirement — his dalliance with drugs was “a substitute for the adrenaline rush of competition, which I sorely missed, or to take advantage of the opportunity, which I had never had”.

    As a player, Wasim’s rise was precipitous, a Test cricketer by the age of 18 and national captain at 26. When his mentor Imran Khan, who viewed him as “the blue-eyed boy”, left the sport after the 1992 World Cup win a team of youngsters were rudderless.

    “That’s where the problem happened,” he says. “There was no one to discipline or guide us, not in a kind of army discipline way, but in a nice way.” When Wasim was made captain, without any previous experience of such a role, he regularly phoned Imran for advice, but there was only so much he could do.

    Nor was there much help forthcoming from the Pakistan cricket board, possessed of few staff and little backbone. When nine players refused to play under Wasim, costing him his position, the board failed to punish the rebels, and ended up passing the job to the “negative, selfish” Saleem Malik, with infamously corrupting consequences.

    Wasim played on in the ranks, but on a tour to New Zealand kept himself apart, taking wickets but barely celebrating. “I wanted to prove a point,” he says. “Perhaps that gave me more willpower and motivation, and actually helped me in the long run. But it kind of messed me up psychologically.”

    He found respite in his seasons at Lancashire, which he describes as the best part of his cricketing life. “That was fun. That’s the way anyone should be playing any sport. Play, give 100 per cent and move on. But that wasn’t the case in Pakistan in the 1990s.”

    When Justice Qayyum’s report into match-fixing in Pakistan appeared in the early 2000s, it recommended that Wasim should be censured and barred from the national captaincy. The case against him was ambiguous but Qayyum’s commission found “there has been some evidence to cast doubt on his integrity”. Wasim admits that until he came to write the book he had never bothered to read the report — “I knew I was innocent” — but having now done so he finds its conclusions baffling and contradictory.

    “Everything was he said, she said, I heard from someone else, Wasim sent a message through someone else. I mean it doesn’t even sound right. I know there is this younger generation of Pakistanis on social media, whatever they have read without any proof . . . when they say, ‘He’s a match-fixer’, that hurts.

    “It’s embarrassing because my kids have grown up and they ask questions.” At one point in the book, he says of Qayyum’s findings, “the damage was done, and nothing could repair my reputation”.

    Wasim is now working on a regular T20 World Cup show on Pakistan’s first HD sports channel, A Sports, and will be involved in commentary on England’s forthcoming Test tour, which he describes as “huge”.

    “This country has been starved of cricket. It’s really the only sport we have here. It goes beyond a passion in this country, every youngster wants to be a cricketer.

    “The tour will do a great good to cricket and to the country. Things here have improved a lot [since England’s last Test tour in 2005] — the food, the infrastructure, the security.

    “It’s a huge deal that England are coming and it means that every other team will follow, fingers crossed.”

    Best batsman bowled to Viv Richards. It wasn’t just the way he batted, it was the whole package — the way he walked, the way he didn’t wear a helmet, the sheer charisma. Early in my career, he was scary. Technically, against myself and Waqar Younis bowling reverse swing, Martin Crowe was superb for New Zealand

    Best bowler faced Malcolm Marshall. He was the complete bowler. He bowled well in England, West Indies, India, Pakistan and Australia — he got wickets all over the world. He was intelligent, he was sharp, he had a beautifully rhythmic run-up as well

    Favourite ground Old Trafford. It has changed now but it was where I spent the best part of my cricketing life. I still have a house in Manchester and still go the ground once in a while

    Best match The World Cup final in Melbourne in 1992. England were the best one-day team in the world at the time. The best Test I played? Chennai 1997, when Sachin Tendulkar scored a hundred but Pakistan won by 12 runs

    Best captain Definitely Imran Khan. Not great tactically but very firm and focused. He put belief into his players

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/2...38c8c631ed9c31


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  11. #11
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    Poll added also


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  12. #12
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    What are you all talking about. It’s very brave for him to admit. Good on him.

  13. #13
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    Trust me theres plenty more skeletons in Wasims cupboard We always knew he wasnt as holy as he makes out


    If pakistan cricket is to move forward they need to stop going back

  14. #14
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    NOTE: Thread is ONLY About Wasim Akram based upon his own admissions.



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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    Wow, this guy will lose respect as fans will bring this up along with his fixing.

    I lost respect for him man.. I know he himself told this but.
    That’s very poor and judgemental from you. He overcame an addiction that can claim lives very easily and is incredibly tough to come back from.

    This is the thing with opening up with things like this to a qaum like that of Pakistan.

    The most judgemental people on earth who they themselves have plenty of skeletons in their closets. Maybe its judgemental of me to say this, but ok.

    Always looking for a reason to look down on someone else.

    A man can change and move on from bad and self destructive habits, but it will still be held against him. They are just waiting for a guy to fail.

  16. #16
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    Wasim Akram: Pakistan great reveals he was addicted to cocaine after his playing career ended
    I think he only accepted half the truth.

  17. #17
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    A little shocking to hear about this. But , i believe this is very brave for him to do and I respect him for owning up to something that's hard to talk about. Everyone is addicted to something in life, and we don't have any right to act like a saint. Drug addiction and conversations like that need to be more mainstream imo.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suleiman View Post
    That’s very poor and judgemental from you. He overcame an addiction that can claim lives very easily and is incredibly tough to come back from.

    This is the thing with opening up with things like this to a qaum like that of Pakistan.

    The most judgemental people on earth who they themselves have plenty of skeletons in their closets. Maybe its judgemental of me to say this, but ok.

    Always looking for a reason to look down on someone else.

    A man can change and move on from bad and self destructive habits, but it will still be held against him. They are just waiting for a guy to fail.
    Opening up doesnt mean its alright. What he did is wrong and will lose respect of fans and this will be bought up when discussing him

    Besides he is opening up to sell the book.

    Even though he had corruption allegations against him, but i still respected the guy enough to watch his shows and listen to his views. What creadibilty does he have left when he critisizes other players.

    I never have respect for drug addicts, they arebpeople who cannot be trusted.

    I feel sorry for Akrams family

  19. #19
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    Still won us a lot of matches. Still the same respect for the great man.

  20. #20
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    There is no upside for Wasim in this confession. None in our society.

    His own people will haunt him by calling him all kinds of names. They will call him charsi, sharabi and much worse.

    They will also say, "I told you, he is a liar."

    They will say "he is hiding more stuff."

    They will take his other mistakes/commentary snippets/Karachi King stints and tie it up to cocaine.

    Nobody has any evidence, but that will not stop anyone.

    It is very clear behind his very strong exterior lies a complex person, much like most humans.

    He is going to pay for this.

    Oh well, at least he will sell a few extra copies.

  21. #21
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    Nothing to see here.

    He has no problem admitting cocaine use but when asked about match fixing he says he's hurt when he sees the younger generation accuse him of fixing which as per his claims could'nt be further from the truth.

    You want to admit one evil head on but on the other hand continue to lie about match fixing, get a grip of yourself.

  22. #22
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    No one should go near drugs and no one should be judgemental. He didn't hurt anyone. Whatever he did is between him and the Almighty.

    It's incredibly brave of him to open up and admit this as a Pakistani because as we know he's from a place which filled with intolerance and religious extremism.

    I just hope Rizwan and the Tableeghi gang don't try to ostracise him.

    Well done to Wasim for overcoming this addiction and for raising awareness. Youngsters in Pakistan who look up to him will think twice before taking up the habit.
    Last edited by topspin; 29th October 2022 at 23:49.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    NOTE: Thread is ONLY About Wasim Akram based upon his own admissions.

    For those with comprehension issues.


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  24. #24
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    It takes guts to come out and be honest about your issues, like Wasim was. Especially in a country like Pakistan. My respect for him has only increased after his admission. He had no reason to come out and say this and risk his public image getting damaged. Hopefully, other cricketers who suffer from such issues can learn from his experiences. It's never too late to give up.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    Opening up doesnt mean its alright. What he did is wrong and will lose respect of fans and this will be bought up when discussing him

    Besides he is opening up to sell the book.

    Even though he had corruption allegations against him, but i still respected the guy enough to watch his shows and listen to his views. What creadibilty does he have left when he critisizes other players.

    I never have respect for drug addicts, they arebpeople who cannot be trusted.

    I feel sorry for Akrams family
    Yes, he doesnít deserve a Nobel peace prize for it. But he overcame something millions struggle with- addiction, and is now living a normal life.

    Humans arenít perfect, and itís not like he took a life. Yes, ofc, being addicted to drugs is a low point, and no human inspires to get to that level.

    But You are speaking as if he is still addicted and spreading misery and chaos across the globe. Instead after overcoming a very tough addiction heís making an honest living which is commendable.
    Last edited by Suleiman; 30th October 2022 at 00:17.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    It takes guts to come out and be honest about your issues, like Wasim was. Especially in a country like Pakistan. My respect for him has only increased after his admission. He had no reason to come out and say this and risk his public image getting damaged. Hopefully, other cricketers who suffer from such issues can learn from his experiences. It's never too late to give up.
    Yep. As you said, especially in a country like Pak.

    Knives are already out in this thread too, for something he had taken care of and overcome already.

    But I think Wasim is used to this backlash and doesn’t care about public opinion anymore of this country which is a good thing. He’s mentioned many times on the Pavilion how our people are very quick to turn on you, and will hold something against you for years no matter how big or how small.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suleiman View Post
    Yep. As you said, especially in a country like Pak.

    Knives are already out in this thread too, for something he had taken care of and overcome already.

    But I think Wasim is used to this backlash and doesnít care about public opinion anymore of this country which is a good thing. Heís mentioned many times on the Pavilion how our people are very quick to turn on you, and will hold something against you for years no matter how big or how small.
    Yeah, one thing you can say about Wasim is that he has never cared what other people think. He never associated himself with that faux-Islamism that a certain contingent of the team started associating themselves with in the 90s. And he seems like someone who is comfortable in his own skin. More power to him for that.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    Yeah, one thing you can say about Wasim is that he has never cared what other people think. He never associated himself with that faux-Islamism that a certain contingent of the team started associating themselves with in the 90s. And he seems like someone who is comfortable in his own skin. More power to him for that.
    Not sure why people are connecting Islam with what Wasim has done.

    No connection with anyone else

    This was his own cross to bear which he has done admirably - leave it at that and no need to bring others into it.


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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suleiman View Post
    Yes, he doesn’t deserve a Nobel peace prize for it. But he overcame something millions struggle with- addiction, and is now living a normal life.

    Humans aren’t perfect, and it’s not like he took a life. Yes, ofc, being addicted to drugs is a low point, and no human inspires to get to that level.

    But You are speaking as if he is still addicted and spreading misery and chaos across the globe. Instead after overcoming a very tough addiction he’s making an honest living which is commendable.
    you are not wrong, you are right.

    But for me the guy has lost his credibility, and wont see him the way now. Though he came out instead of being exposed, but I lost respect for him

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    you are not wrong, you are right.

    But for me the guy has lost his credibility, and wont see him the way now. Though he came out instead of being exposed, but I lost respect for him
    This is exactly it

    Opinions will change or get reinforced - he will sell books!


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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    Yeah, one thing you can say about Wasim is that he has never cared what other people think. He never associated himself with that faux-Islamism that a certain contingent of the team started associating themselves with in the 90s. And he seems like someone who is comfortable in his own skin. More power to him for that.
    THat is a very good point you make!

    Yes, the best thing about this is Waseem himself came out and didnt use religion to hide his acts. Alot of players did end up using religion as a front to cover there acts later in there life, like the Inzi group.

    It just still bothers me man, because if more allegations about him come up, than they would be more likely to be true

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by topspin View Post
    No one should go near drugs and no one should be judgemental. He didn't hurt anyone. Whatever he did is between him and the Almighty.

    It's incredibly brave of him to open up and admit this as a Pakistani because as we know he's from a place which filled with intolerance and religious extremism.

    I just hope Rizwan and the Tableeghi gang don't try to ostracise him.

    Well done to Wasim for overcoming this addiction and for raising awareness. Youngsters in Pakistan who look up to him will think twice before taking up the habit.
    I like this post but I don't see the need to have an unnecessary dig at Rizwan especially when you mention nobody should be judgemental.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    This is exactly it

    Opinions will change or get reinforced - he will sell books!
    To be fair, I would had never cared to buy his book as he is a cricketer who I didnt see. But now I am tempted to buy a copy of his book, should be a good read.

    Akhtar was a good ready as it told about his journey from Pindi to Pakistan

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savak View Post
    Not sure if this is a strategy to sell the book but this is an incredibly dumb disclosure to make. Any credible organization and sponsors would ask Wasim to step down after these revelations but Wasim knows Salman Iqbal is not going to remove him as A Sports President and Karachi Kings President.
    I think he realises most of his sales from the book will not come from Pakistan. He will get book sales and be heralded for his behaviour and bravery.

    I don't see Salman Iqbal removing him either, this is not as serious as his complete lack of effort at KK and his recent behaviour towards the franchise captain are worse than this ( from a KK perspective).

    Nowadays you can get a lot more traction bringing up a harrowing detail about your past and telling the world how you fought your demons. He won't lose any sponsors but will probably gain them.

    None of the old cricket gang will criticise him because who knows what they have got up to in the past.

    He is safe from any blowback imo.

  35. #35
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    Nowadays everyone especially in conservative countries like Pakistan are well aware of a celebrity lifestyle. Fame, drugs, sex, multiple affairs, depression etc etc. As this book is ghosted by Gideon Haigh, so one thing I'm sure is that it will a good analysis on Akram the person and the cricketer. It will definitely make good sales in England and Australia.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadlyVenom View Post
    I like this post but I don't see the need to have an unnecessary dig at Rizwan especially when you mention nobody should be judgemental.
    It's not Rizwan, it's who he's associated with. Saeed Anwar mingled with them as well and when they corrupted him, he decided to say stuff about Imran Khan's past during a speech inside a Mosque.

    We don't want that happening again.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by topspin View Post
    It's not Rizwan, it's who he's associated with. Saeed Anwar mingled with them as well and when they corrupted him, he decided to say stuff about Imran Khan's past during a speech inside a Mosque.

    We don't want that happening again.
    Ok and we stop here.

    Back to Wasim.


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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    Yeah, one thing you can say about Wasim is that he has never cared what other people think. He never associated himself with that faux-Islamism that a certain contingent of the team started associating themselves with in the 90s. And he seems like someone who is comfortable in his own skin. More power to him for that.
    I'm actually surprised at the reactions at some of the posters here. There are older interviews with Wasim and the late Huma Wasim available even now on YouTube where he admits to being a party animal to the anchor in front of his wife and they both seemed comfortable with that.

    It must be noted that Huma Wasim was a UK educated? psychotherapist and that may be one of the reasons I suspect Wasim never felt the need to display overt religiosity even when almost all of his ex colleagues went that route.

    So, he's bever actually pretended to be a saint unlike the accusations here. That's probably more true of pretty much every other 90's Pakistani cricketer.


    'There's a lady who's sure all that glitters is gold'

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    NOTE: Thread is ONLY About Wasim Akram based upon his own admissions.

    One more reminder.


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  40. #40
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    Brave admission from Wasim.

    Listen, donít judge.

  41. #41
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    I meannnnnn .. the book ain't gonna sell itself . It's a risk free way to get exposure for his book ( battled with it "after" playing days but clean now ) .Homeboi covered all his bases . TBH I am impressed more than anything , he has got a good marketing team . It was either this or talk crap about some other cricketers from his playing days.


    you really can't beat the game. If you earn anything, it's minus taxes. If you buy anything it's plus taxes.

  42. #42
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    We know he liked a drink or 2 but this next level. Although it's honest of him to admit it, it shows how low players can go. At least he isn't like the hypocrites that do a Sajda and then fix matches- yes I am looking at you Salman Butt

  43. #43
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    He may earn extra rupees from the sale of his book from such revelations but we shouldn’t forget that it is never easy for us humans to admit so openly our follies and errors unless forced to do so. Nor will he be unaware of the reputational damage to himself especially given the stigma associated with drug-addiction in South Asia. I therefore agree with those that say he has been brave in acknowledging this dark episode of his life.

    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    Wasim acknowledges that his admission will shock and disappoint. He can only attempt to explain what happened by linking it to his retirement — his dalliance with drugs was “a substitute for the adrenaline rush of competition, which I sorely missed, or to take advantage of the opportunity, which I had never had”.
    I can imagine for some it is not easy adjusting to life after retirement in a sport in which they excelled in. Sport would have provided them with meaning, purpose, self-esteem, excitation, a sense of importance. When it ends there must be a large hole. Most will find other things to give them some structure and meaning to their life. It could be another career or punditry or religion or family or politics or philanthropy or losing themselves in trivial daily routines.

    A minority may find more negative strategies for numbing the pain of the void. “I drink not from mere joy in wine” so wrote the Persian poet Omar Khayyam, “nor to scoff at faith—no, only to forget myself for a moment, that only do I want of intoxication, that alone."

  44. #44
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    Man ! What more could be hiding in his skeleton. There is anyways lot of toxicity in Pakistani media against their own. Sarfaraz Nawaz will come out now and level more allegations

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by KB View Post
    He may earn extra rupees from the sale of his book from such revelations but we shouldn’t forget that it is never easy for us humans to admit so openly our follies and errors unless forced to do so. Nor will he be unaware of the reputational damage to himself especially given the stigma associated with drug-addiction in South Asia. I therefore agree with those that say he has been brave in acknowledging this dark episode of his life.



    I can imagine for some it is not easy adjusting to life after retirement in a sport in which they excelled in. Sport would have provided them with meaning, purpose, self-esteem, excitation, a sense of importance. When it ends there must be a large hole. Most will find other things to give them some structure and meaning to their life. It could be another career or punditry or religion or family or politics or philanthropy or losing themselves in trivial daily routines.

    A minority may find more negative strategies for numbing the pain of the void. “I drink not from mere joy in wine” so wrote the Persian poet Omar Khayyam, “nor to scoff at faith—no, only to forget myself for a moment, that only do I want of intoxication, that alone."
    Well Sachin has gone into decorating his house and redoing everything like in an interview I heard he opens up all electrical equipment in house and just rejoins them, start s changing Color of walls etc.

  46. #46
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    Addiction is a serious medical condition. It is not simple as just not doing it. I believe each board needs to have a support line where players can seek help for psychological issues without fear of retaliation. Glad he was able to seek help and overcome his addiction. but many are not able to do that. Good on Akram to come out and talk about his addiction and recovery.

  47. #47
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    brave of him.

    hence the need for mental health and good on ben stokes to take a break from the game.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    you are not wrong, you are right.

    But for me the guy has lost his credibility, and wont see him the way now. Though he came out instead of being exposed, but I lost respect for him
    well, im 100% certain that wasim akram does not care about whether you respect him or not. He has accomplished a lot more than you or many posters on pakpassion will ever do in their lifetime.

    The whole world including the cricketing fraternity respects him and hails him as all time great and the greatest left arm fast bowler of all time. He walks into any all time ODI AND TEST team

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedwoodOriginal View Post
    Yeah, one thing you can say about Wasim is that he has never cared what other people think. He never associated himself with that faux-Islamism that a certain contingent of the team started associating themselves with in the 90s. And he seems like someone who is comfortable in his own skin. More power to him for that.
    Agree with this.

    Its because Wasim Akram was far more professional than any of his teammates.

    He was the rare combination of brains, skills, and professionalism.

    That is the ultimate test of your love for your country and dedication towards sport.

    You still see it - look how well has taken care of himself and his health compared to inzamam, saqlain, saeed anwar and the rest.

  50. #50
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    People do this kind of things to sell their book , Wasim didn't do anything unusual . Hope someday he will reveal the truth behind his sitting out in 1996 WC semi.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by moghul View Post
    People do this kind of things to sell their book , Wasim didn't do anything unusual . Hope someday he will reveal the truth behind his sitting out in 1996 WC semi.
    He did. During the show on A sports.

    It was shoulder injury that he had been nursing for 3 days.

    The reason it was not publicized is because they did not want to give India confidence.

    Secondly, Ata ur Rahman who was Wasim Akram's replacement had a great outing and bowled really well. So Wasim's absence was not missed.

    It was Waqar's last two overs that cost us.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by arif_2021 View Post
    well, im 100% certain that wasim akram does not care about whether you respect him or not. He has accomplished a lot more than you or many posters on pakpassion will ever do in their lifetime.

    The whole world including the cricketing fraternity respects him and hails him as all time great and the greatest left arm fast bowler of all time. He walks into any all time ODI AND TEST team
    I dont know why are you getting so worked up.

    No one is doubting his cricketing career. However, his drug abuse has tarnished his respect, and this you will see in coming years.

    Waseem Akram is the biggest Brand in Pakistan, by coming out with this, he has destroyed his brand integrity. I won't be surprise if Ariel cancels its contract with him

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by arif_2021 View Post
    He did. During the show on A sports.

    It was shoulder injury that he had been nursing for 3 days.

    The reason it was not publicized is because they did not want to give India confidence.

    Secondly, Ata ur Rahman who was Wasim Akram's replacement had a great outing and bowled really well. So Wasim's absence was not missed.

    It was Waqar's last two overs that cost us.
    I'm saying THE TRUTH, what he said was a made up story in my opinion. A person who can accept cocaine from a "friend" can accept anything .

  54. #54
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    Wasim has a big fan club, what message he is giving to the youngster ? You can be a drug addict and still can regain your respect . There was no need for him to reveal this, his book would sell OK, even without this masala.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    I dont know why are you getting so worked up.

    No one is doubting his cricketing career. However, his drug abuse has tarnished his respect, and this you will see in coming years.

    Waseem Akram is the biggest Brand in Pakistan, by coming out with this, he has destroyed his brand integrity. I won't be surprise if Ariel cancels its contract with him
    ? No one is getting worked up. I am responding to you in an appropriate manner and what you said does not make much sense.

    How is his legacy tarnished?

    Are you suggesting that cocaine is a performance enhancing drug? It's not.

    It's brave of him to discuss these things. This is important esp. for Pakistani youth and cricketers.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by moghul View Post
    I'm saying THE TRUTH, what he said was a made up story in my opinion. A person who can accept cocaine from a "friend" can accept anything .
    Cocaine is not a hallucinogenic. It does not work that way by the way.

    Why would he need to lie after 25 years?

    In regards to his story about shoulder pain, I am sure medical records are available.

    Again, it would be a fair point if Wasim's absence actually cost us the game. It was not the case - ata ur rahman bowled well. It was Waqar Younis who cost us the game.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by arif_2021 View Post
    ? No one is getting worked up. I am responding to you in an appropriate manner and what you said does not make much sense.

    How is his legacy tarnished?

    Are you suggesting that cocaine is a performance enhancing drug? It's not.

    It's brave of him to discuss these things. This is important esp. for Pakistani youth and cricketers.
    Your the one getting worked up, as I shared my pov but you came here as if you are speaking for the people. No need to get so worked up to shut others down

    Anyways I have written above everything not gonna repeat myself.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by moghul View Post
    Wasim has a big fan club, what message he is giving to the youngster ? You can be a drug addict and still can regain your respect . There was no need for him to reveal this, his book would sell OK, even without this masala.
    He just tarnished his reputation, and I am actually surprised that he opened up and didn't think about the repercussions.

    Seriously, I live in pakistan and I know for a fact that amongst the biggest brands personalit wise, Waseem Akram is up there in top 3.

    Next time he criticizes a fan favorite player, people are gonna bring up his drug abuse. Lets see if brands start to distance themselves from him.

    Was watching today's pavilion, the guy was getting angry again and again on trivial things regarding cricket. How is he gonna take criticism for this

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    Your the one getting worked up, as I shared my pov but you came here as if you are speaking for the people. No need to get so worked up to shut others down

    Anyways I have written above everything not gonna repeat myself.
    hahaha...ok...good luck to you

  60. #60
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    Good on him to kick that dirty habit. Hope remains sober for the rest of his life. Drugs are not the solution for anything. Instead it makes our problems even worse.


    If there is a better batsman than Sachin then he hasn't arrived yet: Viv Richards

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenInG View Post
    NOTE: Thread is ONLY About Wasim Akram based upon his own admissions.

    Reminder


    For the latest updates on Cricket, follow @PakPassion on Twitter

  62. #62
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    There is no need to castigate or commend Akram for his revelations. He has his own motives for doing so - whether they are guilt/remorse; commercial considerations to drive sales or combination of these. It is his life, his book and his choice to decide how much to share.

    Can only hope this autobiography is similarly revealing about other interesting events from his career such as his failures/successes as a leader, pressures from fixing syndicates, dressing room politics/tensions etc. instead of being usual anodyne narrative

  63. #63
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    Shows that anyone can become addicted or that anyone can have major personal problems, no matter how successful. Good on Wasim for telling the truth and not making it a story about how great he was - admitting that he only stopped after his wife's death.

  64. #64
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    Doesn't make me think any less of him & good on him for admitting it. It's no surprise a lot of partying can go on in those circles.

  65. #65
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    Cocaine is a vile addiction. He's rightly proud of overcoming it and should try to share his experience as much as possible. Drugs are a big problem in Pakistan and a role model like Wasim can go a long way in the field of addiction rehab. He can probably contribute greater to this fight than developing any fast bowlers.
    Last edited by daytrader; 30th October 2022 at 14:21.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    Opening up doesnt mean its alright. What he did is wrong and will lose respect of fans and this will be bought up when discussing him

    Besides he is opening up to sell the book.

    Even though he had corruption allegations against him, but i still respected the guy enough to watch his shows and listen to his views. What creadibilty does he have left when he critisizes other players.

    I never have respect for drug addicts, they arebpeople who cannot be trusted.

    I feel sorry for Akrams family
    Man, I'm sorry to say this but you need to have more sense and maturity. Don't let our culture (which is great at times, but not here) cloud your judgement.

    Drug-addiction is treated as a serious illness in the modern day, and rightly so.

  67. #67
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    Well done to him for keeping the problem under wraps from 2003 to 2009. If you watch his pics and videos from this time period, you can't tell if this guy has a using problem at all.

    The signs are a bruised nose, sweaty face, arms, general uneasiness in physical appearance.

  68. #68
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    Good by Wasim for admitting and removing his drug habits.

  69. #69
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    We all do some things in our lives we are not proud of and do not want anyone to know about them. Drug use is very common in pakistan these days especially among the youth , who would have thought that crystal meth will find its way to pakistan universities along with the infamous roofies. If anything i find it admirable that he got rid of this very dangerous addiction.


    It is either a heartache or a headache ..Argh relationships.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExpressPacer View Post
    Man, I'm sorry to say this but you need to have more sense and maturity. Don't let our culture (which is great at times, but not here) cloud your judgement.

    Drug-addiction is treated as a serious illness in the modern day, and rightly so.
    Dont worry about me.

    Dont do drugs in the first place. And it wont become an addiction.

    There is no justification and that too for cocaine

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Major View Post
    Dont worry about me.

    Dont do drugs in the first place. And it wont become an addiction.

    There is no justification and that too for cocaine
    Bro, life isn't that easy sometimes. Some people use it as a coping mechanism, others are vulnerable and in the wrong company, some think they need it, some don't have a good environment around them or the knowledge of its risks...

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExpressPacer View Post
    Bro, life isn't that easy sometimes. Some people use it as a coping mechanism, others are vulnerable and in the wrong company, some think they need it, some don't have a good environment around them or the knowledge of its risks...
    Life is easy, we make it complicated. There is no justification for drugs especially cocaine. This would never stabd in court of law if caught. There is no such thing as bad company.
    You make the decision to do drugs no one forces you, well atleast in akrams case no one forced him.

    People who do drugs or even smoke cigs shouldbe called outt and be shamed by others. People claiming that oh there is a stigma to people who do drugs, in canada, even if you smoke a cig, people give you weird look because hat is the conditions they have created to stop cig smoking.

    What Akram did there is no justification

  73. #73
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    Itís good Akram overcame this and was brave enough to admit it.

  74. #74
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    You might have a good life but not everyone does open your eyes and stop living under a rock

  75. #75
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    The question that springs to mind is, were there others in the Pakistan team?

    My guess is that there probably were.


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  76. #76
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    Akram is lucky that he being a celebrity, person of influence can get away with this in Pakistan. Any poor sarak chaap person caught doing drugs will end up being locked away by the anti narcotics forces.

  77. #77
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    Im not sure if was post retirement tbh Id also like him to be honest about being arrested in WI in 1993

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savak View Post
    Cocaine is a very serious and expensive addiction. One small pouch would cost Rs 25-30 k in 2017, now it must be Rs 50-60k. I know a few people in Pakistan who have sold their cars, plots, houses to finance their addiction. Always avoid at all costs, don't fall for the classic it's only one puff, one line, that's how it starts and then you get addicted.
    Cocaine in Pakistan is 90%+ not cocaine but made up of various substances. Even in the UK majority of people have never tried real coke but think they are doing it. The other substances are also usually much stronger, more dangerous to ones health and more addictive.

    Good on him for stopping whatever it was.


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  79. #79
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    I am curious to see what else he talks about in his book - seems this story has taken the lions share in media coverage


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  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saj View Post
    The question that springs to mind is, were there others in the Pakistan team?

    My guess is that there probably were.
    I think Alcohol was the bigger issue for players. From being super athletic fast bowlers both Was and Waq suddenly grew beer bellies. Both could have taken another 100 test wickets each if they were professional.


    Lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of Sheep

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